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The English Art of Cookery, 1788

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TITLE: The English Art of Cookery
AUTHOR: Richard Briggs, sometime cook at the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street
PUBLISHER: GGJ & J Robinson, Paternoster Row, London
DATE: 1788
THIS VERSION: Adapted for Foods of England from the version made available at https://archive.org/details/englishartcooke00briggoog, this is based on an OCR scan and has been partly edited, but still contaions significant errors.



English Art of Cookery,

ACCORDING TO THE PRESENT PRACTICE;
BEING A
Complete Guide to all Houfekeepers,
ON A
PLAN ENTIRELY NEW
CONSISTING OF
THIRTY. EIGHT CHAPTERS.
CONTAINIKG,
Proper Diredtiont for Marketing, and
Tniffing of Poulcry. The making Seups and Broths Prefling aU bortt of Fiih. Sauces for every Occafion. Boiling and RoaAing. Bakings Broilingy and Frying Stews and Haihec. Made Diihes it every Sort Ragout and Fricafees. Direons for dreffing all Sorts of Roots and Vegetables. AU Sorts of Aumlets and Eggs PnddingSj Pies, Tarts, &c. Pancakes and Fritters. Cfecakca and Cuflards

Blancmange, Jellies, and Syllabobs
Diredions for the Sick.
Direions tor Seafaring Men
Preferving, Syrups, and Conferves
Drying and Candying
AU Sorts of Cakes.
Hogs Puddingfiy Sanfages, Arc
Potting, and little cold Diflies
The Art of Carving. Collaring) Salting, and Soufing Pickling.
To keep Garden Vegetables, &c
A Catalogue of Things in Seafon.
Made Wines and Cordial Waters
Brewing Engliih and French Bread, 9kz%

WITH
BILLS OF FARE
FOR
EVERY MONTH IN THE YEAR,
Neatly and correffl engraved on Twblvb Copper-Plates,

J. I . ' ' i I ii

By RICHARD BRIGGS,

MART YEARS COOK AT THE OLOBS TAVER FLEET-$TREETj - THE WHITE HART TAVERN, HOLBORN, AND NOW AT THE TEMPLE COPFEE-HOVSE

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR G. Q. J. AND J ROBINSON,

FATER-N0STER-ROW M.DCCLXXXVIII.

im

6

T O T H E

READER.

HAVING cmjiloycd milch of my Life In the Praflke of Cookery in all its Branches, I prefume to offer the following Sheets to the Public, in hopes that they will find the DirecticKis and Receipts more intelligible than in moil: Books of the Kind, I have beflowed every Pains to render them eafily pradlicable, and adapted to the Capacities of thofe who may be ordered to ufe them. To wafte Language and high Ternas on fueh Subjedts, appears to rae to render the Art of CookWy embarraffing, and to throw DifftcuUies in the Way of the Learner- nor can the Reader rcafonably expedl any fuperiluousi Embellifhments of Stile from one whofe Habits of Life hye befn f&ivo, and not flu dious.

The Errors and Imperfedions of former Treatifcs firft fuggefted to me that a Performance )ike the following would be acceptable to the Public, Jij one Article that of trnffing Poultry, I have endeavoured tp give particular and ufdfid DiredtionSy becaufe po Book of this Kind has contained fuch tha: Subject having been univerfally overlooked by them-p-9and in this, as

well

iv

well as in all other Branches of the Art of Cookery, I hope the Reader will find much Improvement, and many ufeful Hints. The Cpn tents I have endeavoured to render a$ complete as poflible, tlat the Learner may have immediate Recourfe to whatever Article may be wanted.

Aware, however, of the DifBculty of my Tafk, I fubmit this Performance, with Deference and Refped, as I am confcious that Errors will creep into the beft Performances, and that the only Merit I can claim is, that of having corrected the Mifhikes of former Works, and added the mofl ufeful Improvements derived from my own Pra£Uce and Experience.

RICHARD BRIGQS,

Temple Ckffee-HttJiy Ofl. J, 1788, '

CON,

C O N T £ K t S.



C H A I.

t

M A B

L K E T I N G;

TQROPER rules to be obfcrvcd X in marketing, for all kinds

Hares - Pae li

Rabbits

ibid

of provifiohs

Pa I

FiOx

ij

IWrf

ibid.

Turbot

ibi

Motion

i

Cod

ib.

Lamb - •

$

Whiting Haddocks.

ib.

Veal

4

14

Pork

1

Scaite, or thoriiback

ib.

Venifon . •

Salmon

ib.

Brawn

7

Sturgeon

15

Hams

ib.

Soles

ib.

Baeon

ib.

Trout

ib.

Toikies

8

Carp and tench

ib.

Capon -

ib.

Smelts .

16

Fowls A

ibi

Herrings Mackrel

ib.

Chickens •

9

iU

Gecfe

ib!

Flounders.and plaice

7

Docks and dncklings

ib.

Red mullet.

ibl

Wild docks

lO

Grty mullet

ib.

Pheafants

ib.

Lobfters

ib.

Partridges

ib.

Shrimps aad prawns

18

Woodcocks and fnipes

II

Oyfters

ib.

fiuftards

ib.

Chccfe

9

Pigeons - '

ib.

Butter

ib!

liVheat-ean larks, ScCh

II

Eggs •

39

RULES

FOk '

TRUSSING

Talkies -

ii

Pigeons - •

j

Toikcy poults

2i

Woodcocks and fnipes.

ib!

Geefe

ib.

Wheat-ears, larks, &ci

26

Docks

2J

Pheafants and partridges

ib.

Fowls

lb.

Hares

7 iU.

Chickens

4

Rabbits

Wild fowl of all forts

ib;

•



a 1 C a A P

;)

C O N T E K T S.

CHAP.

II.

O U

s.

K

Proper roles to be obTered in making foups and brodis

Soup a la reine . - 39

Mock turtle (bop 30

Giblets a la turtle - $t

Giblet foop

Soup puree •

SoupcreiTee - j

Green peas foop 34

Another green peas foup 59

tVhite peas foup • ib

f COS foup for winter 36

Common peas foup ib.

A Spanifh peas foup 37

feup Lorrafn • ib

Almond foup • 38

Soup de fantnr • 39

Gravy foup • • ib.

Vermieelli foup - • 40

Macaroni foup • ibw

Soup and boulee • 41

Soup and boulee with cabbage ib.

A Weft Indk pepper pot 44

Hare foo - 43

lartridee foVf ib.

Onion loup - 44

Attother onion foup ibtf

IVhite onion foup • 4

Spanifh onioti (bup . - ib

Another Spanish oiiio foujp ib

it!

49 ib.

Chefnut foup • Page 46 Rice foop Aiiothct lict foup Ox cheek foup Oz cheek foup baked Hotch-potch

Another hotch-potch 5a Bread of veal in hotch-potch 51

Hotch-potch of muRon 52

Mutton broth - ib.

Barley broth cf

Scotch ba-rfey bsoth ib.

Veal broth - ib.

Beef broth tjf.

Crawfiih foop - U)

Lobfter ibup - fff

Scaite, or tnorhback £buy ib

Oyfterfoap - - jfd

Ed foup -m c.

Mtffcle foup • lb

Milk foup " 8

Milk foiip the Dutch add Ger

man way - ib

Ejjg foup . r

Tumep foup • ib

Soup maigrc • 6d

Plom porridge - 61 Common phim porridge for

Chriftmas • ib

Portable foup 6t

CHAP. III.

F I

Proper fules to be obicrvedin dicSitfg dih - 63

To drefs a turtle the Weft India tvav - 64

Anotfier way to dicfs a turtle 67 Sturgeon in imitation of turtk 68 To boil a turbot • 69

To d efs a turbo t the Dutch

way - - ' ibrf

Tl tiA.t a tvrboc • 70

7

S H.

To boil a codir head To foaft a obd's head

To bake a cod's head 73 To ftew a cod's head inrcraret ib

To boil cod or codlings 75

To crimp cod - ib.

To boil crimp cod • 7

To broil crimp cod id

To fricafee cod • ib.

To fry finn codling3 75

C O N T £ f T S.

lii

To boU felinon . Page c

Salmon an court Boaillott jt Saltoioir a la braife lb. To bdl a jowl of pickled

iblmon 77

To colvcr falnton - ib

To boil colvcir Mtaon i i

To brail falfiion lo

To broil fai mon in paper ib. To bnl ftefh or fait water trout ib. To drcfs troot the Dutch wy 79 To boil cod founds io.

To broil cod founds So

To fricace cod founds ib.

To boil fcaite or thomback ib. To crimp fcaite or thomback 81 To boil crimped fcaite or

ornback •• ' ib.

o frj crimped fcaite or

thomback • ibi

To (lew fcaite 6r ftomback 9%

TofricafeefcaiteorttiornbAck ib.

To boil ftutgoh - H$

To roilft fbirgeon . • ibk

To roAft iJL collar of ftngeon 84.

To bake a collar of fturoa 8

To ftcw holJybert . - ib.

To boil a John-a-dort 86

To boil a brill • ibw

To boil fqles ib.

To drefs foles the Dutch wdy 87

To fry foics • ibw

To ftcw foles • 88

To fricafee foles white ib.

To fricafee foles browa 9

To broil red mallet ib.

To boil grey mullet 90

To broil gity mullet lb.

To broil weaver ib.

To boil makrel • ibi

To bnttl mackrel - t

Mackfel a la maitre 4e bokk ib

To boil whitings • 2

To broil whitings • ib.

To fry whithin?s • ib

To boil haddocks

To broil haddocks

To fry haddocks ibt

?

To drefs haddocks the Spanifl)

way Page 94

To drefs haddocks the Jews

Way - - n

To boil pipers or garnets Id. To boii herrings • ib

To broil herrings q$ To fry herrings ft,

'fofry fmelts, - ib.

White bait 07

To broil fprats • ib

T() boil plaice or flbtknde ib To fry plaice or flounders ib. To boil barrel or fait cod 9$ To boil fait ling - 99

To drefs bacaloa or talk h To broil dried falmon ib

To boil Scotch or fait had

docks M 100

To broil dried whitsngt ib

3riti(h or pickled hdtriiigt

boiled ib

To boil i pike • lot

Te roaft or be i pike ib. To boil carp or tench i os

To fry carp or tenck ib.

Another way to fry carp or

tench ab

To bake carp 105

Cztp ad blue • 104.

To ftcw carp or tench ib.

To ftew carp or tench aiM ther way lor

To boil perch 106

Perch in water ibuchM ib.

To fry perch - joj

To fry lampreyt • ib.

To dew lampreya roS

To boil eels . ib.

To fry eels . 109

To broil eels • ib.

To pitchcock eels . ib.

To roaft eels and lampieys i ro

To ftew oeh • n

Another way to ftew eels ib.

Tp ftew eels with brodi ttz

To farce eels with white faucc ib;

a 4 To

iv

CONTENTS.

To make acollarof Edt in

ragou - f ag(

2 112

To boil lobftere

114

To broil lobfters

ibl

To roaft a lobfter

ib.

To ftcw lobfters

ib.

To ragoa lobfters

'5

To butter lobfters

ib.

A difti of cold lobfters

ii6

To butter a crab

ib.

To drefs a crab

ib.

1 dilh crawfifh

117

Page Iff

ib.

• 118,

ib.

To di(h prawns To ftcw fcollops To fricafee fcollos To ftcw oyfters To ragou oyfters Scollopped mrfters To ftew mafcles - izo

To ftew mufcles another way ib. To ftew cockles - 121

To ftew crawfiftij prawns or fhrjmps - ib.

lb.

CHAP.

IV.

U

Gravy - - 122

Gravy for whi te fauces 123

Gravy for a fov'l when you have no. meat - ib.

Brown gravy for fifh ib.

White gravy for fi(h, fauces, &c. - - 124

Gravy for venifon - ib.

Sweet fauces for venifon or hares - ib.

Force-meat balls for real or mock turtle - 12

Egg balls - ib.

Brownine for made diftiesy&c. ib.

Lobfter uiuce - 126

Oyfter faucc for fifti ib.

Oyfter fauce for boiled turkey fowls, or any white meat

Shrimp fauce - .

Anchovy faucc

a27

ib.

ib. J 28

ib.

ib.

Mufclc fauce Cockle fauce Melted butter "White celery fauce Brown celery faucc Onion fauce for boiled rabbits, ducks, geefe, &c ib. Spani(h onion iauce 130

129 ib.

s.

Gallentine fauce

Bread fauce

Sauces for a pig

Green fauce for green geefe,

ducklings, &c. Sorrel fauce -Feimel Sauce Parflcv faucc £gguce Apple fauce Mint faucc Caper fauce Poveroy faucc •

Carrier fauce •

Goofeberry fauce White fauce for boiled fowls

or chickens Mock 03pfter fauce White mufliroom fauce Brown mufhroom fauce Pickled mufhroom faucc Sauce for roaft rabbits White fauce for a hare Lemon fauce for boiled fowls Another fauce for boiled

fowls Sauce robart Fin fauce

10. 131

ib. itz fb. ib. ib.

33

ib.

ib. ib. ib.

3

ib. ib. ib.

lb. ib.

3 ik

ib. ib. ib.

CHAP.

CONTENTS.

CHAP.

V.

BOILING.

Proper rules to be obferved in boiling Page 137

To boil a haunch or neck of venilbn

Hams

Toneues

39

ib.

Beef

Mutton

Veal

Brcaft of veal

Calves head •

Lamb

Pork

Torkies

140

ib. 141

ib.

ib. 142

ib.

ib.

Fowls Rage 144

Chickens - jb

Chickens with bacoa and

celery - ib.

Chickens and tongues tf

Gooie - - ib.

Ducks - ' - 146

Ducks boiled the French way ih. Pigeons . - ib

Rabbits • 147

Pheafants - ihu

Partridges • ibu

Woodcocks or fiiipes 14S

Plovers - 149

CHAP.

VI.

ROASTING.

149 ib.

'LI

Ybt

'5J

Proper mles to be obferved

in roafling Beef Mutton Lamb

Fillet of veal Loin of Tcal Pork

Tongue and udder Venifon

Haunch of mutton Leg of mutton with oyftcrs fb. Leg or (houlder of mutton 16 Pigs - - lb.

Hind quarter of a pig drcfled

lamb fafhion - J c8

A fawn - ID.

Ham or gammOn of bacon ib. Ox palates Calf's Uvcr Jiare Rabbits hare faihion Rabbits Turkey IVirkcy with chefnuts

S9

160

ib. x6i

ib.

ib. 162

Turkey the Hamburgh way 163

Green geefe Goofe Ducklings Ducks Fowls

Fowls the German way Fowls with chefnuts Chickens

Chickens with cucumbers Pheafants Partridges

Fowl pheafant fafhion Wild ducks Woodcocks and fnipes Ortolons Ruffs and reefs . Larks the Dunfbble way Guinea fowl •

Pigeons Plovers Wheat-ears Ox heart Calf's heart Veal fweetbreadi Quails •

ibw

ib.

lb. m6&

ih.

ib. 167

ib. 1 63

ib.

ib. 169

ib. 170

ib,

ji

ib.

1'

CHAP.

n

CONTENTS;

C H A A B A K

Rump of beef Page 174

Kibsofbeef • tt;

Toad in hole- id

Leg f bMf ib.

Calf's head . 176

Calf 's head Ihc Dutch wny lyj

C H A

B R 6 I

lrcr rules to be obferred

in broilinff • 179

Fowls and chickens 180

pigeons • ib

:Beef (leaks - i))i

teef fteaks the French way ib Mutton chops ibu

Cutlets znaintenon 182

C H A

.FRY

per rules to be obfervtd

in frying . • 1 S j

Beef fteaks - ib.

Motton chops 1S6

Lamb chops • ib.

Another way - ib

Lambs fry • 187

Figs ears • ib.

Veal fteaks - ib.

CM veal: - 188

C H A

STEWS AN

Proper rules to be obferved

in ftewing and haftiing 1 92 Rump of beef - 193

Rump of beef another wav ib Rump or briiket of beef tne

French way - 194

Beef gobbqts - 105

Beef the Portugal way ik

Beef ftealcs - lu

Beef with cucumbers ro

P. VIL IN G.

Lamb and rice

FiUet of veal Ox heart Herrings Sprats

Page 177

•k

ibi 75

P. L

1

VliL N G.

Pork chops 4 i8

Veal cutlets - ib

Veal cutlets malntenoh i8j

Veal chops - ibi

Jamb chops . • ib

Potatoes - 184

Legs of turkey or fowls jb

Calf's heart ib.

P. IX. I N G.

Coid fowl, pigeon, or rabbit

Tripe

Saufages •

Potatoes

Arrichokes

Celery

Caaliflowers

Eggs

Gutters

Calf's liver atid bacoa

18S

18a

b

ib.

i9di

JQt

lb.

ib.

292

P. X.

D HASHES.

Neats tongues whole 107

Bceaft of veaifoa - iow Breaft of venifon another way iqi

Knuckle of .veal - icn

Knuckle of ye;il with rice ibu

Calf or lamb's head 199

Fillet of veal . • 200

Veal and peas soi

Turkey ftewed browm ib

Another way ao

Turkey

CONTENTS.

tu

ork with cdcry Page loi

Fowl - 2p3

Fowl with celery - ib.

Fowl witli rice - 204 Fowl or chicken the Dutch

way - ib.

Chickens - 20;

Chickens another way ib.

Chickens the Scotch way ib.

Fheafant - 206

Pigeons • lb.

Geefc giblets - 207

Docks giblets • ib

Hare - 208

fueled hare - 209

's feet - ibl

Calf's head hafhtd brbwn

Pate t09 Calf's hea4 haflied white 2 zo Calf's heart httihod 111

Hafhcd real • ib

Minced veal ib

Halhedhare - 212

ia(hed venifoa • ib

Haihed beef • ib.

Haihed mutton • S15

Wiy fowl haihed - ib. Turkey or fowl haihed ib.

Woodcocks or fnipes haihed 214. theafants and partridges

hafhed . tb.

figs. pet ty-tocs • ib.

CHAP.

XL

MADE DISHES.

Prefer rales to be obferred

inmadediihes - 215

Abrowncollis - 417

A white cuUis - ib

Abelhemell - 218

Romp of beef a la donbe ib.

Rump of beef a k braixe 219

A rolled fomp of beef 220 Sutioin ef beef in epigram 22 1 The infide of e furioin of

beef forced - . ib.

To force a mmp of beef 212

Rump of beef In epigram ib. Beef a la mode - ib.

Beef a la mode in pieces 223

Beef cfcarlot? 224

beef a la royale - ib.

M tremblongue iz

Beef olives . - 220

Herrico of beef tMk ib.

Beef collops A fillet of beef

Neat's ttngue fofced tat Cow's udder ftbrced ib.

Beef (leaks rolled ' 229 Loin of veal in cpignm ib. Leg of veal and baooii i A dif

gpife . tfo

BombardedsYcal • ib.

227 ib.

Fillet of veal with coRops 2ji Shoulder of real a la pied montoiie - 231

Veal a la bourgoiie ib.

Netk of real a la royafc 23 J

Neck of veal a la braize ib.

Neck of veal a la glaize 23

Fricandeux of veal 21 (

Veal olives - ib,

VeAl olives anodier way 2t6

Veal olives the French way ih.

Veal blanquets - 23?

Veal rolls . A. Pilloc of veal Pilbc the Indium way

Illoc another way 239

Curric of veal - ib. Pdrcupin of a breaft of veal 240

A ftvory difh of veal 241

Blaft of veal collared lb.

Frieandillal of veal 242

Teddcroons of veal ib.

Tcnderoons another way 243

ItaKan collops ib

ICalSan collo white 244

Scotch coUops • it.

White collops . 24$ Scotch coHops a la Fraacoife ib

CMf 's hesid fuiprift iS

Ham

L

in.

Vlil

C O N -f E N t 9.

Ham a !a brze Page 24.7

bhoukier of mutton in epi gram - 148

Shoulder of mutton furprifc ib. Leg of mutton a la royale ib. Leg of mutton a la bout out 249 Shoulder of mutton wuh a

ragou of turneps - ib. To ltu£F a kg or (houlder of

mutton - 250

Oxford John - 25;!

Mutton the Tnrktfh way ib A bafqne of mutton 252

To collar a brcait of mutton ib. Mutton kebobbed - 253 Neck of mutton called the

hafty difh Mutton a la blaize Mutton chops in Sfgnift Herrico of mutton Mutton the French way Another French way, called

St. Menehout - 256

Loin of mutton forced 257

Breaft of mutton grilled ib. Mutton rumps a la braize ib. Mutton rumps with rice 28 Lamb's head • ib.

To force a leg of Iamb 259 Lamb cutlets with fin fauce 260 Lamb chops in caforole ib.

Lamb chops larded ib

Shoulder of lamb a la falpi con - 261

Breads of lamb a la paitrine ib. Neck of lamb a la glaize 262 Ribs of lamb en gardinere Lamb ears in bememeL Calves ears in befhemel

ib.

'5!

Barbicued pig

A pig the French way

A pig au pcre douillet

A pig matelote

Pork cutlets fauce Robart

Herrico of venifon

A goofe a la mode

Ducks a la mode

Ducks a la braL&e •

ib. 261

ib. 264 26c

ib. 266 267 268

ib. 269

ib.

Duck with green tfeits Page Duck with, cucumbers Sweetbreads of veal a la dauphin Sweetbreads en gcrdinierc Syeetbreads a la glaize Sweetbreads an befliemel Turkey a la doubc Turkey a la braize Turkey a la glaize Peregoc turke Fowl a la braize Fowle a la farce • •

Fowl a la glaizd Pullets a la Sainte Mehehou To marinate fowls Fowls frangas incopadaa Chickens a la braize Chickens chiringrate Chickens furpriztf Artificial chickens or pigeons Pulled chickens

Pigeons a la doube Pigeons au poire Pigeons ftoved Pigeons furtout Pigeons compote French pupton of piflcons Pigeons tranfmograpnied Pigeons in-fricandeux Pigeons' with a farce Pig6ons a la fouflel Pigeons in pimlicd Jagged pigeons Pigeons a la Italienne Partridges a la braize Partridge panes •

Pheafants a la braize Florentine hare To fcare a hare Hare civet Rabbits furprife Rabbits in calTorole Fiorendine rabbi ta Portugal chickens • Currey of chickens Larks pear fafhion

7 lit

ibi

27

iL

%

274

27c

lb 476

ib. 277 278

ib;

280

28 1

282

ib. 284

h 286

ib.

ib. 287 288

ib. 289

ib, 290 291

lb.

294 lb.

lb.' 296

i97

WoocU

CONTENTS;

Woodcocks or fhipes in a

fuftout - Page 297

To falmee woodcodcs or

fnipet 298

H A

Beef

Ox palates NccIl of veal reaft of veal Another way Sweetbreads

A

G

300 301

10.

303 lb.

To falmee a wild duck or

any fort of wild fowl Pag. 29S Macaroni a la parmazan in. A mock turtle - S99

P. XIL

O U S.

Leg of mutton

Livers

Pigs feet and ears

Lamb

Lamb another way

fireaft of lamb

30f lb. ib.

30c

CHAR

xm.

3?J

ib

. - F R I C A

Neat's tongnc Ox palates

Lamb cntlcts r 308 Lamb ftones and fweetbreads ib.

Tripe - 309

Another way • ib.

Tripe a la Kilkeimy 310

Chickens brown f ib.

Chickens white • ib

SEES.

Rabbits brown Rabbits white Pigeons brown Pigeons white Pigeons the Italian way Eees

3t 31a

ib.

'a

3H

Calves feet and chaldron the Italian way ak

CHAP. XIV, ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Pfoper rules to be obierved in didfing roots and vegetables - 315 .Greens and fpronts 3 1 6 Cabbages • ib. Cauliflowers • ib. Another way 317 Broccoli T ih Spinach • ib. Carrots • 31 8 Tumeps r ib. Parfneps - 319 Maihed parfneps? ib. Potatoes r i Maihed potatoes ' • 320 Windfor beans - ib. French beans - ib. Aiparagus •• 321

31

ib.

32 ib.

ib.

Artichokes Green peas Mufluooms broiled Muftirooms ftewed Muihrooms fricafeed Mulhrooms ragou - 323 Peas and lettuces ftewcd ib. Ieas ftewed another way 32 Peas Franoife - ibl

Green peas with cream ib.

Cucullfbers ftewed Cucumbers ftewed another

35

way Cucumbers in rsuou Cucumbers a la farce Skirrets fricafeed Aparagns a la petit poy Aiparagus m ragou

ib.

'b.

lb, 3

Afparagut

CONTENTS.

AftanguidieliAKaBirnr P. s8 Aipsmgus in French rolk ib Fiench beant in rasou jtQ

Bwns in ragou with a farce ib, French beans ragoued with

cajbaec r 350

French Deans xagoued with

parfneps - ib

Fiench beans ragoned with

potatoes - 331

Kidticy beans in ragon ib

White kidney beans fricafeed j$ z Endive in ragou ib.

Ckardoons ftewed - 333 Chardoons fried and buttered ib Chardoons a la petit pois 34 Chardoons a la lron)ge ib

Antchoke bottoms fricafee ib. Artichoke bottoms a la cap 335 Aitichokes au barigoulfc ib lrocGoli in failad • j6 Canliflowers in ragou lb

Cauliflowers dewed - ib

Canliliven d'Baao)c P.jjC

Green truffles boiled 337

Green truttca ftcwed vbp

Green truffles a la Itsdiane ib

Green morels flewed 32S

Green morels fricafee ib.

Green morels fprced ib

Cabbage forced - 339

Cabbage farce maigre 340

Savoys forced and ftewed 341

Red cabbage a la Hailang u

Spinach ftewed • ib

Spinach a la cream 342

Parfneps ftewed - ib

Celery in ragou • ib.

Celery -a la cream 343

Ceienr ftewed • ib

Sorrel ftewed ibp Potatoes in imitation of a

collar of veal or mutton ib.

Potatoe cakes • 344

Omons in ragoix • 9

C H A A U M L E T S

Plain anmit - 345

Aumletwitli fweetherfe ib. Avrolct with afparagus 346

Anmlet widi green peas ib.

Aqmlet with fold orfyinach ib Avmlet with Parmazan dieefc ib Aimlet of beans • 3 A pretty -difti of Ctg £ a U tripe ib.

Eggs in fion - 34!

£ggs poached - ib,

£ggs DutiMad vMi a toaft 349 £s and collofift Med itu

.

Ramaquins of -chiefe Kamaquins on loafts ClecCe ik ibiMieHX Stewed cheefc

3$ ib,

ib. 35$

P. XV.

A N p EGGS,

£gg$ with bread • 349

Eggs forced - 3C9

Eggs with lettuces - vh

Eggs witli ftewed fpinach ib.

Eggs with fbrrel • 351

Eggs with broc€i ib.

Eggs with afparagus ib Eggs fried as round as balls 3Ca

An egg as big as twenty wi

Whites of eggs a la cream ib

Eggs with gravy ' - 3C3

Eggs in marinate r tb

H E E

£.

Welch rabbit Scotch rabbit Ettglifh rabbit

ib.

CHAP,

CONTENTS.

C H A?• XVI. PUDDINGS.

i

Proper rules to 1 oWcrrcd

in makinj paddiBgs Pag. 35 Steak podding s

Pigeon pudding - liu

Ox pith pudding J C9 Calf's foot pudding 10.

Hunting pudding - 360 nin pudding bmlod ib

Plum pudding baked 361

fiaet pudding boiled ib

Yerkfhire pudding ib.

Marrow pudding • 362 Mvrow puddine anodier W9j ib Vermicelli pod£ng 363

Oat pudding • ibl

fitw college puddings 364.

Orange pudding • ib.

Oaange padding a fecond way

Omnge pudding a third way ib Orange pudding a fdkirth

way - 366

Lemon pudding - ib.

Ijtmofk puddingafeoMid way 367 Almona pudding baked ib.

nond pudding boiled 368 Ipfwich almoad pudding ib. &i0 puddii - ib.

Milkt pudding • 369

Carrot pudding - ib.

Cvrot pudding a fecond way 3 70 Uce pudding . ib.

Rice pudding a fecond way 37 1 Kke pudding a third way uu 'Jcc pudding a fourth way ib. Lice puddbg boiM 372

ice puddMig boiled a focond way - ib.

Sifvolina riee pudding 373

&iiiach podding • ib.

gaking pudding - 374.

Cream pudding iK

Oatmeal pudding - 37 r

Ciifiard pudding boiled ib.

Cuftaid pudding baked Pag. 36

Flour pudding -, ib

Batter pudding - 377

Batter j)ttd4m? aQ(tier way i& Grateful pudding r &• Bread pudding - 37S

Bread pudding a fecond way 19 ' Bread pudding a third way 379 Bread pudding baked itu

Bread and butter puddkig 3 Tranfparent pudding i1

Puddings in little diihei xb Sweetmeat pudding 31

Ratifia pudding • ib

Plain puddine • 389

Chefnut pudding ' .- i&u

CowAip pudding 3! Apricot pudding • ib.

Quince pudding • ib.

Italian pudding • 3S4

Pearl barley pudding aiv

Pearl barley puddii a (econd

way - 38f

French barley pudding ib

Apple pudding baked ib.

Afle pudding boiled 38

lruen pudding • iBu

Spoonlul pudding m 384 Cfitron puddings • ib.

lfnon tower pudditig ib.

Fotatoe pudding . 38$

Pocatoe pudding a fecond way ib Potatoc pudding 4 third way ib Yam pudding . 380

Floar hafty pudding ib.

Oatmeal hafty pudding 390 Almond puddings in £in9 sfaw Tanfey pudding boiled 391

Tanfey pudding with almo&ds icL Tanfey pudding baked 39 Little cheefe curd puddings iK Suet dumplfns - 303

Suet dumplins a lecond way ib. Yeaft dumplina . ib.

4 Norfolk

Page 594 Apple damplins Page 305

Hard dumplins • - ib. Apple dumplins a fecood way ib

irii CONTENTS.

Korfolk damplins Hard dumplins

liaid dumplins a iecond way ib.

CHAP. XVIL PIES.

ftopcr roles tp be obfervcd

in miJcing and baking pies 596 PiFpaiic Tart parte

Tart pafte another way Kaifing parte Another raifing pafte Robbed pafte 9

Dcipmng pafte r

Crackling pafte Strcwfbury pafte Crocant pafte GinB pane Vcnifonpafty Scef ftealc pie 3utton pie t

Ox cheek pic Chefliire pork pie Dev'onfhire iquab pie iJhropQiire pic Ham and chicken pie Sweet veal or lamo pie Veal pie Lamb pic

Veal or Iamb jmc raifed Veal olive pie Cairs foot pie Calf's head pie Swan pie

Yorkfhire Chriftmas pie Goofe pic

Tnrkey pie with green truffles - 41 1 Chicken pie - 412 Dock pie - ib. Pigeon pie - ib. Pigeon pie raifed - 413 Giblet pie • ib

?97

in.

ib.

'I

58?

10.

ib.

ib.

400

ib,

ib. ib,



10.

ib. 404.

ib. 406

ib.

407 ib.

408 ib.

410 ib.

Rabbit pie . 414

Hare pie - ib.

Patty gou dc vou 415

Goudevoupie • 416

Beef ftcak patty, ib

Sweetbread patty - ib.

Peregordpie • 4,7

Little mutton pies - ib.

Turbotpie . ig

Salmon pie . ib.

Salt filh pi . jb

Sole pie,,

Carp pic, jb

Tench aad eel pie 420

Jlelpic . ib.

Flounder pie • 421

Herring pic . jb.

Lobftcrpie - jb.

Mufclepie - azz

Fifii paiUcs the Italian way ib.

MInc-mea"k - 423

Jucnt mince pie - 424

Florentine of veal - ib,

Chcefe cued florentine 42c

Florentine of apples and

oranges. . ib,

Tort de moy - 425

Artichoke pie - ib.

Potatoc pic - ib,

Onion pie . I'i

Skirret pie . ib.

Savory tg pie - ib.

Sweet egg pic . 428

Green coddling pie - ib.

Applepie . 429

Gobfeberrypie 1- ib.

Currant and rafpberry pie 430

Morella chcriy pic r ib.

PETTIT

CONTENTS.

xut

PETTIT PATTIES.

Force-meat patties Page 450 Chicken, turkey or veal

patties - 431

Cilti patties - ib.

Oyfter patties Oyfter loaves Lobfter patties Fried patties

Pagp 43143i

TARTS, TARTLETS, and PUFF5.

Orange or lemon tarts Green apricot tarts Green almond tarts Khubarb tarts Angelica tarts Icing for tarts Apple taftlets Rafberry tartlets Apricot tartlets

434 Apolepuft

lb Rafberry pu

43 Apricot pu&

436 Curd puns ib Sugar pnflfs

ib. Chocolate puffs

ib. Almond puffs

437 Lemon puff

437 438

ID

ib..

lb ib-ib.

CHAP. xyin.

PANCAKES AND FRITTERS.

Cream pancakes - 440

fine pancakes - 441

Finepancakes a iecond way ib.

A third way - ib.

Milk pancakes - ib

Common pancakes ib.

A quire of paper pancakes 442

Rice pancakes - ib.

Taniey pancakes - ib. Pink'Coioarcd pancakes Apple fritters

iUple fritters a fecond way ib

fm fritter? 7 444

1'.

fritters royjd Hafhr fritters Curd fritters Skirret fritters White fritters Stringed fritters Vine kaf fritten Clary fritters Potatoe fritters Aple fraze (nond fraze Bacon fraze

ib, ib.

t

CHAP. XIX,

CHEESECAKES and CUSTARDS,

Fine cheefecakes 449

Common cheefecakes 450

Citron cheefecakes 41

Lemon cheefecakes • ib. Lemon cheefecakes a ffpcopd

way - ib.

Almond cheefecakes 452

Plaio cheefiKakes Rice cheefecakes Maids of honour Fine cuflards Plain cuflards Almond cuftaj'ds Of ange cp ftards

45 ib.

ib.

CHAP

9UV

CONTENTS.

CHAP. XX. BLANCMANGE, CREAMS, and FLUMMERY.

tlpBc'tfunge - 45;

jAnac'mange, a fecondVay 4C6 Blanc'mangc, a third way it. dtple cream - 7

Lcojojj ciem ib.

Lemoa cicao), fecond wa 48 Qrsm cream, a recoii4 way ib. Xbwih cream • 459

i o( cream - ib.

Piftachio cream - ib.

Pifiichio cream, a Second

yfSLV - 460

Hmtihorn cream r ib.

Alfiond cream ib

Katlfia cream: • 461

-Barl cream? ib.

• Gooicberry cream ib.

Lste cceam r 462

Whipt cream - ib,

Clouted cream - ib

Quince cream r 463

Citron cream • ib,

Raibeny cream • ib.

dow and cream 464

Ice cream r ib

HartQiorn flummery 465.

Hartfliom flu9imery ja £b cond way - ib

Oaitmeal flummery 4661

FjDnch flummery . • 'ib

Hedge-hoe r ii £ and bacon in flmnmery 467

' J.E L L I E S

'Mvtfhom idly r

Calf feet jfeUy Jelly for moiildsj Sec, Savory jelly Qrange jelly r

KHJband Jelly Gpeen mellon in jelly Fruit in jelly Gold fifh in jelly H's neft in jelly Ke4 currant ielly

Fairy butter

Oi hulter r

HAP. XXI.

AND SYLLABUBS.

46s Blade currant jelly

469 Turkey in jelly

470 Chicken in jelly

468 ib

lb.

Lobftcr or crayfifli in jelly 476

Whipt fyllabuW - ib.

Solid fyllabubs - Jb,

Everlafting (yllabubs 477

Syllabub under the cpw iPt

Imon fyjlubs- - 478

Trifle • .

FJoatiiig ifland 473

CHAP. XXII. DIRECTIONS FOR those that attekd the SICK.

Mutton broth - 479 To hoi 1 pigeons . 48 j

Tp boil % ibrag of yI 480 Beef or mutton broth, for "wcry weak people yo take but little nouriihment ib. Bvff drink, which is ordered

for weak people ib.

Beef tea • ib.

Pork broth - 481

To boil a chicken ib.

To boil a jpartcidcc or any other wild fowj - ib

To boil a'plaicc, or flounder b.

To mince veal, or chicken, for the fick or weak people 83

To pull a chicken for the lick ib.

Chicken broth - ib.

Chicken water - 484

WWte caudle - ib

•

Brown

.

C O N T E N T" S.

X9

IK

Water grud

Panada

To boil fago

Tolwilfalop

Ifinglafs jcUk

The peroral drinft;

Jtnttered water, or what the Gennans call egg-foup, who are very foSo of it for Tamper • •

Seed water - •

Bread foop for the £ck ib.

485 lb.

ibw

4S6

Artiikial aflca ihilk 4i

Cows milk next totfflbitiilk

done thus ' •

A good drink i

Barley water - •

Sage tea • ib.

tbiu chird - 4S8

Liquor for a chiM that haa

the thniih Vsl

To boil comfrey roots ik The kottckte broth • ib. A medicine for a diforder iji

the bowels - 489

c H A F. xxm.

DIRECTIONS FOR SEAFARING MEN.

Cachnp tokttf twcmy ywiw 49 Ml faucctokccpditwhode

year '' n.

To pordrippingr wy fi"V

meat, mWecs, ate ik

To pickle MtduooiB fev the

fea - 49

Mkiihroom powder - ib. To keep malhreew wIduKif

pickle 4

To keep artichoke boUboM

dry •

To Uy artichoke bottoms ib. To ragoo artichoke bottoms lb. Todiefsfilh - 493

To bake fi(h - ib.

m

A gravy foup

Peas ibttp

Fork puddin;-, or beef

A rice paddmg

A fuet podding - 405

A liver pudding botfed - ift.

Oatmeal pudding •• iL

To bake an oatmeal pnddLog i&

A rice pudding bakedr' itu

A- harnco of trench beans 4

A fowl pie - 16.

A chefhire pork pie for iea 4ay

Sea venifort &•

Dumplings, when you have

white bread Chcuder

498 499

P R

Boles tobe obfemug ht pie ierviag Offanges Jxmon Goofeberries Rafberries Ked currants iniite currants Gieen codliags Golden pippins

CHAP. XXIV. It S E R V I

₯99

COI

ib.

Walnuts white

N

Walnuts-eieen Walnuts bhick Gieen-gage Plums Damfons

Damfons for tarts MoreUa chenier Surawberries Pine apples Bbernes Quineer Poaches Apricots bl

G.

K06

16. $08

i ib.

ib.

5rb

ib.

Cucumbers

3CV1

Cacombers . Kaiberry jam Apricot jam

CONTENTS Page 5x2 Strawberry jam ib. Black carrant jam

53

Page SJ3 lb.

CHAP. XXV. SYRUPS AND CONSERVES;

Syrup of quinces - 514 Syrup of rofcs - ib.

Syrup of citron '- ib'.

Syrup of clove gillifiowers 5 1 5

Sy rap of peach bloffoms 515 Conlcrvc of red rofes, or any

other flowers - ib.

Conferve of hips - ib.

Conferve of- oraDge-)eel 516

XXVI.

CHAP. DRYING ANii CANDYING.

To dry chprries - 516

Cherries with their leaves

and ftalks ff Fcen - cr7 To dry cherries a third way ib. To dry cherries a fourth way 5 1 8 To dry peaches - ib.

To dry plums - 519

To dry damfons - ib.

To dry plums green 520

To dry apricots - ib.

liemon and orange peel can' died - ib.

Melon citron candled 52 1

Angelica candied Caffia candied Orange marmalade Apricot marmalade Red Quince marmalade White quince marmalade Ralberry palle . Currant palle Goofebefcjr pafte Orange chips Apricot chips Ginger tablet

C2t

ib.

C22

ib.

ib.

523 lb.

ib. ib. ib.

CHAP. C A K

Proper rules to be, obfcrved

in making cakes Icing for jpes A rich cke Plum cake

A pound cake Seed cake, Wiitc plum cakes Butter cake 'Rice cakes. Cream cakes

A £ne feed or faffron cake Knns cake Tcpper cakes

C2D

ib.

C28

ib.

ib.

529

ib.

530 ib.

lb.

XXVII.

E S.

Portugal cakes A pretty cake Little £ne cakes Shrewfbury cakes Maudling cakes Little plum cakes .Carraway eake Sugar cakes.Almond cakes Uxbridge'Cakes Bride cake Pruflian cakes Apricot cakes Quince ces t

5S

£

ib.

ib. ib.

554 ib.

ib.

ib. ib. Orange'

G6NTENTS.

Orange cakes Bath cakes Black caps Gceen caps Gingerbread cakes Macaroon cakes Lemon bifcuits

g 537 lb.

ib.

ib.

ib.

539

French bifcuits Droip bifcuits Common bifcuits Spon bifcuits Spanifh bifcuits laght wigs Buns

XVli

Page 539 lb.

540 ib. ib. ib.

„ " C H A P. XXVIII. HOGS PUDDINGS, SAUSAGES, &c.

Abnond hogs puddings 541 Another way - 542

A third way - ib.

Hogs puddings with currants ib. Black pnddings - 43

Savoloys •- 544

Fine faufaees • 544

Common (aufages - 54 Oxford faufages - • ib.

Bologna faufkges - ib.

Andouilles, or calves chitter

CHAP. O T T

Proper rules to obferved in

potting Venifon Beef

Beef like veniibn Tongues

Tongue and fowl Hare Goofe Turkey Chickens or pigeons

546

548 ib.

lings XXIX.

I N g;

Moor game or plieafants

Woodcocks or fnipes

Wheatears, larks, &c

Marble vead

Savory veal cake

Salmon

Pike

Chars

Lampreys

Eels

Lobfters

54?

ib.

'

ib.

'Li ib.

t

LITTLE COLD DISHES.

Sahamngundy - 557 and bottoms

Dutch or hung beef - 55 8 Dutch or firitiih herrings

Dutch or hung beef on tops Ham

lb.

CHAP. A R V I

XXX.

N G.

To cut up a turkcjr

To rear a goofe

To unbrace a mallard or

dock - 60

To unlace a conv • ib

To wing a partndge or quail ib.

To allay a pheaiant or teal 560

To difmemMr a hern ib

To thieh a iPiroodcock 561

To diplay a erane • ib

To lift a fwan ib.

C HA P

anriH

CONTENTS

CHAP.

XXXI.

COLLARING.

Fkge 55r Calf's head

Bioft of veal - 56 J Pig

Gallenttneofabreaftofveal 563 'SaTmon

Vcnifon - ib. Eels

ib.

566

CHAP, xxxri.

SALTING AND SOUSING.

Pork hams

Beef hams Veal hams Bfotton hams Toncjucs Duto) beef Yorlcihirc hung beef Bagon

57

j66 Wdlphalia bacon

7 Pickled pork

lb. Sham brawn

568 A turkey foufed, in imitation ib. of ill ffgeon - ib ib Pigs feet and ears foufed 572

569 Mackrel fodfed • ia ib.

CHAP.

XXXIII.

.PICKLING.

Proper rules to be obferved

in pickling White wine vinegar • Sugar vineg Elder vinegar Tarragon vinegar Walnuts gveea •

Walnuts white Walnuts black

Gcrkinft •

large cucumbers Ia Jlices Afparagus Peaches Kadilh pods French Deans Caulifloweis Beet-root •

White pluma

Onions Lemons. Mttfhroomt white

5.73

574

'II

ib. 576

577 578

ib. 5?"

sbw 5

ibi 583

To make yickk fdjr xaa&k

looms . - 3

Muihrooms btown 'm. Codlings - 5&

FenneL ibi

Grapes • ib

Barberries • 585

Red cabbage - 586

Golden pippins • ilw

Naftertium DcniesflMPil KmtB 58 Yosog iKkoi, or young artichokes before the leaves air hard • ib Artichoke bottoms ib. Samphire • 588

Mock ginger Jt

Melon mangoes - ib

Elder lhooti iutatic of

bamboo - 589

ladian pickle, qc piec liU rao Bicd caxramr • io.

Ox

O If

Page

Dx palates

Cocks combs

Purple cabbage

Salmon

Sturgeon

Mftckupl, called careadi

ibck aqcfeerie

T 59

E N T S.

Smelts

Oyfters

Cockles or mulcles

Wakitx ketchup

Muihroom ketchup

Muihf oom fowdtt

lb. - 59s

t

CHAP.

XXXIV.

To KEEP GARDEN VEGETABLES and FRUITS.

Ta keep French beans all

the year • 597

70 keep green peas till

fi fccond wy tokeepgteen

peas - lb.

To keep red goofeberries ib To keep walnats a the year 599

AiKtfaer way to keep lemons $99 To keep grapes . ik.

To dry artichoke boctons 6od To bottle gzccn gooftbenks ih. To bottle green curnnfs €oi- . To bottle, damfons,,whiie '

ballace, &c. • jb.

To bottle cranberries ifau

A CATALOGUE of Fish, Game, Poultry, FRint • d Garden Vegetables, in Seafon every Month ia the Year.

JANUARY- lTfti-.Game and poultry- Auit - $U)Ots and vetables • 602

FEBRUARY.- Ditto 60$ MAVS:iLDktp s, 604 APRIL.'-'Ditto . 604 MAY,- Jitta - 60

JUNE,--Dittp - 60s. 606

JULV.- Tifh-Game and poultry - Fruit - Roots and vegetables 606

AUGUST- Ditto 607

SEPTEMBER- Ditto 6o9 OCTOBER- Ditto 6og,6oQ NOVEMBER - Ditto 600,610 OHCEMBEK - Ditto,61 l

CHAP. XXXV. WINES.

Raifin wine • 61 1

Elder wine - 61 a

Orange wine - ib.

Orange wine with raifins ib. Elder Hower wine, very like

Frontiniac Goofcberry wine Currant wine Cherry wine Birch wine Qince wine Cowflip, or clary wine

3

ib.

614

ib.

ib.

6i

616

Tumep wine Rafberry wine Mead wine Blackberry wine Damfon wine Grape wine Apncot wine Balm wine Mountain wine Black cherry brandy Rafberry brandy Orange flinib

616 617

ib. 618 619

ib., ib.

ib. 620

ib.

ib. 621

CHAP.

nxi

CONTENTS.

CHAP. XXX VI. CORDIAL WATERS;

Fper rules to be obferve4 in making cordial waters

Page 621 Walnut water - 622

Treacle water - ib.

Treacle water lady 'Nf.ofir

mouth's way • ib.

Black cherry water 623

Hyfterical water - 624

Red rofe buds - ib.

Flaeoe water - ib.

Snneit water - - 6t Milk water • 6x6

Stag's heart water Page 6z6

To make angelica water 6tj

Milk water a fecond way ibf

Cordial poppy water 62

Peppernunt water - ib

Role waiter - ib.

Lavender waltr r 9

Aqua mirabilis - ib

Orange or letnon rater ib

Piedmont water -, 60

Nutmeg water • ibf

Feverwater ibf

C H BREWING

B

H A

A P. XXXVIL

A P.



Englifh and French bread 6z Englifh bread the London

way - ib.

Bread without yeaft by the

help of a leaven - 6$ 3 Frencn bread 654.

fit

xxxvra,

I N G.

Muflins - 654

To prefervc a lar ftock of

ycaft, which will keep and

DC of ufc for ftvcral

months, either for baking

or brewing

65$

MARKETING.

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MARKETING.

T in ' T I t mmUiimtmtlM

Prefer Rules td he objerved in Marketing, far all

Kinds of PrGvifions

AS it is very intcrcfting to the houfe-kecper, cook, or any other perfon that goes to market, if not Well acquainted with the nature of it, to have ample inftruftions, it is proper to give the bctt in our power J as very often by buying a thing that is not prime and good there are complaints againft the dreffiog or fauce, and therefore it would be well fqr a perfon to read this part of marketing, which is given, before they go to buy; by that means it may prevent them from making miftakes, and give greater fati( fa&ioQ to their employers and themfelves.

