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Lemon or Orange Pudding

Puddings

Now most usually a steamed suet sponge pudding made with citrus zest, but in earlier versions by the definitive Eliza Acton or Isabella Beeton, a form of tart filled with orange custard.


Original Receipt from 'Modern Cookery for Private Families' by Eliza Acton: (Acton 1845)

To make an Orange-Pudding.
TAKE the yolks of sixteen eggs, beat them well, with half of pound of melted butter, grate in the rind of two fine Seville granges, beat in half a pound of fine sugar, two spoonfuls of orange-flower water, two of rose-water, a gill of sack, half a pint of cream, two Naples biscuits, or the crumb of a halfpenny roll soaked in the cream, and mix all well together. Make a thin puff-paste, and lay all over the dish and round the rim, pour in the pudding and bake it. It will take about as long baking as a custard.

To make a second sort Sort of Orange-Pudding.
YOU must tike fifteen yolks of eggs, beat them fine, mix them with half a pound of fresh butter melted, and half a pound of White sugar, half a pint of cream, a little role-water, and a little nutmeg. Cut the peel of a fine large Seville orange so thin as none of the white appears, beat it fine in a mortar till, it is like a paste, and by degrees mix in the above ingredients all together; then lay a puff paste all over the dish, pour in the ingredients, and bake it.

To make a third Orange-Pudding.
TAKE two large Seville oranges, and grate off the rind as far as they are yellow; then put your oranges in fair water, and and let them boil till they are tender. Shift the water three or four times to take out the bitterness; when they are tender, cut them open and take away the seeds and firings, and beat the other part in a mortar, with half a pound of sugar, till it is a paste; then put to it the yolks of six eggs, three or four spoonfuls of thick cream, half a Naples biscuit grated; mix these together, and melt a pound of fresh butter very thick, and stir it well in. When it is cold, put a little thin puff-paste about the bottom and rim of your dish; pour in the ingredients, and bake it about three quarters of an hour.

To make a fourth Orange-Pudding.
TAKE the outside rind of three Seville oranges, boil them in several waters till they are tender, then pound them in a mortar, with three quarters of a pound of sugar then blanch half a pound of sweet almonds, beat them very fine with rose-water to keep them from oiling, then beat sixteen eggs, but fix whites, a pound of fresh butter, and beat all there together till it is light and hollow; then lay a thin puff-paste all over a dish, and put in the ingredients. Bake it with your tarts.

To make a Lemon-Pudding.
TAKE three lemons, and cut the rind off very thin, boil them in three separate waters till very tender, then pound them very fine in a mortar; have ready a quarter of a pound of Naples biscuit, boiled up in a quart of milk or cream; mix them and the lemon rind with it; beat up twelve yolks and fix whites of eggs very fine melt a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, hall a pound of fine sugar, a little orange-flower water; mix all well together, put it over the stove, and keep it stirring till it is thick, squeeze the juice of half a lemon in; put puff-paste round the rim of your dish, put the pudding stuff in, cut some candied sweet meats and put over; bake it three quarters of an hour, and send it up hot.

Another Way to make a Lemon-Pudding
TAKE three lemons and grate the rinds off; beat up twelve yolks and fix whites of eggs, put in half a pint of cream, half a pound of fine sugar, a little orange-flower-water, a quarter pf a pound of butter melted; mix all well to-gether, squeeze in the juice of two lemons; put it over the stove, and keep stirring it till it is thick; put a puff-paste round the rim of the dish, put in your pudding stuff with some candied tweet meats cut small over it, and bake it three quarters of an hour.




Original Receipt in 'The Book of Household Management' edited by Isabella Beeton, 1861 (See Mrs.B)

BAKED ORANGE PUDDING.
1314. INGREDIENTS. - 6 oz. of stale sponge cake or bruised ratafias, 6 oranges, 1 pint of milk, 6 eggs,½ lb. of sugar.
Mode. - Bruise the sponge cake or ratafias into fine crumbs, and pour upon them the milk, which should be boiling. Rub the rinds of 2 of the oranges   on sugar, and add this, with the juice of the remainder, to the other ingredients. Beat up the eggs, stir them in, sweeten to taste, and put the mixture into   a pie-dish previously lined with puff-paste. Bake for rather more than½ hour; turn it out of the dish, strew sifted sugar over, and serve.
Time. - Rather more than 1 hour. Average cost, 1s, 6d.
Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable from November to May.

BOILED LEMON PUDDING.
1298. INGREDIENTS. -½ lb. of chopped suet, ¾ lb. of bread crumbs, 2 small lemons, 6 oz. of moist sugar, ¼ lb. of flour, 2 eggs, milk.
Mode. - Mix the suet, bread crumbs, sugar, and flour well together, adding the lemon-peel, which should be very finely minced, and the juice, which should be strained. When these ingredients are well mixed, moisten with the eggs and sufficient milk to make the pudding of the consistency of thick batter; put it into a well-buttered mould, and boil for 3-½ hours; turn it out, strew sifted sugar over, and serve with wine sauce, or not, at pleasure.
Time. - 3-½ hours.
Average cost, 1s.
Sufficient for 7 or 8 persons. Seasonable at any time.
Note. - This pudding may also be baked, and will be found very good. It will take about 2 hours.




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