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Portland Pudding

Puddings
Dorset

Rich pudding made with dried fruit and candied peel. Formerly a speciality of the 'Portland Arms' on the Isle of Portland, and several times ordered there by King George III during his stays at nearby Weymouth.


The Portland Arms, c1790
Image: British Library



Original Receipt in the 'Evening Telegraph' - Monday 31 December 1900

PORTLAND PUDDING.
Beat to cream ¾ lb. each of fresh butter and caster sugar, then stir in the yolks of nine well beaten eggs, and mix it gradually ¾ lb sifted flour and 2 oz. finely-shred candied peel beat all well together for about ten minutes, then stir quickly and lightly the stiffly-whipped white of the eggs, pour it into small moulds, and bake. Serve with sweet sauce to taste.



The British Library report an unknown travel-writer making this report of his stay at The Portland Arms, taken from The Penny Magazine [Vol.VII, Issue 377, 17 February 1838]; "The ‘Portland Arms’ is not a wayside house, where travellers are coming and going every hour, and where, therefore, you have no right to expect more than prompt but general civility. It is rather one of those retired country inns, where visitors are treated with a homely but warm-hearted attention, which places them almost on the footing of friends. And though the inn cannot boast of being as fine as a London hotel, it has, nevertheless, its reputation. George III, during his visits to Weymouth, had several times made a tour of the Isle of Portland; and on those occasions he made the ‘Portland Arms’ his head-quarters, and used to finish his day by dining at the house. The then landlady had a recipe for making a certain famous Portland pudding, and the King never failed to order this pudding, in honour of the island. She bequeathed the recipe to her daughter, the present landlady; and though the pudding may now be ordered by the humblest visitor, the honour of the king's visits is still felt in the ‘Portland Arms’ with something of that satisfaction which another royal visit left in the Castle of Tillietudlem".






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