B 1& E P.

IN chufing of ox beef, obfepve that if the meat is young it will have a fine fmooth open grain, of a pleafing cjirnatioQ red, and when you pinch it, will

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feel tender.; the fat mult be rather white than yel low, and the fuet white and firm; if it is very yellow it has been fed with oil cakes, or it is not good meat; if it feels rough and fpongy, and nips hard, it is old, or nearly fo. Heifer, or young cow beef, is clofer grained, and the fat whiter than the ox, buc the lean has not fo bright a red; if you can fee the udder try if there is any milk, or the teat open, if not you are fure it is young; bull beef has dill a clofer grain, and the lean of a deep red, the fat is (kinny and hard, and has a rank fmell; be fure to mind there are no bruifes, if there is do not buy it, for if you fait it it will be fure to (link.

The different pieces in a bullock contain the head, tongue, and palate, the intrails are the kidneyj Ikiru, and tripe; there is the double the roll, and the reed tripe, the heart, liver, and lights.

The fore-quarter contains the haunch, which includes the clod, marrow-bone, ihip and the flicking pieces, that is, the neck end; the next is the leg of mutton piece, which has part of the blade-bone in, then the chuck, the brifket, the fore rib, and middle or chuck rib.

The hind quarter contains the firloin and rump, ' the thin and thick flank, the veiny piece, the ich bone, buttock, moufe buttock, and leg.

MUTTON.

IF the mutton is young, the flefh will pinch tender, but if it is old it will pinch hard and continue wrinkled, and the fat will be fibrous and clammy; if ewe mutton the flefh is paler than weather, a clofer grain, and eafily parting; if ram mutton the grain is clofer and the lean of a darker red, and the fat Ipongy; if there is a rot, the lean will be palifb, and the fat a faint whililh colour, inclining to yellow, and

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if you fqueeze it hard fome drops of water will (land tip like fweat; the bed method is to examipe th(i liver; if it is clear from knots, fmooth and fuundi you are fure the meat is sood. Mutton, except iti very hot weather, is kept rour or five days before it ii dreft, and moft people chufe the fhort (hanked mut ton. The different joints in a Iheep are, the head and pluck, whichincludes the liverj lights, heart, melt and fweet-breads The forequarter contains the fhoulder, neck, and bread. The hind-quarter the leg and loin though two loins together make a chine; the two necks and part of the fhoulder cut on diem are the faddle, which are two fine joints, if the mutton is fmall and fat. •

LAMB.

IF the eye is bright and plump in the head, it is frcfl, but if funk and wrinkled and the head looks dry, it is dale. Mind if the vein. in the neck looks of a fine azure blue, if fo it is frefh; if it is green or yellow, and the meat looks dry, it is dale; in the hind-quarter if there is a faint fmell and -feels clammy, and the knuckle liniber, it is not frefh. Houfe lamb is in feafon from the id of September, till July i grafs lamb from Eader to October. The lamb con tains the head and pluck, that is, the liver, lights heart, nut, and melt, and the fry, which confids o( the fweet-bread, dones, fkirts, with a little of the liver the fhoulder, neck, and bread together is the fore-quarter i the leg and loin the hind. In chufmg lamb, be fure to mind it is very white; if it looks brown it will not drefs half fo well; be fure to buy the ewe leg for boiling, as the udder makes it look liandfomer than the ram lamb

B a VEAL.

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r B 4 L.

IN tt choice of veal be furc to chufc it fat and whice, and obfcrvc when it is cut that the juices follow the knife, then you are fure it is good meat and will drefs well; if it is hufky and dry it will eat fo. The flefli of a cow-calf is whiter than bull, but the lean is not fo firm; the fillet of the former is prcfcred on account of the udder. If the bloody vein in the (houlder looks blue or red, and when you fqueeze It bleeds freely, it is frelh; but if it looks black, or yellow, and the knuckle withered and dry, it is ftale. The bread and neck taints firfl: at the upper end, which you will know by its looking yellow or green; rub your linger on, and if it fmells mufty don't buy it, but if it look red or blueifli and has a good fmell it is frefli; the leg is known by its (liffhefs in the knuckle joint i if limber, and the flclh feels clammy, with yellow oi green fpecks on, it is ftale if you fmell under the fat or udder, it will fmell of an agreeable Bavour if frefti, if ftalc it will fmell mufty the loin taints firft under the kidnies. Put a fkewer under the kidney and if it comes out clean, and fmells well, it is fre(h if flimy and fmells mufty, it is ftale; Be fure to buy the dofe fide if you can, as it drefles better, and eats mellower than the open fide. If the head is frefii the eyes will be plump, and the veins in the neck end will look red if otherwife it is ftale. The pieces in a calf, are the head and in- . wrds, which contains the heart, liver, lights, nut, and melt j the (kirts, the throat, fweet-bread, and the wind-pipe, or heart fweet-bread, which is the beft j the fore-quarter is the Ihoulder, neck, and breaft; the hind-quarter is the leg which contains the fillet, knuckle, and loin.

FORK.

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PORK.

YOU mvttt. be paniculaily careful in the choice of,pork, for when it is mcafly it is very dangerous to be

eat. You will know whether it is meafly by the following maxim: rake and fqueeze the lean between your hands, and if it is meafly there will appear little fpccks like fifhrs eyes, and the infide of the throat, '

the liver, and lights, will be full of them, and the fata very pale white; if young and good, the lean yiWl break on pinching it, the flcin very thin, and will dent by nipping it with your finger and thumb; the fat and lean ot a fine white, like veal, and fofc as velvet. If the lean is red and tough, and the fat flabby and fpongy, and feels rough, it is old. If off %

a young boar, or a hog gelded at its full growth, 4

the lean will • be hard, tough, red, and of a rank rammifh fmelL If the meat is cool, ftiff, and fmooth, it is frelh; if clammy or flimy, it is dale. Be furc to run your finger under the twift of the leg;;

if it is frelh, you may be affured that the reft is fo,

as it gets mufty there fooncft. The pieces in a

porker are the head and inwards, which is the heart, '

liver, lights, crow, kidnies, and fkirt; the maw and the guts, which areeithermade chitterlings, or cleanfed ";

for hogs puddings. The fore-quarter s the foreloiji, and ipring. The hind-quarter is the leg and hind-loin, or cut thus; cut a Iparib off the fore quarter and the hand j cut the leg like a ham j then .'

cut off the belly-piece to fait, and with a chopper cut it about an inch from the chine, cut it all through and take off the rind; the chine-bone makes a fine grifkin, and the other the fwcet-bonc. A bacon hog !

is cut different for making hams and bacon; you can cut bald or fparibs, chines and griikins, and plenty ' •

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of flake, for-hogs lard; the haQet is very good roafted, and the feet and ears d reft fevera) ways. Pork is in feafon from the ift of September till May,

F E N I S O N.

AS venifon is the deareft article that is bought of flefh kind, fo you (hould be more circumfpeft in the choice of it the haunch is undoubtedly the fined. Run a fkewer under the bone, and if it fmells fweet, ic is good but be fure that the thick part or cufiiioti does not look green, if it does it is ftruck and ftinks all through; the infide of the flioulder will look red if frefh, if ftale it will look black and green; the neck part ftinks firft on the fide, and looks very green and clammy, run a fkewer into the thick part of the neck, and if it fmcll fweet the neck is fo 5 be fare choofe it with the fat white and very thick on the haunch and neck; if you have occaGon to keep ic any length of time, and have an ice well, wipe it dry with a cloth, and pepper the infide well; put a ihcet of paper all over it, and put it on the ice, and when it comes out hang it in the air two or three hours to' tak of the damp. If you fliould have it hang- ing in the air, and you perceive it is likely to lighten, be lure to carry it into a cellar where no lightening can get to it, for if it ftrikes it, it will ftink in a few hours; the different parts are the head and umblcs, the fry and chine, which is very good to make foup with; the haunch, the flioulder, and the fide, which is the neck and breaft. Buck venifon comes in fealbn the 1 ft of June, and lafts till the middle of September. Doe venifon conies in about the middle of Oflober, and lafts till January; likewife the heifer, which is a buck fawn cut while it is young. A buck (hould never be kiUed qndr feven years old, nor above

BR4fFN.

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B R A W N,

THERE arc four forts of brawn, int Canterbury, Oxford, London and Shrewfbury; the Shrewsbury is a very red colour, and the rolls thicker than any of the others. Canterbury is efteemed the fined, and is. a pale colour; fo is the Oxford and London. It is known to be old by the thickncfs of the rind % if thick and hard it is old, but if moderate it is young. The find and fat of barrow or low brawn is very tender.

HAMS.

THE Weftphalia hams arc cut longer, and are thinner than the Engliih hams. The Weftmoreland and Yorkfliire are chofe by the fliortnefs of the ihank and thicknefs in the cufhion; put your trying or penknife under the bone, and if it comes out clean and has a good fmell, it is fweet and good, but if it is daubed and has a rank fmelj, it is tainted or tufty and be fure not to buy it,

BACON.

THE Hampfhirc, Wiltlhire, and Berklhire bacon is efteemeil the beft if the lean is of a fine red and flicks clofe to the bone, and the fat of a clear white, without any yellow ftreaks, and the rind thin, it is young and good; if any yellownefs, or the fat of a faint duiky wbite and feds fofc, it is rufty, or foon will be fo.

B4 rURKJES.

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S M A R K E T I N Ci.

r V R K I E s.

IF the cock turkey is young, it will have fmooth black legs with the fpur juft appearing; if frefli the eyes will look full and bright, and the velvet of a fine red, and the feet moift and limber. Be careful tp obferve that the fpurs are not cut, or fcraped over to deceive you. If the eyes are funk, and the head looks black, the feet dry and ftiff, it is ftale. Tho fame rule will hold good for a hen when old, her legs are rough and red if with egg, the vent will be fort and open, but if not with egg, the vent will be clofe and hard

C J P O N.

A true capon, if young, his fpurs are (hoft and thick, his legs fmooth, the comb large and pale with a fat vein on each fide his bread; very fat down the back and rump, and a thick belly, his body larger than any common fowl if new a hard clofe vent, and the fat moift and limber; if ftale a loofe open venr, and the fat dry and ftifF A capon is the better for keeping four or five days.

F O fF L S,

A ycung cock has very Ihort fpurs his legs fmooth, but take the fame precaution as in turkies if old his fpurs will be long and (harp, and an open vent -, if ftale its feet will be dry and ft iff; if frelh the vent clofe a(id hard, the feet limber and moift and fo of a hen for newnefs or ftalenefs; if old her legs and comb are rough, with long hairs all over the body; a pullet with egg is efteemed the beft, a little before fhe begins to lay them (he has a large opea

vent;

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C H I C K E N S.

THE bread of the chickens, if well fedj have a ht vein on each (ide of it; a ft rump, and the breaft feels as foft as velvet; if freih the feet are moift and iimbei; if ftale, dry and ftiff and the whiter tbey are the better,

GEESE.

A. young goofe has got a yellow bill and feet, with no hairs but Hubs on them; when freih the feet are limber, when dale dry and lltfT; when old the bill and feet are very red, with long hairs all over the body. Green geefe come in fealon in May, and laft till Midfummer; the others are in feafon till Chriftroas. The green geefe (hould be fcalded, and the ftubble geefe picked dry. The fame rules will hold good for a wild or bran goofe, only this difierence, their fielh is a great deal blacker,

DUCKS and DUCKLINGS.

THE breafts of ducklings or young ducks, if properly fed, will be plump and fiefhy; by handling thcro,you will know if thty are fo by the fubftance, becauie the poulterers flatten them on the breaft, to Inafce them took wider over; if freih the feet will be limber; if ftale dry and ftifF. Old ducks legs are Very red, with hard fcales at the bottom, and their bodies lull of long hairs and yellow. Ducklings come in feafon in February, and (hould be icalded till ffay and jicked dry after that time.

frJlD DUCKS.

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WILD DUCKS.

A wild duck's feet are very fmall and red, the belly very plump and if good the fat on the rump is hard and white; if very yellow, it eats ftrong and . fiftiy if it is fre(h the feet are moid and limber, if ftale the feet are dry and ftifF, and the body looks Uack.

Eafterliags, pintails dun birds and teal are chpfen the fam way, only the feet are black.

PHEASANTS.

THE cock pheafant is the mofl: beautiful wild bird that ever was bred in England, and both cock and hen are of a fine flavour the cock if young has ibort dubbed fpurs, but if old long and very (harp i the ben has none, but mod valued; when with egg the vent is large and open; if the vents are loofe and green they are ftale. As this is game by aft of parliament, they are not allowed to be in feafon only from the ift of Oftober to the id of February; Heathcocks and hens are known whether new or ftale b the fame manner.

PjIRTRIDGES.

THE cock bird is the largeft of the two, has dark red feathers on both (ides the breaft and wings, and when young the bills are of a dark colour, the legs yeUowi(h, it they are fre(h the vent will be firm, but if ftale it will look green, and the (kin will peel oflf when rubbed with the finger; if they are old the bills will be of a light colour, and the legs blue; be furc as you et them to draw the crop out, for if they

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have fed on green wheat they foon will (link; Thia game is allowed from the ift of September to the 14th of February,

m

WOODCOCKS and SNIPES.

THESE are birds of paflTage, and found in this country only in winter % they are better after a monthi reft from their long paflage over . the ocean; and efpecially in frofty weather, as they feed by the clear fprings that don't freeze; when fat they arefirm and thick, with a fat vein on each fide the breaft, the thigh and rump fat and a clofe vent; a lean one will have a loolc vent; if frefli killed their feet will be limber, and the head and throat clean; if you opea the bill and fmell at the throat, it will foon tell whether it is frefli or ftale;

BUSTjiRDS.

THESE are the real wild turkey, and a very largp heavy bird, and vcrv Ihy to come near to kill; con fequently are very fcarce. The fame rules will hold gcod for the choice of thefe curious birds as is given for turkies.

PIGEONS.

WHEN young they are not full feathered, their legs are of a dark colour, fiill and fat at the vent and the feet limber; if the vent is loofe and green they are ftale % when old the legs are large and red. The Tumham Green pigeon is the fineft and biggeft of any. The tame pigeon is larger, and preferable to thq wild i 1$ very fat and tender but the wild

pigeoa

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pigeon is not fo fat. Wood pigeons arc larger than the fame, and the feathers blueiOi, but in. other re(pe£bs like them.

fTHET ERS, LARKS, &c.

' ALL forts of fmall birds are chofen by the fatiiefs of the breait and rump; and for newnefs or aknefs by the fecc being limber, if new dry and •ftia; if ftale.

HARES.

• WHEN a hare is frefli it will look of a pale colour, and ftifF; if it is ftale, the fledi black, and the body limber; if the cleft in her lips fpread very much, and the claws blunt and rugged, (he is old; if the hare is young the claws will be imooth and (harp, the ears tear eafily, and the cleft in the lips not ipread much. The only diftinftion between a hare and a leveret is, that a leveret has a knob, or fmall bone near the foot on the fore leg, if not it is a hare. Hare hunting begins the iftof O6tober, and lads till the iftof March;

RABBITS.

THE wool and claws of a rabbit when young are fmooth; if old the claws are very long and roughs with grey hairs intermixt with the wool, if fre(h ic is ftiflr, and the fle(h white and dry; and when ftate the body will be limber, tlie fle(h look blue, with a Oime upon it. Wild rabbits are in fcafon from July to December. Tame ones all the year.

FISH.

MARKETING. 13 FISH.

THE beft method to difcovcr whether fi(h is nc or dale is by looking at the gills; if they look of a lively red, and open tight, ith the eyes Handing plump in their heads, the body of the fifli ftiff, and the fins ftand firm, you are fure the fi( is frefh; but if the eyes are funk, and the gills look dim, blacky' or muddy, it is not good; and be fure to fmell it at the gills or mouth. Frefti water filh is the beft that are caught in running water. Fond filh is liable to

cat muddv.



T U R B T.

YOU muft chufe a turbot by the tbicknefs and plumpnefs of the belly, the gills of a fine red, and the belly of a bright cream colour; if it is thin and looks bluifh it will not drefs nor eat well. Turbot arc ia high feafon from April to the latter end of Auguft

CO D..

CHUSE a large or fmall cod that is thick and round in the body, and feels finp the eyes bright and plump, and the gills of a lively red, and the flcfh looks white and clear when it is cur, then you are fure the fifli is good; if it feels flabby, the eyes funk, and the gills dim or muddy, it is not good nor frefli. Cod is in feafon all the winter.

WHITING.

THE filver whiting when frefh, (bines bright, and as white as filver, the eyes plump and lively, the gills of a fine red, and tight, the body ftififand firm 1

whca

14 MARRfiTlNG.

vhen dale looks dim, the eyes hrunk, and the head withered and black, the gills black, and the body limber and flabby.

HADDOCKS.

tVHEN frcfli they have a lively hue, rather inclined to black, their eyes full, bright and plump, they have a j;)lack fpot on each fide the back like the mark of a finger and thumb, their gills red and hard to open, and their bodies (lifF; when ftale the eyes are (hrunk, dnd the head withered, the gills black, the body limber, and of a flat duiky colour

SCAirE, or THORNBACK.

CHUSE the thickcft and whiteft you can get y in cold weather it will be better the fecond or third day after it is brought to market alive, but in hot weather it muft be eat frefh, it fo foon ftinks, and then it is very difagreeable, it fmells fo ftrong.



SALMON,

THE fcales of this fi(h when frefh and in high feafon, are very bright and clear, and the fins red, the flefh feels firm and of a fine red, head fmall, with very little fpawn in the infide; when out of feafon it is full of red or yellow fpots, the flefli pale and flabby, with the belly full of roe or melt, the head long, and the jaws turning at the ends, in that ftate it is not good. Salmon eats mellower when kept 'two or three days, than when it is quite frefh, for ic boils curdly when jufl dead. The Severn and the Wye falmon are cfteemed very much, but whether that or the Thames is beft is a matter of doubt, and moftly depends upon fancy.

SfURGEOK

MARKETING. 15 STURGEON.

WHEN fturgeon is frclh the meat cuts vcrf white, firm, and without crumbling, the veins and griftles of a fine blue, the ikin tender, good coloured and foft, of a fine pleafant fmell; but when the veins and griftles are brown or yellgw the fkin harfli, tough, and dry, of a ftrong difagrecable fmell, the fifb is not good.

SOLES.

WHEN you buy foles chufe them that arc the thickeft towards the htd, and firm, the bellies of a fine cream colour, and alive if you can get them; if inclined to be blui(h or flabby they are not good, nor will not eat well

TROUT.

FRESH water trout is efteemed the beft, they are red and yellow; the female is the beft, which is known by the fmallnefs of the head, and the belly deeper than the male; when fre(h they look of a fine; bright colour, their eyes plump and bright, and the gills red. The Berwick trout is long and ftraitj with fine bright fcales, the flelh firm and red; this is efteemed the fineft fifti of the kind; they both come in feafon at the beginning of June and laft till September.

CARP and TENCH.

THESE fi(h flhould always be dreft alive, for if they die in the water they are good for little; if out of the water mind the gills are frefix and redj and hard to

open.

I M A R K B T 1 N G.

open. The carp ihould be thick and plump, and the fcales of a bright hqe j the tench if good is of a gold colour; the fame rules will hold good for pike perch, and all forts of frefti water fifli except eels. The ThanDcs eel Is th bcft,' having a fine filver beUy the Dutch and the Iflr of Ely in general are not good, cat muddy and (Irong; they ihould always be dreffed alive.

IS M 1 L t S.

WHEN frelb, are of a fine filver hue, firm and ftiff, with an agreeable fmcll refcmbling that of a cucumber ) thofe caught in the river Thames are the beft.

HERRINGS.

WHEN iheir heads are of a fine red, the cale fhinc bright, and the body ft iff, they are new 5 if the head is black and the fcales dim, the body limber, they are ftale. The Britifh pickled herrings arc fat, thick, and the fcales fhine like gWifs that is broken the red herrings are red, firm and dry, and all herrings fhoukl be full of roe, for when Ihoiten they arts good for nothing; (tttti herrings are in ieafqn HC Michaelmas, and when the mackrel fir ft come in.

M A C K R E L.

THIS is a very tender fi(h, and muft be handled but very little; when frefti it looks of a moft beau tiful ftiining green, the eyes bright and full, the body firm and ft:ifF, and the grlls red and full of roe; when ftale the body looks black, fiabby and thin, the eyes fhrunk and withered, and the gills black, the fofc oe is efteemed the beft it is in feafon from April to July;

FLOUNDERS.

MAkKBtiNGi if

PLOUNDMrH and plaice.

THESE fiOi ought to be drcflcd alive; the oundercaught in the river Thames is the bed, but fome are caught in other rivers and the Tea; if dead and freffi the bellies will look of a creani colour, the eyes plump and the gills red and hard to open, the body ftifF and cleans when ftale the bellies look bluifh, the eyes fhronk and withered the gills dim and the body limber and flimy; they are in fcaloh from January till March, and from June till Seps tcmberi

RD MULLET.

THIS IS a very fine fifti, and when frcfli iSbf i fine gold colour, almoft equal to gold flfli, the eyes bright and the body ftiff; if Hdle the body looks faded and the eyes (hrunk and withered.

GRET MULLET.

When frelh the fcales are of a fine fpirkliAgj grey; the eyes full and plump, the gills red, and the ify ftifF; if Rile the fcales look dim, the eyed fiirunk the gills black, and the body limber and fiimy.

LOBSTER Si

THIS fifti will live till all the fubftande is walled i the beft method is to buy them alive,- and boil them )rourfelf but be furc to weigh them if they arc heavy and the tail ftrikes quick arid ftroftg, they ard good 5 if weak and light, with a froth at the mouthy they arc fpent When you chufe a boiled one,' put

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your finger and thumb on the body and pinch it, i( it pinches tight, and the tail goes back with a ftrong ipriflg, the Tobder heavy, and a good bright red, ic is good; if. light and loofe, and the (hell dufky, ic i;s ftale or fpent. The cock lobfter is known by the narrownefs of its tail, the two upper fins under the tail are hard and ftifF; thofe of the hen are foft, and the tail broader; the meat of the cock is firmer than the hen, but the hen is preferred on account of the fpawn.

The fame rule will hold good for crawfiOi, or a crab, only be fure, if the crab is boiled, to fmeU udcr Che tail, if fwcct it is good.



SHRIMPS and PRAfTNS.

THESE little (hell-fi(fa, when alive, are fo ckar that you mayee through them -, the prawns, when frefh boiled, are of a light red, their tails clofe and ilifF; if loofe and (limy, and fmell ftrong, they are fiale fo of (hrimps only, they look of a dufky red.

o r s r E R s.

THE Cokhefter, Pyfleet, and Milford, arc the beft barrel-oyfterS) and efteemed the fined flavour; they are fat and white, with the beards green; the native Milton is the next as the fatted, the Aells are tranfparent and thin. In chufing an oyfter take the deeped fhell, and if you hold it up to the light nnd it looks clear and clofe, bites keen to the knifc and opens as fon as the body is wounded, it is a good one.

CHEESE.

M A R ic g f 1 K a i

C It B n S E.

CHESHIRE checfc is cftecmcd the beft whcri 6i(i and a fine blue mouldy the coat of a fine fmoothnefsj; and the cheefe feels firm, withotic any holes in it$ if there are any holes be fure to try it to the bottom, to find whether there are any mitei in itj and obferve that it is white and dear where there i no blue mould, and taftes mild; if it is of a dufky. white, and taftes ftrong it is not good. North WiUfhire aod double Gloucefter cheefe fhould be as yellow ad gold, of a fine fmooth coatj and the tafte a little ftarp', the way to mke it mellow and fine is t6 put it ioto a cellar and cut a hole in the middled; and fieed it every day with mountain wine fof one month; then it will be mellow and fine; Thin Gloucefter cheefe 18 chofen by its clofenefs, and the colour incIinihg io yellow the tafte mild, aitd the cot clear' and fmooth; if it is full of eyes and pale, or Very, yellow, it is poor. The Stilton cheefe is made of creamj amd is not good till it is quite fbfc and rotten;

B U t f E Rs

WH£N you buy frefh butter be fure to put the! knite in xYit middle and tafte ie if it tKftes mild andl fweet ic is good; if you boy a cafk of fait butter faaye the caSc unhooped and try it in the middle, for very often there is good butter at both ends and bad in the middle, owing to deceitful package t the Cambridge fait butter is the beft and bften in winter better than frefh if managed properly, 5y wdrkin k up a little, and putting it rn fpriAg water for a feW houts.

i0 MARKETING.

E G G S.

TO chooTe eggs' pmperly yoi muft put the thick, end CO yaur tongue, if it feels waFoi it is new i if it fs cold it is ftale and according to the heat or cold it is new or ftale: the beft method is to bold it up againfl: the fun, or before a candle, if the yolk appears round and the white clear it is good j but if the yolk is broken, or fticks to the fide, the white thick and muddy, k is ftale. Another way to try % ro put them in cold water,the frefher it is the fooner it finks CO the boctom •, if addled or rotten it will fwim on the furface of the wacer: the Hertford(hire eggs are the largeft and beft. The bed: method to keep eggs for ufe is to bury them in fait but the fooner they are ted the better.

As the poulterers in London always trufs all kinds of poultry, it will not be amifs to give the young beginner a few inftruAions how to trufs poultry and game, as many are obliged to leave London to go with a family to their country-houfes foj: the (ummer, and may be very good cooks, but not proficient in drawing and truffing. In the firft place,, be careful that all the Hubs are picked outj: and when you draw any kind of fowls, &c. be fure you do not break the gall, as it will give the whole fowl a difagreeable bitternef3, that aU the wafiiing and wiping cannoi iremovcr

RULES

i i 3

RULES FORTRUSSINa

r U R K I B S.

AFTER they art properly picked, break the leg-bone clofe to the foot, and put it on a hook faftcned againft a wall, and draw out the firings from the thigh; cut the neck off clofe to the back, but mind and leave the crop fkin long enough to turn over to the back, take out the crop, and with your middle-finger loofen the liver and gut at the throat-end i cut oflF the vent and take out the gut, pull out the gizzard with a crooked (harp-pointed iroilj and the liver will follow, but be careful you do not break the gall, wipe the infide out clean with a wet cloth, then with a large knife cut the breadbone on each fide clofe to the back through, and draw the legs clofe to the crops, put a cloth on the breaft, and beat the high-bone down with a. rolling-pin till it lays fiat. When you trufs it for boiling cut the legs off, and put your middle-finger in the inGde and raife the (kin of the legs.and put them under the apron of the turkey, put a (kewer in the joint of the wing and the middle joint of the leg, and run it through the body and the other leg and wiftg, put the liver and gizzard in the pinions, having firft opened the gizzard and taken out the fihh and the gall of the liver, and turn the fmall end of the pinion on the back -, tie ii packthread Qver the ends of the legs to keep them in their places i for roafting leave the legs on, put a (kewer in the joint of the wing, put the legs clofe up, and put the (kewer through the middle of the leg and

C 3 body.

s

21 TRUSSING,

body, and fo at the other fide put another flcewer tii ft the fmall part of the leg; put it clofe on the out fide of the fidefman and put the flcewer through, and the fame on the other fide, pqt in the liver and gizzard in the pinion, and turn the point of the pU hion on the back, then put another (kewer through fhe body of fhe turkey clofe above the pinions.

rURKEr POULTS,

• CUT the neck from the head and body, but leave pn the neckrikia, draw therp the fame a a turkey, ut a ikewer through the joint pf the pinion, put he legs clofe up, run the ikewer through the middle of the leg, through the body, and fo on the other fide; cut the under part of the bill oS twift the ikin of the neck round, and put the head on the point of the ikewer, with the bill-end forward3; put another ikewer in the fidefman, and put the legs in between the fidefman and apron on each fide, run the ikewer through all, and cut the toe-nails off, thefe are mott commonly larded on the breai):; you may put the liver and gizzard in or not, as you pleitfe

GEESE.

WHEN they are picked and ftubbed clean, cut

the feet oflf at the joint, and the pinion oflF the firft

joint cut the neck off almoil clofe to the back, leave

the Qpn of the neck long enough to turn oyer to the

back, puU the throat our, and tie a knot at the end,

and with your middle- finger loofen the liver, &c. ac

the brcaft-end, cut it open between the vent and the

rump, draw opt all the guts, gizzard, liver and heart,

but leave in the foal, wipe it clean out with a wet

cloth, and with a rolling-pin beat the bread-bone

jltj put a ikewer into the wing, and draw tte legs ..., ....... ... .....

TRUSSING. 23

dcffe up, put the fkewer through the middle of the leg and through the body, and the fame on the other fide; put another fkewer in the fmall of the leg, put it fJown clofe to the lidefman, and run it through, and the fame on the other fide; cut the end of the vent off, and make a hole big enough for the rump to go through, as it holds the feafoning the better.

D U Q K S

ARE drawn and trufled the fame way, only leave on the feet, and turn them clofe to the legs,

FOWLS.

PICK them clean, and cut the neck off clofe to the back, take out the crop, and with your middlefinger loofen the liver and guts next the breafl, cue off the vent and draw it clean; break the breaflbone flat with a rolling-pin; if for boiling, cut off the nails of the feet, and turn them down clofe to the leg, put your finger into the infide and raife the fkin of the legs, cut a hole in the top of the fkin and pufh the legs under, put a (kewer in the firfl joint of the pinion, bring the middle of the leg clofe to it, put the fkewer through the middle of the leg and through the body, and th fame on the other fide, open the gizzard and take out the filth, take the gall oixt of the liver, put them in the pinions, and turn the point on the back; tie a itriog round over the tops of the legs to keep them in their places for roafting put a fkewer in the firft joint of the pinion, bring the middle of the leg clofe to it, put the fkewer through the middle of the leg and through the body, and the fame on the other fide; put another fkewer in the fmall of the k and through the fidefman, and the fame on the

C 4 othcf

4 TRUSSING.

pthtr fide; put another ikewer (hrough the ikin of fhe feet, 9nd cut off the nails,

CHICKENS,

• PICK and draw them the fame as fowls j and for boiling cut the nails off, give the finews a nick on each iiae the joint, put the feet in at the vent, and put the rump in, draw the (kin tight over the legs, put a fkewer in the fird joint of the pinion, bring the middle of the legs clofe, put the (kewcr through the middle of the legs and through the body, and the fame on the other fide; clean the gizzard and take out the gall in the liver put them in the pinions, and turn the points on the back; for roafting cut off the feet, put a fkewer in the (irfl: joint of the pinions, bring the middle of the leg clofe, run the fkewer through the middle of the leg and through thp body, and the fame on the other fide; put another (kewer in the fidefman, and put the legs between the apron and the fidefman, and run the fkewer through; clean the liver and gizzard, put them in the pinions, turn the points on the back, and pull the breaft-fkin over;hc ncck'cnd,

WILD F O W L of all Sorts,

PICK them' clean, xxxx. off the neck clofe to the back, and with your middle- finger loofcn the liver and gurs next the brcaft; cut the pinions off at the firft joinr, cut a flit bctweenihc vent and the rump, and draw ihcm clean j clean them, out with the long f:athcrs on the wing, cut the nails off, and turn the feet clofe to the legs,, put a Ikewer in the pinion, vith your hand pull the legs clofe to the breafl:, ana run the Ikewer through the Irgs, body, and the othcf pinion cut the vent off and put the rump through. . ' ' PIGEONS.

T R U S. S I N G. 25

PIGEONS.

PICK them and cut' the neck clofc off to the back, take out the crop, cut off the vent, and draw the guts and gizzard out, but leave the liver in (a pigeon has no gallV, for roafting cut the toes off, and cut a flit in one of the legs, and put the other through with your finger and thumb, draw the legs tight to the pinion, put a Ikcwer through the pinion, legs, and body, break the breaft flat with the handle of a knife, clean the gizzard, and put in one pinion, and turn the point on the back for a pye cut the fijet off at the joint, turn the legs, and ftick them in the fldes clofe to the pinions; the fame for ilewing or oiling.

WOQDCOCKS and SNIPES.

THESE are very tender to pick, efpecially when ftale; ybjLi mufl: handle them as little as poflible, for the heat of your hand wil.peel the flcin off, which will fpoil the beauty of the bird; when you have picked them clean cut the pinions of the flrft joint, and with a roUing-pin break the braftbone down flat, turn tke legs clofe to the thighs, and tie them together at the joints, Jut the thighs clofe to the pinions, put a (kewer into the pinion, and run it through the thighs, body, and the other pinion; ikin the head, take out the eyes, tura the head, put it on the point of the (kewer, with the bill clofc to fhebreafti nevpr draw any woodcocks, fnipes, nor plovers, wiich are trulTcd in the fame nianner.

fFHEAf

a6 TRUSSING.

JVHEAT EARS, LARKS, &c.

PICK them clean, cut o(F their heads, and the pinions off at the firft joint; with the handle of a Icnife break the bread Sat, turn the feet clofe to the legs, and put one into the other, draw out the gizzard, and run a long ikewer through the middle of the bodies of twelve, and tie them on a (pit.

PHEASANTS and PARTRIDGES.

WHEN you have picked them clean, cut a flit at the back of the neck, take out the crop, and with your middle-finger looien the liver and gut next the breafts, cut off the vent and draw them, cut the pinion off at the firfl: joint, wipe out the infide with the pinion you have cut off, (you never need pick them farther than the firft joint on the pinion) break the bread-bone flat with a rolling-pin, put a flcewer in the pinion and bring the middle of the legs cloie run the flcewer through the legs, body, and the other pinion; bring the head and put it on the end qf the ikewer, the bill fronting with the bread, put another ikewer in the fidefman, and put the legs clofe on each fide the apron, run the flcewer through alii you fliould leave the beautiful feathers on the head of the cock pheafant, and put paper over to keep the fire off, and fave the lon feathers in the tail to dick in the rump when roaded. Moor game of all forts is (ruffed the fame way.

When you trufs them to boil, put the legs the fame as a fowl trufld to boiU

H4HES

M- -.

TRUSSING. yj

H A RE S.

CUT the four legs off at the firft joints, raife the ikin of the back, and draw it off the hind-legs, leave ' the tail whole, draw it over the back, and (lip the fore legs out; with a knife cut the ikin off the neck and head, but mind to leave the ears on and (kin them, take out the liver, lights, &c. and be fure to take the gut out of the vent, cut the (inews underneath the hind-legs, bring them up to the fore-legs, put a fkewer through the hind- leg, then through the fore- leg under the joint, run it through the body,' and the fame on the other fide % put another fkewer through the thick parts of the hind-lgs and body, put the head between the (boulders, and run a fkewer through to keep it up, and one in each ear to make them ftand up; tie a ftring round the middle ot the body over the legs, and that will keep them in their place,

N. B., A young fawn is truffed the fame wayj only the ears are cut off.

RABBITS,

CASE the rabbits the fame as the hares, only cut the ears off clofe to the head, cut the vent open, and flit the legs about an inch upon each fide the rump $ make the hind-legs lay flat, and bring the ends to che fore-legs; put a fkewer in the hind-leg, then in the fore-leg, and through the body, (the fore- leg and the hind-leg if for boiling) bring the head round, and put it on the fkewer if for roalting; leave the head loofe, and put a fkewer through the thick part of ihe hind-legs and body; if you want to roaft two together, truS them at full length, with fix'fkewers run through them both, fo as the fpic rill faften between the rabbits,

? H A P,

28 J

C H A p. IL

O U P S

Proper Rules to be ohferoed in making Soups ani

Broths.

IN the firft place, take great care that your fouppots and covers are kept very clean infide and out and well tinned, otherwife the verdigreafe will gee in them which is the mbfl: pernicious thing of any to the health of thole who eat the different ibups and broths you make, and give the foups, &c. a brackifli, difagfeeable flavour. When you proceed to make any brown foups, fuch as Gravie Vermiceli, or De Santea, always put a little lean ham or bacon at the bottom of you foup-pot or ftew-pan, and cut your meat fmall, as you fooner get the virtue of tl)e meat out, with a little water at the bottom; cut your roots and herbs as directed in the different re ceipts (be careful always to have them well picked and wafhed clean before you ufe them put them over the meat, with the fpicesj cover your pot very clofe, and dew it gently over a flow fire, till you find all the juices of the meat and herbs are drawn out; which will make your foup have a finer flavour, than by purlsing a contrary condud; always be fure to flcim all the fat and fcum clean ofiP; foft water is much the beft for all kinds of foups and broths, except green peas foup, and then hard water helps the green colour of your foup. In all white foups ncypr put any ft in of any kind gnd be furc

to

s o p: 19

to boil your milk or cream before you put it into your foup and put it in the iaft thing; boiling prevents it from curdling, which is often the cafe when put in raw. Gravy and all brown foups, by ftanding, will have a (kirn on, which you muft take o(F, and peas foop will fettle to the bottom; be fure to ftir it well up before you put it into your di(h or tureen; let all your ingredients be properly proportioned, that they may not tafte of one thing more than another; let the tafte be equal, and the whole of an agreeable relifli.

Laftly, for all brown or white foups cut the cruft of a French roll in round or fquare pieces, about two inches over, and crifp them before the fire; and for peas foup, toaft the bread and cut it in dice, put it before the fire to crifp, as frying bread in butter or fat makes it greafy, and often gives the foup a naudous tafte,

S.f . la Rchr.

TAKE a pound of lean ham, and cut it ver fmall, and put it at the bottom of your foup-pot, cut the lean of a knuckle of veal in fmall pieces and put over the ham a large fowl cut in quarters, put over the veal a little mace, (i onions, fix heads of cellery, two turncps, four leeks, a fmall • bundle of fweet herbs, all well waflied; then put in half a pint of water, and cover it clofe, and fweat it gently for half an hour over a flow fire (but take care ic does not catch at the bottom); then pour .boilingwater over it till it is above covered, and when the fcum rifes Ikim it off clean, feafon it with fait, and fiew it gently for two hours; then ftrain it off into an earthen pan, and let it ftand half an hour to fettle then flcim all the fcum off and pour it from the fetf tling at the botioin i in the mean time, take half a

pound

20 SOU P S;

pound of fweet almonds, blanch them and take the ikins off, and throw them into cold water, then puc them into a mortar and beat them fine, adding a little creacn as you beat them, to keep them from oiling, pick all the white meat from the fowl and put in the mortar, and the yolks of eight hard eggs, and beat them well together;- take the crumb of two penny French rolls, and put a quart of the foup to them, and fimmer them over the fire for two minutes; put them in the mortar, and mix them well together with the reft of the foup, and rub it through a tammy or napkin put it in your foup-pot again and boil it up, as the froth rifes fkim it off; then put in a pint of boiled cream, ftir it well up, then pour it into your tureen with criip French bread at the top.

Mock Turtle Soup.

TAKE a calves head with the (kin on, and fcald it in the following manner: Put it in fome cold water, beat fome rofin fine, and rub all over it i then put it into fcalding water, and keep turning it about till you find the hair will (lip ofTi then take it out, and as quick as you can clean off all the hair, and waih it well after, put it into a pot aiKl boil k half an hour; then take off all the ikin cloLe to the bone, and cut the tongue out and peel it, take and break the, bones all to pieces and put them into a foup-pot with a ihin of beef cut to pieces,with two gallons of water when it boils fkim it well, and put inf fome all-fpice, fix onions, a carrot, two turneps, four leeks, fix heads of cellery, walbed well and a bundle of fwcct herbs; fl:ew it gently for four hours,, then ftrain it into a pan: in the mean time cut your Ikin into fquare pieces, about an inch and a half Qver and flit the tongue down the middle, and then

SOUPS. 31

cut it acrofs about one inch long, put them into a foup pot with the foup, chop twelve fhallots fine, tic up a large bundle of bafil, marjorum, winter I'avory and thyme, twelve cloves, fix blades of mace, twelve corns of all-fpice beat very fine, put all tbefe in and ftcw it till tender J mix a bottle of Madeira wme with four large fpoonfuls of flour veryfnoooth and put in, but be fure to ftir it wjell about; feafon ic high with Cay an pepper and fait, take out the fwcrec herbs, and fqueeze the liquor out between two places into the foup, and lew it half an hour; then put in two dozen of forcemeat balls and two dozen egg balls, and fqueeze in two )enM)ns; boil it up for cwa or three minutes, then ferve ic in tureens.

GibleU a la turtle

TAKE three pair of goofe giblets, fcald and pick them clean, cut the neck in three, fplit the head ia two, cut the pinions in three, the feet in two, and the gizzard in eight pieces, wafh them veiy clean,, put them in four quarts of water,, thrqs pounds of lean veal cut in' fmall pieces; when the fcum xi fkim it well, then put in fix onions, two turneps,, four heads of cellery, a large bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace and all-fpice, and a little falt ftew them till near tender, (train the foup fron? them,, and wafh the giblets out clean from the other ingre- dients in warm water; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan and melt it, put in three fpoonfuls of fiour, llir it till it is fmooth, fkim and pour the foup from the fettlings, and by degrees put it into the ftew-pan, ftir it till it is fmooth, put in a pint of Madeira, and feafon it with Cayan pep per and fait; boil ic for half an hour, then put ia the giblets, with half a dozen yolks of hard eggs,,.. ikioi it well and boil ic up till the giblets are tender

boa

32 S O U P S.

boil the livers in a quart of water till tender and put in; then put them into a foup-dKh or tureen as hoc as poQible.

GiMet Soup,

TAKE three pair of goofe giblets, fcald and cut them as before, put them on in three quarts of water, and when the fcum rifes (kim them well, and ptit in a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace and all-fpice tied in a bag, with fome pepper and fait, ftew them gently till near tender; mix a quarter of a pound of butter with flour and put in, with half a pint of white wine, a little Cayan pepper, ftew them till thick and fmpoth, take out the herbs and fpices, ikim it well, boil the livers in a quart of water till tender and put in then put them in a fbup-diih or tureen.

Soup Puree.

TAKE four pounds of lean beef and one pound of pickled pork cut fmall, put it into a pot with a gallon of water, and when it boils fkim it well, then put in a quart of blue fplit peas, four onions, fix heads of cellery, a carrot, tvyo turneps, and four leeks cut fmal, with a fpoonful of driecl mint a little pepper and fait; boil it gently for two hours, (mind and Itir it very often to keep the peas from fiicking to the bottom) then rub it through a fieve, and then through a tammy or napkin, put it inta the pot again and give it a boil up, take two turneps cut in dice, four leeks cut I'mall four heads of cellery cut fmall, wa(h them well, and boil them ia two quarts of water till tender j ftrain them off and put them in your foup, andjuft before you fend tt away put in half a pint of fpinacb juice give it a gentle

boil.

S U I g; JJ

M and keej) fttrring it all the ticne or Afe it will tardlc; put it hot into your ttirecii) with crifpt bread in a plate,

N. B. Mind your foup h well feafoned with pep ()fer and fait.

Soup CreJJee.

t AKE a i)Ound of lean ham and cut tt vferj Imal), put it at the bottom of a ftew-pan, then cuf two penny French rolls in thin flices and tit over the ham, cw6 dozdn heads of cellery, fix onions, twd turnepsy toxxx leekS, and on carroty well wafhed and tut fniall, a fmall bundle of fweet herbs aild a handful of watfcr-crefies, fix cloVfcs and fix blades of tnace, all oVer the bread; put a pint of broth made jis follows, take three pounds of lean veal and one of mutton, cut very fmall, put into a ftewpan, with two ohiohs, four heads of cdlery a carrot, four leeks, put half a pint of water in ahd fWeat it gently for half an hour; then put in a gallon of boiling water, nd when k boils fkim it well; boil it gently for two hours, and then ftratd it oflF theii fweat the ibove ingredients half an hour, pour all the broth In, and ftew it gentfy for foiir hburs, then rub ic through a tamitiy or napkin, put it into the ftew-paii again, and boil it up gently for a few minutes; feafon it with fait and Cayan P£Ppr to your pakte, boii two handfuls 6f water-crefles in virater till tender lxur the foup into a tuten, and put two pieces of crifpt French roll on it, ahd the water-crefles otrt that

t Qr$m

34 SOUPS.

: Green Peas Soup.

TAKE half a pound of lean ham cut fmall, and pOt ic at the bottom of a fouppot, a knuckle of veal cut in pieces over it, put in halF a pint of water fix heads of cellery, fix or eight onionsj four turneps and a carrot four cloves and two blades of niace, fweat it over a gentle fire for half an hour, in the . mean time boil two quarts of old green peaa well, and (train the liquor into ypur pot, and when it boils (kirn it well; boil it gently till it is good, ftrain ic off into a pan, beat the peas well in a mortar, and mix the foup with them, and rub ic through a tammy or napkin; if you have no mortar, you may rub the peas through a fieve with the back of a fpoon, and mix with your foup, put it into your pot again, pare two or three cucumbers, cut them down the middle, take out the pulp, and cut them an inch long, four cabbage lettuces cut acrofs, boil them till tender, and a pint of young peas boiled green, put them into your foup and boil it up for five minutes j feafon it with pepper and fait to your palate: if you find your foup not thick enough, take the crumb of a French roll, put a little ioup to it, and fimmer it, then rub it as the peas and put it in, ftir it well about, and two or three minutes before you fend it away put in half a pint of ipinach juice, and keep it fiiirring till it boils up, juft to take the rawnefs of the fpinach off-, thca put it in tureens, and fend crifpt bread in a plate.

N. B. You may (lew a little fpinach and Iqueezo it dry, chop it a little and put it in with the peas,&c.

Another

SOUPS. ' 35

Anatber Green Peas Sdup.

i AKE a gallon of fpring water and rinak it boil, then put in two quarts of old green peas, and boil them till tender, drain them off and fave the liquor and put it in the pot again, with fix or eight large pnions, fix turneps two carrots, fix heads of cellery, and if you have them fix cabbage lettucesi a little fpinach, all well wafhed, a little cloves and mace; boil them till all are tender, beat your old peas well in a mortar and mix with the foup, and rub it all well through a tammy or napkin; put it in your poc again, feafon it with pepper and fait to your palate then treat it as in the above receipt.

White Peas Soup.

TAKE four pounds of lean'veal and half a pound of lean ham, and put it into fix quarts of .foft water and as foon as the fcum rifes fkim it well, then put three quarts of old green peas, fix onions, two heads of cellery, a carrot, two turneps, a little thyme, and a blade of mace -, boil it well for three hours, then tub it well through a fieve till all the pulp is out xf the peas, and then through a tammy or napkin; put it into your pot again, take two cucumbers and pare them cut them through and tak the pulp out, cut two cabbage lettuces acrofs and boil them till tender, with a pint of green peas boiled green, put all tliefe in and ftew them for fifteen minuets feafon it with ialr mix three yolks of eggs in a pint of cream put it in and ftir it wll about till it boils; then put it into your tureen, with two or three pieces of French

bread criipt at the top

- .

06 SOUPS.

Peas Soup for Winter.

TAKE a ponnd of bacon or pickled pork and z in of beef cue fmall, put them into a pot with fit quarts of water (when the fcum rifes fkim it well) then put a quart of white fplit peas in, fix heads of cellery, fix large onions, four leeks, two turneps and a fpoonful of dried mint rubbed fine; boil it gently for three hoursj and ftir k about every quarter of an hour to keep the peag from fticking to the bottom; then rub it through a fieve and rub the pulp of the peas well through, put it into your pot again eafon it.withipepper and fait, cut two curneps into dice, four heads of cellery, and four leeks Cut fmall, boil them in two quarts of water till tender, drain them in a fieve, put (hem in, fry twelve fmall ralhers of bacon and put in, and boil it up five minutes; then put it into your tureens, and fend crifpt bread in a plate. You may make peas foup in this maii- ncr: When you • boil a leg of pork or a piece of beef fave the liquor till next day, then take oflT the fat when the liquor is cold, then put it in a pot and Inake, it boil, with the bones of the meat and two

quarts of fplit peas then treat it as above direfted.

•

Common Peas Soup.

TAKE three or four rump beef bones with t pound of bacon, put them into a gallon of foft water, and when the fcum rifes fkim it well, put in a quart of fplit peas, four onions, three heads of cellery, two leeks and two turneps cut fmall, a fpQonfgl of driied mint, a little pepper and falts filew it two hours, then rub it through a fieve, put it into your pot again, with four heads of cellcry cut fmaU W(tboiled then boil it op ten minutes, and fend it

10

SOUPS. 37

in a tureen or foup-difh with a handful of crilpc bread in t. .

A Spariijh Peas Soup.

GET a pound of Spanilh peas and put them in water the night before you ufe them, then cake three quarts of fct water and one of fweet oil, make thembotl, then put in your peas wich a head of garlick, cover your pot ctofe, and'fiew it gently till 'the peas are foft, feadfion it with peppeiand fait, beat the yolk of an egg in a little vinegar and put in; ftir it weli. fry ibme large fippets in butter and put them at the bottom of a foup-diih, poach fix eggs and lay on the fippet5 then pour the foup boiling hot over.

Soup Lor rain.

TAKE half a pound of lean ham cut (mail and put it at the bottom of a foup-pot, and two pounds of lean veal cut fmail over the ham, and a large fowlput in wholci with four onions, four heads of cdlery, two turneps, one carrot, a bundle of fwcec herbs,four clovea, two blades of mace, put in half a pint of water, (pt it over a flow fire, and fweat ic well, but take care it does not (tick or burn; then pour four quarts of boiling water, and when it boils fkim it well i boil it for one hour, then take out the fowl and boil it one hour longer; then ftrain it off and let it fettle,, ikim it well and pour it off the fettling: in the mean time take a pound of almonds, blanch them, and beat them in a mortar, put in a little water to keep them from oiling, talce the yolk of fix hard eggs and the white part of the 'fowl, beat them fine with the almonds, mix fome of theAoup withjt, and rub it through aammy or napkin; put it into your pot again with moll of the reft of the

P 3 foup.

38 SOUPS,

foup, boil Mt gently for ten minutes, iktm off all the froth as it rifes, and feafon ic with fait.; take the white par; of another fowl and mince it, put ic in a ftew-pan, with a little of the foup, a little pepper and fait, and grate a little nutmeg in it, mix a little flour and butter to thicken it, give it a tofs or two in the pan, then take a penny French roll and cut a piece out of the top, pick out ail the crumb, pm the mince in, and put the tppon; pour your foup boiling hot into your turetfii, and put the itoll withthe mince in the middle, 'qtid four pieces of crifpt f rnch bread round it.

•

jilmcnd-Soup

TAKE three pounds of lean veal and two pounds of fcrag of mutton, cut them fmall and put them into a foup-pot with four quarts of water •, when the fcum rifes (kirn it weH, and put in two turneps two heads of cellery, two leeks, all wafhed well and cur fmdl, and two blades of mace; boll it' gently till half is reduced, feafon it with fait and a little Cayan pepper, blanch half a pound of fweet almpnds, beat them in a mortar, and as you beat them pm in half a pint of cream, to keep them from oiling, ftrain your foup to the almpnds, and rub it through a fine iieve; put it in your pot again and miike it hot, but do not let it boil; have ready three fmall French rolls about as big as a tea-cup, blanch a few Jordon almonds, cut them lengthways, and (lick theoi all over the tops and fides of the rolls; put the rolls into your tureen, and pour your loop over them:• thefe rolls look like hedge-hogs, and the French CQok terrrx 5r Kdgc hog foup.

SOUPS. 39

Soup dc Santea.,

TAKE fix rafhers of lean ham and put them oh the bottom of a dew-pan, then three pounds of lean veal cut fmall over the ham, and three pounds of lean beef over that, fix onions, four heads of celleryi two leeks, a carrot, two turneps, all waflied well and cut fmall, a bundle of fwect herbs, twelve corns of all-fpice, four cloves, and four blades of mace, put in half a pint of water, put it ovr a Qow fire till it fticks, (but mirid it does not (lick too much) then put in a gallon of boiling water, and when it boils flcim it well, feafon it with fait,' and ftcw it gently for two hours; then drain it oflF "into a clean pan and let it fettle then fkim all the fat off and pour it off the fettlings into, a fotip-pot; have ready d large carrot, one turncp, four heads of cellery, two leeks cut about two inches long, and as fine as yoii can cut them lengthways, two heads of endive, to cabbage lettuces cut acrofs fmall, with a little forrel and chervil chopped fine; wafh them all well, and put them into a itew-pan with half a pint of foiip, and ftew them gently fifteen minutes; tnen put theni into the foup, and boil it fifteen minutes longer then pot it into your tureen, iflvith crifpt French bread at the top,

w

Gravy Soup. .

TAKE afhin of beef and cut it in pieces, and put it in a foup-pot, with half a pint of water, fix onions, foUr heads of cellery, two turneps, a carrot, and twelve corns of all-fpice; fweat it till it flicks then pour four quarts of boiling water over it, and when it boils fkim it well; ftew it gently for three bourS) or till tt liquor is half wafted, feafon it with

D 4 iait,

( J

49 $ O U P $?

fait, then ftrain it ofF into a cleas pan and flcim tha fac offi have ready a carrot and two turneps cut in dice9 with two heads oif cellery cut about half an )nch long, boil them in water (ill tender, then drain fhem in.a fieve, put them into your foqp, and boi( it ten minutes put it into your tureen wtthcrifpt Iench bread in ic.

N. B. If it is not brown enough put a fpoQpfpl pf rowping in it.

Vermicelli Soup.

TAKE a pound of lean ham cut fmall, ind put It at the bottom of a foup-pot, cut a fmall knuckle of veal in pieces, and two pounds of fcrag pf miit-r ton, and put them over the ham, four onions two furncps, a carrpr, foqr leeks, four heads qf cejlery well waihed and cut fmall, fix cloves, four blades of inace, and a bundle of feet herbs, with half a pin( pf water, all put ip the pqt and (seated gently for half an hour, then pourfopV quarts pf boiling wate pver it, when it boils )cifp ic well, andboil it gentiv for three hours, then drain it into a clean pan, Ikitn pfF all the fat, and pour it into a Ibup-pot from the fettling; boil a quarter of a pound of yerniicelli jrj water, ftrain it in a fieve, put it into yopr foup, anc) with two fpoonfuls of browning boil it for ten minutes; put fome Grifpt French bread into the tufeen, and pour;he foup over it;

Macaroni Soup.

MAKE the foyp as for vermicelli, and bftil s quarter oF a ppund of fmall pipe macaroni in tvq quart$ of ater and twp ounces of gutter till i; is fender, then ftrain it in a fieve. and cut it about twq jqcies long, put it in yoifr foup and (!K)il it ten

SOUPS, 41

minuces; pu( U into your turiren aq crifpt FfCficIi )read at (ijlc top

Soup and Boulie

TAKE two pounds of a ferae of veal, and about fix pQpnds of the bri(ket of beeii tie theoi tight with p9ckthread put them in a po( with fix quarts of water, and when the fcum rifes ijcim it wellj then put in Gx onions four keks fix heads of cellery, a carrot, and (wo turnep$, well walhed, a bundle ti fwcet herbsj a little alUfpicCt cloves, and mace; bQ4 it gently for five hours, nd feafon it with fait; then take out the briket and tap the bone out, keep it hoc, ftrain ypur foup into $ pan to fettle, (kim off 11 the fat an() pour it froip the fettlings into a foup pot, put in twQ fpqonfuls of browning, cut a carrotji two turneps, twp leeks, and four heads of cellery. in long llips and boil them in your foup till tender fben put the brifket into a tqreen or foup-dilh, and pour jhf foup oyer it, with crifpt bred jn 4 plate.

Soup and Boule with Cabbage.

TAKE fix pounds of brilket of beef, tie it up with fwp pounds of fcrag of veal, put them into a pot with fix quarts of water, and when the fcum rifes jkio) it well, and boil it gently for two hours •, cut two carrots in quarters, four turneps in quarters, two leeks fpit in two, and four heads of cellery, cut one )arge or two fmall cabbages in quarters and acrofs fbout an inch long, wafii them all well, put them in with a bundle of fweet herbs, fome aHfpice, cloves and mace tied in a bag, feafon it with fait, and boil it gently for three hours longer; fkim the fat off well stnd take the brilket out, untie it and put it in a di(h by itfelf and garniih it with carrot y take out the

veal.

4t SOUPS.

veal fpfccs, and herbs and put the Ibup and the ingredients into a tureen, with crifpt bread in i plate,

A WeftIndia Pepper Pot.

TAKE two pounds of lean veal, the fame of rnutton, cut them fmall, with a pound of lean ham, put them in a ftew-pan, and about four pounds of brilket of beef cut in fquare pieces, with fix onions, two carrots, four heads of ccUery, four leeks, two turneps, well walhed, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome ail-fpice, cloves, and mace, and half a pint of wai Itr; fvveat them well for half an hour, then pour four quarts of boiling water into it, and flcim it well boil it gently for three hours, then ftrain it off, take Ofut the pieces of beef; then put a quarter of a pound of butter in the ftew-pan and melt it, put two fpoonfuls of flour, and ftir it about till itis fmooth; then by degrees pour your foup in, and ftir it about to keep it from lumping, put the pieces of beef in; have ready two large carrots cut in quarters, and four turneps in quarters, boiled till tender, take the fpawn of a large lobfter and bruife it fine, and put it in to colour it, with a dozen heads of greens boiled tender; make fome flour and water into a pafte, and make it in balls as big as a walnut, boil them well in water, and put them in, boil it up gently for fifteen minutes, and feafon it very hoc with Cayan pepper and fait; put it in a foup-diflx nd fend it up hot, garniflicd with fprigs of cauli flovers round tSic difli, or carrots, or any thing eIfJ you fancy.

'Her

SOUPS, 4f

Hare Soupi

Take a large old bare and qut ic io pieces put it in an earthen mug, with three or four. blades oC mace, a litcle fait and Cyan pepper two large onions, a red herring, fix large morels, a pint of red wine, and three quarts of water; tie it down with brown paper, bake it three hours in a quick oveo, then fxrain it into a pan and let it fettle; pour it from the fetclings into a ftew-pan, fcald the liver for two or three minutes, and rub it through a (leve with a fpoon jind put it iq; have ready a quarter of a pound of French barley, boiled well in water and ' put in, put it over the Ere to make hot, (but take care ic does not boil) theu pour it into a foupdifii or tureen; with crifpt French,bread at the top. This is eftcemed as a very rich foup, and fit . for a large company, where two or three foups are ferved up.

N. B. If you difapprove of the red herring you may leave it out.

• Partridge Soup.

TAKE two old partridges and (kin them, cut them into quarters, with thee or four dices of ham, fix onions fliced, and four heads of cellery; fry them brown in butter, but do not burn them, pour three quarts of boiling wafer over them, with a few pepper corns, and ftew it gently for two hours; take out the partridges and ftrain the foup off, put ic into the ftew-pan again, and have ready fix heads of cellery cut about fix inches long, and ftew them in a little of the foup, two ounces of whole rice boiled well iri water, put them into the foup feafon it with falc and Cayan pepper, and put in the parcridges; give it a boil for five minutes, then put it into the tureen, with 4 handfl of crifpt brad.

Onion

44- S O U F S.

Onion Soup.

TAKE a pound of lean ham cut fmallj put it at the bottom of a ftew-pao, three pounds of lean beef and two pounds of lean veal, cue fmall and put over the ham. fix onions four heads of cellery, four leeks, two turneps, and one carrot, well waflied and cut finall, put them over the meat, with a bundle of fweet herbs and a dozen corns of all-fpice, put in half a pint of water, and fweat it for half an hour over a flow 6re, ('take care it does not burn) then pour four quarts of boiling water over it, (kirn it well and feafon it with fait; boil it gently for three hours, then drain it off into a clean pan to ietile, ikim the fat od; and pour it from the Settlings into a Ibup-pot peel four dozen of fmall button onions and put them in the foup, and boil it gently half an bour; put it into a tpreen with grilpt French bread atxbe top.

Another Onion Soup.

TAKE half a pound of butter and put it into a fieW'pan, melt it, cut twelve large onions in fliccs and try them brown, put in fome flour, and (hake them about; fry them a little longer, then pour in three pints of boiling water, ftir them round, put the upper cruft of a penny loaf cut in fmall pieces in, feafoned with pepper and fait, and ftew it fifteen minutes, keep ftirring it pretty often-, have ready the yolks of three eggs beat fine, with half a fpoonful of vinegar, mix in fome of the foup well with them, then mix all (he foup together and pour it m a tureen;

miff

w

p

White Onion Soup

TAKE % knuckle of veal cue fmallj put k in • pot with five quarts of water, and when the Icum riles (kirn it well peel thirty large onions, boil cheiri with it till they aretender, with a little whole pepper and two blades of mace; feafon it with fait, then rub your onions thfough a fleve till all the; pulp is out J put thiTi into a ftewpan with half a pound of butter (hake in a little flour and half a pint of cream, ftir thenri well about till the butter is melted then (train the foup in, and keep ftirring till it is ready to boil then pour it into a foupdiQi oif tureen;

Spanijh Onion oup4

BOIL eight or ten large Spanilh onions in milk and water till they are tender, change the milk and water twice while the onions are boiling, rub them through a fieve till the pulp is all through; take an old towl and cut it to pieces, and ftew it in three quarts of water with a blade of mace for two hours then ftrain it to the onions in a ftew-pan ftir it well toge ther, and feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait % put in half a pint of boiled cream, and boil it up gently a few minutes $ then put it into the foupdi(h or tureen. You may, if you pleafe, put in a liQtlc ftewed fpinach, or afparagus tops boiled.

Another Spanijh Onion Soup.

TAKE two large Spanifh onions, peel and flice thetD, ftew them gently in half a pint of fweet oil till tender, then pour in three pints of boiling water and ftew it gently for half an hour feafgn it with

pepper

46 SOUPS.

pepper and falc a little beaten cloves and mace put in two fpoonfuls of vinegar and a handful of parfley chopped fine; fry about a dozen fippets and put f hem at the bottom, of the fouprdifli, poach fix eggs and put over the fippets, and pour the foup over ineoiy and lend it to the table hot.

Cbefnut Soup.

TAKE half a hbndred of chefnuts and notch them, put them in an earthen pan, and put them in a hot oven for half an hour, or rQaft them over a bow fire in an iron pan, (but mind they do not burn) peel them, and.ilew them pnehour in a quart of veal or beef broth: in the mean time take three or four ralhers of lean ham or bacon and put them at the bottom of a ftew-pan, one pound of veal, one pound of lean beef, a pigeon cut into pieces, two onions ' fiuck with cloves, and two blades of mac a bundle pf fweet herbs over the ham, with. half a pint of ater; fwet it gently till it flicks, but mud not burn, pour in two quarts of boiling water, and fkim It well, (luff two pigeons with force-meat, and dew them in the foup till .tender; then take the. pigeons out, and ftrain the foup to the chefnuts, feafon it with pepper and fait to your palate, and boil it up for five minutes; put the .pigeons into a foup-di(b, the chclhuts round them, and pour thp foup boiling ot oyer them, and two or three pieces of crifpt French bred at the top; garnifh . the. edge of .the difli with fome of the chefnuts fplit in two.

N. B. If you have a partridge you may ufe it inftead of the pigeon, cut to pieces.

RUf

S O U P $• 47

, Rice Soup.

TAKE a pound of lean ham cut fmall two pounds of lean vcal two pounds of lean beef, cut Imall and put over the ham, fix onions, four heads of cellery, two leeks, two turneps, a carrot, waded well and cut fmall, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little cloves and mace, with half a pint of water over the mejit 5 fweat it gently over a flow fire for half aa hour, (but take care it does not burn) pour three quarts of boiling water over it and ikim it well ilew it gently for two hours, then drain it into a pan: in the mean time boil a quarter of a pound of rice in two quarts of water till tender, ftrain ic through a fieve, put the rice and foup in a pot, 4nd boil it for ten minutes -, feafon it with fait, and pour it hoc into a tureen, with crifpt French bread at the top.

, N. B. If you like it brown put a fpoonful of browning in.

Another Rice Soup

TAKE half a pound of rice and put it into twa quarts of water, with a ftick of cinnamon, cover it cbfe, and ftew it gently till the rice is tender; take out the cinnamon, fweeten it to your liking, grate in a nutmeg, and let it (land till it is cold; beat up the yolks of three eggs with half a pint of white wine, (lir it all together, put it over a flow fire, and keep (lirring it all the time, till it is thick and boils, otherwifc it will burn and curdle, then put it into a foup-diflu

On

4 S 6 V t

Ox cheek Soup.

t AKE half an ox headland cut the cdcek dean ffotil the bones, break the bones to pieces, and put them iii Si large pan of ater alt night to foak out the blbod i in the morning walh them cleah out, and f'ut them intd a pot with fix quarts of water, wheh the Iciim rlfe ik'rni it well; take x onions, fix heads of dllerJTj about four leeks, and two turneps, well waQied ana cut in two, with a bundle of (wect herbs, a fpoonful of all-fpice, fbme cloves and mace, and a little fait; put in two palates, and ftew them till tender, then take them out and throw them into cold water, and take otf the flcins; cut them into fquare pieces, ftcW the head five hours, tfy if the head is tender, if not ftew it gently till it is; then take it out, and (train the Ibup into a pan to fettle, flcim it well, and pour it from the fettlings; put a quarter of a pound of buner in a ftew.pan and melt it, put two large fpoonfuls of flour in, and ftir it about till it i& ooth I by degrees put the foup in, keep ftirring for fear it fiiould go into Impi, if it does you mult ftrain it through a fieve, put in half a pint of whitii wine and feaion it with Cayan pepper and common pepper and fait, nearly as hot as mock turtle; in th mean time cut a carrot and two turneps in dice, four heads of cellery and two leeks about half an inch long, boiled in water till tender, (train them in i fieve, and put them to the foup; cut the cheek id fquare pieces and put it in with the palates, and two fpoonsful of browning, fiiew it gently for half ail hour, and (kim the fat off clean i put it into a foup diih.or tureen with crifpt bread in a plate

N.B. You may put the cheek whole in a largt foup-difiiy if you like it beft, and the foup over it

1

SOUPS. 49

4

Ox Cheek Soup Baked,

TAKE half an ox head and cut the cheek clah from the bones, break the bones and lay them in a large pan of water all day to foak the blood out; then wa(h them cleanj and put them in an earthen pao, and cover them with water, arid put a fpoonful of all-fpici fodr onions, a carrot, two turneps, four heads of cellery two leeks well wa(hed, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome pepper and fait, two or three bay leaves, and a pint of mild ale or beer, not porter, tie it over with ftrong paper, put it in the oven after dinner, and let it (lay in all night; in the morning take it out, and if it is not tender enough, after you heat the oven put it in again till you think it is done; then take the cheek out of the foup, and ftrain it through a fieve to fettle, Ikim off all the fat, and pour it from the fettlings into a pan, and put the cheek to keep hot (if it wants any feafoning put fome in) put the cheek in a foup-dilh, and pour the foup over it, with a handful of toafted bread. A leg of beef done in the fame manner is very good.

Hotch-potch.

TAKE a pound of lean ham cut it fmal), and put it at the bottom of a (t:ew-pan, two pounds of lean veal, two pounds of lean beef, over the ham, fix onions, four beads of cellery, two leeks, two turneps, si carrot, waOied well and cut fmall, a bundle of fwfcet herbs, twelve corns of all-fpicc, fix cloves, and three blades of mace, with half a pint of water over the meat; put it over a flow fire, and fweat it till ajl the juices are out of the meat and herbs, then pour four quarts of boiling water over it,

E dnd

I

o SOUPS.

and fkim it well, feafon it with fait, dew it gently for two hours, ftrin it into an earthen pan; put about two ounces of butter into a ftew-pan and melc it, and a fpoonful of flour, ftir it wcU till it is fmooth, then by degrees put the foup in, and (lir ic well; take a large fowl and trufs ic for boiling, (inge it and put it in, cut a favoy or white cabbage in quarters, and tie it with packthread, a large carrot cut in fix pieces, fix middle-fized tgrneps whole, fix heads of the white part of cellery, and boil two ounces of rice in water half an hour and put in, flew it all gently till the fowl and herbs are tender; have ready two pounds of pickled pork boiled tender, cut it into fquare pieces and put in, put in a little Cay an pepper to your palate; take the fowl out and put it in the middle of a foupdifh, the pork all round, untie the cabbage, put that and the roots all round and over the meat, and the foup over that.

N. B. When green peas are in feafon put a pint of them inllead of the rice. Garnilh with fprigs of cauliflowers boiled.

Another Hotch-Potcb.

TAKE two pounds of brisket of beef, two or three pounds of the brisket of a bread of veal, cut in fquare pieces, two tail-ends of rumps of beef cut in pieces about two inches long, put them into a flejv-pan, cut a favoy or white cabbage in quarters, tie it up with packthread, two carrots cut in quarters, four white heads of ccJlery, fix middle-fized turneps whole, fix round onions, all well wafhed, a bundle of fwcct herbs, a little all-fpice, cloves, and mace xied in a bag, with half a pint of water; fweat it gently over a flow fire for half an hour, (take care it does not burn) then pour four quarts of boiling water on it and flcim it well, put in a quarter of a

pound

SOUPS. 51

pound of butter rolled in flour, and (lew it three nours, feafon it with pepper and falc (if green peas are in feafon put a pine in); have ready a pound of pickkd pork boiled tender and cut in fquare pieces, put it in; take out the cabbage a$ whole as you can and untie it, and the fweet herbs and fpice, put the neat into a foup-di(h, and the cabbage, roots, and foup all over, wi(h crifpt bread in a plate; garnifli vith carrot or cauliflower fprigs.

Breaji of fal in Hotcb-Potcb.

TAKE the brisket eiui of a bread of veal, and fut it ifl little fquare pieces, flour it, and put half a pound of butter in a (lew-pan, when it is hot put in ht veal, and fry tt of a light brown then put in two quarts of boiling water, ftir it round, (if peas are in feafon put in z, pint of green peas) four cabbage lettuces cut in quarters and well waQied, two onions chopped fine, a bundle of fweet herbs, a litde cloves, mace, and all-ipice tied in a rag, a little pepper and fait, cover it clofe and flew it till the veal is tender, and feafon it to your palate; take out the fpice and fweet herbs and put it in a foup dilh; garnih with fprigs of cauliflowers or fmall heads of greens; if cauliflowers are in feg(bn, boil a imzW one tender, and put it in the middle of the di(h, and the meat round it will make it look hand lome; or if peas are not in leafon, and cucumbers are, pare fix cucumbers, take out the core, and cut them in thin (lices inftead of the peas. In winter cue a carrot in foiaU pieces, two turneps in dice, four beads of the white part of cellery cut about two Riches long, with the heart3 of four fmall favoy cabbages, or fix beads of greens.

E 2 Hotcb

52 SOUPS.

Hotch-potch of Mutton.

TAKE a neck of mutton of about fix pounds and cut it into chops leave the fcrag end whole, put ic into a flew-pan with half a pint of water, put in fix round onions and fix middle-fized turneps whole, a carrot cut in quarters, a favoy or white cabbage cut in quarters and tied up with packthread, all well Walhed, with a little thyme; fweat it gently for half an hpur over a flow fire, then pour three quarts of boiling water over it, feafon it with fait and pepper, and Ikim it well; ftew it for two hours, and put in a Ipoonful of browning, flcim off all the fat, put the chaps into a foup-diflh, leave out the fcrag, untie the cabbage, put over with the foup, &c. Garnifli with toafted fippets. You may add two ounces of Scotch barley if you like it.

Mutton Broth.

TAKE a neck of mutton of alout fix pounds, cut the bed end whole and the icrag end in pieces, put it in a ftcw-pan with a gallon of water, and when the fcum rifes fkim it well, put in two onions, four turneps, two leeks, and a little thyme and parfley. well waflied •, boil it gently till the beft end is done, then take it our, ftew the reft till your broth is as good as you would have it, feafon it with fait, and ftrain it oft, ikim all the fat clean off; have ready four turneps cut in dice, and two leeks cut fmall, boil them a quarter of an hour in water, ftrain them in a fieve, and put them to your broth, with a few marygolds and the piece of mutton 5 give it a boil for ten minutes, then put it into a tureen, with crifpt bread in a plate. You may thicken it with oatmeal if you think proper.

Barley

SOUPS. 53

Barley Broth.

MAKE the broth as in the above receipt, and boil half a pound of pearl barley for two hours in two quarts of water, (train it off, and put it to the broth with the mutton, and boil it for ten minutes; put it into a tureen, with fome crifpt bread in a plate.

Scotch Barley Broth.

GET a (beep's head and feet with the (kin and wool on, and (inge the wool off with red hot irons, (the bcil way is to fend them to a fmith's (hop to be done) when (inged, take a clean bru(h and fpme warm water, and brufh them well till thev are quite dean; put them into a foup-por with fix quarts of water, and when the fcum rifes fkim it clean, put in half a pound of Scotch barley, fix onions whole, (ix turneps whole, fix leeks, and fix of the white heads of cellery fplit in two, two carrots cut in quarters, a favoy or white cabbage cut fall, and half a pint of oatmeal, (lew it for four hours, and ieafon it with fait; chop a handful of parfley fine, and a few marygolds, put them in, let it boil up five minutes, then put the head and feet into a foupdi(h, and the foup and ingredients all over, with crifpt bread in a plate

Feal Broth.

TAKE about four pounds of fcrag of veal cut fmall, put it in three quarts of water, when the fcum rifes (kirn it well, put in two onions, a turnep, and three or four blades of mace; (lew it gently fpr two hours, feafon it with fair, and drain it off-, have ready four ounces of rice boiled in ater till tender,

E 3 ftrain

56 SOUPS,

about two pounds of any fort of frefli fifli, a Jittid lemon-peel, a bpndl? of fwcct herbs, twelve corns of vhole pepper, two or tiree blades of mace a little horferadifh, an onion ftuck with cloves, and the top-cruil of a penny loaf, with a little parfley, cover it clofe and ftew it gently two hours; take a French roll, cut a little piece out of the top, pick pir all the crumb, and put it in the foup; rub it through a (ieve, aod pound part of the fcaite or thornback jn a mortar, mix the foup with it, and rub it through a tammy or napkin; put it in a fouppot and make it hot, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait: in the mean time mince the refl of the fifh fmall, and put it in a (lew-pan, with two fpoonsful of the foup, a little buctcr rolled in flour, and a little pepper ana fait; give it a tofs or two, then fill the French roll, pour your foup into a foup-difh or tureen, and put the roll in to fwim at the top. This is a very rich foup, and cod or hollyt)ert Lup is made the fame way.

Oyjier Soup.

TAKE two pounds of fcaite, flcin ir, two large eels, and four flounders, cut fmall, well waftied and gutted, put them into four quarts of water, and when the fcuoi rifes (kirn it well, and put in two or tjiree blades of mace, an onion ftuck with cloves, two heads of crllery, a fey parflcy roots, and a bundle of fweec herbs: cover it clofe, and ftew it for twoh;urs, fcalon it with pepper and fait and half a nutmeg, grated; in the mean time get two quarts of oyftcrs, and boil them in their own liquor, ftrain them in a ficve, and throw them into cold water, walh ihcm well out, and beard them, pour the oyfter liquor from the fettlings into tbe foup, pound the pyftcrs and twelve yolks of hard eggs in a mortar

' very

s a u p s, j7

very fine, and ftr-iin Ac foup to thcmj mix them well up, and rub it through a tammy or napkin, then put it into a Ibup-pot, and give it a boil till ic is as thick as cream; then pour it into a tureen, vyiiii crifpt French bread at the top.

Eel Soup.

TAKE four pounds of eels, (kin, gut, and walh them well, cut them in pieces, and put them into a pot with four quarts of water, with a cruft of bread, an onion ftuck with cloves, two or three bkdes of mace, and a bundle of fweet herbs; feafon it with fait and ikim it well, boil it till half the liquor is walled, then drain it off and put it into a ftew-pan, nd chop a handful of parHey fine, put it in, and boil the foup five minutes; then put it into a tureeir, with a handful of toafted bread.

Mufcle iSoup.

TAKE a hundred of large mufcles, wafh them dean, put them into a ftew-pan, cover them clofe, and ftew them till they open, then pick them out of the Ifaells, and pick the beard or crab off, if there is any, (train the liquor through a fine (ieve into a pan to fettle, then pour it from the fettlings to the mulcles i take two pounds of any fort of frefli filh and put on with a gallon of water, with a bundle of fweet herbs, a large onion ftuck with cloves, a little whole pepper, a fmall piece of horfe-radifh, and a little parQey; bruife a dozen crawfifli in a mortar, and a dozen almonds blanched and beat fine, take two French rolls and take out the crunrtb, and fry ic brown in butter, and put in with three parts of the mufcle liquor, feafon it with fait and a little Cayan Pepper, and ftew it till the liquor is half wafted:' in

the

1% s o u f s.

the mean time get a parfnep and a carrot, fcraped ind cut in thin fliccs, fry them brcwn in butter 5 rub the foup through a fievc and put it into a ftcw-pan, with the fried carrot and parfnep, and half the mufcles, (lew them gently for fifteen minutes; take the other half of the mufcles and liquor, put them into a (lew-pan with a quarter of a pound of butter, and (hake in a little dour, and keep it (lirring till the butter is melted; feafon it with pepper and fait, and grate in a little nugmeg, beat the yolks of three eggs up and put in, keep it (lirring till it is thick, or clfc it will curdle, put it into the French rolls after they arc crifpt before the fire, and pour your foup hot into a tureen, with the roils fwimming at the top.

Milk Soup.

TAKE two quarts of new milk, two (licks of cinnamon, two or three bay leaves, a very little ba(ket fait, and fine fugar to fweeten it, put it over the fire to heat; in the mean time blanch half a pound of fweet almonds, and beat them fine in a marble mortar, put in a little milk to keep them from oiling, grate a little lemon-pcel into the almonds, and wnen the milk, &c. boils drain it to the almonds, put it into a pot, with half a nutmeg grated, and boil it up for two or threeminutes; cut fome flices of French bread, and crifp them before the fire, put them into a foup-diih or tureen, and pour the foup hot over them.

Milk Soup the Dutch and German Way.

TAKE a quart of new milk, and boil it with a ftick of cinnamon and moift fugar, put fome fippets cut in what Ihape you pleafc into a dilh, pour

the



SOUPS. f

the milk over them, and take out the cinnamon; put it over a gentle charcoal fire to fimmer till the bread is foft, beat the yolks of two eggs and mix with a little of the milk; then mix it all together and fend it to the table in a tureen hot.

Egg Soup. '

BEAT the yolks of two eggs in a deep difli, with a piece of butter as big as a hens egg, take a tea kettle of boiling water in one hand, and a fpeon in the other, pour in a quart gently, and keep it ftir ring till the eggs are well mixed and the buner melted, then pour it into a Oew-pan, and ftir it tilt it fimmers; take it off the fire, and pour it between Cwo vefiels, out of one into the other, till it is quite fmooth and has a great froth, then fet it on the fire, and ftir it all the while till it is hot, but not boil i pour it into a tureen and fena it hot to tabic.

Turnep Soup.

TAKE a large bunch of turneps aod pare them, fave out three or four, put the reft on in a gallon of water with a bundle of fweet herbs, an ontoo ftucla with cloves, a blade of mace, a licile whole pepper half a nutmeg, a little (alt, and the cruft of a penny loaf I boil it till the turneps are tender, thn rub it through a fieve till all the turneps and bread are rubbed through, put it into a ftew-pan, with four heads of cellery cut fmall, two turneps cut into dice, cut one turnep and two or three carrots into thin dices, flour them, and fry them brown in frefh butter, and four onions cut in flices and fried brown, two ounces of vermiccli -, boil it gently till all the roots are tender, then fend it up hot in a tureen, with crifpt French bred at the top.

Soup

6o SOUPS,

Soup Maigrel

PUT half a pound of frcfh butter into a ftewpan, and melc it till it is done hilTing, have a dozen round onions peeled, throw them in, and fliake them well about for five minutes; then put in fix heads of cellery cut fmail, two handsful of fpinach well picked and waflied, two cabbage" lettuces cut fine, with a pint of green peas when in feafon (hake them in the pan for fifteen minutes, put in a little fiour, and pour in two quarts of boiling water, and jftale cruils of bread cut in fmall pieces, feafon ic with pepper and fait, and a little beaten mace, ftir k well together, and flew it gently for half an hour take it off the fire, beat the yolks of two eggs and put in, with a fpoonful of vinegar ftir it about, and then put it into a tureen.

You may make it thus: Get a quart of Morratq peas, and .boil them in three quarts of water, with fix onions fliced and fried brown in butter, four heads of cellery cut fmall a carrot, turnep, and parlhep, feafon ic with pepper and fait, a little beaten mace, and ftcw it gently till the peas are very tender i then rub it all well through a lieve till the pulp is all through: have ready fome cellery cut fmall and boiled tender, a handful of fpinach ftewed and fqueezed very dry, put them into the foup, and boil it up ten minutes; take ic off the fire, and put in a gill of fpinach juice, ftir it well up, and puc ic into a tureen; fend to it table hot.

N . B. Afparagus tops or artichoke bottoms boiled tender, when in feafon, is a great addition.

• Plunk

T

SOUPS. 6i

PJum Porridge.

PUT a knuckle of veal into a gallon of water cut very fmall, with a bundle of fweet herbs, fix blades of mace, when the fcum rifcs (kirn it well, and put in two pounds of raifins of the fun, and one pound of pruens, boil it three hours, then rub it all well through a fieve till all the pulp of the raifins and pruens is through; put it into a foup-pot, with a pint of fack, half a pound of fine fugar, half a pound of raifins fioned and picked, and half a pound of currants clean waftied and picked, grate in a whole nutmeg, boil it gently up half an hour, and ftirit often; put it into foup-difhor tureen, with crifpt French bread at the top.

Common Plum Porridge for Cbriimas.

TAKE a leg and (bin ot beef and cut them fmall, put them into eight gallons of water, when the fcum rifcs (kim it well, boil it for fix hours, then drain it into a pan, clean out the pot, and pour your broth in again; flice the crumb of fix penny loaves very thin, and put fome of the broth to them, cover them up for a quarter of an hour, then give it a boil up, and rub it through a fieve into the broth; have ready fix pounds of currants well wa(hed and picked, four pounds of jar raifins picked and fioned, and two pounds of pruens, boil all thcfe in the foup till they fwell and are tender; then put in half an ounce of mace, half an ounce of cloves, and two nutmegs, all beat fine; mix them. in a litde cold broth firil, and then put them in, with four pounds of fugar, two quarts of fack, and the juice of four lemons; boil it up ten minutes, keep it flirring, then put it into earthen pans, and put it by for ufe: when you

want

6z SOUPS;

wane it make it hot, and fend it m a foup-difli or tureen, with crifpt French breads

Portable Soup.

TAKE three legs of veal and one of beef, with ten pounds of lean ham, all cut very fmail, put a quarter of a pouncf of butter at the bottom of a large pot or cauldron, and the meat and ham in, with four ounces of anchovies, two ounces of mace, a bunch of cellery, fix carrots wa(hed well, a large bundle of fweet herbs, a fpoonful of whole pepper, and a hard cruft of a penny loaf; fweat it over a (low fire till you find all the juices are drawn out of the meat, then cover it with boiling water, and fkimit well; let it boil gently for four or five hours, then drain i? off to fettle, pour it clear from the fettlings firft, (kirn the fat off well, and pour it into a pot, and boil it till it is a ftrong jelly, and as (lifF as gluc; feafoA it withCayan pepper and fait, then pour it into little tin moulds let it (land till cold, then turn it out of the moulds, put it on tin plates, and dry it in the fun, or at a great diftance before the fire, keep turning it often till it is quite dry; then put it in tin boxes, with a piece of writing paper between each cake J put them in a dry place for ufe. This is a very ufeful foup for travellers, or large families; for by putting one fmall cake into a pint of boiling wter, a:id giving it a boil up, it will make a pint of good foup j or a little boiling water poured on a cake, will make good gravy for a turkey or two fowls. It poflcflcs one good quality, it never lofes any of its virtue by keeping.

CHAP



63

CHAP. III.

I S H.

Proper Rules to be obferved in dreJing Fijh,

AS fifti is a curious article in the art of cookery; it will not be amifs to give a chapter adapted entirely for dreffing it.

Be careful chat your fi(h kettles are kept clean from fand, or any thing picking to the fides, as the fcum of the fi(h will occafion, and that they are weU tinned, and the frying-pans the fame, your fat well rendered and clear: be lure to have your fifli well foaled, gutted, and walhed clean, before you drcfs it; when you boil it ufe fpring water, and be fure to let it boil before you put in the fifh, with fait according to the lize of the fifh; and when bioiled or fried dry it well with a cloth, for when it is wet it will not broil well nor fry crifp; never ufe any vinegar to falmon or trout, as ic draws the colour out; boil your fiQi gently, if you boil it quick it often breaks it to pieces, which very much disfigures it, and fpoils the beauty of your fifli;• for when whole, and locks well to the fight, it gives the company a good opinion of it; when it boils, and the fcum and froth rife, (kim it clean off, and take great care that your filh goes hot to tai)le, as nothing is fo difagreeable as cold fi(h.

As turtle is a fifii, we (hall give the dire6lions for rcffing i firft, fo proceed with every fort, and thq iSerent vvays they are to be drefifcd.

64 FISH.

0 drejs a Hurtle the Weft-India Way.

AS turtles arc of various fizcs, from one pound td eight or nine hundred weight, I (hall confine my direftions to one about fifty or fixty pounds, biggef or lefs in proportion. Kill your turtle the night before you intend to drefs it, which you muft proceed to do in cJie following manner: Tie it by its hind fins with a cord (iifficient to hold it, then cut off the head and hang it up to bleed all night; in the morning cut the cailipee, which is thebelly, round, and raife ic up, cut as much of the white meat to it as you con veniently can, throw it into fpring water and fait for half an hour, cut the fins off and fcald them with the head, and take the fcales off, cut all the white part our, and throw it into fpring water, (the guts and lungs muft be taken our, but be careful you do not break the gall) wafti the lungs and heart well and flit the guts and maw all through with a penknife, and wafli them well in warm water, fcrape all the infide (kin off, and boil them till tender in two gaU Ions of water; (you had better throw the liver away, fcldom any perfon eats it, and it always makes youf turtle look blacky then rake and faw the back fhell about two inches deep all lound, fcald it, and take off the fhell; in the mean time make a good veal ftock in the following manner: Take a knuckle of veal and two neat's feet cut in fmall pieces, and put ihem on, with three gallons of water, a bundle of ftyeet herbs, four onions, a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace, and when it boils (kim it well, boil it for three hours and ft rain it off; cut all the white meat from the bones, fave out about two pounds, and cut it in pieces as big as an egg, put a quartef of a pound ot butter at the bottom of a ftew-pan put in the white meat, fet ic over a flow fire, and

fwcat

FISH. 6$

fwcat it gently till you find it tender j put the lunga and the part of the back (hell into a llew-pan, and cover them with the veal (tock with Gx ihallot?, two onions, a little bafil, fweet marjorum, winter favory, thyme, and parflcy, all chopped fine, a quarter of an ounce ot clovts and mace, and twelve corns of all-fpice beat fine, and ftew it till tender; take it out of this liquor, and ftrain it o; put the fins on in the fame manner as the lungs, and flew them till tender; take them out of the liquofi and ftrain it off, put half a pound of butter into a ftewpan, melt it, and put three fpoonsful of flour in ftiritwell till it is fmooth, and by degrees pour in the liquor that came from the lungs and white mear and ftir it well till it boils, put in a bottle of Madeira, and feafon it with Cayan pepper and falc pretty high; cut your lungs and the part of the back. Aell in pieces, with the two hind fins cut in three pieces each, and the white meat put in j ftew it fifteen minutes, put a ftiff paftc all round the edge of the back fhell, which is called the callipalh, and ornament it with leaves, &c. cut out of the paftc to your fancy, feafon the fhell with Cayan pepper and fair, putinthefe ingredients with thcjuice of two lemons, fome force-meat and egg balls and bake it two hours; raifethe white meat of the belly (hell, which is called thecal'ipee, and fluff it with force-meat, then notch it acrofs at the top, and feafon it with beaten fpice, bafil, marjorum, winter favorv, and thyme, chopped fine, and fome little bits of butter here and there On it, fome Cayan pepper and fait, put a patte round the rim, and bake it three hours; put the bones and the two pounds of white meat on, with fome of the ftock and a quart of water, with a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves and mace, and ftew it till YOU 6nd the foup is good; ftrain it off, then put it IR a foup.pot thicken it with flour and butter about

66 R I S H.

as thick as cream, fcafon it with Cayan pepper and alt, and put in half a pint of Madeira, boil it gently for about fifteen minutes, and (kirn it well; 6ut lome butter into a ftew-pan and melt it, with a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, then by degrees pour in the liquor the fins were ftcwed inj liir it till it boils, feafon it with Cayan pepper and lalt, half a pint of Madeira, and the juice of a leinon, put in the two fore-fins, and ftew them fifteen minutes, with forne force-meat and egg balls; put a little butter into another llew-pan, and a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, and by degrees pour in a pint and a half of hock, ftir it till it boils, put the guts and maw, cut in pieces about three inches long, itto it, and ftew it tor fifteen minutes; feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, mix the yolks of three eggs with a pint of cieam, and grate fome nutmeg inj put it in, and keep it ftirring till it is ready to boilj then take it oflr, keep it fnaking, and fqueeze in a lemon; have your callipafti,.callipee, foup, fins, and fric afee, all hot together, and difti tliem up hot in the following manner, your foup in a tureen in thq middle:

Callipash Fricaseb Soup Fins

Callipee

When you fend the callipafh and callipec to bake, you fhould put them in a tin dripping-pan, ancFput bricks underneath to keep them fteady, that the Jiquor may not fpill.

J

FISH. 67

notber Way to drefs a Turtle.

KILL ydur turtle the ovcr-nighr, as before di refied, cut the belly (bell all round, and raife it up, cut It clean from the meat in the infide, cut off the fins, and cut cue the white meat wa(h it well in %ing water, and put it in fpring water for half an hour; take out the guts and lungs, and throw the Jungs into water, treat the guts as before directed, faw off the rim of the back hfll about two inches deep, fcald ihc fins, hcad and (hells in hot water, and clean off all the fcales and (hells; have readv a veal broth, made as follows: Cut a knuckle of veal of about fix pounds and two neat's feet in fmall pieces, put them on in two gallons of water, and when it boils (kirn it well, and put in a bundle of fwect herbs, fix onions, four turneps, and two carrots, fome cfovcs and mace, and a little all-fpicc, boil it for three hours, and then (train it off; puc your fins, head, the belly and back (hells in, and cover them with the veal broth, with a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace, half a nutmeg, and twelve corns of all-fpice, beat fine, fome bafilj fwcet maijorum, winter favory, thyme, and parflcy, chopped very fine, fix (ballots and two onions chopped fine, ftew them till they are tender, then ftrain the liquor from them; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a (lew- pan, and cut the white meat in pieces as big as an egg and put in, with a quart, of the broth, a bundle ot fweet herbs, and a little fait, fct ii over a flow fire, and ftew it gendy till you find it is tender, ihen llrain the liquor from it, and wafh the meat in warm water, to walh the curd and fcum oflFj throw away the liver, put the lungs and heart in fome veal broth, and ftew them till they are tender, with a bundle of fweer herbs, then ftrain the liquor

F Z from

P FISH,

from thenii and cut them in fmall pieces, and thfs ns and brawn from the back and belly fjiells cut in pieces, and take the meat from the head, nvafli them sn warm water clear frpm the herbs and fplce; put a pound of buttjer into a ftew-pn big enough to hold all the turtle and melt it, then put in four large jfpponsful of flourj ftir it till it is fmooth, and by degrees put in all the broth, keep it ftirring till it i$ quite fmooth, then piu n two bottles of Madeira, and all the meat, fin, tripe, &c. with three dozen pf force-meat balls and three dozen of egg balls, jfeafon it with Gayan pepper and fait pretty high, and ftcw it one hour very gently, fqueezc in four lemons, ftew it five minutes longer, and Ikim it well; then tafte if it is of a fine talle, that it wants nothing, cither of wine, fcafoning, or lemon, if it docs put it in; in the mean time put a pafte round the back Ihell, as before direfled, and feafon the fhell with fCayan pepper and fait, and put in half a pint of Madeira, and bake it one hour-, put fome of the tunle into the (hell, and brown it with a falamander,;ind the reft in tureens as hot as pollible.

N. B. When you drcfs-a fmall turtle under twenty ppunds, you will have no occafion to bake the (hell, but cut the (hell all up, and take the brawn out, ancj Icrve it in tureens.

Sturgeon in Imitation of turtle.

MAKE a veal broth as for turtle, gut and fcale about eight pounds of fturgcon, and wa(h it well, cut the brawn fF the white part, and cut both in jTmall Iquare pieces, put them in a ftew-pan, and cover tnem with broth, a bundle of fweet herbs, a dozen Ihallots chopped fine, a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace beat fine, ftcw it gently till it is near tender; mix a bottle of Madeira with four

Ipoonsful

ipioonsful of fiour very fmooth; pot it in and ftir it well about, and feafon it high with Cayah pepper and fait; ftew it gently for half an hour, then put force-meat and egg baJlsin fqueeze in the juice 6f two lemons, and boil ic up two or three minutes i take out the fweet herbs, put it in a tureen, and fend it to table as hot as poflible. •

r

To boil a TurboU

FIRST gat your turbot and wafli it weU, thed cut it acrofs the back, and draw your knife juft abore the fins through the back-fkin, fprinkle little fait over it, which will fetch all the ilime ofS% make a kettle of fpring water boil, and put in z handful of fait, with a bundle of parfiey and half a lemon; waOi your turbot well from the flime; and put it in on a fifli-drainer with a fheet of white paper over it, and boil it gently: at tdrbot of 6ight poundst will uke half an hour bigger or lefTer in proportion; take it out of your kettle, and let it drain the water froni it, then carefully flip it on your difb, with a filb-plate in it, and take the paper off; garnifh ic with fi(h-patties lenon, and parfley, and fend lobfter ihrimp, and aifchovy fauce in boats.

_, • • •

16 drefs a Turbot t be Dutch Way;

TAKE your tirbot alive and gut it, cut it fouf tiiiics aCrofs the back and belly- walh it well in fpring water, and pu( it in fpring wate and fait for one hour to crimps have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in fait enough to make it preiiy falt but not too falr walfh the turbot our ptitit ih and boil it moderately fait for fifteen minutes; then throBr in a large handful of parfley, well picked and waibcd, iuid boil it five miiutes longer hive ii deep Ifoup

f 3 4iUit

70 FISH.

dilh, and carefully take out the turbot, put it irt vfih all the parfley, and cover it with the liquor; garni(h the difh with green parfley, and fend parfley and butter and anchovy fauce in boats, mih bread aud butter cut very thin in plates.

To bake a Turhot.

TAKE an earthen difli the fizc of your turbotj rub butter thick all over it, fprinkle a little pepper and fait and parfley fl)red fine over it, and grate half a nutmeg over it; cut the head and tail off the tuibot and put it into the difli, pour half a pint of vrhite wine over the iifli, then with a fmall brufii rub the yolk of an egg on it, with little bits of butter here and there bake it for one hour, or till, it is of a fine brown; then put it into your di(h that you intend to fend it to table in, and put it before the fire to keep hot; take the. fauce and ftir it well together, put it into a ftcw-pan, with a little butter rolled in flour, and a fpoonful of anchovy liquor and one of catchup, fqueeze in half a lenoon, and bdil it up for five minutes; garnifh the fifli with Ijsmon and parfley, and add flirimps or picked muflirooms to the fauce, and fend it in boats or bafons,

To boil a Cods iSead.

' TAKE a large cod, and cut the head and (houlders off dofeothe venr, take out the gills and guts and open the found, fcrape out the blood clean from the back: bone, lyfli it clean, tie it up with packthread, fprinkle a handful of fait over it, and let it lay two hours; have rady a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fair, two or three bits of horfefadilh, and quarter of a pint of vinegar, put the

head

FISH. 71

head on a fi(h-drainer put it in, and boil it gently; (if a large head, it will cake one hour; a middling lizc, three quarters of an hour, and fo on for Icfs) then tak it out of the water, and fet it acrofs the kettle to drain, flip it gently on the diffa, and garnilh with fmclts fried, or any other fmall filh, or fried oyfters, with horfe-fadilh and parflcy, or barberries J fend oyftcr, lobfter, fhrirnp, or cockle fauce, in fauce-boats: the bed is oy Iter and Ihrimp faucc for cod.

7i? roaji a Cods Head.

yUFTER cleaning it as before, fcore it with a knife, drew a little falc on it, and put it into a fmall tin dripping pan, lay it before a brifk fire, with lomeihing behind, that the fire may roaft it (all the water that comes from it the firlt half hour throw away); then with a pafte-brufli rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and ftrew on a little nutmeg, cloves, and mace beat fine, and fome bread-crumbs all over; fet it to the fire again, and bafte it gently with butter, turn it often from one fide to the other before the fire, till it is of a fine brown (a large head will take four or five hours roafting); have fome melted butter, and put in a fpoonful of anchovy, fome flirimps or cockles, with the liquor that comes from the head, ftir it well together, and give it a boil (mind it is not oily); put the head in a difh, with the liver boiled, cut in two, and laid on each fide; garnilh it wjth horfe-radilh and parfley, or barberries, with the above fauce and oyfter fauce in boats or bafons.

F 4 0

72 F I S H.

To bake a Cad's Head.

TAKE a deep tarthen pan, big enough to hold the head, and butter it well, gut and wa(h the head very clean, and dry it with a coarfe cloth, put it in with a bundle of fweec herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves, three blades of mace, a little whole pepper, a nutmeg bmifed,a little lemon-peel and horfe-radifti, rub the head all over with the yolk of an egg grate fome nutmeg over it, and crumbs of bread, with half a pint of water in the di(h; bake it three hours in a moderate oven, then take the head, put it into the di(h you intend to fend it to table in, and cover it-, put it over boiling water, or before the fire, to keep hot; ftrain the liquor that the head was boiled ininto a ftew-pan, with Ibme ketchup, and ihrimps or cockles, thicken it whh butter rolled in flour, give it a boil, put it over the head, and garnifli with fifti patties, horfcradi(h, and par(ky with oyftcr or lobiler fauce in boats or bafons.

Tojlew a Cods Head in Claret.

TAKE a cod's head, gut, gill, and wafli it clean, tie it up with packthread, put it on a drainer, and put it in a kettle jud big enough to hold it; put half a pound of butter in a (tew-pan, melt it and put four fpoonsful of flour in, ftir it till it is fmooth put four bottles of claret in, and ftir it till it boils, then put in a bundle of fwcet herbs, a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace, and a little all-fpice, a gill of ketchup, a fpoonful of anchovy liquor, blanch a pint of oyfters, and (train the liquor in, feafon ic high with Cayan pepper and fait, and ftew it half an hour; then drain it through a (ieve to the cod's head, (but mind it is very thick, for the juice of the cod's

head

FISH. 73

head will thin it) put in a pint of mulhrooms, the oyfters waflied and bearded, a quarter of an ounce of truffles and morels fcalded and wafhed clean with two or three cod's founds, frelh or falt boiled tender and cut in fnall pieces; ftew it gently one hour and a half, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, and if ic wants feafoning put it in, as it fhould be well fca'-. foned s take it carefully and lay it in a deep di(hy untie it, but mind you do not break ir, pour the fauce and ingredients over, garniih with fi(h patties fried fippecs, or oyfters and horfe-radiOi.

10 boil Cod or Codlings.

AS thefe fi(h differ fo much in Cze, it is almoft impoflible to give a good receipt for drefling them; but by many years practice I will give the bcft I can: Gut, gill, and wafli the fi(h well, turn k round with the tail in its mouth, and tie or (kewer it; have ready a kettle of fpring water boiling, and put in fait according to the fize of your fi(h, boil ic gently for fear of breaking, (a middling-fized one will take half an hour, bigger or lefs in proportion) then take it out of the water, and fet it acrofs the kettle two minutes to drain; flip it very gently into the diihj and garniih with horfe-radifh, parfley, lemon, or barberries, as you plcafe, with oyftcr AOd anchovy fauce in boats

0 crimp Cod.

TAKE your cod alive and gut it, cut it in Qices about an inch and a half thick, wafli it clean in fpring water; haVe ready a large pan of fpring %i'ater, throw in a handful of fait, put in your fi(h, and Ice it lay two hours; then .vafli it clean out and put it to drain.

74 FISH.

To boil Crimp Cod.

Have & ftcw-pan of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fair, put the cod on a drainer, put it Ml and boil it very quick ten minutes; then take it out of the Water, and fct it acrofs to drain, and take a fmooth brulh and wafc it with the water, to clean off any (kirn or duft which may happen to be on ic; fey a napkin in your di(h, put the fifti on, cover it over, and fend oyfter and anchovy faucc in boats, with fcraped horfe-radifh in a plate.

To broil Crimp Cod.

TAKE nd wipe the fliccs very dry with a cloth, tfnd flour them on both fides 5 have a very clear fire, put on the gridiron, and mind it is very clean, rub it with a littFe beef or mutton fat, put on the fi(h, and broil it of a fine brown on both fides, but not burnt; put it in a hot difli, and garriilh with horfcradifh and parflcy, with oyfter and anchovy faucc in boats.

Tofricafee Cod.

' GET to or three cods founds and boil them till tender, (if fait ones you muft ioak them in water all night) cut the roe in fmall pieces, and blanch it with the liver cut in pieces, put them into a ftewpan, with two or three flices of cod about two inches thick, with a pint of fidi broth or boiling water, feafon it with a little beaten mace, nutmeg, and fait to your palate, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves, cover them clofc and ftew them ten minutes, but not too faft; then put in a gill of white wine, a few oyftcrs blanched, a piece of but tet

FISH. 75

tcr rolled in ftourj.take out the onion and fwcct herbs, (hake it round gently, mix the yolks of twa eggs with half a pint of cream, put it in gently till ic boils up; then fqueeze ift half a lemon, put it Ty carefully into the difli, and garnilh with fried fippecs. Mind to cut the found into fquare pieces.

0 fry f mall Codlings.

GUT and wafh them clean, dry them in a cloth, and turn them round; make a batter thus-. Take two pr three fpoonsful of flour, and mix it with fmall beer or ale till it is fmooth, then put the fifli in 1 have ready a panful of hot fat, put the fi(h into the batter, and let the batter cover it, then put it into the fat, and fry it of a fine brown; put it on a drainer before the fire to drain the fat from it, then put it into a hot diih, and garnifh with horfe-radifh with anchovy fauce in boats.

75? boil Salmon.

GUT and fcale the falmon, wafli it well, and fplit it all through; have ready a kettle of fpring water boiling, throw in a handful of fait, three or four bits of horfe-radifh, put your Blh, cut in as large or fmall pieces as you fancy,on a drainer, the backfide uppermoft, and put it in, boil it gently for three quarters of an hour, (if the fifli is very thick it will take an hour; be fure you ikim it well) take it out of the water and fet it acrofs the kettle to drain, and with a pafte-brulh waffi it well at the top, clear froth all fcum or dirt that may fettle on it put it into the di(h, sjnd garnifti with fried fmelts, oyfter patties, horfe-radiOi, parfley, or barberries, with lobfter and flirimp fauce in boats.

Sulmn

76 F I S Hw

Salmon au Court Bouillon.

TAKE about eight pounds of the middle of i falmon, fcale and wafli it very clean, fcorc the fides about two inches deep, that it may caice the (eafoning, beat a quarter of an ounce of mace and cloves, a nutmeg, a quarter of an ounce of pepper ground fine, and fome fait, a lemon peel and a handful of parfley chopped fine, mix it up with a pound of butter rolled in flour, and put it into the notches i roll it up in a napkin, and bind it with a fillet, put ic into a fifb-ketdc juft big enough to hold it, pour in a quart of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, ibme fait, and a fprig of bay leaves, with as much boiling water as will cover it, boil it gently one hour and a half, then fold a napkin in your difh, take it cut of the napkin it was boiled in, and put it in the difli; garnifli with crifpt parfley, ferve it up with plain butter in a boat, grated horfe-radifli and vinegar made hot.

Salmon a la Braife,

TAKE the double jowl end of the falmon, or a large falmon trout, fcale, gut, and wafl) it clean, take a large eel, flcin, gut, and wafli it, take all the fifli from the bones, chop it fine, with two anchovies, a little lemon peel cut fine, grate half a nutmeg in, fome parfley and a little thyme chopped fine, a few crumbs of bread, a little pepper and fair, roll them up with the yolk of two eggs, and put it in the belly of the fifli, few it up, and lay it in a long fiftikettle juft big enough to hold it; put half a pound of butter into a ftew-pafv artd melt it, ftiake in three large Ipoonsful of ftour, and ftir ic till it is a little browa, then pour in a pine of any fort of broths

vritltf



FISH. 77

With a bottle of white wine, a bundle of fweec herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves, a fpuonful of an chovy liquor, and a little beaten mcei ftew it ior half an hour, then drain it through a fieve over your falmon, put in' half a pint of fre(h mufhrooms peeled and wa(hed, an ounce ot truffles and morls well walhed and cut fmall, feafon it wirh Cayan pepper and falc pretty high, cover it clofe, and, ftcw it gently one hour and a half j then take out the falmon, be very careful you do not break it, put it in a deep di(h, and pour the fauce over; garnifli with filh patties and horre-radi(h,or barberries. Tbia is a very elegant diih for a genteel or large company.

To boil a yowl of pickled Salmon.

,WHEN falmon or other filh is dear and fcarce, take a jowl of pickled falmon and lay it in fpring water all night 3 have a kettle of fpring water boiling, with a little fait in it, put the jowl onafifhplace and put it in, boil it gently fitteen minutes; taki; it out of the water gently, and be careful you do not break it, and flip it into your difli; garnifli with lmon and barberries, with lobflier, Ihrimp, or anchovy faqce in a boat. .

To colver Salmon.

GET a live falmon, fcale and gut it, cut it in ilices about two inches thick, wafh it clean in fpring water, and then put it in a" large pan of fpring water for two hours, then take i put to draii).

To

•

7 FISH,

Tb boil colver Salmon.

HAVE a ftcw-pan of fpring water boiling, throw Jn a handful of fait, put your dices of falmon on a fifh-pla,te, and boil it quick for fifteen minutes, then take it out, and wafli the fcum off with a pafte-brufh, lay a ngpkin in your di(h, and put it on the napkins garnifl with green parfley, with lobfter and anchovy

fauce in boats.

To broil Salmon

EITHER take colver or any other falmon cur in flices, dry it well in a cloth, flour it, and Iprinkle alitile pepper and fait on it; have a very clear 6re, and bfoii.it on both fides of a fine brown, put it into a hot difh, and garnith with horfe-radifh, with anchovy fauce and plain butter in boats.

To broil Salmon in Paper.

SCALE and walh three pounds of falmon, cut it in dices an inch thick, dry it with a cloth, feafon it with pepper and fait and a little grated nutmeg j butter half (heets of while paper and roll the falmon in it, and faflen the paper all round by pinching it over -, broil it gently over a very clear fire for twenty minutes put it in a hoc di(fa, with anchovy fauce and plain butter in beats.

To boilfrejh or fait Water Trout.

GUT your trout, but never fcale it, as that takes off the beauty of the fifli, wafli it well, and tie a packthread round the nofe of it, and with a large needle or (kcwer put it through the middle and draw it to the tail, till you make it the figure of

an

FISH. 79

an S, tie it in that form to the uil, and put it on a drainer; have rcad!y a kettle pf fpring water bojling, put in fomc fait to make it reliftiing, then put iip your filh and boil it gently, (if a rniJdle-fizd half an hour.) tak it out ot the water anid let it drain a moment, put a folded napkin in your difb, and pujc the fifli whole upon it; garnifli with oarfly, with lobfter and anchovy or Ihrimp fauce in boats.

N. B. If your fifli is alive, gut and wafti it, cut it acrofs on both fides, and lay it in fpring water one hour to crimp before ypu drefs ic, apd boil it fifteen minutes.

To drefs Urout the "Dutch Way.

TAKE your trout alive, gut them, and cut them acrofs on both fides to .the bone, afh them well, then throw them into fpring water and fait for gne hour to crimp; put on a kettle of fpring water enough to cover your fi(h, with a handful of fait, make it boil for five minutes, then put your fifh on a dv'ainer, put them in and boil them ten minutes; then put in a handful of parHey well picked and wafhed, and boil them five minutes longer; take your fifii very carefdly out and lay them in a deep di(h, with the parfley and liquor over them; garnifh the di(h with horfe-radi(h, with anchovy fauce and plain butter in boats, amd bread and butter cut thin in plates.

Ho boil Cod Sounds.

TAKE fix or eight large founds, and lay them in water to freflien, (fome will take two days and a night) then wafh them well and put them on in milk and water, and boil them till they are tender; put them in a diih with hard eggs cut in two, and

fome

6o F I S H.

fome chopped fine for garnifli, with egg faucc in t boar. You may boil two parfneps and cue thern in pieces, and fome potatoes, puc them in a di(h coge cher or feparate, as you plcafe,

N. B. If you can gee them frefli they will not want foaking, as it is meant for fait ones only take carie to clean them.

To broil Cod Sounds.

TREAT them as above till boiled, and take them out of the liquor, dry them well with a cloth, pepper and flour them, and broil them over a clear fire till they are brown; then lay thenri in a hot di(h, and pour melted butter and muftard mixed ovcr them.

Tojricafee Cod founds.

TREAT them as above, and cut them in fquare pieces, put them into a (lew-pan, with a little pep per and falc, beaten mace and nutmeg, as much cream as will be fauce enough and a piece of but ter rolled in flour, keep (haking the pan well, till the butter is melted, and as thick as you would have it; put them into a hot di(b, and grnifli with kmon and beet root

To boil Scaite or Thornback.

TAKE your fcaite or thornback and flcin it on both fides, gut and gill it, wa(h it very cleans and put it in water for one hour; have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fair, put the fi(h on a drainer, and put it in boil it, if a middlc-fized one, half an hour, (bigger or Icfs in proportion) and flcim it well; take it out of the water and put it over the kettle to drain, gnd with a brufh wafh it with the

b9

F I s h; 8i

liot liquor; put it on your diib and garniih with horfe-radilh and parfley, or barbenies, wicb flirimp and anchovy fauce in boats.

0 crimp Scaite or Tbornhack.

TAKE your fifh alive, Ikin ir gut and giti it wafli it very clean, cut it in long (lips the whole length of the fiflit about an inch hroadj roll ic over your finger, and throw it into fpring watery cut the middle part in any form you like, Wafh ic out, and put it into fpring water for one hour then wafli it clean out, and put it to drain for ufc

5V boil crimped Scaite or hornback.

HAVE a ftew-pan of fpring water boiling, throw In a handful of falt put tbe fifli on a drainer and put it into the water; boil it ten minutes flcim it well, take it out of the water, and hold it to drain a moment put a f(4ded napkin in your diih, and carefully lay the fifh on; garniih with horfe-radifh 4Uid parHeyt with (hrimp and anchovy fauce ia boatsi

To fry crimped Scaite or Thornback.

CUT the fifli in pieces, about five or fix inched long, dry t well with a cloth, make a batter with flour and mild ale, put the fiOi in, and cover it all over with the batter; have a pan of hot fat, put in yourfifh,' and fr it of a fine brown % take it out and lay it on a drainer to drain the fat from it, put it in a hot dilh and jgarnifli with lemon anfl horfv radifh, with anchovy fauce in boats.

Ja

82 FISH.

ojiew Scaite or Tbornback.

TAKE about four pounds of fcaite or thornback and fktn iCj and then cut your fifli in handfome fquare pieces, wa(h it well, and dry it in a cloth, put in a pint of good gravy, a pint of red wine, an onion Iluck with cloves, a little beaten mace, a bundle (tf fweet herbs, a fpoonful of anchovy liquor, and ftcw it gently for half an hour take out the onion and fwect herbs, and put in fome butter rolled in flour ihake it about, and make it of a good thtcknefs, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, a fpoonful of ketchup, and ftcw it for ten minutes longer; (kirn ic well, fqueeze in half a lemon, give it a Oiake round, and then put it into a hot difli -, garnilh with lemoii or fried oyfters i you may put in muhrooms,oyfters, or artichoke bottoms cut in pieces, if you think proper.

Tofricafee Scaite or Thornback.

SKIN the fiih on both fides, gut it jand wa(h U clean, cut it in pieces about an inch broad and two or three inches long, lay it in a Hew- pan, (to every pound of fifli put a quarter of a pint of water) put in a bundle of fweet herbs, a tittle beaten mace, nut meg, and a little fait, cover it clofe, aid fiew it fifteen mit)uces; take out the fWeet herbs, put in ibme butter rolled in flour, and fliake it round, put in a pint of cream and a glafs of white wine, and keep (haking the pan one way till it is thick and fikntth then difh it up, and garniih with leoioo.

t$

FISH. $3

I • •?

To koil Sturgeon

TAKE a piece of fturgeon of about eight pounds gut it and wa(h it clean, lay it in fait and water four hours I have a kettle juft big enough to hold ir put iD as much fpring water as will cover it, and to two quarts of water put a pint of vinegar, a dick of horfe-radilh cut in dices, two or three bits of lemonpeel, a ipoonful of whole pepper fix bay leaves, and a handful of fait i boil it for ten minutes, then lay the filh on a drainer and put it in, and boil ic gpndy for one hour and a half; then take it up, put itacrois the kettle to drain, and put it on your difli i gamifli with crifpt parfley and barberries, with the lollowing fauce in boats: Put half a pint of red wine, half a pint of gravy, with two fpoonsful of anchovy liquor, or ketchup, a little butter rolled in fiour, boil it for ten minutes, keeping it ftirring till it is fmooth; fhrimp or cockle fauce and plain butter.

To roqfi Sturgeon

TAKE a piece of fturgeon of about feven or eight pounds and wa(h it well, put it into a deep difl), take half a pint of white wine, half a pint of vinegar, an onion, a bundle of fweet herbsi fix bay leaves, a little mace, cloves, and all-fpice, and a fpoonftil of fait, boil it five minutes, and put it over the fiih, keep turning it often, and with a fpoon pour the liquor over it; let it lay all night, the next day take it out and dry it with a cloth, fpit it, and. bade it for one hour with red wine; have j-eady mixed feme crumbs of bread, fweet herbs and parfley chopped .fine, a little mace, cloves, and nutmeg beac Ane, with pepper and fait, bade it with butter and

G 2 fprinkle

4 F r S H.

fprinkle it with herbs till it is almoft done, baitiog k ever now and then with butter; a thick piece will take two hours and a half reading, a thin one two hours, and mind before you take it up it is of a fine brown •, have the following fauce: Take a pint of water, two or three anchovies, a bundle of fwect herbs, a little Icmofpeel, mace, cloves, and whole pepper, and a little horfe-radi(h cover it clofe and boil it fifteen minutes then ftrain it off, ' put k into a ftew-pan agatn put in a pint of red wine and a piece of butter rolled in flour, boil it till it is fmooth; then put in the meat of a crab, or half a pint of picked (brimps or prawns, with a dozen oyfters, a fpoonful of ketchup, and the juice of a lemon, let it boil up five minxues, lay the fifh in the dHh, and put forre of the fauce under it, but not over it, as it will fpoil the fine brown; garnifli with fried fippets and lemon,, or barberres with the reft of the fauce in boats

To roajl a Cottar if Sturgeon

TAKE a piece of a fide of fturgeon, about fixteen or eighteen mchcs long, cut clean from the bone, cake the fcalea off, wafii it well, and dry k in a cloth; chop a dozen oyfters and a quarter of a pint of (hrimps very fmall, an equal quantky of crumbs of bread, a' little beaten mace, pepper, and fait, two anchovies chopped, fome fweec herbs and parfley chopped fine, mix them together, cut a piece ofi the thick fide in the infide of the fi(h, and lay it upon the thin fide to make it even, rub it all over wkh the yolks of eggs, and ftrew the mixtuie over t then roll it up tight, run two flcewers through it and tie it with packthread, run the Ipit througn the niddk and put it down to the fire, roaft it gently for two hoiin and a half and bafte it well with but tcr

FISH. s

fcr; when it is done take it off the fplt, untie it, and puil the Ikewers out, put it in the dith, and put the fame fauce as for roaft fturgeon over ft garniHi with fried fippets and horie-radilh.

To haki a Collar of Sturgeon.

TREAT it the fame as for roafting, put it into a deep diih, with a pint of red wine, half a pint of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little' cloves and mace, and a little pepper and fait, flour it over, and put fome pieces of butter over it; bake it two hours in a moderate oven, then put it into your drib and cover it, and as quick as you can ftrain the liquor into a ftew-pan, with a little butter rolled in flour, a fpoonful of anchovy liquor, a fpoonful of ketchup, and the juice of half a lemon; boil it till it is fmooth, then pour it over your fi(h garniih with fried fippets and horferadi(h

Toftew Hollyhert.

TAKE a piece of hollybert of about fix pounds, eut acrofs the fiOi, walh it well, and cut the fins clofe; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew.pan and melt it, put in three fpoonsful of flour, Kx it till it is fmooth, then pour in a pint of good gravy, a bottle of red wine, and ftir it till it boils; then put in a piece of lean ham cut very fmall, a few cloves and mace, a bundle of fweet herbs, fix fiial lots chopped fine, feafon it with fait and Cayan pepper pretty high, boil it for half an hour, put your fi(b into a pan juft big enough to hold it, Arain the fauce over it, put in a pint of frefh mu(hrooms, a dozen oyfters, and fome tiuffles and morels, ftew it gently till it is tender then fqueeze in a lemon, give it a ihake put it into your dilh, and pour the

G 3 fauce

86 FISH.

fauc over it; garniih with fi(h patties or fried oyfterf, lenfK)n and oarberries.

N . B. You may put water inftead of gravy, and leave out the ham, if you do not like ic fo ftrong. A head ftewed in the fame . manner is very fine, only allowing more fauce, according to the fize.

To boil a Jobn-a-Dore.

GUT the fifh and wa(h it clean; have ready a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handfiil of fait, put the fiSi on a drainer, and put it in, boil it gently for twenty minutes; take it out of the water, let it drain, and put it on your difli; garnifli with horfe-radifli and parfley, with lobfter and ihrimp fauce in boats.

to boil a Brill.

•

GUT and wa(h the fifli well, throw a little fait over it, and lee it lay one hour have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in fome fait,- lay the fi(h on a drainer, and put it in -, boil it gently for half an hour, fkim it well, then take it up, put it acrofa the kettle to drain, put it on the difli, and garniih with horfe-radiih and parfley, with lobfter and anchovy fauce in boats.

To boil Soles.

SCALE the belly of the foles, and take the fkin off the back, gut and wafli them clean, and cut the fins oflF clofe; have a ftew-pan of fpring water boil ing put in a little lalt, put in your fifh, and boil them according to the fize; (a fole of one pound will take fifteen minutes, and lb on in proportion) take them out of the water and with a paftc-biufh

wa(b

FISH. 8;

waih them clean, put them on your difh, and garni(h with lemon and parfley, with Ihrimp and anchovy fauce in boats;

To drtjs Soles the Dutch Way.

TAKE your foles alive, and fcalc the belly-fide, but do not take o(F the flcin, gut and waih them very clean cut them acrofs on both fides four times to the bone, put them in fpring water and fait one hour to crimp; have a ftew-pan with fpring water, tnough to cover them, put in fait to make it relifliing, boil it five minutes, waih your filh and put them in; boil them ten minutes, then put in a hand ful of parfley, picked and walhed clean, and boil them five minutes longer; take the fifh carefully out and put them in a foup-diih, put the parfley at top, and pour the liquor in; garnifli with lemon and barberries, with anchovy fauce and parfley and butter in boats, with bread and butter cut thin in plates.

N. B. Plaice or Bounders are dreflfed the fame way.

To fry Soles.

SCALE, gut, and fkin the Ibles, wafli them well, cut the fins clofe, wipe them in a cloth, fif they are large cue them acrofs the back, and fiour them with a brufli) put fome yolk of egg on the belly-rfide, and fprinkle crumbs of bread on; have ready a pan of hogs lard or beef dripping boiling hot, put them in the beliy-fide downwards, and fry them till they are of a fine brown; turn them, and fry the backfide till done; take them out and put them on a fieve, or drainer, to drain the fat from them: have ready a handful of parfley picked and wafhed very clean, throw it into the fat and fry it crifp; put it on a

G 4 fieve

88 F I S H.

fieve to draitit put the folcs in a difl) and garftifii with fried parfley and horfe-radifl, with fhrimp and anchovy faucc in boats.

ofieno Soles.

SCALE, gut, and Ikin your folcs, wafii tbetn veil, cut the. fins clofe, put them in a pan juft big enough to hold them; put a quarter of a pound of butter in a (Icwpan and melt it put in two fpoona- ful of fiour, ftir it till it is fmooth, then put in a

Eint of gravy and a pint of white wine, ilir it till i( oils, put in fix fhallots chopped fine, a few cloves, mace, and all-fpice, half a lemon, and a bundle of fweet herbs, fealbn it with Cayan pepper and fait, boil it for twenty minutes, then (train it over the foles, put in a ipoonful of ketchup, cover them clofe, and ftew them half an hour over a very flow fire; put in fome oyllers blanched, and fome pickled muihrooms, ftew them five minutes longer, then put them into your difli, and the fauce over them % gar niih with fried fippets and lemon,

Ho-fricafee Soles V)htte

SCALE, (kin, gur, and wa(h your foles, cutoff their heads, dry them in a cloth, then with a iharp knife cut the fi(h from the bones and fins, cut them lengthways, and then acrofs, fo that each fole will be in eight pieces; take the heads and bones, put them into a fauce-an, with a pint of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, a little whole pepper, two or three blades of mace, a little lemon-peel, a cruft of bread and a little fait, cover it clofe, and let it ftew till half is wafted; put your foles in a fteW' pan, and ftrain the liquor through a fine fieve over thcmi and half a pint of white wine, a piece of but

r

FISH. 89

ter rolled in flour keep (baking it round for ren minutes; then chop a little parfley fine, and a few mulhrooms cut fmall and put in, grate a little nutmeg in a gill of cream, pour it in, and keep (haking the pan till it is thick and fmooth; put it in a hoc dilh, and gatrniih with lemon and parfley.

Tojricqee Soles browrtm

•. TREAT your foles as in the above reoeipt, boil the bones, flour the fi(h, and fry it of a light brown in butter take the filh of a fole, beat it in a mortar, with a piece of bread as big as a hen's egg foaked in cream, the yolks of two bard eggs, a little butter, a litcle thyme and parfley ihred fine, and an anchovy; feafon it with a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, beat all well together, and mix it up with the yolk of a raw egg and a little fiour, make it into fmaU balls, and fry them of a light brown; put the fi£b and balls before the fire, pour all the fat out of the pan, and ftrain the liquor into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of red wine, and ftir it well round in the pan; put in a few trufHes and morels a few pickled mulhrooms, afpoonful of ketchup, and the juice of half a lemon, put in a piece of butter rolled in.flour and keep ftirring it till it is fmooth and thick; then put in your filh and balls cover it clofe, and (tew ic five minutes, put it in a hot dilh, pour the fauce over it, and garnilh with lemon. You may drefs a fmall torbot or any flat filh in the fame manner.

To broil Red Mullet.

NEITHER fcalc nor gut your mullet, wipe them very clean in a cloth, butter half a (heet of writing paper for each filh, put them in, and fallen it all round; have very clear fire broil (hem very

gently

90 F I S H.

jgently for twenty minutes, then put them in a diflit with anchovy faucc and plain butter in boats

0 ioil Grey Mullet.

GUT and walh the,fi(h very clean -, have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of falt lay the fi(h on a drainer, put them in and boil them fifteen minutes; take them out of the water and let them drain a moment, put them in the difli; gamiih with horferadilh and parfley with anchovy lauce and plain butter in boats.

To brcil Grey Mulkt.

GUT and wafli your fifli clean, dry them well in a cloth, and flour them on both fides; have a clear fire, broil tliem of a fine brown, aijd put them in a hot di(h; garnifh with lemon and barberries with -anchovy faoce and plain butter in boats.

To broil Weavers.

GUT and wafli them clean, dry them in a cloth, and flour them oh both fldes have a clear fire and broil them or a fine brown put them in a hot diih, with plain butter in a boat. Thefe are a fine fi(h, and cur as Arm as a fole; but be careful you do not wound yourfelf with the (harp bones in th( head, and the fins on the back.

To boil MackreU

m

GUT and walh the mackrel clean, take care of the liver and roe, and put it in the fifh again have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in fome fait, put the fifh on a drainer, and tie them acrofs it with

pack

FISH. 91

packthread, put them in and boil them; (if large half an hour, fmaller twenty minutes) tke them up, let them drain a moment and put them in a di(h $ garntlh with green fennel and fcalded goofeberrics, with fennel and butter and plain butter in boats.

To broil MackreL

GUT four mackrel and walh them clean, fplit

them down the back, wipe them dry with ' a cloth,

fpriokle fome pepper and fait on them, with a little

fennel, mine, and parlley chopped fine, flour them,

and broil them over a clear fire till they are brown i

put them in a hot dilh, and garnifh with fcalded

goofeberries and fennel, with fennel and butter and

plain butter in boats. You may broil them whole:

gut and wa(h them very clean, chop fome fennel,

mint, and parfley fine, mix it with a piece of butter

and a little pepper and fait, ftufi the mackrel and

wipe them with a cloth, flour them, and broil them

gently for half an hour; put them in a hot diib, and

garniifa with fcalded goofeberries and fennel, with

plain butter in a boat,

Mackrel a la Maitre de Hotel.

TAKE three mackrel, gut and wafli them clean, wipe them dry in a cloth, flit them down the back from head to tail, but do not open them, flour and broil theiti over a clear fire; have a hot difli ready, chop a handful of parfley and young onions, well picked and waflied very clean, mix it up with a quarter of a pound of butter, and pepper and fait, put the fifl) in the difli, and the parfley, &c. in the flit; keep them before the fire till the butter is melted, fqueeze the juice f two lemons over them, and fend them away hot.

To

9 FISH,

VTo boil Whitings.

GUT and wa(h the fifh clean, and take care of the livers fprinkle a little fait over them, and let them lay one hour; have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in fome fait, put the fifh on a drainer, and put them in; boil them gently according to the fize, a whiting of a pound weight will take twenty minutes, bigger or lefs in proportion $ take them out of the water, and let them drain a moment, put them in the difli; boil the livers by themselves, and put them with the fifh; garnifli with horfe-radifh and parfley, with anchovy faucc and plain butter in boats.

To broil Whitings

GUT and wa(h them clean, and put the livers in again, wipe them with a cloth and flour them, broil them over a clear fire till they are brown on both fides, and put them in a hot di(h; garnifh with horfe-radilh and parfley, with anchovy fauce and plain butter in boats

To fry Whitings.

GUT and wa(h them clean, and with your knife cut ail the fin clofe on the back, flip the fkin off, turn them round, put the tails into their mouths, and fallen them with fmall Ikewers, wipe them with a cloth, then with a pafte-brulh rub them over with the yolks of eggs, and fprinkle bread-crumbs over them I have ready a pan of hogs-lard or beef-dripping boiling hot, put them in, and fry them of a fine gold colour; take them out, and put ihem on a flrainer or fieve to drain the fat from themi fry a

handful

FISH. 93

handful of parfley put it to drain, and put them in a hot difli i garnifli with crifpt parfley, with anchory iauce and plain butter in boats.

To boil Haddocks.

SCALE and gut the fi(h, rip them open, take the black (kin out of the infide, wafh them well, fprinkle fome fait over them, and let them lay two hours v have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in ibme lalt, put the 6(h on a drainer, and put them in; boil them gently according to the fize, (a haddock of two pounds will take half an hour, bigger or lefs in proportion take them out and fet them acrofs the kettle to drain, and with a pafte-bruih wafli them, put them in a diihi boil the livers by themfelves, and put them round the filhi garnilh with horfe radifh and parfley, or barberries, with anchovy fauce in boatSa

To broil Haddocks.

SCALE, gut, and wa(h the fi(h as before, fprinkle them with fait, let them lay an hour, wipe them dry with a cloth, and flour them % have a clear fire, put on the gridiron, make it, hot, rub it with beef or mutton fuet, put on the ftfh, and broil them on both (ides of a fine brown; boil the livers, and put the fifii in a hot difh, with the livers round them j gamiih with horfe-radilh, wiih flirimp and anchovy uce la boats.

To fry Haddocks.

GUT and waih them clean, cut the fins on the hack clofe, flip oflT the flcin% turn them round with the tails in their mouths, and faften ihzva with little

Ikewers,

94 FISH.

ikewers, then with a brujb put fome yolks of fggf on and ftrew bread-crumbs over them; have a pan of hogs-lard or beef-dripping boiling hot, put them in, and fry them quick of a fine light brown; take them out, and put ihem on a drainer before the fire to drain $ fry a handful of parfley crifp, and put it on a fieve to drain; put the fi(h in a hot difh, and garnifh with the fried parfley, with anchovy fauce in a boat..

Another way is, fcale and gut the fifh, wa(h them very clean, cut them in flices about an inch thick, dry them well in a cloth, and flour them; put a pound of butter into a frying-pan, and melc it till It is done hifling, put in your fifli, and fry them on both fides till they are brown; put them in a diihl before the fire to keep hot, and put a pint of boiling water, a quarter of a pound of butter, a fpoonfuL of anchovy liquor, two fpoonsful of ketchup, boil It up, pour it over the filh, and garnlfli with horferadifli.

To drefs Haddocks the Spanijh Way.

TAKE two fine haddocks, fcale, gur, and wa(h them well, wipe them with a cloth, and broil them; put a pint of fweec oil in a fl:ew.pan, feafon it with pepper and fait, a little cloves, mace, and putmeg beaten, two cloves of garlick chopped, pare half a dozen love-apples and quarter them, when in feafon, put them in, and a fpoonful of vinegar, put in the fifli and ftew them very gently for half an hour over a flow fire; put them in a hot difli, and garni(h with lemon.

T"-!

FISH. 95

0 drefs Haddocks the Jews Way.

TAKE two fine large haddocks, fcalc, gut, and 'walh them very clean cut them in dices three inches thick, and dry them in a cloth; put half a piat of fweet oil in a fiew-pan a middling onion aad a handful of parfley chopped finej let it boil up put in the fi(h with half a pint of water, fealbn ic with beaten mace, pepper and fait, coyer it clofe, and flew ic gently for three quarters of an hour; beat up the yolks of two eggs wiih the juice of a lemon, put them in and (hake the pan well a minute or two; put them in a hot difli, and garni (h with lemon.

To boil Pipers or Gurnets.

GUT and walh them clean; have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handful fait, put the fifli on a drainer, the belly downwards, put them in, and boil them gently half an hour, fkim them well, take them out, and put them acrofs the kettle to drain; put them in a dih, and garnilh with fried oyfters and horfe-radiih with lobfter and Ihrimp fauce in boata

To boil Herrings.

SCALE and gut your fi(h, cut oflF the heads, and walh them clean fprinkle them with fair, and lee them lay an hour; have fpring water boiling in $i ftewao, put in fome fait, and put in the fifh i boil them ten minutes, then take them out, put them in a dilh, and garni (h with barberries, with melted butter and muftard mixed in a boat.

J&

5 p r S H.

To broil Herrings.

SCALE and gut your fifli, Cbucnever wa(b them) ivipe them dry with a cloth, fprinkld fome fait and a little flour over them; broil chem over a clear fire very brown, put them in a hot difti, with melted butter and muftard mixed and plain butter in boats.

To fry Herrings.

SCALE, gut, and wafh them very clean, cutoff the heads, wipe, them dry with a cloth, flour them, fry them quick and brown in butter, and put theiQ before the fire to keep hot: in the mean time have a pan of hot far, and fry a handful of parfley crifp, cut fome onions in thin flices, dip them in ale batter, and fry them crifp; put the parfley and onions on a fieve to drain, put the herrings with the tails in the middle, with the parfley and onions round; put butter and muftard, and plain butter in boats.

To fry Smelts.

PULL the gut out, but mind and leave the roe in, wipe them very clean with a cloth, beat up two eggs in a plate, and dip your fmelts in on both fides; have crumbs of bread and a little flour mixed in a dilh, put the fmelts on one by one, and give them a roll over by fliaking the difli; have a pan of hogs- lard or beef- dripping boiling hot, put them in, and fry them on both fides of a fine gold colour; take them out, and put them before the fire to drain; fry a handful of parfley crifp, and put it on a fieve to drain; difli them with the tails in the middle, the crifpt parfley round for garnifl), with plain butter in a boat.

TVbiic

FISH; 97

White Bait.

TAKE your white bait frefh caughr, put them ia a cloth with a handful of flour, and two people have hold of the cloth, one at each end, and fhake them bckward and forward till they arc quite dry and fcparated; have fome hogs-lard boiling hot, and fry them quick two minutes, put them on a iieve to drain before the fire, and difh them in a hot diifa with plain butter in a boat and foy in a crewec.

7(7 hroil Sprats.

,

WIPE them clean, with a cloth, lay them clofc on a plare,. fprinkle a little fait and flour on them put that Hde on the gridiron, and fprinkle fait and flour on the other (ide, broil them on both fides over a clear fire very brown, put them in a hot difh, with bread and butter cut thin in a plate;

Ti boil Plaice or Flounders:

GUT your fifh and cut the fins clofe, warn theni well; have fome fpring water in a (lew-pan boiling, put in a little fait, put your fifh on a drainer, put them in, and boil them ten minutes; take them out, drain thetn a moment, put them on the diOi, and garnifh with parfley, with anchovy and parfley fauce in boats.

To fry Plaice or Flounders:

GUT and wafli them clean, cut oiF tlj.e heads and fins, dry them in a cloth, flotrr the backs, and with a bruDi put iome yolks or eggs on the belly, fprinkid brcadcrumbs over them; have readr a pan of hogs H ' lard

98 FISH.

lard or beef-dripping boiling hot, put thena in belly downwards, and fry them of a fine brown, turn them, and fry theai five minutes longer; put them on a drainer or ficve co drain, fry a handful of parflcy crifp put the fifti with the tails in the middle of the difti, and garnifh with crifp parflcy, with anchovy fauce and plain butter in boats.

To boil Barrel or Salt Cod.

AS this fifh is an article very much approved of by all ranks of people, it will be proper to give diredtions for cleaning, foaking, and dreffing it: In the firft place, take a (harp knife and pare the infidc all over, then wafli it well, put it into a tub of fpring water for twenty-four hours, then walh it out and put it in fpring water for twelve hours longer, take it out of that water, cut it through the middle, and then in pieces acrofs about fix inches wide, cut off all the fins j have a kettle of fpring water boiling, walh it well and put it on a drainer, boil it according to the thickncfs, if very thick half an hour, if rather thin twenty minutes, and (kirn it well; then take it up and fct it acrofs the kettle to drain, and with thepafte-brufli wafh it well,put it in your difti, and garniilz with hard eggs chopped fmall, with egg fauce and plain butter in boats-, mafli fome parfheps and put in a di(b, with fome boiled cut in fiices round it; mafii fome potatoes, and put fome whole round in another di(h, and fend it to table as hot as poflible. This is meant for cod that is not dried; it it is dried, it is proper to foak it twelve hours before you pare it, and then proceed as before diredted.

To

P I S it. 99

Tif boil Salt Ling.

PARE the iniidc well with a knife, nd put it irt I large tub of water to foak for forty-eight hours ihifting it every twelve hours, then wa(h it clean out and cut it down the middle and acrofs about fix inches widei put it on a drainer, and put it in fpring water cold boil it gently for half an Hour andfkiori it well; then take it out ef the water, fet it acrofs the kettle to drain, wafli it Well wth a pafte-brufli, put it in your difli, and garnifh with boiled prfneps and potatoes with egg fauce and plain butter in bo4ts.

0 drefs Bacaloa or 7tik.

YOU muft beat it well with a hammer or a wooden peftle on a block, then lay it in a large tub of water to foak for forty -eight hours, (htfcing the water every twelve hours •, then take it out and wafh it well, cut the bones our, cut it in pieces about fix ' fix inches wide, put it into foft water cold, andlnimcr it two hours j then take it up, fet it acrofs the kettle to drain, walh it well with a pafte-bruQi, and put it in a difh; garnifli with boiled parfneps, with egg fauce and melted butter and muftard in boats.

To broil dried Salmon.

m

CUT it in dices, put it into warm water for ten minutes, take it out and wipe it dry with' a cloth, pepper it, and broil it brown on both (ideft over a clear fires then put it in a hot difb with plain butter in a boat.

Ha T0

loo FISH.

To boil Scatcb or Salt Haddocks.

LAY therp in water all night, in the mCrniftg waih them out, and put them in frefli water, and lee them lay till you want to ufe them; then put them into cold fpring water, and boil them ten minutes; put them in the difh, with boiled potatoes rouodj and egg fauce and plain butter in boats. If you chufe to broil them after they are foaked fplit thetn, dry them with a cloth, pepper and broil them over a clear fire (five or (i minutes will do them with plain butter and mullard in boats.

jH? broil dried Whitings.

LAY the whitings in warm water for ten minutes, take them out, dry them with a cloth, with a feather rub them over with Tweet oil, put them over a clear fire, turn them quick, and every time you turn them rub them over with fweet oil, which will moifteo them and make them eat mellow; (five or fix minutes will do them) put them in a hot difli, and fend them up to table without any fauce, as they are generally eat with oil and mudard.

Britijh or pickled Herrings boiled.

LAY them in water the over-night, in the morning wafti them out, and put them m frelh water, let them lay till you want to ufe them; then put them in a kettle with cold water, and boil them fifteen minutes; put them in your difii, with malhed potatoes in another and plain butter in a boat.

Tp

I '

H. loi

10 boil a Pike.

SCALE, gill, and gut the fi(h, and wafli it well j make a ftufiing in the following manner: Chop a dozen oyfters fmall, the crumb of a penny loaf foakcd in cream, a quarter of a pound of butter, two anchovies chopped fine, a little grated nutmeg, fome fweet herbs and parfley, with a little lemon-peel Oired fine, feafon it with pepper and fait, mix it up well together, put it into the belly and few it up; then tie a ftring round the nofe, and with a large needle or Ikewer put it through the middle, and make it in the form of an S, by tying the ftring to the tail, and put it on a drainer-, have a fi(h kettle of fpring water boiling, with a handful of fait, put it in and boil it gently according to its fize; (a pike of eight pounds will take a full hour boiling, bigger or lefs in proportion) take it up and fct it acrofs the kettle to drain; put it in your difh, and garniih with fifli patties, or fried oyfters and horfe radifh, with ftrong anchovy fauce and plain butter in boats. You may if you pleafe boil it without the ftufHng.



To roajl or bake a Pike.

TREAT it with a ftuffing the fame as for boiling, put it on an iron baking-plate, rub the yolk of an tgg over it, fprinkle fome crumbs of bread on it, put fome bits of butter here and there over it, bake it two hours in a moderate oven, or put it in a tin oven before the fire and roaft it; bafte it often with butter, and turn it from one fide to the other before the fire, till it is of a fine brown j put it in the di(h, with fi(h patties and horfe-radiOi for garniih, put ravy fauce and anchovy fauce in boats,

H3 J

io PISH

7(7 boil Carp or 7'encb.

SCALJp, gut, and wafli the filh well; have ready a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fair, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome bay leaves, and half a pint of vinegar, put your filh on a drainer, put them in, and boil them half an hour, take them out and fet them acrofs the kettle to drain; foki a napkin, put it in your difli and put the fi(h on; garni(h with horfc-radifti and parfley, with anchovy fauce in boats. Be fure to favc the livers, melts, or rocs, and boil them by themfclves, and put them round the fifli,

Tojry Carp or Tench.

SCALE and gut the carp or tench, wafti them clean, dry them in a cloth, and flour them; put a pound of butter into a (lew-pan, make it hot, fry them on bcth fides of a fine brown, put them on a fieyc to drain; cut fome fippets three corner ways, and fry them with the roes or melts, put the fiih in 9 hot di(h, with the fippets and roes all round; garnifli with lemon, with anchpvy fauce in boats.

Another Way to fry Carp or T'ench,

TAKE three carp or tench, fcalc them, and pull the guts oqt by the giU??, but do not open the bellies, wafli them clean, and with the point of a knife flit them down the backs on each fide of the bone, from the head to the tail, raife the flclh up a little, and take out the bone; take another carp or tench, cut all the fifh off, and mince it fmall, with a few raufli rooms, cives, fweet herbs, and parfley (hrd fine, fcafop them with beaten cloves, mace nutmeg, pepper

I

H.

103

per and fait, beat them in a mortar very fine, and put in the crumb of a roll foaked in cream, two ounces of butter, with the yolks of three raw eggs 5 ftuff your carp or tench, and few the bark up with a needle and thread, wipe them with a cloth, flour them, fry them in butter of a fine brown, and lay them on a coarfe cloth before the fire to drain; pout all the fat out of the pan, put in a quarter of a pound of butter, (hake in fome flour, keep it ftirring rill the butter is a little brown, thc?n put in half a pint of white wine, half a pint of ale, an onion (luck with cloves, a bundle of fwetrt herbs, and two blades of mace, cover them clofe, and (lew them gently fifteen minutes; then ftrain it oflf and put it in a ftew-pan again, add two fpoonsful of ketchup, an ounce of truffle and morels rut fmall and boiled in half a pint of water, put the water in, with half a pint of oyfters blanched, liquor and all, (when your iauce is hot feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait) put in the filh and ftew it twenty minutes, fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, put the fifti in the dih, with the fauce all over thenri 5 arniih with fried fippeis and lemon.

Ho bale Carp.

SCALE, gut, afnd wa(h a brace of carp, cut the fins off clofe, and wa(h them well, take a long earthen pan, ju(t big enough to hold ihem, butter the pan ajittle, lay in the carp, feafon them with mace, cloves, nutmeg, whole pepper, a little fait, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, and an anchovy, pour in a bottle of white wine, cover them clofe, and bake them an hour in a hot oven if large, if fmall three quarters of an hour will do; when they are done take them out carefully, and lay them in a di(h, fet them over hot water and cover them clofe

' H 4 to

J04 F I 3 H.

to kee( hot; then drain the liquor they were bakctj in into a ftew-pan and (kim the fat off, put in half a pound of butter rolled in flour, let it boil, and keep ftirring it till it is thick and fmooth fqucczc in the juice pf half a lemon, with a litcle pepper and fait; pour the fauce over the fi(h, fry the rqes and lay them round; garnilh with lemon.

Carp fiu Blue.

TAKE a brace of carp and gut them, but neither fcalc nor wafli them, tie them to a fi(h-drainer, and put them in a fifti keale, pour boiling vinegar over them till they are blue, (or you may hold them down in a fi(h-kettle with two forks, and another perfon pcur the vinegar oyer them) then put in a quart of boiling water, a handful of fait, a ftick of horfe-radifli cut in flices, and boil them gently for twenty minutes; fold a napkin and put it in the difli, put them on the napkin, and garnifh wiih parfley; boil half a pint of cream, grate fome horfe-radifh in, and fweeten it with fugarfor fauce iq a boat. Be fure to lend them up hot.

Tojlew Carp or Tench.

TAKE a brace of carp or three tench, fcale, gut, and wafh them clean, cut the fins off clofe put thenri in a kcttk juft big enough to hold them; put four cunces of butter in a ftew-pan, melt it, and put in a large fpoonful ot flour, flir it till it is fmooth, pour in a pint ot good gravy, a pint of red port or claret, fix ihnllots chopped fine, a bundle of fwcct herbs, a littie cloves, mace, and all-fpice, one onion, a fpoonful (f ketchup, and a little anchovy liquor, leaion ir with pepper, fait, and Cayan pepper pretty highi boil it up for twenty minutes, then ftrain it

over

F I S H, 195

.oyer the filh, put in half a pint of frelh mufliroomst an ounce of truffles and morels, wa(hed well and cu( in pieces, half a pint of oyfters wafhed well, cover it dofe, and put ic over a flow fire, with fire on the lid, ftcw ic gently one hour, and give ic a gentle (hake now and then, to keep the fi(h from (ticking to the pan: in the mean time boil the roes, and cue them in fquare pieces, dip them in batter, and fry them brown in a pan of fat, with fippets cue three corner-way.s; take your fifh carefully out, and puc them in your di(li; ikim the fat off the fauce, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, pour it over the iilb, and garnilh with the roes, fried fippets,- and horfe-radifh, and (lick fome of the fippets in the fifh. You may, if you like it, fkin, gut, and wa(h two fmall eeU, fiour them and fry them brown with butter, and ftew them with the carp or tench.

Put one large carp, a brace of tench, and two eels in a di(b, put the carp in the middle, a tench on each fide, the eels round, and the garniOi round them. This makes an elegant tcp-di(h for a large or genteel company.

Tojienv Carp or Tench another Way.

SCALE and gut the carp or tench, and wafh them in a pint of ale or beer to fave the blood, put fome butter in a flew pan and melc it, put in 4 fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, drain the ale or beer in, put in a pint of red wine, fome cloves and mace, a little whole pepper, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, three or four (ballots, and an anchovy; Icafon it with pepper and fait, cover it clofe, and ftew it for fifteen minutes; put your fifli in a ftcw-pan and drain the liquor over them, put them over a flow fire and dew them gently for one hour, giving thcoi a gentle (hake noy and then to keep

lo6 FISH.

the fifli from (licking to the pan: in the mean tinne beat up the roe vfith the yolk of an egg, a little flour, a little pepper and fait, and a little lemon-peel flired fine, fry them in butter, about as big as a half-crown, of a fine brown, with fome fippets cut corncr-wajyi; put your filh carefully in the difli, pour the faucc over them, and garnilh with the roe, fippets, and horfe-radifli. If you chufc to have them white, ufe fi(h broth and white wine, infteai of the ale and red wine; or if you (houM be in a hurry, oil the fifh in fpring water and fait for twenty minutes, drain them, put them in a dih, and ftrair. the fauce over them j garnilh with horfe radifli and barberries.

To boil Percb.

SCALE the fifl) and draw the guts out by the gills, but do not oen the bellies, leave the roe in, and wafh them clean •, have a ftcw-pan of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fait, a bundle of fwect herbs, and a little horfe-radilh, with a gill of vinegar, put them in and boil them -, (if a pound weight twenty minutes) take them out and drain them, put them in a di(h, and garnifii with parflcy, with parfley-fauce in a boar.

Percb in Water Soticbee.

GET ten or twelve middle-fized perch alive, fcale, gut, and wafh them clean, cut the fins clofc ofF, cuiT them four times acrofs on one fide to the bone, (mind they are all cut on the fame fide) put them in fpring water one hour to crimp; take fix Dutch parfley roots, cut the Ikin ofi, cut them about two inches long, and as thick as a ftraw, boil them in fpring water till they are tender have a ftew-pan of fpring

water

FISH. 107

wftter boiling, enough to cover them, put in a handful of lalt, a gill of vinegar, the parfley-roots, and boil them fix minutes; put in the fi(h, with the cue fides uppcrmoft, boil them five minutes, then throw jn a large handful of green parfley, well picked and alhed clean, aqd boil them five minutes longer take them very carefully out with a filh-flice, put them in a foup-difh, with liquor enough to nearly cover them, ftraia the parfley and roots in a ficve, and put them over the fifh; garnifh with lemon, with parfley fauce in a boat, and bread and butter (ut thin in plates

To fry Perch.

SCALE, gut, and warn them clean, wipe them dry with a cloth, make a batter with flour, ale, and the yolk of an egg, and dip the fifli in on both fides; have a pan of hogslard or btef-dripping boiling hot, try them on both fides of a fine brown, put them on a coarfe cloth before the fire to drain; fry a handful of parfley crifp, put the fifli in a hot dih, and garnilh with the crifpt parfley with anchovy fauce in a boat. You may drefs roach, dace, and gudgeons the fame way.

To fry Lampreys.

YOU muft get them alive, bleed them, and fave the blood, waCh them in hot water and. ialc, take off the flimc, gut them, and wipe them with a cloth; cut them in pieces, flour them, and fry them in frefli burtertill they are nearly done; pour out the fat and put in a pint of white wine, give the pan a (hake round, feafon it with cloves, mace, nutmeg, lind a little whole pepper, fome falc, a bundle of fweet herbs, and a bay leaf or two, put in a ff w

capers.

io8 F I S H,

capers, a piece of butter rolled in flour and the bloody give the pan a Ihake round often, cover them clofe, and ftew them till they are tender; take them out with a fork, put them In a hot difti, flrain the fauce into another fteiv-pan, boil it up quick, fquccze in half a lemon, and pour it over the fiOi j garniih with lemon.

Tojiew Lampreys.

SKIN and gut the fifli, wafh them clean, turn them round on a fkewer, or cut them in pieces, put chem in a ftew pan, and feafon them with beaten cloves and mace, a little lemon peel (hred fine, pepper and fait, put in a pint of gravy, half ar pint of fed wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, a whole onion, % ipoonful of ketchup, a little anchovy liquor, and a piece of butter rolled in flour, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently over a flow fire, give the pan a fhake to keep them from fticking,ftew them till they are tender, take out the fweec herbs and onion, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, put them in a hoc difli, take out the fkewers, and pour the fauce over them; garniih with lemon and beet-root.

To boil Eels.

SKIN and gut the eels, and with a knife fcrape the blood out of the infide, wafh them clean, turn them round, and put a fkewer through •, have fpring water boiling, put in a little fait, boil them till they are tender, put them in a difh, and garnifti with parflcy, with parfley and butter in a boat.

r9

I S H, 109

Tofry Eels.

CLEAN them as before, cut them in pieces, pepper, fait, and flour them, fry them brown in butter, put them before the fire to drain, then put them in a hot diih; garnifh with horfe-radifli, with anchovy fauce in a boat.

0 broil Eels.

CLEAN them as before, wipe them with a cloth, turn them round, faften them with a fkewer, and rub ibme yolk of egg over them; have ready fbme bread-crumbs, fweet herbs and parfley chopped fine, a little lenK)n-peel fhred fine, pepper and ialc mixed together, and fprinkled on them; have a clear fire, and broil them of a fine brown, but mind you do not burn them; put them in a hot di(h, and garnifh with hor(eradih and parfley, with anchovy fauce and plain butter in boats.

To pitchcock Eels.

TAKE a large eel and fcour it well with fait, wipe it clean with a cloth, flit it down the back, take out the bone and guts, cut off the head, and wipe the blood ofi, put the yolk of an egg on it, and fprinkle bread-crumbs, fweet herbs, parfley and Icmon-peel fhred fine, a little nutmeg grated, pepper and fait mixed together, all over it; cut ic into four pieces, have a clear fire, and put them on the gridiron, fkin-flde downwards, and when that fide is done turn it on the other, and broil it of a fine browns put it in a hot difh, and garnifh with horferadifli and parfley, (or if you put two boiled eels in the middle and the pitchcocked all round, ic makes

a fine

no F I S H,

a fine difh) with anchovy lauce and parfiey and butter in boats.

To roqft leh and Lafnpreys.

THESE fi(h are roafted both in the fame manner t Gut them and cut 'ofF their heads Icour them well with fait to take off the Alme, and cake the blood from the bones; take a fmall eel, cut th fi(h from the bone mince it, the crumb of a halfpenny roll foaked in cream, a little lemon-peel, fwcct herbs, and parfley chopped fine, and a little pepper and fait; beat them in a mortar, mix them up with the. yolks of two eggs, put it in their bellies ftnd few them up, torn them round and faRen them with Ikewers, rub the yolk of an egg over and ftrew crumbs of bread on them, put them in a tin oven, and roaft them before the fire till they are of a fine brown; put them in a hot difh, and garnifh yixih lemon and parfley; have a fauce made with half a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, thicken it with flour and butter, and put in a fpoonful of ketchup and a little anchovy liquor, boil it ten minutes, and then put it in boats. You may bake them, after having prepared them in the fame manner as for roafting: put thetn in a di(h with half a pint of water, flour and put' fome butter over them, bake them in a moderate oven; when they are done, put them in a dilh, and fet them before the fire to keep hoc; take the gravy they were baked in, Ikim ofi the fat, ftrain it into a fauce-pan, with a glafs of white wine, one of browning, a fpoonful of ketchup, a fittle lemon pickle, pepper and fait, with a little butter rolled in flour, boil it ten minutes, and ftrain it over the fi(h; garnilh with lemon and beet-roott

r0

J

1 I S H.

Ill

T7 Jiew Eejs.

SKIN, gut, and cut the heads off of four eels,

take the blood out clean wa(h them welJ, cut them

into four pieces each, wipe them with a cloth, flour

and fry them brown in butter, and put them on a fieve

to drain, put a quarter of a pound of butter in a

ilew-pan, melt it, put in a fpoonful of flour, (lir it

till it is fmooth, pour in a pint of gravy, half a pine

of red wine, a bundle of fwect herbs, four ihallots

chopped fine, a lemon-peel, two or three bay leaves,

a fpoonful of ketchup, a little anchovy liquor, fca fon it with mace, cloves, Cayan pepper and fait,

and fl:ew it till ic is fmooch •, put your eeU in a flew

pan, flrain the liquor over them, put in half a pint

of niufhrooms, a dozen oyfters, and a few trufl3es

and morels well wafbed cover them clofe, and ftew

them gently three quarters of an hour, flcim them

clean, fquecze in half a lemon, put them in a di(h,

with the fauce overs garnilh wich lemon and horfe

radiib.

Another Way to Jiew Eels.

SKIN, gur, and wafli them clean, cut off the heads, take out the blood, cut them in pieces, and put them in a ftew-pan, with juft water enough j for fauce, an onion ftuck with cloves, a bundle of fweec herbs, three blades of mace, and fome whole pepper tied in a muflin rag; cover them clofe, ftew them gently, and put in a piece of butter rolled in fiur; when they are tender take out the fpice, onion, and herbs, chop fome parfley fine and put in, with a little fait; ftew ihem five minuteslonger, and put them in a difb, with the fauce over them garnifti with lnion.

0

112 FISH,

To flew Eels nvitb Broth.

CLEAN -your eels as before, put them into i ftew-pan, cover them with water, a blade or two of mace, a cruft of bread, and a little fait; ftew them till they are tender, take out the bread, chop a litde parfley and put in, and ftew them five minutes longer j then put them in a foup-di(h, with parfley and butter in a boat. This is excellent for confumptive or weak people.

To farce Eels with white Sauce.

SKIN and clean your eels well, pick off all the fifli from the bones, which you mufl: leave whole to the head, cut it fmall, and beat it in a mortar, with half the quantity of crumbs of bread, feafon it with nutmeg and beaten pepper, an anchovy pounded, a good handful of parfley chopped fine, a few truffles boiled tender, and a few muflirooms chopped fine, beat it well together, mix it up with the yolks of three eggs, and put it over the bone in the fliapc of an eel; butter a pan and put it in, rub the yolk of an egg and fprinkle bread-crumbs over it, bake it of a fine brown, and lay it carefully in the di(h; have ready half a pint of cream, four ounces of frefti butter, ftir it one way till it is thick, pour it over the eels, and garnifli with lemon; Three goodfized eels make a handfome difli.

To make a Collar of FiJJo in Ragou.

TAKE a lage eel, Ikin, gut, and wafli it clean, take off the filli from the bones, beat it in a mortar, with an equal quantity of crumbs of bread, fome fweet herbs, parfley and a lictk lemon peel chop-"

ped

FISH iij

ped fine, feafon it with a little bteil macci nut- meg, pepper and fait, beat it all well together put in the yolks of two eggs, and mix it up; take a turbott fcaite, thornback lal-ge foles of any flat fiih that will boil well, lay the Rlh on the drefler and take away all the bones and fins cut it ai it will foil even, rob the yolk of an egg ovcf ir and coirci it with the farter then roll it up as tight as you can open the eel ikin and bind the collar with it fo that it may be flat top and bottom to (land well in chd difhs butter an eanhen di(h and fct it upfight in ir flour it all over. Hick a pice of butter on the top and round the edge, fo that it may run down the fides of the fi(h, put a quarter of a pint of water in thj di(h, and bake it well, but take dare it is not broke i 10 the mean time take alltHe bones of the filh, fet them on to boil in a quart of water, with a little cloves and mace, whole pepper, a bundle of fweec herbs, and an onion, cover it clofe, let it flew till it is reduced to fi pint, apd then ftrain it off j pu a little butter into a (lew-pan, melt ir, and put iii a little flour, ftir it till it is imooth, by degrees pour the liquor in, ftir it till it boils then put in cw6 fpoonsful of ketehup, a gill of red wine, a gill of piekled muftrooms, fome truflSes and morels waihed well, and a dozrn oyfters, feafon it with Cayan pep. per and fait; fave fome of the farce, make it into fmall balls, and fry them brown in butter; when the fi(h is done put it in the difh, kirn all the Fat off the liquor in the pan, drain it into your fauce fqueeze in half a lemon, give it a boil up, pour it over the fi(h, and put the balls round; garniib with lemon and beetreot. You may roaft it in a tin oven before the fire, and then you can bafte k often with butter

114

H.

ITo boil Lobjlers.

TIE the tails up fall to the bodies with a ftriog put on a pot of water, lee it boil put in a. handful of fait, (boi) a good-fized lobfter half an hour) take it out, wipe all the fcum off, break the claws, and fplit it through the tail and back i put it in the difli, with a claw on each fide, and melted . butter ia a boat.

To broil Lobjlers.

BOIL them; as before, take the claws oflT, and fpttc the body and tail in two, pepper and falc it, and broil it claws and all;. crack the claws, lay the body and tail infide uppermo(V, with the claws od each fide, and plain butter in a boat.

Tb roajl a Lobjler.

TIE the tail to the body with packthread, and boil it in (alt and water half an hour; untie it, put it in a difli before the fire, and bafte it with butter till it is a fine frothy crack the claws, and fplit the tail open put it in a hot difii, with plain butter in a boat

ToJIew Lobjlers.

HALF boil two fine lobfters, break the claws and take out the meat as whole as you can, cut che tails ih two and take out the meat, put them in a ftew pan, with half a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, a little beaten mace, Cayan pepper and faltt a fpoonful of ketchup, a little anchovy liquor, and a little butter rolled in flour, cover thcm and fiew them

gently

I S H. 115

gently for twenty minutes give the pan a Ihakc round often to keep ibem from flicking, fqueeze in a little lemon, cut the chines in four; pepper, fair, Md broil ihem ( ptit the neat and fauce in a difli iuid the chines round for garni(b:

To ragou Lobfitn

HALF boil two lobfters, break the claws am) take out the meat, break the (hell of the tail and take it out whole bruife the fpawn, put a little butter in a dew-pan, melt it, and put in a little flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, then put in half a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine and a fpoonful of ketchup fealon it with a little beaten niace, fame Cayan pepper and lalt pretty high and boil it till it is fmooth; cut oflP the ends of the tails that they may lay even in the difb, cut fhe red: into fquare pieces, and put it into the flew-pan with thefpawn, cover it clofe and ftew it gently tor twenty minutes, fqueeze m a little lemon, put the tail in the .middle of the dilh, with the other meat round and the fauce over it garmfli with fried fippets.

To butter Lobfiers.

TAKE two lobfters and boil them in fait and water, break them to pieces, take out all the meat cut it fmall, put it into a ftewp, with as much melted butter as will moiften it, a licte pepper and fait, and a little vinegar, keep it ftirring till it is hoccut the .chines into four pieces, pepper, fait, and broil them, put the meat in adUL with the chines round tt.

%

ii6 FISH.

A Dijb of cold Lobjiers.

• TiKE three middle- fized lobflers, and tie the tails with packthread to the bodies, boil them in fait and water for half an hour, take them out, put a little butter in a cloth, and wipe them to raife the colour; when cold, pull off the claws and tails, crack thf claws, fplit the tails in two, and put the bodies upright in the difli, with the tails and claws all round garnifli them all over with parfley.

Sn? butter a Crab.

BOIL the crab in fait and water pretty well, pull the claws oflp, break chem, take out the meat, and cut it fmall, pull the fmall claws off and keep them hot, take all the meat out of the (hell and cut it fmall, put all the meat in a ftew-pan, with melted butter to moiften it, a little, pepper, fait, and vinegar, ftir it till it is hot; cut the chine in two, pepper, falc, and bfoil it, make the (hell hot in water put the meat in, and put ic in a difi, with the chine at each tposl I crack the little claws, and put chem round for garnifli.

To drefs a Crab.

BOIL the crab well in fait and water, and when,coId break it up, mix the meat in the infide of the (hell well together, break the large claws, take out the meat, and cut it fine, lay it over the (bell-meat as handlbme as you can in the fhell, put it in the di(h, fplit the chine in two, and put at each end; crack the fmall claws and put them round mix fomcoil and vinegar, a little muftard, PPPr, and

ftle,

F- I S H.- 117

QAtf and put It over the meat in the Ihell; garniO with parQcy.

To dijh Crawfijb.

HAVE a faucc-pan of fpring water boiling, throw in aiiandful of falc, put them in, boil them a quarter of an hour, and then drain them ofF; when coJd put a handful of parflcy in the di(h, and place them all round as clofe as you can with the tails outOde, and put ibme at the top in what form you pltafe garnifh all over with parflcy.

To dijio Prawns.

HAVE a faucc-pan of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fait, put them in, and boil them quick for ten minutes, ftrain them oS'i and when cold, take a di(h a fize Icfs than the one you intend to put them in, turn it upGdc down, place the prawns as clofe as you can, the backfidc down and the tails outward, put a handful of parflcy in the middle, put the oihcr difli over them and turn them over, then put a few at the top, and garnifli wiclf parflcy,

Tojieiv Scollops.

OPEN a dozen fcollops-, and take them out as whole as you can, put them in a faucepan and fet them, then ftrain the liquor from them through a fieve, wafli them well in cold water, take off the beards and the black fpot, put them into a ftewpan drain the liquor from the Icttlings, and put to them a gill of white wine and a fpoonful of ketchup, fea fon them with a little beaten mace, pepper, and fait, put in a little butter mixed ith flour, flew them

I 3 gently

ii8 FISH.

gently till they are as thick as crearr, iqueeze in ttie juice of a Seville orange, put them in a hot dilh, and garnifh with fried fippcts.

Tofricafee Scollops.

OPEN a dozen fcollops, and take thein out a) ivhole as you can, put them in a faiice-pan and fet them, then ftrain the liquor from them through t fieve, wafh them very clean in cold water, take off the beards and the black fpot, put them in a ftewpan, pour the liquor from the fetclings and put in ieafon them with a little beaten mace, Cayan pepper and fait, and put in a little butter mixed with flour, keep them ftirring till thick and finooth, mix the yolk of an egg with half a pint of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, put it in, and keep (baking the paa till it is near boiling, but do not let it boil, for feir of curdling, fquceze in the juice of a Seville orange and give it a (hake round i then put them in a hot di(b, and garnilh with toa(ted (ippets

9

9

ojiew Oyjlers.

TAKE a quart of large oyfters, put them in a faucepan and fet them, ftrain the liquor from them through a (ieve, wafli them well and take off the beards; put them in a ftew-pan, and drain the li- quor from the fettlings, put to the oyfters a quarter of a pound of butter mixed with flour, a gill of white wine, and grate in a little nutmeg, with a gill of cream, keep them ftirring till they are thick and fmooth, put (ippcts at the bottom of the di(h, pour the oyfters in, and put (ippcts all rounds

f

f

FISH. fi9

To ragou Oyiers.

TAKE a quart of the largeft oyfters you can gtt, put them into a faucepan andjuft fct them ftrain the liquor from them through a (ieve, wa(h them well, and take off the beards make a batter thus: take the yolks of two eggs, beat them up well, grate in a little nutmeg, a little lemon -peel, and a band ful of parfley chopped fine, a fpoonful of the juice of fpinach, with a gill of cream or milk, and mix it up with flour to a thick batters put a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it till it is done hifling flcim it, and have it clear; dip half the oyfters in batter, roll them' in bread-crumbs, and fry them of a light rown; the other half dip in the batter only fry them Ix-own, and put them on a fieve to drain ( boil a quart of chefnuts for half an hour, peel them, flour and fry them in butter, and put them on a fieve to drain i pour out all the butter, (hake a little flour over the pan, and rub four ounces of butter 'all over the pan with a fpoon till it is meltedf then drain the oyfter liquor from the fettlings and put ic In, with half a pmt of white wine, feafon it with a little beaten mace and nutmeg, Cayan pepper and fait, let it boil up, put in the chefnuts, and dew them five or fix minutes i beat up the yolks of two eggs in half a pint of cream and put in, keep the pan (baking round till it is thick and fmooth, then lay the oyfters in a hot di(h, and pour the chefnuts and fauce over them garnifti with lemon and beet root.

ScoOopptd Oyfters.

TAKE a quart of large oyfters, put them in a iauce-pan and (et them, ftrain the liquor from them

I 4 . through

IS9 FISH.

t

through a fievc, vafli them well, and take off tbe beards; get three fcoUqp-fliells, either real or tin ones, butter the bottoms, and fprinkle a few crumbs of bread on them, then put on the oyfters, with a little pepper, grate a little nutmeg and put a piece of bqtter over them, pour the liquor off the fettlings and put as much in as the (hell will hold, put bread crumbs over all, and put them on a gridiron to make the bottom part hot, then put them in a tin oven before the fire to brown, mind and turn them, that 11 the fcoUop is brown i put thpm in 4 di(h and cnd them to table hot.

0 fiew Mufchs.

TAKE one hundred mufcles, put them in a pail of water, and wa(h them well with a birch broom, then put them in a pail of fpring water and fak for two hoirs, wa(h them out, put them into a faucepan, and cover them clofe; ftew them gently till they open, drain the liquor from them through a fieve, pick them out of the (hells, and take out the beard, (if there is a crab under the tongue throw thac mufcle away) put them into a ftew-pan, drain the liqgor from the. fettlins and put half of it in, with a gill of white wine, a little grated nutmeg, find a piece of butter miiced with flour, Rew them gently, and keep them ftirring till they are thick and fmooth ', put them in a ho( difli, with toaftcd fippeta for garnifh

ojlew Mufcles another Way.

STEW the mufcle as before, put them in a dilh, fprinkle lome bread-crumbs over them, and with a lot (ajamiodf or iron brown thm over, or pu:

FISH. izi

em in a tin oven before the fire and turn them round till they are of a fine brown.

To Jlew Cockles.

PUT two hundred cockles into a pal! of water, and waOi them well with a birch broom, then put them into a pail of fpring water and fait for two hours, wa(h them out and put them into a fauce pan, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently till they open, drain the liquor from them through a iieve, pick them out ot the (hells and wath them well, put them into a ftew-pan, drain the liquor from the fectlings, and put it to the cockles, with a glafs of white wine, a little grated nurmeg, and a piece of butter mixed with flour, ftew them gently till they are thick and fmooth; put them in a hot difb, and garnifh them with toafted fippets.

VCoftey Crawfijhf Prawns or Shrimps.

TAKE half a hundred crawBfb, or one hundred prawDS or two quarts of ihrimps, boil them in fak and water, pick ou the tails and bruife the bodies, put the bodies on the fire with half a pint of water, a pint of white wine, a blade of mace, and a bit of horfe-radifb, and ((ew them a quarter of an hour $ then (train the liquor ofl, wa(h out the ftew-pan, and put the tails and liquor in, with a piece of butter mixed with flour, and a little grated nutmeg, ftir them and ftew them till they are thick and fmooth; cut a thin toaft round a quartern loaf, toaft it brown on both fides, cut it into fix pieces, lay them clofe in a difli, nd put the ingredients over; if it is crawfiih, break fome of the claws, take out the meat, and put them round the di(h for garnifli, and put the reft with the tails.

CHAP.

t?2 1

CHAP. nr.

SAUCES.

YO U (hould be very careful and particular in making your fauces and gravies for if they are not good they often fpoil whatever fi(h, &c. they are made for; and be fure to (kirn the ft off the gravy and never oil the butter nor fauce: if it (hould hap pen chat your fauce is oiled, fkim off all the oil, and melc fome butter foiooth, and put it in in its ftead.

Gravy.

TAKE two or three ra(hers of bacon or ham, a pound of lean beef, one of veal, and one of mutton, put the bacon or ham at the bottom of ybur pan, cut the meat in thin pieces, and put over, with four, onions, a carror, two turneps, four heads of cellery, a little thyme well wafhed and cut fmall, a little cloves, mace, and all-fpice, with a little water; cover it cloff and fweat it over a flow Bre till it iticks, which you will know by the pans hiding, but mind it does not burns pour in three quarts of boiling water, fkim it clean, feafon it with fait to your palate, and (lew it gently till it is as good as you would have it, then ftrain it off for ufe. You may make it of beef without veal or mutton in the fame manner,

Crwvf

fr.

S A U C E S. 115

Gravy for white Sauces.

TAKE two pounds of lean veal, cut it in fmali pieces, put it in a ftew-pan with two quarts of water, (when the fcum rifes fkim it well) and put in an onion a carrot, two or three blades of mace, and. a little thyme; feafon it with fait, and (lew it till ic i% half wafted, then ftrain it off for ufe.

Gravy for a Fowl when you have no Meat.

• _

TAKE the neck, gizzard, and feet, put them in

a pint of boiling jwrater with a cruft of bread, a

blade of mace, a little thyme, and fome fait, ftew

them till the liquor is above half wafted -, put in a

glafs of red wine, ftew ic five minutes longer, and

ftrain itj if you like it thickened, put in a bit of

butter, mixed with flour and boil ic up till it is

fmooth.

As it often happens in country places, that gravy

beef is not always to be got: if you have any beef,

veal, or mutton in the houfe, and in want of gravy,

trim off the outfides of the meat, and proceed as

in the iirft receipt i or when you have a large encer tainment you may add more meat, according to the

quantity you think you (ball want •, and if you

chufe to have it rich, cut an old fowl into pieces and

put it in, or a pigeon or two

Brown Gravy for Fjh.

TAKE a pint of mild ale and half a pint of water, an onion cut fmall, a little lemon-peel, fix cloves, two blades of mace, a lictle whole pepper, a fpoonful of ketchup, and a fpoonful of anchovy liquor i put two ounces of butter into a ftew-pan

an4

l SAUCES.

and melt it, put in a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is a little brown and by degrees pour in the above ingredients, ftir it well round, and boil it twenty minutes; then (train it off for ufe.

White Gravy for Fijh Sauces &e.

TAKE two pounds of any fort of filh you have, clean it well, cut it in pieces, put it in a fauce-pan, with two quarts of water, a little cloves and mace, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little lemonpeel, aisd a little fait, cover it dole, and boil it till half is wafted i put a little butter into a Itew-pan, melt'it, put in a fpoonful of flour, and ftir it till it is fmooth then ftrain the gravy through a fleve to it let it boil till it is fmooth, then it will be fit for ufe

Gravy for Venifon.

WHEN you have boned your venifon, chop the bones to pieces, and put them in an earthen pan, with the ikins and trimmings, cover them with water, and put in fome pepper and fait; tie it over with coarfe paper, and bake it two hours, then ftrain it off, ikim off the fat, poiir it from the fettlings, and make it boiling hot, then put it into the pafties; if it is for roaft venifon, put a fpoonful of browning in to colour it. This is better than any other fort of gravy for venifon, as it has its own natural flavour

Sweet Sauces for Venifon or HareSn

PUT half a pound of currant jelly into a ftewpan, two or three knobs of fugar, and a gill gf red wine, fimmer it till the jelly is melteds or a pint of red wine wifth a quarter of a pound oi fugar fin) mcrcd

SAUCES. tij

tnered over a clear fire for five or fix miiluts; ot half a pint of vinegar and a quarter of pound of fugar ficnoicred till it is a fyrup.

Force-meat Balls for real or mock Turtle..

TAKE half a pound of lean veal, half a pound of beefofuet picked from che firings, a quarter of a pound of fat bacon cut fine, put it into' a mortar and beat it well; then put in half a pound of bread-crumbs, fome fweet herbs and parley, fix fhallots chopped fine, fealbn it ivith Cayan pepper and pepper and fait, beat it' well together, put the yolks or two eggs in, and mix it up then put the white of ail egg in a fl:cw-pan, cover. aindf beat it till it is of a fine froth, put it in and mix' it well altogether, and with a little flour roll the out in balls, and boil them in a quart of boiling Wter.

When you make force-meat for Scorch bt' white coUops, &c. leave out the Cayan pepper, and ptit very little (ballot in; and for brown dilhesyou maf fry theoi, if you like it belt.

Egg Balls.

BOIL eight eggs hard, and take out the yolks put them in a mortar and bruife them, put in a little pepper and falt the yolk of a raw egg, and a little flour, mix them all well together, and with a little flour in your hand roll them into little balls; have a fauce pan of water boiling, put them in, boil them a minute or two, and drain them ofiT

Brcwningfor made Jijhes tSc.

PUT a quarter of a pound of lump fugar into ah' earthen ppkin with a little water tp mclc ir & bit

of

t2$ SAUCE S,

of butter as big as a Dutmeg, put ic on a flow fire and when the fugar begins (o froth, keep it ftirriog with a ikewer till it is quite black, then pour in a pint of hot water, and take it off the fire diredly,or elfe it will boil over; then boil it gently for half an hour, with a gill of ketchup in it, ftrain it off, and when cold bottle it for ufe This article the cook ihould never be without.

Lobfter Sauce.

TAKE two hen lobfters alive if you can, if there is any fpawn on the outfide pick it off", boil the lobfters half an hour, take out all the meat and foawn put all the ipawn in a mortar with a little Dutter, and bruife it fine, put the fhells la a fauce pan, with a pint and a half of water, a little cloves and niaci, a few bits of horfe-radi(b, and boil it half an hour; then ftrain it into a ftewpan, c.ut the meat in little pieces and put in, with the fpawn, a pound of frefti butter, half a lemon, two fpoonsful of anchovy liquor, one of ketchup, and fome butter mixed with flour, boil it up gently till the butter is melted, and it is thick and fmooth, take out the lemon and fqueeze the juice in, ftir it rQund, and put it into the fauce-boats.

Ojifier Sauce for Pijh.

OPEN a pint of large oyfters and juft fcald them ftrain the liquor from them, wafli them clean, and beard them, put them into a ftew-pan, and drain the liquor from thefettlings to them, put in halfa pound of butter, fome butter mixed with flour, a quarter of a lemon, a fpoonful of anchovy liquor, and one of ketchup, boil it up gently till the butter is melted, and (be lauce thick and fmooth, take out the lemoi

and

SAUCES. 127

and Iquene the juice in. You may, if you like iCy put a glafs of mountain wine in.

Oyjler Sauce for boiled Turkey Fowls, or any

white Meat.



OPEN a pint of large oyfters and juft fcald thcm ftrain the liquor through a fieve wafli and beard them, put them into a ftew-pan, and poor che liquor from the fettlings in, put in half a lemon, a piece of butter mixed with flour,. a quarter of a pound of butter, and a gill of cream, boil ic getitly till it it thick and fmooth; take out the lemon and fqueeze the juice in, ftir it round, and then put it in your

&uce-boats

Shrimp Sauce.

TAKE balf a pint of picked (hrimps and wafli them clean, put them in a ftewpan, with a gill of gravy or water, half a pound of butter, fome butter mixed with'fiour, a ifxKinful of anchovy liquor, one 0f ketchup, and ' half a lemon, boil it tiH the butter is melted: and it is thkk md fmooth; take out the lemon and. fqueeze the juice in, ftir it about, and then put it in the fauce-boat.

Anchovy Sauce.

MELT half a pound of butter fmooth and thick, put two fpoonsful of anchovy liquor in, and boil ic up a minute or two, then put it in the fauce-boat Toumay put in two fpoonsful of ketchup, walnut pickle, lemon pickle; iby, or quin fauce, or any thing you fancy.

• MttfcU

128 SAUCES.

Mufcle Sauce.

WASH half a hundred of mufcles well, put them in a lauce-pan cbver them clofe and dew them till they open, pick them out of the fhells, take out the beards wafh them clean in cold water, put them into a ftew-pan, ftrain the liquor through a fieve, and pour half to the mufcles, put in half a pound of butter, and fome butter mixed with flour a fpoonfal of anchovy liquor, boil it gently till the butter is melted, and the fauce thick and fmooth i then put it in the fauce- boat. - .. j

Cockle Sauce.

WASH a hundred cockles very clean, put them into a fauce-pan, cover them clofe, (lew them gently till they open, ftrain the liquor. through a fieve, waih them clean, in cold water, and put them in. a ftewpan, pour half the liquor, in,;, with half a pound of butter, fome butter mixed whh fiourifWo Spoonsful .of anchovy liquor, and •- dne of ketchup.; . boil it gently tiU the butter is melted, and the fauce thick and fmooth, then put it in the fauce-boat.

mt'

Melted Butter.

PUT a pound of butter cut in pieces into t fauce-pan, with a quarter of a pint of water and duft in a little flour, Ihake it well round, put it on a clear fire, and ihake it round often till it is melted and juft boils up.

You may melt it without flour and wat: cut the butter into fmall pieces, and keep h ihaking over a clear fire till it is melted

S A U C E S 120

'•i

White Celkry Sauce,

TAKE the white part of a dpzen heads of CtWetj tut ic about an inch long, wa(h it cleanf, and boil it in foiK quarts of water till ic is tender: in the mean time get a gill of white gravy, half a pint of cream, aad a little butter rolled in flour; boil it up till it is thick and fmooth, grate in a little nutmegs ftrain the cellery in a fieve, and put it in with a little fait) boil it up a minute, and then put it over a boiled turkey, fowlsj or any thing elfe you want is fpr, or in boats.

Brown Celkry Sauce

CUT, waih, and boil the cellery as before, put about two ounces of butter into a ftew-pan, meltTt, and put in a fmall fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, and put in a pint of gravy, a glafs of white wine, smd boil it till it is fmooth, grate in a little nutmeg, and feafon it wjth pepper and falt ftrain otf the cellery and put in, ftew k for five minutes and then it wiU be ready for ufc.

Onum Sauce fir boiled Rahbits Ducks, Geefe &C4

TAKE two do2en of large onions, peel the (kins oflF, and take off the firft coat, flit thcin almoft through, and throw them into cold water, boil them in plenty of water till they are very tender, chiinging the water twice, ftrain them in a cullender, ahd fqueeze out a little of the water, then with a wooden fpoon rob them through the cullender, put them Into a ftew-pan, with a gill of cream, a quarter of a Kund of butter, and duft in a little flour, with a litde falti boil them up gently till the butter is

K meltedj

130 SAUCES.

melted, and kep ftirring it all the timc or elfe it will burn.

Spanijh Onion Sauce.

PEElr the fkins and take oflF the firft coat of fit or eight large Spanifh onionst flit them almoft throut and boil them in a gallon of water (change the water once till they are very tender, drain thedi in a fieve, and chop them fine on a board, put them into a ftew-pan, with a gill of cream a quarter of a pound ot butter, a little ftour and fait, boil them up gently till the butter is melted, but keep ftining it all the time, or it will burn. Thiy is a proper fauce for roaft turkis, wild fowl, mutton, &c.

N. B. If vou have no Spanish onions, you may ule large Englim ones in their room.

Gallentine Sauce.

CUT the crumb of a penny loaf in thin flice( put it into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of water and a ftick of cinnamon, boil it gently till the bread is foft, beat it up with a fpoon, put in half a pint of red wine, a little butter, and a dozen knobs of fugar, boil it gently till it is fniooth, take out the cinnamon, and it will be fit for ufe.

Bread Sauce

TAKE the crumb of a penny loaf and rub it through a cullender, put it into a ftew-pan, with a little water, apint pf milk, a whole onion, aipoonful of whole white pepper, a little butter and fair, boil it gently, and keep it ftirring often till it is fmooth take out the onion, and then beat it up

well

I



S A U C E 8,- 131

well with a (pooD make it hot, and put it into a

lauceboat

. . . I

Sauces for a Pig

WHEN you have cut up the pigi lak out thf brains and chop them, put them inCQ a ftew-pai with half a pint of white broth or gcavy the fca Iboing in the infide, and the gravy that coine frongi the pig, put a little flour and butter, in to thicken ix and as quick as you can give it a boil up aujd ut i( in the diOi under the pig.

Take the crumb of a penny loaf and rub it through a cullender, put it into a ftew-pan with a pint of milk, walh a quarter of a pound of currants weU, dry them in a doth and pick them, put thena in, boil it gently, .keeping it ftirring till i( is fmooth and put it in a I'auceboat. .. .

Take the crumb of a penny loaf, cut it in thin flices, put it in a ftew-pan with a pint of milk, boil it, keeping it ftirring and beat up till it is fmooth; cut three or four heads of pickled famphir and put in, give it a boil up, and put it in a fauce-bo)it

. '.•

Green Sauce or Green Geefe, DuckXrigs (0c.

TAKE half a pint of veal broth, and thicken it with a little flour and buttery put in half a dozen knobs of fugar and boil it up, then put in a gill of fpinach juice, make it hot, but do nor lee it boil 1 then fqueese in the juice of a Seville orange, buc take care the feeds do not fall in, flir it rounds and put it in a fauce-boat. - -

K a Sorrel

13 SAUCE S.

Sorrel Sauce.

PICK a large quantity of garden forrtl, and walk it very dean, boil it in a fauce-pan with a little water till tender, ftrain it oflT fqueeze the water ooi be tweeo two plates, chop it fine on a board, put it in a ftewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter a little flour half a pint of gravy, and ibme pepper and fait, ftir it till the butter ia melted, then it is fit for uie.

Fennel Sauce.

PICK and wafli a handful of fennel, have a fauce-pan of water boiling, put it in, and Ml i quick and greeny chop it fmall, put it in a fiiuceDoa pour melted butter in, and ftir it well up. .

Farjley Sauce.

PICK and waOi a handful of parQey, have a fauct-pan of water boiling, put it in,, and boil, it quick and green; chop it on a boaid, put it in a fauce-boat pour melted butter over it and ftir it well up

Egg Sauce.

JBOIL three eggs hard, take off the fhells, and chop them on a board, but not too fine, put them in a fauceboat or bafon, pour in half a pound of inclte4 butter, and ftir it up.

Afflt

S A U C E S 133

Apple Sauce.

PARE and core (ix large apples, cut them in quarters, put chem in a flew-pan, with a little water to keep them from burning, a bit of cinnamon and lemon pee cover them cloie, and (lew them gently till render; take out the cinnamon and lemon-peel, bruile them well with a wooden fpoon, put in fome moift fugar and a little butter, and ftir it well till the butter is melted.

Mint Sauce.

PICK and walh a handful of green mint very clean, chop it fine, mix fome fugar and vinegar in a boar, put in the mint, and ftir it up

Caper Sauce.

CHOP a gill of capers, but not fine, put them ID a fauce-boat with a little of the liquor, pour in hpt melted butter, and ftir them up.

pQveroy Sauce.

PEEL and chop fix (ballots 6ne, put them in a fauce-pan, with half a pint of gravy, a fpoonful of vinegar, a little pepper aiid fait, boil it up, and then put u in the fauce- boat.

Carrier Sauce.

SLICE two large onions very thin, put them in fpring water for one hour, ftrain them off, and piit diem in a plate, fprinkle a little pepper and lalt over thes mis ibme oil and vinegar and pour over alL

K 3 Coi

134 SAUCE S.

Goifihtrty Sauce.

CODDLE half a pint of goofeberries, ftnm them off, and put 'thenti in a boat with feme fine

Sowder fugar, pour fome hot melted butter in, and;ir them up gently.

Wbitf Sauce Jor botled Fowls or Chickens.

TAKE half a pint of veal gravy, put it in a ftew pan, with a little mace, white pepper, and fait, boil it five minutes, (kirn it clean from fat, mix a little flour with half a pint of cream and put in, 9il it up five minutes, and drain it over your fowls, or into a fauce-boat.

Mock Oyjler Sauce.

TAIE half a pint of water, two blades of mace, an anchovy, a little lemon-pee), and a few white pepper corns, boil it gently for ten minutes, ftrain it off, put it in a ftew-pan, with a little flour and butter and half a pint of cream, boil it till it is thick and fmooth, and pour it over your fowls or .turkey;

• •

White Mujhroom Sauce.

FEEL and cut off the roots pf a quart of frelh mufhrooms, wafh them clean and cut them in two put them into a (lew-pan, with a quarter of a pint of water, a piece of lemon-peel, a little beaten mace and nutmeg, cover them clofe, . and Hew them very .gently for half an hour; (but mind they -do not Itick. or burn) beat up the yolks of two eggs with haif a pine of cream if there is much liquor put in a

little

S A U C E S 135

little flour and butter and a little fait, ftir them till they are fmooth then put in the egRS and cream keep them ftirring till they jufl: boil, fqueeze in a little lemon juice, and then put them ovtr the fowls or in fauce-boats; Obferve to take out the lemon peel.

Brown Mujhroom Sauce.

TREAT' the muihrboms as before, put them in a fiew-pan, with half a pint of brown gravy, a little lemon- peel, fome pepper and fait to your palate, ftew them gently for half an hour, (if the gravy is wafted too much put in Ibme more, with a little butter mixed with flour) keep them ftirring till thcf are thick and fmooth, fqueeze in a little lemon-Juice, take out the lemonpeel, and pour them over roaft or broiled fowls.

Pickled Mujhroom Sauce.

PUT half a pint of brown gravy into a ftew-pan, a fpoonful of ketchup, a little pepper and lalt, a piece of butter mixed with flour, a giil of pickled mulhrooms, and a little of the pickle, keep it ftir ring till it is thick and fmooth, then pour ft over roaft or broiled fowls.

•

Sauce fir roaji Rabbits.

BOIL the livers with fome parfley for a quarter of an hour, chop them feparate, put them together in a boat, pour hot melted butter in, and ftir it well up. You may either put it under the rabbits, or lend it in a boat.

K 4 fVbhe

I I

13

SAUCES.

f

White Sauce for a Hare.

PUT a pint of cream and half a pound of butter snco a fteW'pan, keep it ftirring till the butter is melted and the fauce thick, then put the fauce io the diih, and the hare upon it.

Lemon Sauce for boiled Fowls.

. PARE oflF the rind of a lemonj cut it in flicei, take out the kernirU, and cue it in fquare bits, boil the liver of a chicken or fowl and chop it fine, put he lemon and liver together in a boat, pour hot,melted butter in, and dir it up.

Another Sauce for hoiledFowls.

TAKF the liver of the fowl, bruife it with a little of the liquor, cue a little lemon-peel fine, and mix it by degrees with melted butter, give it a boil end pour it in tbedilh.

Sauce Robart.

CHOP two large onions very fine, put a little butter in a ftew-pan, and fry them a little, put in a litcle fiour and hlf a pint of good gravy, ftir it about, feafon it with pepper and fait, fiew it for five mlnuces then put in a fpoonfu! of muftard

Fin Sauce.



TAKE one onion, fome parflcy, frc(h mufhrooms

' and fome capers, chop them fine, put a little butter

in a lUw-pan put the things in and fweat them a

little

BOILING. 137

little over a flow fire 1 then put in half a pint of gravt A Kttle butter mixed with Sour, and ftew it till it is thick and fmooth, (kirn it fea&n it with pepper and falt and fqueeu in a little lemon-juice.

CHAP. V.

B O I L I N a

proper Rules to be obferved in Boiling.

AS neatnefs and clinlinefs is requifite in a kiichen, as well in a cook's perfep as the uteniilsj it is proper that the cook (hould fee that all the pots nruce-pans, covers, and every other article is kpc clean from greafe and fand, and well tinned. In boiling all kinds of meat and poultry much care and nicety is required, particularly in veal, lamb, and poultry I it is often a great fault in putting too little water in the pot, as that often makehe tnings look black; be fure always to put in plenty of foft water make it boil firft and fkim it wellt fpr veal, Iamb, or poultry, 'before you put it in. As for large joints tf beef, mutton, or pork, it is beft to put the meat in the water coM, except in the hot fummer months, when you cannot make beef fait enough before it will fttnk; thep it is beft to put it in the water boiling, to ftrike the fait in. Before you boil any meat or poultry prepare them in the foUowing manner; - Inge the poultry, and put them in cold water for

ones

139 BOILING.

one hour; walh the beefj mutton or pork clean, flcewer the udder or fat of a buicock of beef to the lean, and tie it . with a fillet or packthrei tight; for veal, lamb, or poultry, take fome flour in your hand and rub it all over, rub and wafli them well, for the flour will take off all the dirt, put them into the water boiling, with a piece of (tale white bread, as the bread will draw all the fcum up, and make them look whiter than flour or milk put into the water, or over the meat and poultry. Be fure to boil every thing gently, for if you boil itfaft it makes the outfide hard before the infide is warm.

Beef ahd mutton fiiould be rather under done, and allow one hour for every four pounds; veal, pork,

. and lamb fliould be thoroughly done, or elfe it is apt to fucfeit, park in particular: a knuckle of veal of eight pounds will take two hours boiling, a leg of twelve pounds thre hours and a half, a leg of pork of twelve pounds four hotirs, a leg of houfe-lamb of four pounds one hour and a quarter, a leg of

grafe lamb of fix pounds- one hour and three quarters, and fo on in proportion; Be fure to flcim the fat and fcum off as it rifes, and never leave your fheac Of poultry in the pot after it is done, as that oakes it foddenec), and takes out all the juices. If you ftiould be delayed in fending your dinner or fupper up in time, take the things out of the water, put them in a difli, cover them clofe withat:loth, and put the difb over the hot water 5 and .when you want them dip them in the hot water a moment before you fend them away. This method I have found to be the beft m the courfe of upwattUof twenty years pradice.

sfh

BOILING. 139

i'o boil a Haiincb or Neck of Venifon.

AS this iswery feldom done, it is proper to give dice&ions for it in cafe it fhould be wanted; take a haunch or neck of yenifon frelh killed and fait it well, turn it, and fait it every day for a week, then puc it into water for one hour and wa(h it clean out, put it into cold water,, boil it Qowly, (kirn ic very dean, and allow one' hour for every four pounds the haunch weighs; boil a cauliflower and pull it into fprigs, boil fome white cabbage, maftx it with butter and cream, and Ibme turneps the fame way lay a fprig of cauliflower, next cabbage, and next turneps, till you have laid them all round the diOi; put in the haunch pr neck, garniih the edge of the difh to your fancy with beet-root, and fend melted butter and fweet fauce in boats,

N. B. The neck will only take one hour and a half boiling. THe haunch or neck eats well haihed ibe next day.

Hams

WHEN you have any very old Weftphalia or Engbfh hms they require a great deal of foak ing; the bed: method is, to put them in water overnight, take them out in the morning, and hng them up all day; put them in water again at night, and fo proceed for a week, which will make them mellow and fine; if they are not very old two days and two nights foaking in foft water, changing the water e?ery night and morning, will be Sufficient; fa green ham requires no foaking) cut the dirt off the under fide, fcrape the rind clean, cut the knuckle oflf at the joint, and wafh the ham cleans put it into the fopper when the water is warm as that will fet the

. . colour,

1

140 BOILING.

colour, (for if you put it in when the water is cold it draws all the colour out; when it boils flcim it well, acid bol it as gentiv as you can, fo the water does but juft boil it is lufficient; (a ham of twenty pounds will take five hours, and bigger or lefs in proportion) when done, take it up and puli off the rind, if it is of a fine red colour put it in the difli, if it is rather pale fifi iome rafpings of bread over it, and put it to the fire till it is biown; or rub it over wich the yolk of an egg, and drew breadcrumbs over it, put it to f he fire, and turn it round till it is btown sUI over; gptrnifli with carrots.

N. B. If you chufe you may put a handful of leather (havings and two handsful of juniper berries 4n the copper with your bam to give it a high flavour.



Tongues.

IF your tongue is a dry one, foak it in water all night; but if a pickled onc only wa(b it well, and put it in cold water; (the dry one will take three hours boiling, the pickled one two hours and a half) when it is done peel the fkin and cut the outfide of the root off, put it in a di(h, and garniih with cartots and Iprigs of greens, or whole turneps boiled

Beef.

A BUTTOCK, tch-bpne, rump, brisker, thick or thin Sank, (hould be eight or ten days in fait, then wa(h It well out in clean water, put it in the wacer cold, and boil it as dirtied in the ruKs, when it is done take it up, and with a pafte-brufh wa(h it clcaa put it in the di(h, and garnilh with carrots and fprigs of greens, wirh greens cariots, and turneps in fe parate diflics.

AfltfMf

B O i L I N Q. 141

Mutton

CUT. off the Ihank end and flap of a Ifg or IhouU der of mutton joint the neck, put it in water for one hour, wafli it dean out, and put it into the water cold; when it boils (kirn it well, put in a piece of ijtale white bread and boil it gendy (a leg of mut too of twelve pounds will take three hours, a ibouU der of eight pounds two hours, and a neck of fix pounds one hour and a half) when done take it outf walh ic well with a pafte-bruih, and garnilh with capers, carrots, turneps, or fprigs of greens, with greens and mafhed turneps in fcparate difhes, caper iauce and plain butter in boats 1 or you may fmother the flioulder with onion fauce.

Veal.

BREAK the bone of a knuckle or leg of veal in two places, put it into cold water, and with a hand' ful of flour wa(h it well, put it into the water boil ing, fkim it well, put in a piece of ftale white bread, and boil it as direded in the rules; boit a piece of bacon in another pot till tender, when it is done take the veal up, wa(h it with a pafte-bruib and garnilh it with fprigs. of greens or cauliflowers.; take off the rind of the bacon, and hold it before the Ere till it is brown, put it in a dilh, and garnilh it with fprigs of greens or carrots, with greens in a diih, parfley fauce and plain butter in boats.

Breaji of Veal.

JOINT it, and take off the flcin of the broad end put it in water for one hour, wafli it well, and put it in boiling W4Cer, (if a fn)all pne, one hour will boil

i5

142 BOILING.

it; if a large one an hour and a half ) fkim it well, and when done take it up, put it in a hot dtfii, and put white, oyfter, or cellery fauce over it; garniih with lemon. The chump end of a loin eats well done the fame way

Calves Head.

CHOP the head in two, take out the brains, trim it clean, and lay it in plenty of water for two houn to foak out all the blood, wa(h it clean, dredge it with Bour, put it mxm the water boiling, pur a piece of dale white bread in, and boil it one hour and a lialf: in th mean time walh the brains and take off the flns, boil them in a fauce-pan with fage leaves and parfley; when done, chop them fine, put them in a fauce-pan, with a little butter, pepper, and fait, fiir them till the butter is melted; take up the head, cut out the tongue, peel it, and flit it in two, put the braias in a difli, the tongue on each fide, and the head in another dilh.

Lamb.

CUT off the fliank end and flap of a leg of lamb .give it a cut in the firft joint and turn it, to make it look as round as you can, put it into cold water for one hour, and with a handful of flour wafh it well put it into the water boiling, -flim it well, put in a piece of ftale white bread, and boil it gently asdi reAcd in the rules; when done take it up, and with a pafte-brufli wafli it well, put it in a difli, and garnifli with carrots and fpinach; with fpinach in a difli, and plain butter in a boat. If you fry the loin, fry jt aa dire£bed in the chapter for frying; put afmall difli within the other, put the leg in and the loin all round % garnifli with fpinach and fried parfley.

--

£ O I L L N G. 143

BREAK the ihank of a leg of pork and pi!it it in water for one hour walh ic well and fcrape che rind clean, put it into cold water, and aa the fcum rifcB (kirn it well, boil it gently as before dire&ed; (if it is a belly-piece boil it till the rind is tender) when done take it op, wa(h it with a pafte-brufli, put it in a difh, and garnilh with fprigs of greens with peaspudding, turneps, and greens in feparate dilhes, and plain butter in a boat.

Turiies.

HAVING truflcd your turkey as for boiling make a ftuifing as follows t take a fcore of oyfters and blanch them, walh them clean in cold water, take off the beards, and chop them fine, flired;a little lemon-peel and parfley, with a quarter of a pound of blotter, the yolks -of three eggs, and -a fpoonful of cream, feafon it with pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, mix it up in a light force-meat, ftuff the craw with it, turn the fkin over it,- and ikeweric on the back, finge it and put it into water for one hour, and with a handful ot flour wa(h it well; put it into a large pot of boiling water, fkim ic clean, put in a piece of (tale white bread, and boil it gently;, (if a middle-fize one hour, a fmall one three quarters of an hour, a very large one an hour and a half) when done take ic tip, waih ic clean with a pafte-brufli, and put it in a di(h, with oyfter, eel. Icry, or white fauce over it; garnilh with lemon and beet-root, with oyfter and cilery fauce in boats

Fs.

144 B O I L I N G.

Fowls.

TRUSS your fowls for boiling, finge and put them in cold water for one hour, and with a handful of Hour wafli them well; put chem into the water boiling, put in a piece of ftale white breads ilcim them wellj and boil them half an hour, if a middling (ize, if large ones three quarters of an hour; when done take them up, wa(h them clean with a paftebrufh, put them in a di(b, and garni(h with lemon and boiled parfley, with oyAer, cellery, or white fauce over them, oyfter-fauce and parfley and butter in boats.

Chickens.

TRUSS your chickens for boiling, finge them, and put them in cold water for one hour, with a handtul of flour, wafli them well, put them into the water boiling, with a piece of ftale bread; boil them, if fmall, fifteen minutes; if bigger, twenty or twentyfive minutes; when done take them up, wafli them with a pafls-brufli, put them in a difli, and gamifli with lemon and parfley put parfley and butter or iiyhite fauce over the breaflsj with parfley and butter and oyfter-fauce in boats.

Chickens with Bacon and Cettery.

BOIL two chickens, and a piece of ham or bacon by itfelf, boil the white part of two bunches of eellery tender, cut it about two inches long, and put it into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of cream, a piett of butter mixed with flour, and fome pepper and (alt; fet it on the fire, keep it fliaking till it is thick and fmooth, lay the chickens in the difli, and poor

the

BOILING. 145

the Taiice over them; cut your ham or bacbn in thin Qices, and garoifh them with it all round.

N. B. If you have any cold ham in thehoufe cue fome thin dices and broil them 1 it anfwers the pur pofe as wellk

Chickens and Tongues.

SALT fix hogs tongues for one week in the fame )ickte with the neats tongues or hams 5 boil fix fmall chiGkenft, bdil the tongues by themfelvcs and peel the fkins off boil a caulifiower white and a good deal of fpinach picked and wa(hed clean in fe Veral waters I boil it green, and fqueese it between two pewter difhes very dry; put the cauliflower upightin the middle of the di(h, lay the chickens tlofe round, the tongues round the chickens, with the roots outwards, and put the fpinach between the tongues; gsirnifh with toafted bacon, and lay a piece 0.1 each of the tongues.

This is an occeUent difH for a large company.

Xj$e.

Pick your goofe clean, finge it, and fait it well lor four or five days; then walh it clean, trufs it, put it in boiling water, and boil it one hout j when done take it Qp and put it in a di(b, with onionfauce over it; boil lome white-heart cabbages very tender, chop them up and put them in a fauce-pan ith a little cream, butter, pepper and falt ftir ti; found till it is quite hoc, put it in a difb, and fend it up to table with the goofe

Ducks.

146 BOILING,

., Duds.

SCALD your ducks, draw them, and put them into warm milk and water till you want them; then trufs them, put them into the water boiling, boil them twenty minutes, and fkim them well; then uke them up, put them in the difli, pour onionfauce over them and garni(h with lemon.

Ducks boiled the French W.

SCALD and draw two ducks, lard them on the breaft, and half roafl: them; then put them in an earthen pipkin, with half a pint of red wine, a pint of good gravy, about twenty chefnuts firft roalled and peeled, half a pint of larg oyfters bknched and bearded, an onion, two or three blades of garlick chopped fine and a little thyme (hred; fealbn it with pepper, fait, beaten mace, a little ginger beat fine, and the cruft of a French roll grated, cover them clofe, and dew them gently over a flow fire for half an hour; when done, put them in a diOi, pour the fauce over them, and garnifh with lemon.

Tigeons.

SCALD, draw, and trufs four pigeons, wafh them tn feveral waters, dredge them with flour, put them into boiling water, and boil chem fifteen minutes - then take them up, put them in a hot difli, and povr parfley and butter over them; lay round them fprigls of brocdli boiled, and fend parfley and butter and plain butter in boats.

KabVxts.



BOILING. 147

TRUSS the rabbits and put them in cold water for two hours changing the water two or three time? 1 put them into boihng water with a piece of ftale bread, fkim them well, and boil them, if large one, three quarters of an hour then take them up and drain them, put them into a hot di(h, pull the jaw-bones out, ftick them in the eyes, and fmother them with onionfauce, with a fprig of myrtle in dieir mouths;

Tbeafants.

PICK and trufs your pheafants, fingfe them lay them in cold water, wa(h them out, put them in a large pot of boiling (oft water, Ikim them clean, and boil them half an hour i when done put them in a dtlb, put white cellery fauce over them, and gamiih wim lenion.

Partridges.

PICK and trufs three partridges, wafh them clean; put them in plenty of bdiling water, and boil them quick for fifteen minutes: for fauce, take half a pint of cream and a quarter of a pound of butter, put it over the fire, and ftir it one way till it is thick and fmooth; put the partridges in the di(h, pour the iauce over them, and gamiih with lemon

Put white cellery fauce over them, or this faxjce: take the livers and truife them fine, chop a little parfley fine, melt a little butter fmooth, and then add the livers and parfley; give it a boil up fqijeeze in the juice of a lemon, and pour it over the bids Or this Iauce: take half a pint of cream, the yolk of

La xk

r

148

B O I L I N G.

an egg beat fine, a piece of butter as big as a waU nuc mixed with flour, a little beaten mace and nutmeg, and a fpoonful of white wine; ftir it one way till re is thick and fmooth, then pour ic over the birds; or white muihroom fauce.

Wbcdiocks or Snipes.

. BOIL them in. beef gravy made tbua: take a pound of. lean beef cut into little pieces, put it into Vfto quarts of water, with an onion a bundle of fweet herbs, two blades of mace, fix cloves, and fome whole pepper; cover it clofe and boil it till it is half wafted, then ftrain it ofi, put it into a faucepan, and feafon it with fait; take the woodcocks or fnipes and draw the trails out, (rake care of die trails) put them into the gravy, cover them clofe, and boil. them ten mmutes: in the 'mean tinae take t trfiils and livcifs chop them fine, put them. inC0 a,(lew-pan, with a little of the grainy the fntpes or woodcocks are boiling in, and (lew ihem, wUh a lk tic beaten mace and a gill of red wine; take the crumb of a ftale roll, rub it through a cullender fry it with butter of a light brown, and put it before the fir to keep hot: when your invpe% art done,, take half a pint of the gravy they aie boUhrd in and pot itq.tbe trails with little buttei mixed with flour fet it on the fire afid keep it fliaking tiU the butter is neked but do not ftir it with a fpboA, t-faea put tke;f:cymbs of bread in, and fhake it rounds take up the birds put 'them m a hot difli and pCMtr tke faiKe over them I gamiAi with lemon.'

N. B. You may drels wild fos or pkvos die fame yi.

i)



i

R O A ST IN a J49

Plovers, '

DRAW them clean and .wa(h them, put them in boiling and boil them ten minutes; when done take dicm up, and put them in a hot di(h with white cellery or mufbroom fauce over themj and garnifli with lemon.

w

CHAP. VI.

ROASTING.

Proper Rules to be ohferved in Roqfting.

IN the firft plaire be careful that your fpiti and dripping-pan are kept clean, • afid always put ne dripping or butter into the dripping-pan, before you lay down your meat or poultry to the fire, to have it melted ready to bafte with; finge your poultry with white paper, bafte them with butter, dredge on fome flour, and fprinkle fait on as foon i% you put them to the fire; and the fame with all forts of meat, be furC'to bafte it well as (bon as you lay t down, and fprinkle it with fair. Your fire fliould be itguUted according to the thing to be drefled, if it is very, little or thin you fhould have a brifk fire, that you may roaft it quick and nice; if it is for large joints, be fure to lay on a good fire to cake and always have it clear at the bottom. When your joint

_ L 3 is

t50 ROASTING.

is half done remove the dripping-pan and fptt from the fire, and ftir it up tQ make it bum clear and briik I and nevrr put your meat too clofe co the fiie till it 19 nearly done, for by being too near it often fcorches the outlide before it is wrm within. When it is nearly done the fauke will draw towards the fire; then take the paper off, bafte it with butter, fprinkle it with fait, and dredge fome flour on,, to nuke it of a fine froth. Figs and geefe (hould be roafted before a brifk fire but not too near, and turned quick; hares and rabbits require time and care, and be fure you mind that both ends are done enough: when half roafted cut the Ikin at the neck-end, to let out the blood, which will prevent tbem from looking bloody when they are cue up Wild fowls fhould have a clear brifk fire, and roafted till they are of a light brown, but not too much, nor till the gravy runs out, as that deprives them of their fine flavour; if you fee the gravy begin to run take them up dirw&ly. Turkies and tame fowls require more roafting, as they are longer in getting hot thnougb; they ftiould be often bafted, in order to keep up a ftrong troth, as it makes them of a fine colour and rife the better: and it is the beft method to keep all forts of meat well bafted, particularly venifon, lamb or veal, and -alfo hares i beef and mutton is fatter, and does not require fo much bafting. Be fure to have a fine froth on every thing before you take it from the fire.

In roafting of veal, you muft be careful to roaft it of a fine brown; if a large joint, a very good fire; if a fmall joint, a brifk fire; and if a fillet, loin, or the beft cnu ot a neck, be fure to paper the fat,, that you may lofe as little of it as poflible; Ifiykat a diftance from the fire till it is foaked, then put it nearer the fire, and when you lay it down bafte ic well with butter, apd often, all the time it 13 roaft



roasting: 151

ing; the brcaft muft be roalted with the caul on till it is nearly enough C boil the fweetbread for ten minutes, rub it oyer with the yolk of an egg, • ftre w crumbs of bread on ir, and ikewer it on the breaft when it is nearly done take off the paper or cau1 bafte and froth it up, puc it in a hot dim, and put a little gravy and butter n)ixed in the difh -, garnifh with lemon and beet-root, and put the fweetbread on the breaft.

Beef.

BEEF fliould be kept fome time before it is drelTed, according to the heat or coldnefs of the weather; wipe it very clean with a dry cloth, and take care you do not leave any damp place on it, hang it where the frefli air can come to it, but never fait it, as it makes it hard; and when you have fpitted it, paper the top to keep the fat from melting away, put it to the fire, bafte it well all the time it is roafting, and fprinkle it with fait; (a furloin of beef of thirty pounds will take three hours and a half before a good fire) when it is nearly done take ofi the paper, bafte it, fjrinkle on fome fait, and dredge it well with flour till it is of a fine froth; then take it up, put it in a hot difli, and garniih with horfe-radifli.

Mutton.

IN roafting of mutton, the loin, the chine, and the faddle. fhould have the fkin raifed and (kewered on; when it is nearly done take ofi the ikin, and put it clofe to the fire to brown, then bafte ir, fprinkle on a handful of fait, and dredge fome flour on to froth it up; tAe leg or flioulder wants no paper, except you put a little over the fat part of the leg.

L 4 Lamt

iz ROASTING.

Lamb.



WHEN you road a fore-quarter: after you have fpittcd it put white paper over it, particularly the fat part of the leg, and bade it well all the time it is roafting; when, it is nearly done take off the paper, and froth ic up. In roafting the ribs, they Ihould be done very quick, as they are t;hin, and of a light brown; when done, put it into a hot diffa, and garnilh with crefles or fmall fallad, with mint fauce in a boat.

Fillet of Veal.

TAKE a fine fillet of veal, take out the bone,' and make the following ftufBng: rub the crumb of a penny loaf through a cullender, chop a little beeffuct fine, a little parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-, peel flired fine, fcafohed with pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg; mix it all up with two eggs, and ftufF it under the fat and where the bone came out. of, trufs it clofe and run the fpit as nearly through the middle as you can, rub it over with butter, tie paper over it, lay it down before a good fire to rpaft, and bafte it well; (a fillet of twelve pounds will take three hours, bigger or Icfs in proportion) when it is nearly done take off the paper, fprinkle it with fait, then bafte it, and let it be of a fine brown; then bafte it with butter and dredge it with flour, to make it of a fine froth; take it up, put it in a hoc di(h, mix fome melted butter and gravy, and pour s, under garnifl with lemon nd beet-root.

Im

R O A S T I N a. J53

Loin of Veal. • • •

TAKE a fine fat loin of veal, mind it 19 well

chopped, paper it all round to keep in the fatj fpit

it and lay it down to a good fire, but not too near,

and bade it well; (it wril take as long as a fillet)

when it is nearly done take off the paper, fprinkre it

with fair, bafle it, and let it be of a fine brown;

then baile it with a little butter and dredge it with

floui till it is of a fine froth, take it up, put it in a

hot difb with gravy and butter undex ir; xoSi a

thin toad, cut it threecornerways, and put round

it garnifh with lemon and beet-root.

Pork.

PORK mull be well roafted, or it is apt to furfeit: when you roaft a loin, take a (harp pointed knife and Icore it juft througfi the fkin, and about half an inch afunder, to make the crackling eat the better; when yoti roaft a chine, with your kmfd Icore ic, one fcore down the middle firft, and then on each fide; and poced with a leg thur: fcore it all round, take a little fa and onion, wafh -and chop it fine, and mix it with pepper and fait, fufF k at the knuckle, cut a hole under the flap and put ibme in, and fkewer it up; when you put it to the fire bafte it well and roaft ft crifp, as moft people like the rind crifp, which is called crackling $ put it into a hot dilb, and a little gravy under it, with apple-fauce in a boat. The fpring or hand of pork, if very young and roafted like a pig, eats very well j or take the belly- piece, and fprinkle fage and onion with pepper and fait over it, roll it round, tie it with a ftring, and roafl it two hours, it eats very vell thii fparerib &ould be bafted with butter,

fprinkle

154 R O A S T I N G.

fprinkle,lbme fait on ir, chop fome fage very fine and fprinkle on it as it is roafting, with gravy in the difli, and appe-fauce in boats. Sweet-bone is roafted the fame way.

Tongue and XJdder.

SALT the udder a week, then wafli it clean, and boil it and the tongue till they are tender; peel the tongue and ftick three or four dozen of cloves in it, the udder the fame, and rub the yolk of an egg over them, fprinkle them with bread-crumbs, put them in adiih betore the fire, bade them with butter, and road them till they are brown all over; then ut them into a hst difti, with a little good gravy under them, and garni(h with lemon and beet-root, with gallindne fauce and currant jelly in boats.

Venifon.

CUT the knuckle oflT the haunch and fpit itj rub the fat part with butter, and fprinkle it with fait, put a large (heet of paper all over it, and a thick fheet of common pafte over the fat part, then three flieets of paper over the pafte, and tie it acrofe about two inches apart with packthread to keep it on; as foon as you put it down bafte it well, and keep bafting it all the time ir is roafting: be furc to have a large fire before you put it down to roaft (a large haunch will take four hours roafting) when done take off the paper and pafte, bafte it with butter, dredge it with fiour, and let it be of a very light brown •, take it up, put it into a hot difh, and garnift) with boiled French beans, with gravy and venilbn fauces in boats, and French beans in adi(h. When you roaft a neck put three ikewers through, and put the fpit between the fkewcrs and bones, paper and pafte it

the

ROASTING. 155

the fame as a haunch, and one hour and a half will roaft it fend it up with the fame fauce, &c.

Haunch of Mutton.

TAKE a hind-quarter of fac mutton, and cut the leg with part of the loin in the ihape of a haunch of venifoQ, (if it is cold weather hang it up for a fortnight) then lay it in a pan with the backfide dowawardsi pour a bottle of red wine over it, and let it lay twenty- four hours turn it two or three times, and pour the wine over it with a Ipoon every time; then fpit it and paper it over, bafte it all the time it IS roafting, before a quick fire, with the fame liquor and butter, and two hours will roaft it, take off the paper, bafte it with butter, and dredge a little flour on to froth it; take it up, put it into a hot difli, and garnifh with beetroot, with gravy and venifon fauce in boats. A fat neck of mutton eats well, put into red wine twenty-four hours and roiafted the fame way.

N. B. You may roaft the haunch of mutton, after it is kept a fortnight the fame way as a haunch of venifon, without putting the wine over it.

Leg of Mutton with Oyjiers.

TAKE a leg of mutton that has hung up for a week, cut the knuckle and flap oflf, get a quart of oyfters, blanch, beard, and waih them well, cue boles ali over the mutcon and ftick the oyfters in, tie paper over it, fpit it, and roaft it for two hours; then take the paper off, bafte and dredge it with flour, put it into a hot difli, and garnifli with horferadiib, and good gravy in the difti.

You may ftew an hundred of cockles, ftuflf the mutton with them and roaft it the fame way.

%S6 R O A S T I KG.

Leg or Shoulder of Mutton.

CUT off the (hank of z leg or (houlder of matton and fpic it, road it before a brilk fire, and bafte k vrtMy (a leg of ten pounds will takenwo hours Md a half a ihoulder two hours) when it is nearlj done bade tr, fprinkle on fome fair, and dufdge k with 6our to froth it cake it up, puc it into a hot riiO), and garniih with horfc-rttdifh, and onion-fauce ti a boat.

I

IF it (hould happen that you Aiould have the pig to kill, proceed in the following mamufr: take a Iharppointed penknife, ftick the pig J uft above the bread bone, and run the knife into £e heart, if the iieart is not cue it will be a long while dyings as foon as it is dead puc it into cold water a few mifnutes, then rub it over with a little rolin beat fine; hare a pail of fcalding water, pitt it in and let it Igy half a minute, then take it our, lay it upon a clean table, and pull oiF the hair as quick as poffiblej if the hairs do not come off clean, dip it in the water again; and when it perfeftly clean, wafh it in warm water, and let it lay half an hour in cold water, then wadi it out well, that it may not uAe of the rofin; take off the four feec at the joints, (lit the belly open, and take ogt the entrails put the heart, liver, lights, and petty-toes together in cold water, wafh the pig well in cold water, and dry k wich a cloth and if you are not ready to drefs it di rf6lly, put ic into a difh, and put a cloth over k. When you road your pig, pick and walk a dozen fage leaves, and chop them fine, with a large onion put fome pepper and £ilt in, and the cnamb of a halfpenny

R O A S T I NO. 157

penny roll, or a piece of crumb of bread, put ic into che infide of the pig, ind few it up; pat a Ikewer through the beily of the pig, juft acrofs the ends of the forc-Iegs and another at the hicid-ltfgd, vyhich will keep it tight run the fptt in at the vent and out of its mouth, lay it down to a clear briik gre put a Aarcow pig-iron on the bar in the middle of the fire, flour it wdU, atid keep flouring ic often till the eyes dfop out or the Crackling hard; and be ftfrcip fet a difli under it, to catch all the gravy that drops out. When the ptg is nearly enough ftir up the fire a little brifker, put a quarter of a pound of butter in a coarfe cloth, and lub it all over till the crackling is crifp; wipe it dry, then take it up, hv it in a difli, cut off the head with a fiiarp knife, and cut it all diofwn the back before you draw the fpit out, pot it biick to back in the diih, and put it before che flre; fplit tht head in two, take em tbt brMiA, cut the. ears off, and fplit dach fide in tw hf one piece oo each fide tte pig, one at' each cMl ai)d the ears upon the (boulders chop the bmm fine, and put thenoirwith the fage aod onion, and the gravy that comes fnotm the pig, into a ftew'pani with half a;. nut f white gravy, boil ic up aad paor it'in yoot dilhy with currant and Ikmpbire iaui$e is boats. •

laftead of flouring it, you may rub tc over witfi fwert-tiil before you lay it dowA, and with a Je feathers put fome oil on every ten minutes, till it h nearly done then wipe it dry with a clean dotft, and treat it as above; You may leave out the onion if it Ihould not be approved of, as many ladies and gentlemen have an averfion to onion.

•t

mid

I- 1

158 ROASTING

Hind Quarter of a Figdrejfed Lamb Fajhion

AT a time of the year, when houfe -lamb is very dear or not to be had, take the hind-quarter of a large roafting pig, flun it, put it on a fmall fpir, bafte it with butter, and roaft it half an hour; then froth it up, put it into a hot dilh, with gravy under it, and garnilh with Seville orange or lemon or fmall fallad, with mint fauce in a boat. If you roaft it of a fine light brown it will eat like lamb.

A Fawn.



SKIN your fawn, and make a Huffing in the following manner: rub the crumb of a penny loaf through a cullender, pick and chop half a .pound of beef-fuet, pick and chop a handful of parQey, fome lemon-peel and fweet herbs chopped Bne, ieafoned with pepper and fait, and half a nutmeg grated break in two eggs, and mix them all up together; put it in the belly, few it up, trufs it, fpit it, roaft It before a good fire, and bafte it well all the time it IS roafting; (a middlingfi2ed one will take one hour and a half, a large one two hours) when it is done bafte it with butter, fprinkle fome fait on it, and dredge it with flour; take it up and put it in a hot dilh, with gravy in the difli, and mint fauce in a boat.

N. B. A young kid is roafted in the fame manner

Ham or Gammon of Bacon.

CUT off the (kin, trim the under-fide clean and lay it in lukewarm water for two or three hours i then lay it in a pan, pour a quart of Canary wine upon it and let it ftcep ten or twelve hours turn it

now

ROASTING. 159

BOW and then, then fpic it, and tie white paper over the fat part of it, pour the Canary it was foaktrd in into the dripping-pan, and bafte with it all the time it is roafting; when it is done take off the paper, and dredge it well with bread-crumbs and parflejr Ihred fine, make the fire brifk, and roaft it of a fine brown; if you eat it hot, garni(h with bread-rafp. ings, or lemon and beet-root: or thus, half boil the ham or gammon, take off the rind, fpit it, and dredge it with oatmeal fifted very fine, balle it with butter, roaft it gently for fix hours, ftir up the fire, and brown it quick when fo done, pour gravy in the difli, and garni(h as above.

N. B. If it is to be eat cold either way done, put it on a clean napkin in the difh, and gamiih with parlley for a fecond courfe.

Ox Palates. •

BOIL three ox palates till they are tender, take ofi the two (kins, cut them about two inches long, and lard half of them with bacon -, then have ready two or three pigeons, and two or three fmall chickens draw and trufs them, fill them with force-meat, lard half of them, and fpit them on a bird-fpit thus: cut fome flips of fat bacon, put on a bird a palate, a fage leaf, and a piece of bacon, and fo on each bird a palate, a fage leaf, and a piece of bacon, and tie them on a fpit by theflnfelves; take cocks-combs and lambs-ftones, parboil them, lard them with very fmall flips of bacon, fome large oyfters parboiled, and each one larded with a piece of bacon, put them on a long flcewer, with a little piece of bacon, and a fage leaf between them; tie them on a fpit, beat up the yolks of two eggs and rub over them, fprinkle fome bread-crumbs over them, roaft them, and bafte chem with a little butter; have ready two

fwcct

id R O A 3 T i N O

•

fwectbrcads cut in two, fome artichdk-bcttoms eui in four, and fried brown; rub the difh with (hallots lay the birds in the middle, piled upon one another, nd lay the other things all feparate round about the birds; have ready for fauce a pint of good gravy, a gill of red wine, the oyfter liquor, a little anchovy liquor, and a piece of butter rolled in flour; boil it tip, fqueeze in the juice of half a lenion pour it over all m the difh and garnifh with lemon

Calfs Liver.

StlT the liver fir-ft, lay it on a dreflcr, and lard it with bacon; road it gently bade it with butter fprinkle fome fait on ic, and when it is done put it in a hot difli, with good gravy under it, and garnilh it with ralhers of bacon broiled.

ttart.

' HAVING cafcd and truflcd your hare, a direed )n the article for trufTing, make a (lufEn thus: rub the crumb of a penny loaf through a culTender, chop a quarter of a pound of becf-fuec, a little frelb butter, fome parfley, fwcet herbs, and lemon-peel chopped fine, feafoned with pepper, fair, and a little gratcrd nutmeg, take the gall out of the liver chop the liver fine, and mix together, with two eggs and a glafs of red wine; put it into the belly and few 01" flcewer ic up, put the fpit in at the vent and bring ic out at the neck, put it down to a good fire and baile it well with butter; or put a quart of milk and half a pound of butter into your dripping-pan, bafte it all the time till it is done; then bafte it with a licde butter, fprinkle a little fait on it, and dredge it witk floor to make it a fine froth; (a fmall hare will take an hour, a very large one an hour and a half) take

it

il d A f t N G tit

ft dpi put it into a Hot dlfii with whicfe faUce or raVy under it and grivy and Iweet fauoe in boats;

RaBlfits Marc Fdjbiok.

CASlEi trufs, ahd ftuff t&e rabbit the fame as & liarc, dip the bak into hot water; take off the (kin; lard it whh fmall (lip of bacon oi not, as you fancy; and roaft it of a fine Brown y put it into a hdt dilh; if larded, put gravy iii the diflii if not larded put White fauce under; as for hares, with currdnt jelly and gfay iii boats % garniJSbi with femon arfd beet Wot.

Ralfbiti.

AfTEk your rabbits are truffcd fpit them, and wy them down td a briik fire, bafte them with but)i fpririkte them with a little fair; ahd dredge a little fioUr bti thetii (half an hour will fdaft tnem btcpt they afe very large) iihen done; if they are not of a fine brown, ((op the fpit a trioment, and Brown the back when they are done take them tip, 'cut off the heads, artd fplit them in two, put the DOdies into a hot di(h, the heads round it, and gari)iih with lemon Or obdge, with liver &uce under them Or in bots.

TRUSS your turkey as direfted for roading tnake a ftuffing as follows: take the crumb of a halfpenny roH, nib it through a tulJender, a quarts of a poun4 of beef-fuet chopped fine, fome fwett JKrbr, parfley, and lemon-pel (bred fine, grate fn a little fiutmeg, feafon it with pepper'tfnd fait; mix t tp with an egg, and put it in the breaft of th

M turkey

i6i ROASTING.

turkey, put the Ikin over and fallen h to tbe back with a flcewer, fpit: it, finge it, and cie paper over the breaft, put it before a moderate fire, and bade it ₯cll all the tinie.it is roafting; when it is done take off the paper,' bafte it with butter, fprinklc a litdc, fat on it) and dredge it with flour -, then take it up put it in 9 hot difh, with good gravy, or brown cdtery fauce under it; sarnifh with lemon and beetroot, wth onion and bread fauCe in boats. A middling-fised turkey wtll take one hour and a quartci bigger or lefs in proportion.

N. B. You may fluff the Bread with faufag meat, or veal force-meat, as you like it bed.

"Turkey with Cbefnuts.

TRUSS your turkey for roafting, take JialC a bun.dred of chcfnuts boil them till they ve tender, pcd them, chop half a dozen very fine, and put in the (lufEng as above take the nQarrow out of two beef niarrow-bones, cut it into pieces, and (luff the belly of the turkey with the marrow and chefnutsj fpit ity and cie the vent clofe to the fpit with a ftringb finge and paper, the breaft, put it down to a good fire, and bailc it well all the time it is roafting; thca take off the paper, bafte itith butter, fprinklc a little fait on it, and dredge it with fiour to make the froth rife, take it up, and put it into a hot difh have ready a dozen of the chcfnuts fplit in two, ftcw them in half a pint of brown gravy, a gill of white .vine, two fhallots chopped fine, thicken it wkh a jlittle butter rolled in .flour, boil it fmooth,,pour it in the dilh, and garpifti with lemon and beet-root, with bread fauce and gravy in boats.

N. B. It will take a quarter of an hour longer roafting than vichout the marrow and chefnuts

'. ' furkij

It O A S t 1 fJ Gv 163

Turkey the JUamiurgb VTay

EAlCEtne pound of lean beef thvee quaiters of pound of bedfuei ch(ped verf fiof fome fweet iicrbs and parQe)F a little gar icfc. chopped finoi Tea iimod with pepper, falcv tnd ant meg, mixed up with tJirce eggs draw the turkey 5nge it, raife the fktfi all ronnd the breaft and back, and put the ftoffing in-; trttft it for roafting;, ipit it paper it alk over. put ic cibwn to toaft, and bafteic well tUI it ia done) tiitiitake off the paper, bafte it with butter, fprinkle tin fooae iak, and dredge it ith flour to make it ol afinefioth) cake it up and nic it in a hot dilb, with bniwa cellery fauce under it gamifli . with lemon and beec-rooc, with gravy and bread fauce in boats.

N. B You may lard the breads of the aforemen tinned turkies, but mind to paper them, or cut broact es of bacoQs and tie ihe dVer the jbfeafts.(il

ip caHed ika(difi( • .

••-

AFTlEJk. they are trufled for roafting, put • littlif pepper faJt and butter in the infide fpic thetflii n4 'Ifiy chea dourn to roaft, finge and bafte (ham well withtrutter, fprinkle on a Hctle fait, and dredge ihem with flour roaft them three quarters of ait hour, and of a fine light brown; when they are done bafte thefii with butter, and dredge a little flour on them to wake the frotliriie; then take them up, and dilh iiibem in hot diflies, with good gravy under them; gamilh with lomon or ivgter-crellef with green fagcf ) grary in boaa

M 'Mt9.

x64 K O A. ST iNx;:

TRUSS the goofe for roafting, pick, wafli, il&d chop a dozen of fage Jeaves, and two large oiuoiis a fpoonful of fait and one of pepp6r, put them ta the tnfide, fpic itj and lay it down to the fire, fioge' and bade it, fprinkle fome fait on, and dredge it: with floury (a large goofe will take one hour and a half; a fmall one, one hour a middling-fise one one hour and a quarter) when it is done bafte it with butter, and dredge a little flour on it to raife' the froth i take it up, put it into a hot difli aii4 garnifli with lemon and beet-root, with fome good gravy under it, and apple-iauce and gravy in boats:

tiucklings. .

' TRUSS two ducklings for roafting, put a litd6r pepper and fait in the infide, fpit themi put them down to a briik fire, finge and bafte them, fprinkle a little fait on, and dredge them with flour; roaft them of a fine light brown, then bafi:e them with bucter, ahd dredge a little flour over to froth them; then take them up, put them into a hot difli, and' garnifh with lemon, with green Hiuce and gravy in boats,

•

Tiucks.

TRtJSS your ducks, chop fome fage leaves well wafhed, and two large onions, feafoned with pepper aod fait, and put in the infide, fpit them, and lay them down to a clear, briflc fire, finge and bafte them fprinkle a little fait on, and dredge them with flour; roafl: them, if large, three quarters of an hour i if ndling-fize, half an hour; then bafte them with

butter.

R O A S T 1 N G igj

butter and dredge a little flour over to froth them; take them up and put them into a hot dilh i garnilh .with lemon and beet-root, with gravy and onion,

fauce in boats.

Fowls.

TRUSS them for roafting, fpit them and lay them down before a clear, brilk fire, finge and bafte them, fprinkie a little fait on, and dredge them with flour (a large capon will take an hour, a large fowl three quarters, and a fmall fize half an hour) bafte them often with butter; when they are done bafte them with butter, and dredge ibme flour over to froth them; (be fure to roaft them of a fine brown) then Cake them up, put them into a hot difh, with gravy under them, and garnifli with lemon and becrto root, with egg fauce and parfley and butter in boats,

Fowls the German Wny,'

TAKE a fowl and trufs it for roafting, ftuff the breaft with any force-meat you like, and fill the body with roafted chefnuts peeled, fpic it, and roaft it as above; have a dozen more roafted chefnuts peeled fiew them in a pint of gravy, feafon it with pepper and fait, and thicken it with a little butter mixed with flour, and boil it till it is fmooth; fry or broil half a dozen faufages, put the fauce in the difli, the fowls on it, and the faufage round; garnifh. with kmon.

N. B. You may drefs ducks the fame way only leave out the faufages.

M 3 . Fcwif

i

t66 ROASTING.

Powls iffith CheJhutU



BOIL forty chefnuts till they are tencieri pttjl them, mir.ce about twenty very Bne, and bruile then) in a mortar, parboil the livers of the fowls and put them in the mortar; with half a pound of bani or bacon (hred fine, heat k aH well together; chop a handful of parfley, feme fweet herba a Ikdc lemon-pexrl chopped fine, feafoa it wkh pepper and fait, a little beaten mace and nutm, t% k all well up, and ftuff the Infide and brea)l of the fowl with it, fpit ir, tie the rump $nd oeck-;nd& clofet finge bafte, acd roalt it of a fine brown: for fauce, have ihe reft of the chefnuts, peeled and (hinned, put them into a (lew-pan, with half a pint of good gravy, a glafs of white mrine, thicken it with a littk bucter mixed with Bour ( boil it up till u is fmoethi nd put it in the dilb; froth up the fowl, take it up put it into the diiObi and garni(h with knion.

Chickenu

TRUSS them for roaftifig, fpii them, athd put them down to a clear fire; finge and bafte (hem with butter, fprinkle a little fait and dredge a little ftoar en (hem, and roaft them twenty minutes of a light brown; then bafte them, and dredge or a little flour to froth them take them up, put them into a hot diih, with a little gravy ucder them, and garnifti with lemon and beet- root, with pariley and butter und egg lauce in boats

!

Chickens 'with Cucumbers.

TRUSS two chickens for roafting, break the Iprcddbones Oat;i and (nke 9 force-net ihys: take

the

'R o A ST I ira: 167

the fldD) of a foil and of two pigeons with two or three dices of hatn ot bacon chop them fine akoge ther, take the crumb of a penny loaf, foaked in milk and boiled up, fee it to cool, and when cold mix the ingredients together, with fome fweet herbs parlley, and lemon-peel fhred fine, feafofted with beaten nace nutmeg, pepper and fait, and the yolks of two eggs; fin te chickens with it, fpit them tie them at both ' eiids, and paper the breaftsf: take four cucumbers, pare them, and take' out the pulp, put them in falc and water two hours before you ufe them; then dry them with a cloth, fill them with force-meat, (which you muft take care to fave) tie them round with packthread, flour and. fry th((m brown; when your chickens are roafted enough take them up, and lay them in the di(h; untie the cucumbers, but take care the meat does not fall our, lay them round the chickens, with good gravy in the dilb i garniih with lemon, and gravy in a boat.

Pieqants.

AFTER your pheafant is truflfcd to roaft fpit if, . put it before a clear fire, (inge and bade it, fprinkle a little fait on it, dredge it with flour, roaft it hal an hour, and bafte it often; wbeA it rs done froth if, cake it up and put it in a hoc difh, with gravy under it; garniih with lemon and beet- root, or creflcs, with bread and poveroy fauce in boats.

Be fure to ftick two of the beft tail feathers in th rump.

Partridges

ROAST them the fame way for twenty minutes of alight brown, put them inco a hot difh, with gravy

M 4 ' unddr

68 R Of A S T I N G,

ynder them, and garnifh with lemon aqd beet t with tred and poverqy fauce ia boats.

Fowl lbeafqnt Pajhion.

IF you (hould have but one pheafanti and wanf (wo in a di(h crufs a black-legged fowl the fame way as a phcafant, and lard the breafl: with bacon, but not the pheafant, and nobody will knqw the difr ference. You muil put a ptieafants tail-feather ia the ruoip.

Wild Ducks.

WHEN they are trufled put a littje pepper and fait ifi the inOde pf them, (foqie like a little fage and onion Ihred fine in one; and forpe a little fage pnly) fpit them, and put fhem down before a briflc fire, fingeand bafte them, fprinkle a little f4lt an(l dredge a little flour on them, road them twenty minutes, or it you like them well done twenty-fiye minutes, froth them up, and put them in a hot di(h, jgarnifh with waterrcreflcs, with a good gravy t the ifb, and onion fauce and gravy in boats. Pintail and dun birds yill take twenty minutes i fafterlings or widgeons, if larger twenty minutes, if fmall fifteen minutes, teal twelve or thirteen minutes; difli them the fame s wild ducks, bt m pnion fauce for teai.

Woodcocks and Snipe4

AFTER they are picked and trufled put them on (I bird-fpir, and tie them on another, cut a toa(( Tound a loaf, toaft it on both fides, and buttcf it ly th(! woodcocks down finge and bafte them witi 4tu(tr, ut the toaft under them for the trail to drop

11 O A € T I N O- 169

ff bafte them bfteiu and roaft them if Itrgr crenty-ve minutes, if fmiU and thin twenty mw pmcs froth chem up, take up the toad, cut it 19 iquancrs, put it in the difh, and put fomte gravy an4 ))utcer over it, take up the woodcocks and put them on it with the bills outward; garnilh with lemoi beet-roor, pr creflcs, with 4 little meUed;)utter in )xat.

You my take the trail out before you pot thenai down to rpaft, and put it into ftew-pan with sr little gravy, and fimrper ip five minufes, put a little melted butter to it, (hake it round, and put it on the toafts 0r you niay fry bread-crumbs, the fame as for larks, nd fend in a plate.

Snipes are done the fame way, only roaft th large ones twenty ipinute$ fml tiin ope iif(ee minutcSf

Ortoons.

TRUSS them like woodcocks on a fmall fpit, and put vine leaves between, tie them on another fpit put them to a brifk fire, and tafte them well with butter, with fried bred- crumbs u the difh an4 gr?7Wbots,

Ruffs and Reefs

TIESE birds are found in LincolniJiire and tho Ifle of Ely, and very rarely in any county of Eng apd befides 1 the proper way to feed them is to yax them jn feparate cages, and crumble white breads ibak it in milk, with a little fine fugar, and boil it when cpld put it in the pan or trough, every one fe parate as they are of fo delicate a nature they will not feed together thy feed very faft, and if no( billed 1(1 eight or ten dys they will die of their fat.

When

N

176 RO A S f I N G.

Whtn you kill them, pick nd tfs them tike a woodcock, pnljr cut off the head, or leave it on, 9ccordtn tb your fancy, and draw them, put themen a bird-fpit, and tie them on another, with vine leaves between and over the breads, abd put them before a clear fire cut a toaft' round a Ibaf, toaft it on both fides, put it under the birds, bafte them nith butter, and road them twenty minutes; have ready feme crumbs of bread crifot before the fire, put the toaft in the difh, the birds upon it, with the crifpt bread round them, and good gravy and plaia

butter in boats.

• •

Larh the Dunfiable Way.

PUT a dozen larks on a bird-fpit," tie theifi oft another fpir, and put them down t6 a moderate fire) take the crumb of a three-penny loaf and rub it through a cullender, bafte them with butter, and fprinkle them with the crumbs of bread, bafte then often, ftrew bread crumbs on them for twenty-five minutes, and let them be of a fine light brown: in the mean time take a good many crumbs of bread, put fome butter in a pan, and fry the crumbs crifp and brown; put the larks in a difh, with the crumbs all round them, nearly as high as the larks, with plain butter and gravy io boats.

• •

Guinea Fowl.

TRUSS it the fame as a pheafant, and lard the breaft; roaft it the fame as a pheafant, with bread fauce and gravy in boats,

Pwrf

•

Jl O A $ T I. K (S. 17% '

7

Ptzeons.

CHOP a handful of parfley, put a little pepper and fait, mix it up with butccr, and ftuff the infides of the pigeons wuh'ic; put them on a f mall fpit, and tie both enkis elofc) put difii to "xl clear fkvt finge am) bafte them with butter, fprinkle a liftle fill m, and dredge them with flour foiaft them twentf minutes, -froth thetn up, put them into a di&i and garnifh ith lemon, with parfley fauce and gravy ill boats

You may tie the neckends put a ikewer through' the legs, tie a ftring to it, and to the chimheypiece 'keep chem turning til they are done, and tbef will fwim in their own gravy.

• 1 Plovers.

TRUSS them like woodcocks, put: them an % bird-fpit, tie them on another, and put them before a clear fire; cut a toad rpund a loaf, toaft it on both fides, put it under the plovers, 6nge and bafte them with butter, fprinkle a litde fak on them, and roaft them a quarter of an hduri cut the toaft in four pieced, put it into a hot difh, with a little gravy and butter over hi pfltj( on the bia, and fend them awaf

hot- ",:

. . •• • .



meai-Eart '' '

i

THESE little birds are found in the South Bowdi near Brighcbemftone, Lewes, Tunbridge, &c. . Picl( and truls them the fame as larks,, put them on a bird-fpic, with a vine leaf between, tie them on amttber fpit, put them down before a clear fire, bafte them with butter, roiifl: them ten minutes, and then

put

J7 R A S T I N Cr.

pot them into a hot diQi; have ready (bme bread crumbs fried, the fame as for larks, put them round the birds, with plain butter and gravy in boats.

Ox-Heart.

CUT the deaf ears oflF the heart, and wa(h out iS the blood; make the following ftuffing: grate the crumb of a penny roll, half pound of beeffuet chopped fine, fome parfley and fwcct herbs (bred fine, a little lemon-peel, and a little graced nutcnegi feafoned with pepper and fait, break in two eggs, tatx it altogether, and ftufF the heart with it; tic a piece of ftrong papei' over it to keep in the ftuffing, fpit it through the middle, put it down to a good e, and bafte well all the time it is roafting -, (if a large one it will take two hours) when done take it tip, and put it in a wacer-difli, with hot gravy in it, and fend it away as quick as' poifible, as it foon gets cold, with currant jelly and gravy in boats.

Qalfs Heart.

CUT off the deaf ears, wafli out all the blood, and make the following ftuffing: grate the cruoib of a halfpenny roll, a little veal or. beef fuet chopped 'fine, a little parfley, fweet herbs, aid lemon-peel (bred fine, and a little grated nutmeg, feafoned with pepper and fair, mix it up with an egg, andftuffthe heart with it; tie a paper over the top to keep the (luffing in, fpit it, roaft it one hour, and bafte ic well .with butters when done take it up, and put it into 41 hot diCht with rayy and butter mixed under it

YhA

R O A ST: I N a

173

Veal Sweetbreads.

TAKE three large windpipe fweetbreads boil fbenfor five or.ifix minutes, andvwhen cold rub them over with the y(4k of an egg and iprinkle bread-crumbs on them, put them on a bird-lpir, tie them on another, put them before a clearlfire, bafte thto with butter, and roaft them half an hour of a fine brown I cut three fmall toafts, toaft them on both fides, put them in the difl. and pour gravy and batter over them; then take up the fweetbreads pot them en the toafts and garnifh with lemon amt beetroot. -• '

PICK and troXt them tike partridgis pot theot QB a bird-fpft, tie vine leaves over the breafts, and' tie them on another fpit, • r6aft them fbr twen rra mites, before aclear fire, and bafte them with butoer cftea when they are done put them in a difh, with fried breadctumbt round thenii aid' hiwd iauce u) gravy ja boitti.

CHAf;

t 74 t •

. •

C H A P VH,.

B A KING.

fT. KL£ a linnpof beeC coi the ieft Irood! tiM j bones, cut the finews oS and beat it well wtcli a roiling-pin; cut fome pieces of bacon about a quarter of an inch fquare, chop a band&l of parfley iome fvect lierbs, fome beaten cloves, mace, alK %iccv pepptr fdd faky aniMd iiltogether vi£b it gpH m reel ynvat roll the bacon in, and with a laiigt larding- piA Lard the beef through feafoA k with rpepr,lakv cloves, spd space .beat fine.cfhop the ioOGs,,piK shm in an earthen, pao. ao(i ahe meat at tfy hm a;psu94 of ufceii fonoe bay kaves a little Whole pepper, bundle ef fveet brbs. 'three or four ihallots, half a pint of red wineatnd the iame quantity of watcr cover the pan clofe and iDake it three hours; when done, take the meat out .and pur it into a di(h before the fire, ftrain the liquor oF, Ikim off ail the fat, and put it into a Aew-paDi iwith a piece of butter rolled in flour, boU u tin it is fmooth, rh6n pour it over the meat and gamilh with toafted fippets. You may add mufhrooms truffles, morelsv and artichoke-bottoms cut into piecq in the faucc if you like iu

• '.V

Bik

B.A J IN O. ijs

Ribs of Beef.

. CUT. the chine4xne oflF, and crack the ribs to make them lay even in the difli, pinkie them wtdi fak, tnd lay Toaie bits of butcer 00 the top iFiflF tbeoi all over with Qour put them into;m carthcR pan, and bake them; vhen done, put themia a deaa hoc dilh and garnifii, with horie-radiflu .

, MIX a poqnd pf flour with a, pint and a half of milk and four egjg;s 'into a ba:ter put in a Jitcle ial beaten ginger and a little grated nutqfieg, .put it kto. a depp difb' that you intend to fend it to stable jo take the vemey piece of beef, fprinkJe it With, fait, put it. Into the batter, bake it two hoursii and fendit qp hot. .

I

Leg tf Beef.

iTAKE alTeg of beef, cut off tlie.meat info piecea,; and break the bonjg;, put it Tnto an earthen pan with k bundle of feet hejBs two onions, fix bay leives a fpooniiil of whole pepper, fom Ipves. and nnace, aod a ipoonfiii pf fair, cover It, With wacer and put .in half a pint if red win, tie it dQwn dole, with ftrpng paper, and bake it weH till it is tender; when it is done take it out, ftrain it through a. fieve, and pick oyt all the fat and. finews; put a' little butter otq a ftfw-pap,. melt it„ apd put in. a fpoonful of flour, ftirit till it is fmooth, put in a pint of the liquor, boil it up, then put in the fat and fiiiews feafon it with pepper and fait, and a fpoonful of fiiuftard) (hake it about till it is thoroughly bot Vnit it into the di(h, and garniih with toaCted fippets.

Calf$

I76 6 h J ilf Gi

t

Caifs Head.

TAKE a calPs Head, trim it and afli h ttrf irtcan, take out the bfaiils and throve theiM into cotd water to fbalc out the blood, get an estrthen diAi big taough to lay the head on, and Hib the thlide of (he diih with butter i cut a pound of lean beef into pieces and put in, with a bundle of ftieet BerbSj ari onion ftuck with cloves, two blades of mace; and a quart of water la; fome fkewers acrofs the topi df the diih, and lay the head Upon them, rub foroe Hale bread through a cullender chop fome parflty and fweet herbs fine, a little lemoit-peel (hred fine; ftme pepper and fait, and halt a nutmeg grated, mis: them altogether; fkewer the meat Vip% that it ixiay not touch the di(b, rub the volk of aA ege over k, and ftrew the crumbs and hero's over it; ml iht eyes with butter, and put fome in hv& all over the hd; ill the mean time boil the brains, with three or four fage leaves, and chop ehem fine % iihen the head is baked of a fine brown piit it ill a difli beibre the fire to keep hor then ftir altogether- in' the di(h, put it into a fauce-pan, borl it' up, and ftrairt it; put it into the faucc-pan again, with the brains, knd fage leaves, a fpoontul ot ketchup, a gill of winC) a piece ot butter mix with floury and ixnl it up tin it is thick aifd fmdo; ptit the fauc6 in the diih, and the head uptfn it xoo muft not;cut the tongue out, but hen it is baked peel it, and it will make the head lay better in the difti. . A (beep's head baked the fame way ttvi icrj wtlb

iafT

•i

fi A It B N G. S-

• • •

Calfs Bead the Dutch Way.

GET half a pint of fpaniih peas, and lay them in water all night $ wa(h' the head very clean, take out the brains, and put them into water to foak cue the blood, ay the head in'a deep diih, mix the peas with a pound of whole rice well wafhed, and lay them round the head; then take two quarts of water feafoii it with pepper and fait, and a little beatea mace colour it with fafiron, and pour it over, bake It well, and fend it up iit the fame di(h hot.

You may fry-the brains in little cakes, and put them round and over the head for garnifli.

Lamh and Rke

TAKE a neck or loin of lamb, half roaft it) and tut it into chops; in the mean time boil half a pound of rice in two quarts of water for ten minutes, ftrain it off, and put it into a quart of good gravy, with a little beatea mace and nutmeg, flew it over a Qow fire and keep it flirting till it begins to thick ens take it off, put in half a pound of butter, and ftir it till the butter is melted j beat up the yolks of fix eggs and flir in, then butter your diih, feafoa the chops with pepper and fait, lay them in the di(h, pour the gravy which came out of them over them, and then put the rice over them, beat up the yolks of three eggs and put over all; fend it to the oven, and bake it three quarters of an hour.

TREAT your pig the fame as for roaftmg, rub ft all over with butter and flour it well butter ati earthen diih, put it in, and put it in the oven i take

N it

17 BAKING.

if out as foori as it is done, put a piece of butter in a cloth, and wipe it clean; put it in the oven agaia till it is dry, then take it out, lay it in a difli, and cue it up the fame as a roafted one; fkim the fatoflf the difh clean, and take the gravy that is under, . with the brains fage, &c. and half a pint of veal gravy, thicken it with aJittlc butter mixt with flour, give it a boil up, and put it into the dilh.

Fillet of Veal.

TAKE the bone out of the middle, truls and ftufF it the fame as for roafting, butter an carthci difli, butter the veal all over, fprinkle on fomc fals, and dredge it with flour, put it in the di(h and and bake it; when done put it in another di(b, pour gravy and butter mixed over it, and garnilh with iemon.

Ox- Heart.

STUFF it the fame as for roafting, but do not put any paper over it, fee it upright in the difli by means of a wire ftand,,and bake it two hours; when done, have fome hot gravy ready, put it in a dilh, and fend it away dircAly

Herrings.

SCALE, gut, wafli, and cut off the heads, wipe them dry with a cloth, and lay them on a board; mix fome black and Jamaica pepper, a few clover and plenty of fait, rub the filh with it, lay them ftraight in a pot, with bay leaves between thcmi cover them with vinegar, tie a ftrong paper over them, and bake them in a moderate oven; they may be 6ac hoc or cold, but bcft cold. When ypu

"take

BROILING 179

take any out, put them in a difh, with a little of the pickle; tie them down dofe again and they will keep a long time.

Sprats

"WIPE your fprats with a clean cloth, rub them with pepper and (alt, and lay ihem in a pani bruife a pennyworth of cochineal, put it into the vinegar, and pour it over the fprats, with fomc bay leaves, tic them down clofe with coarfc paper, and fet them io the oven all night They eat very fine cold.

You may put to a pint of vinegar half a pint of red wine, and fpices if you like it; but they eat very well without

mmmmmmmmkmmttmmmimkKimttlillmm

CHAP. VIIL

BROILING.

Proper Rules to be obferved in Broitingt

BE fure to keep your gridirons clean fcraped between the barsj and rub the tops bright before you ufe them, which will prevent f heir flaring, aS it often fpoils every thing you broil. Before you begin let your fire burn clear, and free from fmoke; turn your becf-fteaks, mutton lambj or pork chops quick; cutlets feldom want turning more than once if done. gradually I have your di(h very hot before

N 2 the

8d

BROILING.

the fire, or over a chaffing-difh of coals to put tlie tneac on as foon as it is done. Never garnifh anf thing broiled, but put horfe-radiih and pickles ia aucers or fmall plates; and be fure to cover the dilh as quick as poilible, and fend it away hot. Never bafte any thing with butter or fatof any kind while broiliog, as it will make it fmokey and black. Fowls, chickens, pigeons, &c. require to be broiled gendy, becaufe ihey are not fo foon hot through as meat and have roui' fauce ready to fend, or put over, tht momefht they are done.

Fowls and Chickens.

SLIT them down the back, and put two ikewerf through them to keep them open, finge pepper, and fait them, put your gridiron over a clear fire, an at a diftance; put them on the belly-fide downwards firft, till they are nearly half done, then turn them, and take care the Be(hy-fide does not burn put the liver and gizzard on a fkewer, pepper and fait and broil them -, lay your fowls in a hot difh, and pour frefh or pickled mufhroom fauce over them s garnifli with the liver and gizzard and notched le mon or this fauce, pick and waib fome forrel, chop it fine, put it into a (lew- pan, with half a pint of. gravy, a piece of butter mixed with flour, feafon it with pepper and fait, and ftcw it for ten minutes; put it in the dilh and the fowls over it, or any fauce you fency.

Pigeons.

CHOP fome parflcy fine, mix it up withbQtter pepptr, and fait, tie the neck-ends and ftuff them, tie the other end, put your gridiron over a clear fire at a great diftance, and broil them gently for half

BROILING, i8i

an hour J or you may.fplit them down the back, put alkewer through, pepper, fait, and broil them •, put them into a hot difli, with a little gravy under them, and parfley and butter in a boat.

Beef Steaks.

TAKE a rump of beef that has been hung up for five or fix days, cut your fteaks all the length, about half an inch thick, beat them with a chopper, put your gridiron over a clear fire, and rub it with a little bcef-fuer, put on your fl:eaks, and turn them quick till they arc nearly done, then pepper nd falc them, and turn them quick till done; have a hot difh, put them in, cover them up, and fend them away hot, with chopped Ihallots, horfe-radi(h, and pickles ir) faucers.

Beef Steaks the French Way.

PUT half a pint of gravy, the fame of red w'ne with half a dozen Ihallots chopped fine, feafoned with pepper and fair, into a ftew-pan; cut two fine rump-fteaks, half broil them,'then cut them in fquare pieces, and put them into the ftew-pan, with a fpoonful of vinegar, cover them clofe, and fimmer them over a flow fire half an hour; then put theln into a hot difli, cover them, and fend them away hot.

Mutton Chops

TAKB a loin of mutton, cut off the (kin and part of the fat, (if it is very fat cut the chops about half an inch thick) pepper arid fait them, put your gridiron over a clear fire, and broil them quick i (but mind that the gridiron does not flare, for that

N 3 will

i82 B R O I L I N G.

will fpoil them) put them into a hot diib, with i fpoonful of ketchup under them and horfe-radilh and chopped (ballots in fauccrs.

Cutkts Maintenon.

CUT fix thin chops ofF the befl- end of a necft of mutton, with a bone in eachy cut the fat off the bone and fcrape it clean; take fix half-Hieets of paper,' and rub a liltle butter over them, rub the crumb of a dale penny loaf through a cullender, ihred fome parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-peel fine, mix them with the crumbs, and feafon it with pepper, fair, and nutmeg; melt a little butter in a ftcw-pan, dip the chops in on both fides, and put the crumbs, &c. on ihcm, put them in the paper and fatten it, leaving out the bone, broil them for twenty minutes over a clear fire, but mind the paper does not catch fire; put them into a hot,fli, with poveroy faucc ina boat.

You may make it of a loin of mutton the fame way,

Pork Cbeps.

CUT a loin of pork into chops half an inch thick, notch the rind pepper and fait them, and broil them over a clear fire of a fine brown; (they require more time than mutton) when done, put them into a hot diih, with a little gravy under thein

Veal Cutlets.

CUT your cutlets off a fillet of veal about a quarter of an inch thick, and about fix inches broad, put bread crumbs and herbs, the fame as for cqtleis maintenon, on both ftdes, put your gridiron over

very

B R O I LING. 183

ft very clear fire, put 00 the cutlets, and broil one fide of a fine brown turn (hem, broil the other fide the fame, and put them in a hot difli; have itady the follbwing fauce: put half a pint of gravy in a fauce-pan, with a piece of butter -mixed with flour, two fpoonsful of ketchup, a little pepper and fait, boil it till it is thick and fmooch, and put it over them; or fre(h or pickled muihroom fauce, with thin ralhers of bacon broiled for garnifh.

Veal Cutlets Maintenon

CUT your cutlets off a fillet of veal a quarter of an inch thick, and two inches fquare, put them in paper the fame as cutlets maintenon, broil them, put them in a hot difh, with poveroy fauce in a boat.

Veal Chops.

CUT your chops off a loin of veal about three quarters of an inch thick, pepper and falc them, put your gridiron over a clear fire, and broil them gently of a fine brown; put them in a hot diQi, with gravy and butter over them.

Lamb Chops.

TAKE a loin of grafs lamb, and cut it into thin chops, put a (kcwer through the kidney pare to keep it together, fcafon them with pepper and fait, put your gridiron over a very clear fire, and JJroil them of a fine brown, but take care they do not flare, as that. will make them black; when done, put them in a hot diib and cover them fend them away quick aad hot,

N 4 Potatoes

L

i84 B R O I L I N G.

Potatoes

FIRST boil and peel tbem cut them h two Md broil them brown on both fides, put tficm in a hot difhy with melted- butter iir a boat.

Legs of Turkey or Fowts.

TAKE ihc legs that have been boiled or roafttd, fcore theo) acrofs, and feafon them with Cayan pep. per and fait pretty high, and broil them over a clear fire of a nice brown when done, put thc(n in a hot dilh, with a little gravy under them,

Calf's Hearts

CUT the, deaf cars off, and fpjit it open, put a ikewer acrofs, feafon it with pepper and fait, broil it gently over a clear fire, fifteen minutes, then pu5 It in a hot di(h, and rub a piece of butter over il A Ihcep or lanb's hcwt i? done the fame way,

CHAR

iS J

C H A P, IX.

F R Y I N a

proper Rules to h obfirved in Frying.

BEFORE you proceed to fry any things mind that your frying-pan fe very clean, free from fand, and well tinned and when you ufe any fat be fure it is well rendered and clean, and before you put any thing in to have your fat boiling hot, but do not let it burn, a$ it will fry very thing black; you may know when it is hor,4y its not hiffing; throw in little bit of bread, and if it frys crifp your fat is hot: be careful to wipe every thing with a cloth before you fry it. As fried parfley is often wanted for garnifh, be fure to have it well picked and wa(hcd, put it into a cloth, and fwing it backwards and forwards till the water is out, thenliave your pan of fat hot and put it in, fry t quick ut mind it does .not boil over I have a (lice ready to take it out the moment it is crifp, for if you let it ftay too long it will look black, and put it on a fieve or coarfe cloth before the fire to drain.

Beef Steaks.

CUT rump fteaks in the fame manner as for broiling, put a piece of butter into a ftew-pan and melt it, feafon the fteaks with pepper and fait, put them iq the pan, and fry them on both fides of a fine brown, put them into a hot difii before the fire, throw out the fat ibake a little fiour into the pan,

and

86

F R Y. I N (5.

and half a pint of gravy, with two or tbree (ballots chopped fine, and a fpoonful of ketchup, boil it up, and pour it over the Ileaks, with horle-radilh aq4 pickles in faucers.

Mutton Chops.

CUT a loin of mutton into chops, take off the ikin, pepper and fait them, put a little butter into a pan, melt rt, put in the chops, and fry them quick and brown on both fides; chop a little (ballot or onion fmall, put it in the dih, with the chops over ir, and garnifh with horfe-radi(fa,

hamb Chops.

CUT a loin, or the beft end of a neck of lamb into thin chops, pepper and fair them, rub the yolk of an egg on both fides and fprinkle bread-crumbs over them; have a pan of beef dripping boiling hot, put them in, and fry them on both fides of a fine gold colour; take them out and put them on a fieve before the fire to drain the fat from them; pu& them into a hot di(b and garni(h with plenty of fried parfley, with plain butter in a boatv or you may fry them in plenty of butter if you like it be(t;

Another Way.

CUT the lamb into chops as before, pepper, fair, and flour them $ put fome butter into a ftcw-pao, fry them on both fideS of a nice brown, and put them in a di(h before the fire, pour the fat out of the pan, (hake in fome flour, put in half a pint of white gravy, a gill of white wine, and a few capers chopped fine, feafoned with pepper, fait, and a little putmeg, boil it up -, beat the yolks of two eggs well

up

"i

F R Y I N G. 187

up and put in, keepingic ftirring till it is thick then pour it over the chops, and garniih them with fried f arfley.

Lambs Fry.

CUT your fry into pieces about two inches long, the liver inro thin dices, pepper, falt and flour it well, take the fkin off th 'ftones have a pan of hogs lard or beef dripping boiling hoc, put the fry in, and when you think it is half done put in the liver, keep it turning, fry it quick of a fine brown, and then put it on a (leve to drain; fry a handful of parQey crifp, puc a fifti-drainer in the di(b, put tht fry on that, and garnifh with the fried parfley, with plain butter in a boat; or you may give it a fcald firft, but not the liver, rub if over with the yolk of gg) fprinkle bread-crumbs over it, and fry it as before

Pigs Ears.

BOIL them till they are tender then cut them in two, make a light ale or fmall beer batter, and dip them in have a pan. of fat boiling hoc, fty them crifp and brown, and put them on a fieve to drain the fat fom them; then put them in a hot di(b, mix fome melted butter with, a fpoonful of muftard, pour it over them, and fend theft) to table hot.

Veal Steaks.

CUT your fteaks about as thick as a crown picce pepper and fait them; puc lome butter into a-fryingpan and melt it, put in the fteaks, fry them on both fides of a light brown, and then put them into a di(h )cfidre the tirei pour . the fat out of the pan, (hake

in

f88

R f

I N G.

in a little flour, with half a pint of gravy; a fpooo ful of ketchup, and a little pepper and falc, boil it up, fqueeze in the juice of a quarter of a lemoni pour it over the (leaLs and garniih with lemony cover it over and fend it away hot

Cold Veal.

CUT your veal in thin flices, about as thick as half-crown piece, and as long as you pleafe; have ready fome bread-crumbs, parfley, fwect herbs, and lemonpeel fhred fine, all mixed together, leaibned with pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, rub ibmc yolk of eggs on both fides, and fprinklc the crumbs and herbs on them; put fome butter into a pan and melt it, put the veal in, and fry it brown on both fides; when done, put it in adrfli before the fire: in the mean time make a little gravy of the bones, (hake a little flour in the pan, and put in the gravy with a fpoonful of ketchup, ftir it round, fqueeze in a little lemon, boil it up, and drain it through afieveover the veal; garniftv with lemon. You may put a few pickled muflirooms over the veal.

Cold Fowl, Pigeon, or Rabbit.

CUT them in quarters, and beat up an egg or two, according to the quantity you drefs, grate in a little nutmegs fome pepper and fait, fome parfley, fweet herbs, lemon peel (hred fine, and a few brcsidcrumbs, dip them in this batter have a pan of dripping boiling hot, and fry them of a light brown when done, put them on a fieve to drain, then put them in a hot diih, with pickled mufhroom £iuQe €ver them, and garniih with lemn and beetroot

F R Y I N a . i8f

4:

' Tripe.

TAKE the middle of the double tripe, and cur it acrofs about three inches wide; tif ake a good fmali beer or aie batter aad dip the tripe in on both fides have ready a pan of hogs lard or dripping boiling hot, put it in, and fry it of a fine brown on both fides; take it out, and put it on a fieve or Goarfe cloth to drain before the fire, then put it in a hot dilh, with a iifh drainer in it; garniih with fried parfley, ahd plain butter in a boat.

You may rub it over with the yolks of eggs in ftead of batter if you pleafe.

Baufaes.

•

PUT them into a fauce-pan of hot water, and boil them two or three minutes; take them out, and prick them in feveral places with a pin, which will prevent them from burfting j put a piece of butter in a pan, and make it hot, put in the faufages, fry thcQi brown on both fides and then put them on a fieve to drain cut fome toads and fry them in the pan, put the toafts into a diflt and the faufages over them

You may pare and core fix apples, cut four in flices as thick as a crown piece, the other two in quarters, and fry them with the faufages; lay the ufages in the middle of the difb, the apples rounds Knd garniih with the quarters.

Potatoes.

"fARE as many raw potatoes as you will want cut them in flices as big as a crown piece, flour thesi and fry them brown and crifp on both fides in

frcf

i FRYING.

frefli butter; put theai in a hot di(h, and potff melted butter, fack, and fugar mixed over them, or fend them without, only a little plain butter in a boat.

Artichokes

TAKE four artichokes, break them dF the ftalksi ivafli them clean, cut all the large leaves off clofc to the choke, and boil them till tender i then cut them in quarters, pepper, fait, and Sour them, fry them brown in frefh butter, and put them in a hoc di(b, with plain butter in a boat

When you have artichoke bottoms, dried or pickled; if dried, (immer them till they are tender, wipe them dry with a cloth, make a fmall beer, ale, or egg batter, and fry them brown in a pan of boil' tng hot fat; if pickled, lay them in water all night, then take them out, wipe them dry with a cloth, dip tliem in batter, and fry them brown; put them on a fieve to drain, put them in a hot dilh, and pour melted butter over them. Thefe arc a pretty corner difli for fupper.

Cetlery.

TAKE twelve heads off cellery, trim of all the green and outfide ilalks, walh and pare the roots clean; beat up the yolks of three eggs with half a

int of white wine, grate in fome nutmeg and ittle fait, mix all well together with flour into a batter, and dip every head into it; put a poufld oif butter into a pan and make it hot, then put in the cellery and fry it brown 5 when done, put it on a fieve to drain, then put it in a hot dilb, with plain butter over jt

Caulifiovm

F R Y I N G ii

Caulifiawers;

TAKE one large or two fmall caulifiowers, waflb them very clean, half hpil . thenij and pull them into fprigs; make a batter thus: beat up the yolks of two eggs, with a gill of white wine, a little grated nutmeg, and a little fait, mix it with flour into a light batter, and dip in the fprigs; have ready a large pan of hogs-lard boiling hot, put them id fprig by fprig fry them of a fine brown, and then put them on a lieve to drain put them in a hot difli, and pour melted butter over theni. They are,a pretty garnilh round a boiled cauliflower.

PUT about half a pound of good fat into a frying-pan, make it hot, break half a dozen eggs into cups and put in, fry them quick, but not too much, take them out with an egg flice and put them on a toaft i or fry fix rafhers of bacon, put them in a dift, and the eggs over them.

Oyfleru

TAKE the largcft oyfters you can get, give them a boil in their own liquor a, moment, ftrain the liquor from them, wafli them well in cold water, and dry them in a cloth 5 make a good fmall beer, ale, 01 egg batter, feafoned with a little nutng and fait, and dip them in; have a pan of hogs-lard boiling hot, fry them of a light brown, put them on a fieve to drain, and then in ahot difli; or to garniih made dilhcs calf's head, cod's head, &c.

92 STEW& AN HASHES

Calfs Liver, and Bacon

cut a calf s liver acrofs in dices, wipe it dry with a cloth, pepper, fait, aAd flour it;, put a quaN ter of a pound of butter into a frying-pan, make it hot, pot in the liver, and fry it brown on both fides; put it on a difix before the fire, pour the fat cut of the pan, Ihake in a little flour, and put in a quarter of a pound of butter, fl:ir it round, and pue in half a pint of boiling water, a fpoonful of ketchup, a little pepper and fait, boil it up and put it over the liver: in' the mean time fry half a down ralhers of bacon and put round, and garniih wicit crifp parfley.

CHAP. X

STEWS A rfj HASHES

Troper Rules to be obferved in Stewing and

Hajhing:

BEFORE you proceed to dew any thing, mind that your ftew-pans and covers are free from fand or greaftr, and well tinned; and have all your ingredients ready tb put in at once. Be fure to flcim every thing well and clear from fat, as nothing looks worfe than to fee the fat fwim at the top. For haOiesj be fure to have your fauce ready before you put the

meat

STEWS AK13 HASHES. 193

meat in, and that will prevent it from being hard; particularly beef, mutton, and venifon, ftould only be made hot through, for if you let it boil, it mkea it tough and hard and entirely fpoils it



Rump teef.

TAKE a rump of beef, cut the meat from the bone, lay it in a ftew-pan with a quart of gravy, a pint of red wine, and as much water as will nearly cover it, with fomc whole pepper, two or three onions, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome Cayan pepper and fait, and a gill of ketchup, cover it clofe, ftew it gently over a flow fire for four hours, and put fome red hot coals at the top: in tlie mean time cut four or five turneps and two carrots into any Ihape you pleafe, four heads of cellery cut about an inch long, with a dozen fmall Dnions, and boil them till they are tender; then take out the beef, put it in a diffli before; the fire, flrain off the liquor through a fieve and fkim off all the fat clean; put a piece of butter into a ftcw-pan, melt it, and piit two fpoonsful of flour in, flir it till it is fmooth, then by degrees pour the liquor in, keep it ftirring till it is fmooth, and put in the carrots, &c. boil it up five minutes, and if it wants any feafoning put it in; then put the beef into a deep di(b, put the faucc over it, and garnilh with fried fippets; or you may put truffles and morels, pickled mufh rooms and artichoke bottoms in the fauce, inftead of the turncps, &c.

- t

'Rump of Beef another Way.

BOIL it for two hours, then take it up, and peel t)ff the fkln; chop a handful of parfley, all forts of fwcct herbs, and a little lemon-peel Ihrcd fine, fome

O beaten

'

196 STEWS AND HASHES.

ofF clean, and put it into a ftew-pan, with feme butter mixed witFi fiour, a fpoonful of brownings lome pickled cucumbers cut in dices, and the other chefnuts peeled and fkinned; boil it up till it is thick and fmooth, feafon it with Gayan pepper and fait to your palate, and pour it over the beet 3 garniih with lemon and fried oyfters

Beef Steaks.

TAKE two fine rump fteaks, pepper and iait them lay them in a (lew-pan, with half a pint of water, a little cloves and mace, an onion, one an chovy, a bundle of fweet herbs, a gill of white wine, and a little butter mixed with flour; cover them clofe, (lew them gently till they arc tender, and Ihake the pan round often to keep them from fticking; take them carefully out, flour them, and fry them of a nice brown in frcfli butter, and put them in the difh: in the mean time drain off the fauce, pour the fat out of the frying-pan, and put in the fauce, with a dozen oyfters blanched and a little of the oyftcr liquor; give it a boil up, pour it over the (leaks, and garnih with horfe-radifli.

You may fry the (leaks firft, and then ftew them; put them in a difti, and drain the fauce over thcra, withoutiany oyders;

Beef with Cucumbers.

. TAKE about two pounds of any tender piece of beef, put fome fat bacon over it, and tic a paper over that, half road it, and then cut it into fliccs; pare fix cucumbers, take out the pulp, cut them in little fquare pieces, and flour them, put a piece of butter in a dew-pan, fry them a few minutes, dredge in a little flour, pour in a pint of gravy, a glafs of

whie

STEWS AND HASHES. 197

vhite wine, and feafon it with pepper and fair, put in the beef, and (lew it till it is tender. If the fauce is not thick enough, put in a little butter niixed with flour, and ftew it till it is thick and fmooth; put the meat in a dilhj the fauce over it, and garnifli with fried fippets%

Neats Tongues ivbole.

TAKE two frefli tongues, wa(h them very clean, put them in water jufl: enough to cover them, apd ftew them for two hours - then take them up peel the fkins off, and trim all the root part clofe to the blade, put them into a (lew-pan, with a quart of gravy, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace, whole pepper, and all-fpice in a muflin rag, and half a pine of white wine, cover them clofe, and ftew them till they are tender; in the mean time cut fome carrots and turneps into dice, and boil them tender; take out the fpice and herbs, put in a piece of butter rolled in flour, take out the tongues and put them in a difli before the fire, put in the carrots and turneps, feafon it with pepper and fait, boil it till it is thick and fmooth, fkim it well, and pour it over the tongues; garnifli with fried flppets.

Breqi of Venifon.

TAKE the Ikin off a breaft of veniibn, chop the bones, turn it round, and fkewer it, put it into a ftew-pan with a quart of water, half a pint of red wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves and mace tied in a muflin rag, a little pepper and fait, and ftew it gently for three hours; then take it out, ikim oflf all the fat very clean, takeout the fpice and herbs, put in a. piece of butter mixed with flourj il it up till i( is thick and fmooth i feafon it with

O 3 a little

198 STEWS AND HASHES.

a little Cayan pepper, put in the breaft of venifbn, make it hot, put it into a hot difli and pour the fauce over it; garnifli with leoion and beet-root, with hot currant jelly in a boat.

Breafi of Ventfon another Way.

TAKE a breaft of venifon, fkin and bone it, cut it into four pieces, pepper, fait, and flour it, put quarter of a pound of butter into a pan, maJce it hot, and fry the venifon brown; then put in a pint of gravy, half a pint of red wine, four Ihallots chopped fine, feafoned with a little beaten mace, Cayan pepper and fait, cover it dole, ftew it gendy over a flow fire till it is tender, and fkim it well then put it into a hot difli, and garnifli with lemaD with hot currant jelly in a boat.

Knuckle of Veal.

T A K E a knuckle of veal, break the fhank, and wafli it very clean; lay three or four wooden fkewers at the bottom of a ftew-pan, with two quarts of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, a little cloves, mace, and whoje pepper, a cruft of bread, and fome fait, cover it clofe, and as foon as the fcum fifes flcim it well, and ftew it gently for two hours; when done, put it into a deep difli, and ftrain tha liquor over it.

Knuckle of Veal with Rice.

BREAK the fliank of a knuckle of veal, wafli it clean, and put it into a pot with four quarts of water; when it boils flcim it clean, and put in a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace, and all-fpice tied in a muflin rag and feafon it with fak to your likings

put

STEWS AND hashes; 199

put in a pound of whole rice well wafhed and picktd cover it clofe, fteW 4t two hours, and give it a ftir rouiid often to keep the meat and rice from ftick ing; when done, put it into a deep diih, take out tl fweet herbs and (pice, and pour the rice and broth over it.

f Calf or Lamb's Head.

TAKE a calf or lamb's head, and with a iharppointed knife take all the meat clean off the bonet, cut out the tongue, lay it in water for one hour to foak out the blood, take out the brains and lay them in water likewife; take two pounds of veal and a pound of beef fuir, chop them together, with the crumb of a penny loaf, fome fweet herbs parfley, and lemon-peel ihred fine, feafon it with grated nutmeg, pepper and fait, mix it altogether with the yolks of four eggs, but ave out enough to make twenty OnaJl balls -, wafh the head clean, and wipe it dry with a cloth, put the force-meat in the inlide and clofe it together, tie it round with packy thread, put it into a ftew-pan, with two quarts of gravy, half a pint of white wine, and a bundle of Iweet herbs, cover it clofe, and ftew it gently: in the mean time boil the tongue t;ll it is tender, peel it, and cut it into thin flices; wafli oui the brains and chop them fine, with a little parfley and lemon-peel cut fine, a little grated nutmeg, pep per and fait, mixed up with the yolks of two eggs and a fpoonful of flour have a pan of hot drip ping, and with a fpoon drop theiti in, and fry them in drops of a fine brown, put them on a fievfc to drain, fry the balls, and keep them both hot, and a dozen oyllers fried; when the head is done take ic up, untie it, put it in a di(h, and cover it over to Mep it hot ikini the gravy clean, put in a piece of

O 4. bttttec

20Q STEWS AND HASHES,

butter mixed with fk)ur, the tongue cut in dices, fome truffles and morels, and a gill of pickled mufhrooois, boil all up till it is thick and fmooth feafon it ta ))ur palate,: take out the fwet herbs, pour the faucc over the head, put the fried oyfters upon it, the balls round it, and gatnifh with the fried brains.

Fillet of Veal

TALE the Bllet of a cow calf, take out the bone, and make the following (luffing: take half a pound of lean veal, half a pound of beef or veal fuet, the crumb of a penny loaf, chop them all well together with fome fwecc herbs, parfley, and lemon-peel ihrcd fine, a little grated nutmeg, and feafoned with pepper and fait, mix it up with the yolks of two eggs, and fluff the fillet under the udder and in the mid dje, fkewer it up and half roaft it; then rake it up and put it into a deep ftew-pan, with three pints of gravy, a gill of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, and a little beaten mace, cover it clofe and flew it for two hours, take out the fillet and fweet herbs, put the fillet in a difli before the fire to keep hot, ikim the fat off the gravy, put a piece of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour,, fiir it till it is fmootH, then by degrees ppur in the gravy, ftir it till it boils and is fmooth, then put in fome pickled muflirooms, truffles, morels, and artichoke bottoms cut into pieces, feafon it with Cayn pepper and fait to your liking, and the juice of haj( a lemon, boil it up Hve minutes, and fkim it free from fat; put the fillet into a clean hot difh, pour the fauce over it, and garnifh with lemon and beetroot. ...

VcA

5TEWS ANP HASHES, 201

Veal and Teas.

TAKE about four pounds of a breaft of ycal, cut it into fmall fquare pieces, and flour it, put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftcw-pan, put in the veal, and fry it of a light brown then pour In three pints of boiling water, two or three onions chopped fine two cabbage lettuces cut fine, and a quart of old green peas, feafon ir with pepper and fait, dew it two hours, and Ikinn it clean; when donejt put the veal into a dilh, (he peas, &c. over it and garniih with lemon.

Turkey Jlewed brown.

TAKE a turkey and truTs it as for boiling, fill (he breaft and infide with force-meat, lard the bread:, and half roaft it; then take it up, put it into a deep ftew.pan that will jufl: hold it, and put in as mucti gravy as will cover it, a gill of white wine, feme whole pepper, cloves, and mace tidd in rag. and a bundle of fweet' herbs, coyer it clofe, ana ftcw it gently for one hour; then take up the turkey, and kWp it hot before the fire; put a little gutter in a (lew-pan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, ftrain the gravy to it, and boil it well till there is about a pint; put ' the turkey in a hot dilh, pour the fauce over it, and garnifli with lemon and fried oyfters.

You may fill half a dozen little frcnch rolls, or pyftcr loaves, with ftewed oyfters, and put them und and garnifli with lemon.

Anothet

20Q STEWS AND HASHES,

b.utter mixed with fk)ur, the tongue cut in dices, fome truffles and morels, and a gill of pickled mufhroomSi boil all up till it is thick and fmooth feafon it to ylbur palatcp take out the fwct herbs, pour the faucc over the head, put the fried oyfters upon it, the balls round it and gatnifh with the fried brains.

FiIet of Feal.

TALE the Bllet of a cow calf, take out the bone, and make the following (luffing: take half a pound of lean veal, half a pound of beef or veal fuet, the crumb of a penny loaf, chop them all well together with fome fwcec herbs, parfley, and lemon-peel (hrcd fine, a little grated nutmeg, and feafoned with pepper and fait, mix it up with the yolks of two eggs, and ftuff the fillet under the udder and in the mid' dje, Ikewer it up and half roaft it; then take it up and put it into a deep ftew-pan, with three pints of gravy, a gill of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, and a little beaten mace, cover it clofe and ftew it for two hours; take out the fillet and fweet herbs, put the fillet in a difli before the fire to keep hot, ikim the fat off the gravy, put a piece of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour ftir it till it is fmootfi, then by degrees ppur in the gravy, (lir it till it boils and is imooth, then put in fome pickled mufhrooms, truffles, morels, and artichoke bottoms cut into pieces, feafon it with Cayn pepper and fait to your liking, and the juice of hajf a lemon, boil it up five minutes, and fkim it free from fat; put the fillet into adean hot di(h, pour the fauce over it and garnifh with lemon and beet root, "

"•w

STEWS ANP HASHES, 204

Veal and Peas.



TAKE about four pounds of a bread of ycal, cut it into fmall fquare pieces, and flour it; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftcw-pan, put in the veal, and fry it of a light brown then pour In three pints of boiling wter, two or three onions chopped fine two cabbage lettuces cut fine, and a quart of old green peas, feafon it with pepper and fait, ftew it two hours, arid Ikinn it clean; when doncj put the veal into a dilh, (he peas, &c. over ir and garniih with lemon.

Turkey Jlewed browtu

TAKE a turkey and truTs it as for boiling, fill the bread and infide with force-meat, lard the bread:, and half road it; then take it up, put it into a deep ftew.pan that will jud hold it, and put in as much gravy as will cover it, a gill of white wine, lome whole pepper, cloves, and mace tid in rag. and a bundle of fweet' herbs, coyer it" clofe, ana ftew it gently for one hour; then take up the turkey, and kWpit hot before the fire; put a little gutter in a dew-pan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour, dir it till it is fmooth, drain the gravy to it, and boil it well till there is about a pint; put '' the turkey in a hot did), pour the fauce over it, and garnidi with lemon and fried oyders.

You may fill half a dozen little french rolls, or pyftcr loaves, with dewed oyders, and put them d and garnidi with lemon.

Another,

io2 STEWS Auf hashes;

Another Way.

T

TAKF. your turkey, draw it, and with a froalt pointed knife bone it, but mind you do not cut the ikin on the back, then fill it wich the following force-meat: take the breaft of a fowl, half a pound of lean veal, the flefh of two pigeons, with a pound of pickled tongue peeled, chbp them altogether, then beat them in a mortar, with the marrow of a beef-bone, or half a pound of veal kidney-fuct, feafon it with beaten cloves mace, nutmeg, pepper and fait, mix it all well together with the yolks of two egg, fill the turkey, finge and flour it; put a pound of butter in a itew-pan and fry it of a fine brown; put four wooden fkewers at the bottom of a ftew-pan, juft big enough to hold it and to keep it from (licking, put on the turkey, wirii a quart of good gravy, hair a pint of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace, and all-fpice tied in a rag, half a pint of frefh mufhropms, an ounce of truffles and morels, a piece of butter rolled in fiour feafoned with Cayn pepper and fait, cover it clofe, and flew it for one hour and a half; then take up the turkey and put it into a hot difh, take out the fweet herbs and fpice, ikim the fauce well and pour it over the turkey; put fix oyfter loaves, with ilewed oyllers in them, round it, and garnifh with lemon

Turkey ivitb Cettery.

TRUSS a turkey as for boiling, finge it, put four Ikewers at the bottom of a ilew-pan, put in the turkey, with a quart of gravy, half a pint of white winie, feafon it with pepper and fait, a little beaten cloves and mace i take the white pait of a dozen

beads

STEWS AMD HASHES. 20

heads of cellery cut it about one inch long, walh it rery clean, and put it in, cover the pan cloie and ftcw It gently for one hour; then uncover it, put. in a fpoonful of ketchup, a piece of butter roUed in flour, and ftew it half an hour longer; then take out the turkey and put it in a hot di(h, fkim off the hu and pour the fauce over it; garnifli with lemon and beet-root.

Fowl.

TRUSS a fowl as for boiling, finge it, and ftu It with veal force-meat, put it into a ftew pan, with a pint and a half of gravy, a glafs of white wine, a bundle of fwcct herbs, a little beaten cloves, mace, pepper, and fait, cover it cloie, and ftew it half an hour; then put in a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with flour, a gill of mu(hrooms, a few truffles and morels walhed clean, cover it, and ftew it fifteen minutes longer; then take out the fowl, put it in a di(b, take out the fweet herbs, (kirn the fauce well, and pour ii over the fowl j garnifli with lemon and beet-root.

Fowl with Celkry

TAKE a large fowl and bone it in the fol lowing manner: take a fmall-pointed knife and begin at the breaft, and carefully take all the fle(& off the bones, but leave on the rump, then fill it with veal force-meat, (inge it, and put it into a ftew-pan, with a quart of gravy, a bundle of fweet herbs, half a pint of white wine, feafon it with beaten cloves, mace, pepper, and fait; walh the white part of half a dozen heads of celler very tlean, cut them one inch long, put them in. over them clofe, and ftew them half an hour verv ndy;

take

104 STEWS AND HASHES,

talce- off the cover, and put in a piece of butter mixed with flour (hake it rounds and &ew it very gently- half an hour longer; then take out the fowl and put it in a hot diih take out the fweet herbs, jkim the faucc well, and pour it over the fowlf garnilh with kmon and beet-root.

Fowl with Rice

TRUSS a fowl as for bailing, put it into a flew, pan with a quart of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, aibn it with a little beaten cloves and mace, fome pepper and fait, cover it clofe and (lew it half an hour: in the mean time boil four ounces of rice in a quart of water till it is tender, (train it off, put it to the fowl, and ftew it for fifteen minutes longer very gently, but take care it does not (lick; then put the fowl in a hot di(h, take out the fweet herbs, nd put the rice and fauce over it. . .

You may qfe gravy inftead of water if you want k rich.

Fowl or Chicken the Hutch Way.

TAKE a fowl or chicken, trufs it as for boiling, and finge it; beat four cloves, four blades of mace, 0nd half a nutmeg fine, chop half a handful of parfley fine, with lome pepper and fait, mix them together and put it in the infide of the fowl or chicken, fiour it all over, put it into a (lew-pan and clify as much fre(h butter as will cover it, (lew it rentiy for one hour, then put it into a China bowl with the butter, and fend it up hot.

CiVff

STEWS A!ri HASHES 26j

Chickens

DftAW two chickens finge and walh them cfean cut them in quarters, put them in a ftew-pan, with half a pint of white gravy, half a pint of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs a little cloves and mace beat fine, a little pepper and fait, with a piece of butter rolled in flour, cover them clofe, and ftcw them half an hour then take out the fweet-herbs fkim them clean, give them a (lew up, put the chickens into a hot difli, pour the fame over them and garnifh with lemon.

You may put mufhrooms, trufles and morels or artichoke bottoms, if you pleafe.

Chickens another Way.

TAKE two chickens, draw and finge them, waffi them very clean, and boil them ten minutes; then take them up in a pewter dilh, and cut them up feparating every joint, and take out the breaftbones-, if you have a filvcr di(h and cover put them in and the liquor that cbmes from them i if it is not enough, add a gill of the liquor they were boiled in with a little beaten mace and fait, cover them clofe, and ftcw them gently over a ftove or chaffing dilh of coals for ten minutes, and fend them to table in the fame difli.

If you have not a filver di(h, make ufe of a pewter one, with another to cover it.

Chickens the Scotch Way.

TAKE two chickens, draw and finge them, walh them very clean, cut them in quarters, dry them with a clean cloth, put them into a ftewpap, and

juft

- V

2o6 STEWS AND HASHES.

juft cover ihcm with water, with a bundle of parfley, a little beaten mace and fait, cover them clofe,and ftew them half an hour; tak out the bundle of parflejr, chop half a handful of parfley fine, beat vp fix eggs whites and all, fkim the chickens, put in the parfley and eggs, keep them ftirring till thick, but do not let them boil, then put them into a deep dilb and fend them up hot

Fbeafanf

PICK, draw, and trufs the pheafant with the head on, finge it, put it into a ftew-pan, with a pint of veal gravy, half a pint of white wine, four fliallots chopped fine, feafoned with beaten mace, Cayaa pepper and fait, cover it clofe, and ftew it half an hour; then have ready fome truffles and morels, two artichoke bottoms blanched and cut into pieces, a dozen chefnuts boiled and peeled, a piece of butter rolled in flour, with the juice of half a lemon, coter it over, flew it ten minutes, and flcim it clean; then put the pheafant into the difli, pour the fauce over it, and garnifli with force-meat balls fried and cut in two.

A black-legged fowl, truffcd like a pheafant is a good fubflitute for a pheafant if you have none

Partridges arc ftewcd the fame way.

Pigeons.

TAKE five or fix pigeons, pick and draw them, and trufs them as for roafting makeafeaibningwith 4 little beaten cloves, mace, pepper and fait, fomc parfley and fweet herbs flired fine, mix it up with a little butter, put it in the infide of them, tie up the necks and vents, and half roaft them j cut off the feet, put them into a ftew-pan, with a pint of gravy,

a gill

STEWS AND HASHES. 207

a gill of white wine, a little beaten cloves, mace, pepper and fak, a bundle of fweet herbs, and two fluDots chopped fine, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently for half an hour •, then take out the fvect herbs and put in a piece of butter mixed with fiour, a gill of pickled mufhrooms, a few truffles and morels walhed clean, and one artichoke bottom cut into pieces, ftew them till they are thick and fmooth, flcim them clean, and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon; then put them into a hot di(h, the fauce all over them, and garnifli with lemon and bcet-root.

You may ftew cold roaft pigeons the fame way,' odIv feafon the infide.

Geefe Giblets.

TAKE two pair of giblets, fcald and pick them clean, cut the neck in three, fplit the head, cut the pinions in two, the gizzard in four, and the feet in two, wafli them very clean, put them in a ftew-pan, with a quart of veal broth, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace, and alMpice tied in a rag, feafoned with pepper and fait, put them over a gentle fire, and ftew them till the giblets are tender; take ut the fpice and fweet herbs, ikim them very clean, put in about two ounces of butter mixed with flour, Ihake them round till the butter is melted, then mix half a pint of cream with the yolks of two eggs, grate in a little nutmeg, pour it to the giblets, keep them ftirring one way till they are thick and fmooth, put them into a hot di(b, and garnifli with fippets.

Ducks Giblets.

SCALD three pair of ducks giblets, wafli them very clean, cut them into pieces, and put them intp

a ftew

id8 S17EWS AND HASHES

a ftcw-pan, with three pints of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little beaten cloves, mace, and a little fait, cover them clofe, and ftew thenn gently till they are tender; mix two ounces of butter with flour and put in, take out the fweet herbs, boil them up till they are moderately thick, and fklm them well; chop half a handful of parfley and fix green onions very fine, put them in, and boil them up five mi i)utes, then fendthem in a hot deep di(h. You may put in a little Cayan pepper if you like them high feafoncd

Hart.

CASE the hare, cut it into pieces, and walh it very clean; put it into a ftew-pan, with a quart of vater, a pint of red wine, an onion lluck with cloves, a bundle of fweet herbs, four blades of mace, and a few pepper corns; cover it, and when the fcum rifcs fkim it clean, cover ic again, and ftew it gently till the hare is tender, then with a fork take out the hare, and ftrain the gravy through a fieve put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan melt it, and put a large fpoonful of fiour in, ftir it till it is fmooth j then by degrees pour the gravy in and ftir it likewife, then -put in the hare, a fpoonful of ketchup, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait to your palate, give it a tofs or two, put it into a hor difh, and garnifh with fried fipppets.

You may lard fome pieces if you like it, or you may cut the hare in two, ftuff the belly, roaft the hind quarters, and (lew the fore quarters as above, put the roaft in the middle of the dllh and the ilcwed round.

STfiWS AftD HASHES. 209

yugged tiare. '

CASE your hire and cut it into frtiatt pieces, lafd fame erf the bed pieces with bacon, put it into a kg or earthen Jjrr, with half a pint of red wine, a tnftdle of fwect herbs, an oniori ftutk with cloveS, a few (hatlot chtipped fine, feafon it with Caan . pepper and fair, tie it clofe with coarfe paper, ptic it into a pot of water juft up to the neck, and boll it for three hours •, then, take it up and put 'ft into a toreen or deep foup-difh, take out the oiiion and krbs, arid fend it to table hot.

Too may omit the lardifig if vou do not appro vt xrfit, ' '



Calf's Feet.

TAKE out the large bonrta of ttv ca!fs feet, irpht them in tio, put them in a ftcw-pan, and torcr them with water, a bundle of fweet herbs, three or four blades of mace, and a little fait, cover thert clofe, and fteW' them very gently till they are tender; take out the herbs and fkim them clean, chop half a handful of parfley very fine and put in, boil ihetti up five minutes, lay lonrte fippets at the bottom -Sf a deep difli, pot in the feet, and pour the iiquor over them.

Cs's Head hajhed kroimt

TAltE a calf's heac rtake out the brains Wa(h it very tieatij and boil it till it is nearly enough; tken take it up, cut out the tongue, peel it, and when It is all cold cut the tongue and half the head in thin dices; take the other half, and carefully tak aU the mea( otF the bones whole, notch it acrofs, fob

P it

ftio. STEWS AND HASHES.

it over with the yolk of an egg and fprinkle bread crumbs, fweet herbs, parfley, lemon-peel chopped fine, pepper, fait, and a little grated nutmeg, mixed •altogether and put over it, and put it before the fire to brown; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it, then put in two fpoonsfid of flour, ftir it till it is fmobth, then put in a quart of good brown gravy, half a pint of white wioe, fix mallots chopped fine, two fpoonsful of ketchup, a bundle of fweet herbs, feafoned with a little beatea mace,. Cay an pepper and fait, boil it up for ten mi nutes, and then (train it oflTi put it into a ftew-pan again, with the hafh, a gill of pickled mulhrooms, .an ounce of truffles and morels boiled and wafhcd well, two artichoke bottoms cut into eight pieces, a fweetbread boiled tender and cut into pieces, and a dozen oyfters blanched, flew it altogether endy for a quarter of an hour, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon: in the mean time wafh the brains well and boil them, cut them into little fquare pieces, dip them into ale batter, and fry them of a fine brown in a pan of hot far, and a dozen larse oyfters fried in the fame manner •, put them on a ueve before the fire to drain, (mind that the cheek is nice and browDJ put the hafli into a hot difh, the cheek at the topi and garnifi with the fried brains and oyfters.

If you think proper you may put in a few forcemeat and egg balls

CalJU Head bajhed white.

WASH and boil it as before direded, and cut it up in the fame mann put a quarter of a pound of butter into a fh.-pan, melt it, and put two fpooniful of flour in, ftir it till it is fmooth, and put in a quart of veal broth, then put in the hafh, with a gill of mufhrooms, two artichoke bottoms cut in pijeees a fweetbread boiled and cut itf

r -

STEWS ANi HASHES. 2ir

IB pieces, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fair, and ftew it for fifteen minutes; mix the yolks of two dggs with half a pint of cream, and grate in half a oucmeg, put it in, and keep it (haking round till ic is thick and fmooth; fqueeze in half a lemon, fhake . ic round, put it into a hot di(b, with the brown head

at top, and garnifli with the fried brains and oyfters.

•

Calfs Heart hajhed.

AFTER you have roafted the calf's heart cut it itkto thin dices, put half a pint of gravy into a ftew pan, a glafs or white wine, a little butter mixed with flour, a little lemon-peel Ihred fine, and feafoa it with pepper and fait; boil it up, then put the heart in, and tofs it up till It is qoite hot; put U ioto a hot dilh, and garnilh with Gppets.

Uajbed Veal

TAKE Ibme cold v(U cut it into thin flicesf ut as large as a crowii piece, put it into a ftew'pan, with fome good gravy, a fpoonful of ketchup a little butter mixed with flour, fome lemon-peel ihred fine, and a little pepper and fait; makfe ic thoroughly hot, put it into a hot dUb, and garnilh with fippets.



Minced Veal.

CUT fome cold veal into flices; and then into little fquare bits, but do not chop it, put it into a w-pan, with a little white gravy, fome cream ac' cording to the quantity, fome butter mixed with flouT) enough to thicken it, fome lemon-peel (hred fine, a little pepper and fait, and a tea fpoonful of lemon pickle, keep it fbaking oyer a clear fire till

' . P 2 ic

412 STEWS AND HASHES It is very hot, but do not kt it boil above- a njinutc, a that will make the veal hard ) put fome Appets at. the bottom of the difli, pour the miace into it uA, put fippets all rouod the diih

HaJbeJ Har€.

TAKE fomc hare after it has been roafted, and cut it into fmall pieces with fome of the fluffing, put half a pint of gravy into a fttw-pan, the fame quantity of red wine, two. or three fli.aUotsfhitd fine, a. piece of butter mixed with flour Cayaa pepper and fait to your palate, boil it up, then put, in the hare, and. make it thoroughly hot, put it. iato a hot di(h, and gajniHi. vith le,mpn aiid bcjet.rQQt, or. toaftcd fjppets.

4

Hajloed Ventfon.

CUT fome cold haunch cr neck of venifon 5nto thin Qices, put a little qf it;s owi) gravy, with half a pint of red wine into a ftw-pan four ftJct chopped very fine, two fpoonsful of ketchup,, a r tie butter rolled in fiour fome pepper and fait, ly)ilt it u7 and then put in the venifon;. niak it bo8 as you can. but be fure you do noc le( it bpil abeyea minute or two, put it into a hot dilh, wdtb fippiH) all round.

Haunch or neck of n?utton done the fame way cats very fine.

HnJhed'Bjef,

CUT fome cold roaft. beef into vffyithin fliceil put a pint ot gravy into 4 (lewpani, iwith four fliallot? chopped fyie a littje btfter mixd wiih.flcttir,. a. fpoQnfuJt Qi waUiut pjckiki. fom purpper and fait,

and

STEWS AND HASHES. 213

ind borl it up; then put in the beef, vith four pickled girkins cut in thin flices, make it very hoir, wd put It iftto a hot difh, with fippets all round.

jGr2ZW Mutton .

TAKE fone cdd mutton and with a Iharp knife cut it into thin fliccs, put the bones into a ftew-pan, with an onion chopped fine, a pint of water, and boil it for a quarter of an hourj ftrain it into a •fttw-pan, put in a fpoonful of '-;rownino, the fame f ketchup, two or three ifhallots chopped fine, fome pepper and fak to your liking, and a little butter mixed with flour, boil it up, then put in the mutton, with fome capers chopped and fome pickled .girkins cut thin, boil it up two of thfcc minutes, then putit into a hot di(h, with toaft.d fippets round it.

If you have not time to boil the bonts, make ufe of fome good gravy inftead, but always be fure to five its own natural gravy if you can, as that always makes the haA better.

Vild Fowl baj:ed.

cut your cold wild fowl into fmall piece?, put a giil of gravy into a ftcw-pan, as much red wine, a ipoonful of ketchup, a litdc onion or fliallot chopped fine, a little butter mixed with flour, fome pepper and fait, and the juice of half a lemon, put in tbt f6wl, and boil it up for Ave minutes; then pttc it into a hot difhj and garnilhivith lemon or bc

root.

Turkey or Fowl hajled

CUT the breaft of a turkey or fowl into thin 0ices cut the legs ofi, fcore thcm pepper and falc

P 3 them

214 STEWS AUD HASHES.

them, and broil them of a nice brown put htlf a pint of gravy into a ftew-pan, with a little butter mixed with flour, a fpoonful of ketchup, fooae pepper and fait, a little lemon-peel (bred fine, put in the meat, and -fliake it over a clear fire till it is thoroughly hot; then put it into a hot dilh, with toafted fippets round it and the legs at top.

Woodcocks or Sntpes bajhed.

TAKE the trails out of the woodcocks or fnipes, half roaft them, bruife the trails, and put them into i ilew-pan, with a little gravy, a glafs of red wine, a little (ballot chopped fine, and a little pepper and fait, cut the birds in quarters, put them in, and jlew them about five minutes cut a thin toaft, tosft it on both fides and butter it, cut it in quarters, Uy it in a hot difb, and put the woodcocks or foipe oq xx with the fauce over them

Pbeqfants and Partridges bajhed.

"WHEN the birds are roafted cut them up as for eating, put half a pint of good gravy into a (lewpan, a glafs of white wine, two (ballots chopped fine, a little butter mixed with ' fiour, fome pepper and falt and a fpoonful of ketchup, boil it up, then put in the birds, put them over a clear fire, and make thpm hot, but take care they do not boil above a miqute, as that will make them bard put jftem in a di(h; and garnifh with lemon.

Pigs PettyToes

PUT them into a fauce-pan, with a pint of water, a blade of mace, a little whole pepper, and an onion, boil them ten minutes take oot the liver

lights

r

MADE DISHES. 215

fights, and heart, boil the feet till they are tendert mince the liver, &c. grate a little nutmeg over it, put it into a ftew-pan, and ftrain the liquor to it; Ihrcd a little lemon-peel very fine and put in, with a Httle pepper and fait, and a little butter mixed with flour; boil it up, and with a fpoon ftif it till it is thick and fmooth, put the mince in the difh, fplic the feet in two, and put them over it garnifh with toafted fippets.

IM

CHAP. XL

MA D B D I S H £ S

'Proper Rules to be obferved in Made Dijheu

THIS being one of the mod important chapters in this book, it is proper to give the young learners fome rules by which to regulate their conduft As copper vefTels are the beft to make all kinds of made diflies in, you muft be careful that they are well tinned and kept clean from greafe or grittinefs. In all brown dilhes be (ure to fkim the fat clean df, as nothing looks fo difagreeable as to fee the fac floating at the top; and when you ufe wine or an chovy, put it in -fome time before your di(h is ready to take the rawnefs off, 4s nothing injures the repu tation of ajmade dilh worle than raw wine or anchovy; and be careful that it is of a fine brown and a prot

P 4 Pr



2i6 M A P e PISHED.

per thicknrfs; let B91U: of the ingredients have anf predominant tade more than apoiher, which m depend on the judicious manner yoM mix the various aJTiicks. you make ufe of. In white di(hes and fri calees, have all your ingredients well fiewed aad mixed toge(her and your fauce of a proper thick neis before you put in eggs or cream, as neither will contribute muph to thicken it when you have put ihem in. Do not put your ftew-pan ypon the fire, but hold it a proper height over it, and keep fhaking it one way till it is thick and fmooth, as that will prevent it from curdling qr fticking to the bottom of the pan, and keep it free froai lumps; be careful never to let it boil. When you diHi it u!) take the meat and ingredients out with a fifti-Qice, (train the fauce over it, as that will prevent fmall bits of meat mixing with the fauce, and leave it ckar and fmcoth. Never put any fried force-meat balls into any fauce, but put them on a fic?e to drain and keep hot before the fire, tili your dift isdiflied then put the ti in, as boiling them in the fauce foftens them, and makes then have a greafy appearance, In almoft every made difh yoq may put in what you think proper, o enlarge it and make it good; fuch as fweetbreads, oy palates boiled tender, frtlh, pickled, or dried pu6h rooms, cocks-combs, t: ufflcs, morelf, artichoke botn foms, either frefb, boiled, pickled, or dried ones, foftentd in warm water and cut into fojjr pieces afparagus tops, 6fc. as you cn get them, or they are in Icafpn force-meat balls, egg balls, or thp yolks of hard eggs. The bcft things to give a tartpefs to fauce is, ieoipn juice, elder vinegar, or mv)(h room t;ickle. Jn the ufe of Cayan pepper, it is heft to pqc but a little in at iirft, as it is eafy to put ir Inore if your fauce requires any; and never put any Jemon or lour into any white fauce, till the moment before yog put it 'miQ the uih. When ypy. v(c fiouip

p4

M A D .P I 8 H E-S, ftij

and butter, mix it together on the back of a trencher, or a clean board, with a. knife till it is fmooth, as that will prevent its being lutnpy when you put it inta the lagce.

A brown Culiis.

PUT half a pound of biuter into a ftew.pan' nelc it, and put four fpoonsful of Dour in, ftir ic round till it i$ fmooth, then put in two quarts of good gravy a pint of white wine, (ix ihallots chopped fine, a bundle of fweet herbs, a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace a little all-fpice, fomc cflence pf ham, if you have it, or half a pound of lean bam cut in very fmall bits, and a lemon cut in two, ftir it well round and ftew it gently for one hour; feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, tbeo rub it through a fine ficvr, and keep it for ufc.

If you have any frelh aiuflirpgAis cut them foiaU and put ixi.

ft

A ivbite Cullis.

PUT half a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, pelt it, put in four fpoonsful of flour, and ftir it till it is fmooth; then pour in three pints of veal gravy and ilir till it boils cut a pound of lean ham in very litde bits, fuc (ballots chopped fine, a bundle of fwct herbs, fomc frefh muihrooms chopped and £x blades of mace, put thefe all in, (lew ic gently a cjuarter of an hour, and flcim oflF the fiat j then put in a quart of new milk, ftir it well round, and borj it gently for half an hour longer; feafon it with Cayan pepper and fair, rub it through fine fie ve, then it

will be regdy for ufe

SiS MA DE DISHES.

A BeJhemelL

TAKE a pound of lean ham, Ihred it very fine, put it ac the bottom of ftew-pan, two pounds of len veal cut in fmall pieces, and a fmall fowl cat Ui pieces, lay them over the ham, an- onion cut fmall, fix ballots (hred fmall, the white part of two heads of cellery, a bundle of fwcet herbs, fix blades of mace, and a few freih mufhrooms cut fmall, lay them over the meat, put in half a pint of veal broth or wattr, cover it clofe, put it over a flow fire, and fweat it gently for half an hour, but take care it does not ftick or burn, as that will fpoil it; then put in fwo quarts of new milk, ftir it rounds (lew it gendy for half an hour, mix half a pint of milk with two fpoonsful of flour very fmooth and put in, ftir it well round, bruife a little Cayan pepper very fine and put in, with fait to feafon it; ftew it till you find it as good as you would have it, then rub it through a fine fieve or a tammy, and it will be fit for ufe.

Kump of Beef a la Douie.

TAKE a rump of beef and bone it, put it into a difii take half a pint of white wine, half a pint of vinegar, fome bay leaves, fix (ballots, an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace, and allfpice, boil them altogether for five minutes, and .pour it over the beef; turn it often, and with a fpoon put the liquor over it, and let it lay all night; in the morning take it out, cut fome fat bacon into long pieces about a quarter of an inch fquare, chop s handful of parQey, fome fweet herbs, fix fliallots, a head or two of garlick very fine, fix blades of mace, twelve cloves, twelve corns of all-fpice, and kalf a nutmeg beat very fincj mix them altogether,

widi

4 •

MADE D I S H E S 229

vritfa fome pepper and fait, and a glafs of red wine, put the baco.i to them and roll it about till it has taken up all the ingredients; then with a fmall pointed knife OYake holes aflant through the beef, and put in the bacon, &c. or with a laie lardingpill put the beef into a long ftcw-pan, wich about two pounds of fat bacon cut in llicesj ibme beeffuet, a large bundle of fweet herbs, two heads of garlick, a dozen bay leaves, and fome fait, juft cover it with water, cover it clofe, and ftew it gentljr for four hours: in the mean time cut two carrots and three or four turneps into any (hape you plcafe or fancy, two dozen button onions, and the white part of four heads of cellery, boil them all till they are tfendcr, and put them into a quart of brown cullis i take out the beef, put it into a di(h, pour the faucc over it, and garnifh with lemon and beet-rooti or fried oyfters or fried fippcts.

You may drefs a leg of mutton piece, or part of a buttock the fame way.

Rump of Beef a la Braize.

PREPARE a rump of beef the fame as for a U doube cut fome rafhers of bacon and lay them at the bottom of a ftew- pan, put in the beef, with two quarts of gt'avy, one of red wine, fix fhallots, two heads of garlick chopped fine, fix bay leaves, a little cloves, mace, all-fpice, and whole pepper, put fome flices of fat bacon at the top, cover it clofe put it over a flow fire, with a charcoal fire at the top, and braize it gently for four hours; then take up the beef, ftrain the gravy through a fieve, and flcim off all the fat; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a flew- pan, melt ir, and then put in two large fpoonsful of flour, (tir it till it is fniooth, then by egrfcs poyr in the gravy, put in fome

truffles

.ifc: M A D E D I S H E S.

truffles and morels, haif X pint of fre(b mu(br6ams & ilewed, or t gill of pickled ones, k fweetbrad m m piece), two artichoke bottoms cut in pieces, Sxne fercewmeat bails boiled, and ah ox-palate boikd iider airdcuc ia long fltps, boil it up, feafon it -wiih Cayan pepper moderately high, fquttzc in the jtitce ct a lenool), and boii it up for ten minutes; put your berf in to mke it hot, then put it- into a dcept dilh, pour the fauce all ovtr it, and garmfii th lemon and beet too t

rolled Rump of Beef.

TAKE a rump of beef, cut it from the bonef, nd flit it in turo from top to bottom; take about two pourKds of the thick end, chop it fine, with a poundof beeF-fuet, a pound of leati hatn, bet it well in a mortar, chop feme pariley, fv5eet herbs, a iktte lemon: petl; and four IhaJtets finc and put in, feafon ic with pepper and faft, a -iiTtte beaten mace and grated nutmeg, put them in, wirh the crumb of a penny loat rubbed through a culiexideT, beat them well together, and mix them up wth the yolks of A)nr egjs, pm it oh the beef, roll it up tight, ftick fkewer through, and tie it With packthread; put 'ferr.e flrctrs of bacon at the bottom of a deep ftcwpan, pot the meat upon ir, with a bundle tf fwcet •herbs, fix fliallots, fix bay leavers, a little cloves, 3nace, alMpice, and a pint of red wine, juft cover the beef with water, cover it clofe, and ftew it tiH it is tender, which yoil may know by running a ikewer into the meat i then takt it out, tub the top ever with the yolk of an egg, fprinkle bread-crumbs over ir, put it before the fire, and make it of a fine brown: in the mean time drain tht gravy through a jjeve, flcim off the fat, put a quarter of a pound of buittr into a ftcw-pan, melt it, AAd- put in two large

fpoonul

MADE DISHES. aa

(XQnsful of flour, ftir it ciU k is-firiooftii) then the gravy in, a fpoonful of ketchup, and one oS brownings fcafon it l'ich Cayan pepper and falt boil it up wcU till it is thick and ricb then put ia fome truffles and morels, a gill of pickled mu(h 9000)$, an ox-palate boiled tender aixl cut in pieces with a fpoonful of elder vinegar; put the beef iafif a deep difl, and garnifh with fried fippets.

Surloin of Beef in Epigram.

ROAST a furlain of beef, take it off the fpir, raife the ikin very carefully ofF the back, cut aU the laR our except at the ends, which you muft leave fn as to holdr the following ha(h: (bm you muft pM the fotloiata the fire to keep hot) cut the meat up, and ha(h it in the (ame naanner as direflted in the re ceipt for ha(hed beef, in the chapter for hafhes; put it into the furluin, and carefully draw the (kin over it; put it into a hot difli, and garnifh with horfenidiSt Vou may raife up the fat iu the infide and QUt.ODtjfhe lan, bafh it, put it in again, put the A Qvcr Lc, aad fead the infide upperoioil in the

S%? Infde of a Surloin of Beef forced

TAKE a. furloin of beef, and with a fharp knife. rai& u the fat, cut all the lean out clofe to the bone, chop it fmall, with a pouad of bcef-fuer about as many crumbs of bread, fomc pardey, fwect Kerbs, lemon-peel, and two Ihallots choppeii fine, feafoncd with pepper, fait, and half a nutmeg grated; nwRfit up with the yolks of three eggs, put i;: in the iofide pot the fat aver ir, fkcwer i: down tight,, piper ir,. put it on a fpir, and roaft it four hours;, then unpaper ix. froth it up., and put.it into thedi(h

infide

£22 MADE DISHES.

inlide uppermoft, with fome good gravy in the dif tod garnifh with horfe-radifh.

To force a Rump of Beef.

CHOP the large bone of the thick end of a rump ef beefy carefully raife the fkin up, and cut the lean out of the middle make a force-meat the fame as for the furloin, put it in the place again, and ikcwer it on tight; tie it round with packthread to keep in the force-meat, paper ir fpit it, and road it three hours if a large one, a fmall one two hours and a luilf V thei; taJce o(F the paper, froth it up take it off the fpit, take o£F ihe packthread, and pull the flcewers out boil half a pint of red wine, with four iballots chopped fmall, put it in the difh, then put ia the beef and garnifh with horfe-radifii.

Rump of Beef in Epigram.

SPIT and roaft a fine rump of beef, take it oflF the fpit, with a fharp knife carefully raift up the &in, cut the meat out of the middle, and put the rtfl to the fire to keep hot v hafh the meat that you cut out, as the receipt directs in the chapter for hafhes, put it into the place you cut it out of and carefully put on the fkin, that it may not be perceived where it was taken from put it into a hot difb, with a little good gravy under it and garnifh with horfe-radifh.

Beef a la Mode.

TAKE half a buttock of beef, or a leg of mutton piece, take out the bone, or a clod, and take out cbr bone, cut fat bacon, and mix it with fpice and iKrbSy ihe fame as for beef a la doube, put it into

the

MADE DISHES. 223

the beef the fame way, put it into a pot cover it with water, and a pint of white wine, chop four large onions and Gx cloves of garlick very fine and put in with a dozen bay leaves, a handful of cham-

!)inions, or a pint of frelh mu(hrooms, a tea fpoonul of Cayan pepper, fome fait, a fpoonful of vine gar, ftrew about three handsful of bread-rafpiags iifccd fine over all, cover the pot clofe, and ftew it gendy for fix hours, or according to the fize of the piece, if a .large piece eight hours; then take out the beef, put it into a deep diih, cover it over, and fet ic over boiling water to keep it hot; drain the gravy througn a fieve pick out the cbam pinions or muQirooms, (kini all the fat clean oflF the gravy, put it into the pot again, boil it up, and if it wants anymore feafoning, feafon it to your likitig; fit (hould be pretty high leafoned) then pour the gravy over the beef, or you may cut the beef in dices and puc k in a diih, with the ravy over it. It eats veiy well when cold, cut in dices with fome of the gravy over it for when it is cold the gravy will be of a (Irong jelly, and garniih the cold with pardey.

Beef a la Mode in Pieces.

TAKE as much beef as you will want and cut it in pieces of about two pounds each, lard them with bacon in the fame manner as the other, fry the beef brown in fredi butter, drain it from the far, puc it into a ftew-pan that will juft hold it, cover it with gravy and red wine, fix flialiots, four blades of garlick chopped fine, two onions chopped fine, a iprig of bay leaves, feafon it with Cayan pepper and faJc cover it clofe, and ftew it gently till the beef % tender; then dcim it well, and if it wants any more feafoning put it in, lay the meat in a deep didi and pour the fauce over it

You

ft24 M A £ E DISHES.

You mtj put in champtnions or frdb mufbrootni If ytr pteafe.

Beef fcarhU

TAKE a piece of briflcet of beef of about tcrt fHiHid9, fait u with two ounces of bay fait, oncounctt of fait petre, one ounce of fal piunella, half a pound of coarfe fugar, a pound of comnron fair, mixed alto get her, lay it in an earthen pan and turn it every day for a fortnight; then wafh it very clean, tic it up- with packthread, and boil it five hours; cut a red cabbage very fine acrofs and ftew it in gravy, thicken it with batter rolled in floor, and fealon it wkh pepper and fait; put the cabbage in the di(h, untie the beeand put on it, with peas pudding and greens in feparate di8ie5, garnifhed with boiled carrot. It is very fine coW, cut ii thin flices, and gar niflied with carrot and parfley.

Bef a la Royak.

TAKE a piece of a furloin about twelve pounds a fmall rump, or a piece of briflcet bone it, and make holes with knife about an inch from one another, fill one hole withr fat bacon, another with chopped oyfters, another with parfley fhred fine, tilt the wiiblc is filled, feafon it with nutrteg, mace, cloves, and all-fpice beatfine put it into a pot juft big enough to hold it, and juil cover it with red wmc and water, with fome bay leaves, cover it clofe, and ftew it gently till it is tender; then take up (tit beef, put it into a deep difli, cover it up, and keep it hot; llrain the gravy through a ficve, and (kim off all the fat clean-, put a piece of butter into a ftew-pan,,mch it, put in two ipoonsful of ftour, and ftir ic till it is fmooth i then pour the gravy in put

in

MADE DISHES. 225

In a fpoonful of browning, a fpoonful of ketchup, the fame of vinegar, and (tew it till ic is chick and good; then put in an ox-palate boiled render, one ounce of truffles and morels, give them a boil up, fcalbn ic pretty high with Cayan pepper, and pour the fauce over the meat, with fome fried force-meac balU round, and garnifh with lemon and beet-root.

It eats very fine cold, cut into thin flicesj and gaN nilhcd with parflcy;

Beef remgblonguek

TAKE about eight or ten pounds of the fat entl of a brifket of beef, tie it up tight with packthread, put it into a large pot of Water, and boil it fix houfs very gently-, feafon the water with a handful of allfpice, fome fait, fome onions, leeks, carrots, and turneps take two carrots pafe them, cut thcrh about half an inch long and with an apple-corer cut them our, pare half a dozen middle-fized tur neps, and with a fcoop cut them out round as big as a nutmeg) peel two dozen fitiall button onions, and cut the white patt of four heads of ccllery about half an inch long, wafh them all clean, and boil them, but not too much put then) into a quart of good brown cullis, and give them a boil up a few minutes; take the beef up, and take out all the bones you can, put it into a difh, and pour the fauce over it; garnifli with carrots cut in fhapes and a few fprigi of greens; or the following fauce will do: chop a handful of parfley, an onion, fix pickled cutumbcrs, one walnut, and a gill of capers, put them into a pint of brown cullis, boil them up for ten minutes, anil put them over the meat with the fame garnilh.

L Be

V



26 M A D E D 1 S M E S.

Be fure to fave the liquor the beef was bmkd id, as that will help to make your foups good the nex day.

Beef Olives,

CUT three (teaks off a rump of beef ds fqoate as you can, about ten inches long and half an inch thick, rub the yolk of an egg over them, cut three thin dices of fat bacon as wide as the beef, and abou: three parts as long, put it on the fteaks, rub it over with the yolks of eggs, and put fome good veal force-meat about a quarter of an inch thick on the bacon, rub it over with the yolks of eggs, roll it up tightj and tie it with packthread then nd ic over with egg, and fprinkle crumbs of bread on it; have a large pan of beef dripping boiling hot put them in and fry them of a 6ne brown, put thtm on a fieve to drain the fat oiF, then put them into t ftew-pan, with a quart of brown cuUis and half a pint of freih mufhrooms, cover them clofe and flew them gently for one hour, Ikim the fat off, and put in fome tribes and morels boiled and wafhed -well, an ox-palate boiled tender and cut in pieces, give them a tofs up, then take out the olives, undc them, lay them in a di(h, pour the faucc over, with fome fried force-meat balls round them, and gamilb with lemon and beet-root.

Herrico of Beef Tails.

TAKE three beef tails, cut them into pieces about four inches long, put them into a ftew-pan, with a pound of fat bacon cut fmall, a pound of beef-fuct cut in pieces, a handful of all-fpice, fix bay leavcsi and a quart of water, cover them clofe, and ftew them for three hours: in the mean time pare a car

MADE DISHES. 227

h)t and cut it into dice, pare two turneps and cue into dicc peel o dozen buon onions, and cue the white part of four heads of cellery half an inch long, wafh them clean, boil thetli till they are ten- der, ftrain them off, put them in a quart of brow'ti cullis, and boil them up for five mihutes; take oirt the tails and put them on a fieve to drain a momertc pr two, put them in a di(h, pour the fauce bv them and gamifh with lemon and beet-foot;

eef CoUops.

TAKE two pounds of any tender piece of beef vich fdme fat, cut it into thin collops about as broad as a crown piece, pepper, fair, and flour them, chop an onion or four fliallots fine, put two ounces of butter into a ftewpan, melt it, put in the collops and onions, or (hallots, and fry them quick for five minutes i then put in a pint of good gravy, a little butter mixed wih flptr, a fpoonful of walnut ketchup, cut four pickled . cucumbers into thin fliccs a walnut the fame, and a few capers, with a tea fp6on iful of elder vihegar, a little pepper and fait, juft give therii a boil up, and put them into a hot difh garnifh with pickled cucumber

A Fillet of Beef .

Cut the fillet out of the infide of the furloin ttuite to the bone feafon it with pepper, fait, ahd iome grated nutmeg, roll it up tight, tie it with packthread, rUb it over with fome yolks of egg6, and fprinkte it over with bread-crumbs;, put it on a (pit and road it of a fine brown; put fome (tewed tcUery or ftewed cucumbers in the difh, take up the fillet, untie it, and put it over the (lewed cellery or cucumbers 5 garnifli with horic-radifli.

aaS M A D E D I S H ES.

Neats tongue forced,

BOIL a neat's tongue till it is tender, let it ftand tin it is cold, then flit it down the thick part, and cut the meat out of the infide, chop it fmall, with half a pound of beef-fuet, and as much crumbs of .bread, beat them well in a marble mortar, chop a little parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-peel fine, and put inyfeafon it wiih beaten mace pepper, and fait, mix it up with the yolks of two eggs, rub the infide of the tongue with the yolks of eggs, put in the forcemeat, clofe it together, and tie it with packthread, fpit it, and flick it on both fides with cloves to your fancy, road it one hour and bade it with butter; then put it into a hot di(h, with good gravy under it, and garnifli with lemon and beet- root, with gailintine fauce in a boat.

Coix)s Vider forced.

TAKE a young cows udder, fait it for three or four days, then boil it till it is tender; let it ftand till it is cold, and with a long (harp knife cut it at the thick end almofl: through to the thin end, that is, to fplit ir, but not at the top, but from fide to fide cut the infide out, chop it fmall, and mix it with fome veal force-meat j rub the infide with the yolks pf eggs put in the force-meat, clofe it together, flick the top over with cloves to your fancy, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and fprinklc breadcrumbs over it, then put it on an iron plate and bake it one hour and a half; then put it into a hot di(h, with good gravy under it, and garniih with Jcmon and beet-root.

. The tongue and udder put into a difli together make a grand diih, with gallcntine fauce in a boat.

M A D E D I S H E S. 229

' •

Beef Steaks rolled.

TAKE three beef ftealcs cut half an inch thick, about ten inches long, and as fquare as you can,flat them with a cleaver, and make a force-meatthus: take a pound of lean vea!, the flcfh of a large fowl, half a pound of lean ham, a pound of kidney- fuct of a loin of veal, or beef-marrow, chop them fine altogether, and pound them well in a mortar; boil an ounce of truffles and morels very tender, chop them jfine, with fome parfley and fwcet herbs, and put in, feafon it with beaten nutmeg, pepper and lalt, and mix it up with the yolks of four eggs; rub the fleaks with the yolks of eggs, put the forcemeat on them, roll them up tight, tie them with packthread, and flour them; put half a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, and fry them of a fine brown all round 5 pour out the butter, and put in a pint of gravy, half a pint of red wine, four fliallots' ehopped fine, half a pint of frtfhmufhrooms, fome pepper and fait, a little butter mixed with flour, cover them clofe, and flew them one hour; then flcim the fat off, put in a tea fpoonful of elder vinegar, untie the rolls, lay them in a difli, pour the &uce over, and put fried force-meat balls round ihera I garnifli with lemon and bect-root

Loin of Veal in Epigram • k

TAKE a fine loin of veal, but do not chop the chine bones, fpit it, pa;_.er it all round, and roaft it according to the fize; when it is done take the paper off, and make it of a fine brown; then take ic up, carefully raife the fkin off the back, and cut out the lean, leaving both ends whole to hold the loincc, and put it to the fire to keep hot i cut the

03 leant

9o MADE DISHES.

lean, with the kidney and fome of the kidneyfit into a fiie mince, . put it into a (lew-pan, with a pint of veal gravy and the gravy that run from the veal, a little lenion-peel ihred fiqe, fome pepper and fak, a littled grated nutmeg, a fpoQnfui of ketchup, gill of cream, apd fome butter mixed with flour, enough to thicken it; tofs it till it i$ hot, then ppt it into the loin, draw the fkin over, and if it doc$ not quite coyer it dredge it with flour, and brown it with a hot iron; then carefully put it into a hot diib, with gravy and butter under, and fome toafted bread cut three corncrways round it i garniih with lemon and barberries,

Leg of Veal and Bacon in Difguife.

CUT off the (hank-end of a fmall leg of veal, lard the upper flde with bacon, and boil it with about two pounds of flne bacon when it is done enough take it up, lay it in the di(h, cut the bacoa ip flices and lay round it, fprinkle the bacon with fome dried fage rubbed fine and pepper; have a Ijtge quantity of fried parfley and put over it, with York(nire green fauce in boats made thus: take two Qr three handsful of forrel wa(hed clean, pound it lyell in a mortar, fqueeze out the juice, and fweetct it with flne powdered fugar.

Bombarded VeaU

TAKE a nice Imall fillet of a cow calf cut out the' bop, and fome meat out of the miadle, and make the foIIoying force meat: take half a pound oi lean, veal, the veal you cut put, half a pound of beef-fuet, half a pound of fat bacon, and thccrumb. Qf a penny loat leaked in cram, beat it well in a marble moitar, feafon it with beaten mace, nutmeg.

MADE DISHES. 231

pepper and falc chop a little parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-ped, and put in, mix it up virich the yolks of four eggs, then fill the hole in the middle with this force-meat, and with a (harp knife make holes through the fillet, fill one hole with force-mear, another with ftewed fpinach chopped fine, and arA tber with the yolks of eggs the fame as for egg balls; trufs it as tight as you can to keep in the ftufiing put it into a deep dew-pan, wich a quart of grzvy half a pint of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, and half a pint of frefli muihrooms, cover it clofe, and ftew it tor three hours; then take up the veal, ikim the gravy, and take out the iweet herbs; put in a piece of butter mixed with flour, a fweetbread cut into pieces, fome truffles and morels, and two ardchoke bottoms cut in four, boil it up till it is thick and (mooth, and fquetze in the juice of a le mon; have a roil of force-meat boiled, cut it into thin ices, put the veal in the di(b pour the (auce over, lay the dices of force-meat roind it, and ganHifti with lemon and beet-root; This is a beautiful dUh, for when it is cut acrofs it looks of diSerent ODlours.

Filled of Veal with Colhps.

TAKE a fmall fillet of a cow calf, cut about half of it into thin collops about as big as a crown piece, 'icut a dice off the top pf the udder, and cut it the fame, duff the remainder of the fillet and roaft it; make the collops the fam( as white collops, which yoYi will find in this chapter lay the collops in the difl), and the roaft in the middle y garnifh with leinon aqd beeCrrooi.

04 Should

232 MADE DISHES.

Shoulder of Veal a la Piedmontoife.

TAKE a (houldcr of veal, cut off the knucklfi nd with a fharp knife carefully raife off the ikinj tkat it may hang at one end, then lard the meat with bacon and fmall flips of lean ham, feafon it with pepper, ialc, and beaten ma(;e, parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-peel chopped fine, cover the (kin over again and ikewer it on tight; put it into a ftew-pan with two quarts of gravy, cover it clofc, and ftew it till ic is tender; then take a handful of forrel, two cabbage lettuces (hred fmall, an onion, a little parflcfi and a few mufhrooms chopped take a little of the gravy the veal was ftewed in and bcil them, thickcp (hem with a little Bour and butter, raife up the kin, and put the herbs, &c. oyer it; put over th fkin agin, rub ic over with the yoljc of an egg, and ftrew bread-crumbs on it, fend it to the oven and bake it of a fine brown; then put it into a hot di(b, with fome of the gravy it was ftewed in under ic,aii4 garnilb with lemon and beet-root.

The French method is to grate Parmazan checfp pvcr ic before they bake it, inftead of egg and breadfrumbs.

Veal a la Bourgoije.

CyX four flice? off a fillet of veal an inch thipirt and lard them with bacon; cut fome thin rafhers of bacon, lay thm at the bottom of a ftew-pan, anl pu in the yeal the larded fide uppermoft; lay fonic rafhers of bacon upon them, pour in a quart of veal broth, and ftew them gently for pnc hpur; have a pint of while cuUis hot, take out the veal, lay it the lafjled fide uppermoft jp the difli, pour the cullil gyer it, and garnilh with lemon and eet-ropt,

• m

MAD E D I S H E S. 233

Neck of Veal a la Roy ale.

TAKE the bed end of a neck of veal and bone it, cake odp the ikin and lard the cop with bacon % puc a few rafliers of bacon ac the bottom of a fieWpan, put in the veal che larded fide uppermoft, with a quatt of good gravy, and a bundle of fweec herbs, cover it clofe and ftcw it gently- for two hours; then take out the veal, keep it hot, ftrain the gravy through a fieve and (kirn the fat ofFj put about two ounces of butter into a ftew-pan, mclr it, put in a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, then pour in the gravy, and boil it up till it is thick.; ieafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, fquecze in thje juice of half a lemon, then put in the veal the lardtd fide downwards, and give it a boil 5 put the veal in the difii, pour the fauce over it, and garnib Hfitb fried fippets cut in aqy Ihape you pletif.

Neck of Veal a la Braize.

TAKE the beft end of a neck of veal, chop off the chine hone, raife up che flefli of the rib-ends about two inches, chop off the rib-bones,, take off the (kin, and lard it with bacon; cut fome ralhers Oif bacon and lay (hem at (he bottom of a ftew-pan, two or three thin flices of veal, put the neck on it. tiie larded fide uppcrmoft, with a quart of brown gravy, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves, mace, aod allrfpice, half a pint of white wine, half a pint of frcfli mu(hiooni9, lay fome thin flices of vel over the neck, and fome raOiers of bacon on the veal; cover it clofe, pqt it over a ftove, put hot charcoal at the top, and braize it for two hours and a half; then take up the veal, ftrain off the gravy fi)rough fieve, nd fkim off all the fat clean; put

a little

?t34 M A D E D I S H E S,

a little butter intoa ftew-pan inelt it, put in a largo fpoonfu) of ftour, and ftir it till it $ fmooth; then pour in the gravy, put in a fpoonful of ketchup, and V k is not of a fine brown, put in fome browning to tmkc it fo and feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait; pick the frefli muflirooms from the meat, pot ki fome truffies and morels wafbed dean, feme feotlcd force-meat balls, artichoke bottoms, ox-palates, or fweet breads, as you fancy or can have them, put in the neck of veal the larded fide downwards, give it a gentle ftew for five minutes, and iqueeze in the juice of half a lemon; then put the veal in the dilh the larded fide uppermoft, put the fauce and ingredients round itj and garnilh with Icmofk and beet-root.

Ned of Feal a la Gkize.

PREPARE the be(V end of a neck of veal the lame as for a la braize; put fome rafhers of bacon at the bottom of a ftew-pen, fome thin flices of veal over the bacon, lay the neck on them the arded fide oppercnofl, put in a quart of veal broth, a bun4le of fwcct herbs, and a little cloves and mace', lay fome thin fliccs of veal over it, and rafliers of lacon over the veal, cover it clofe, and ftew ic for two hours: in the mean time take a pint of ftron; veal broth, put in a fpoonful of browning, half an punce of ifinalafs, and boil it trll the ifinglafs is difiblvcd; then ftrain it through a ficve, put it into a ftew pan wide enough to hold the veal, boil it tiH it is of a fine glaze, and then put in the neck of veal the larded fie downwards, to take up the glaze; put fome forrel fauce in a dilh, put in the jpeck oi veal the larded fide uppermoft, and gamifli

iih fried fippets

Fri40nd€vx

•y

Jii D E DISHES. £55

Fricandeux of Veal.

CUT 9 (lice acrofs a filkn of veal about two incline thick, and lard ic vfxih bacon 9 put three or foulp rafhers of bacon at the bo(tonfi of a (lew-pao, putia the veal the larded fide uppermoft, with a pint of gravy, a bundle of fwtct herbs, and a little cloves and mace; lay fome rafhers of bacon over the fricandeu3t, coerjt clofc ajid ftew it gently for one hour; then t-tke out the fricandeux, ftrain the gravy through a fieve, (kirn off the fat, put it into a Hewpan and boil it til) it is of a ilrong glaze; then puc in the veal the larded fide downwards, and erive it a boil up juft to take the glaze;, puc fome forrel fauce in a diO), lay the veal on the larded fide uppcrmoft'ji d garnifli with fried fippets.

Feal Olives.



CUT fix flices off a fillet of veal, as thin, long, nd fquare as you can, flat them with a cleaver, and rub them oyer with the yoik of an egg cue iQcne fat bacon as thin you can, nearly rhe Ir'ngch and wdth of the vral, put it on the veal, and ru it over with egg put fome good veal force-meat thin over, the bacon, and rub it with egg; then roll it up tight tie it with two bits of packthread, rub t ovjcr with the yolks of eggs, and (pcinkle bread-crumbs over it; have a pan of fat boiling hot, put in thi olives and fry them all tound of a fine light brown 5 thea gut them v)n a fieye to drain the tat from ihem, put them into a ftew pan, with a pint oi brown gravyj half a pint of frefh mufhrooms, a glafs of white wine, a little butter mixed with fiour, and fonfie pepper and fait, cover them clofe and ttew them foe !ulf 20 hour 1 fkio) them well, put in fome truffles

an(jl

236 M A D E . D I S H E S.

and morels boiled and waOied well, a fweetbread cut into pieces and boiled tendePj fome force-noeat balls boiled, the juice of half a lemon, and give them a boil up I take out the olives cut the (Irings off, put them in a difh, pour the fauce over them, and garnifli with lemon and beet-root.



Feal Olives another Way.

CUT feme flices of veal very thin, about four inches long and one inch and a half wide, brat them with a cleaver, and rub fome yolk of an egg over them; then lay fome veal force meat very thin over ihem, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, roll them up tight, tie them with packthread, flour and fry them in a pan of hot fat of a fine brown; take them our, lay them on a fieve to drain and keep hot before the fire; in the mean time make a pint of brown cullis and put in, Ibme force-meat balls boiled, fome truffles and morels, a fweetbread boiled and cut into pieces, fome pickled mufhrooms, and boil them up a few minutes; untie the olives, put them into a hot difh, pour the fauce over them, and garnifh with kmon and beet- root,

Feal Olives the French Way.

TAKE two pounds of lean veal, a pound of beef marrow, two anchovies wafhed and honed, the yolks of two hard eggs, a few frefh mulhrooms, and a dozen oyfters bearded, all chopped very fine together, a little thyme, marjorum, parflsy, fpinacb, lemon-peel Hired fine, feafoned with beaten macej nutmeg, pepper and fair, and mix the ingredients together with the yolks of two eggs; take a veal caul and lay a layer of fat bacon on it cue very thin, then a layer of the force-meat, roll it yp in the veal.

caul,

i

M A D E D IS H E S. 2

caul, and either roafl: or bake it an hours when it is enough cut ic into-flices, lay -it in a hot di(h, with good gravy or a little white culKs under it and gar- biib with lemon and beetroot.

Veal Blanquets.

ROAST a piece of fillet of veal, but not too much, cut ofT the (kin and oervous parts, and cut it into very thin little bits; chop fome onions very fine, put fome butter into a (lew-pan, and fry the onions a little crifp, then dud a little flour over them, (hake the pan round, put in half a pint of white gravy or veal broth, a bundle of fweet herbs, alitUe beaten mace, pepper, and fait, and boil ic vpi and then put in the veal; beat up the yolks of two eggs with a gill of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, a little parfley chopped fine, a little lemonpeel grated, put it in, and (lir it one way till it if thick take out the fweet herbs, fqueeze in a little lemon juice, and put it into a hot di(h garniQi with lemon.

Veal Rolls.

CUT twelve thin (lices of veal, about four inches long and one inch and a half wide, put fome yolk of egg over them, and fome good veal force-meat very thin, roll them up tight, tie them acrofs with a firing, put them on a bird-fpit, tie them on another, rub the yolk of an egg over, fprinkle breadcrumbs on, roaft them half an hour, and then lay thcminadiih; make half a, pint of brown cullis, nd put in a few pickled mu (brooms, fome truffles and morels, the yolks of four hard eggs, give them aboil, and pour over the veal rolls i garnifh with lemon.

Pittcc

iS MADE DiSHiBS;

PilJ&c of Veal.

•

TAKE the bed end of a neck of veal half roaft it, cue it into fix chops, feafon it with pepper, faic and grated nutmeg -, take a pound of rice, put to ic a quart of broth, fome beaten niace and fair, aod half a pouted of butter ftew it gently over a flow iirc till it is chick, but take cire it does not bunii and beat up the yolks of fix eggs and ftir in i(; then take a deep dilh and butter itj and when the rice is cold lay fome at the bottom, the veal as clofe as you can, and cover it all over with rice, wa(h it over with the yolks of eggs, and bake it an iioor and a half, when done open the top, pour in a pint of good veal gra y, and fend it to table hot.

Pilloc the Indian Way.

TAKE two pounds of rice, pick and waft it Very clean, put it into a cullender to drain verydryi )ut a pound of butter and half a pint of water imo a (lew-pan, put in the rice, feafon it with cloves and mace beaten, fome graced nutmeg, pepper, and lalt fcover it clofe to keep in the (team, ftew it gcnllyi and ftir it often to keep it from burning, till it is tenders in the mean time boil two fowls and about two pounds of bacon, as in common, or rather imore done-, put the fowls into a di(h, cut thi bacon in two, and lay it on each fide of the fowl put the rice over, and garnilh with hard eggSj and a dozen onions fried whole and brown. This is iht true Indian way;

MADE D .1 S M £ S. i2i

Pittoc another ffay,

TAKE a fihall leg of veal and an old cock ikinbed, cue therh in fmall pieces put them in a pot Vitb a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace, a fpoooful of whole pepper, a pound of lean bacon cue ia bics fix onions, and three gallons of fofc water; when the fcum iifes fkim it clean and put in a fpoonful of fait, ftew it well for three or four hours, and then ftratn it off into a wide earthea pan; the next day take off the fat and put it into a ftewpan, with two pounds of rice cleaned, picked, and waflied, fimmer it till the rice is tender and dry aid ftir it often for fear it (bould burn; roaft two fowls, put them in the difli, lay the rice all round them, heaped as high as the fowls, and garnifli wtcil hard eggs

Curric of Veal.

CUT the beft end of a neck of veal into thiti chops, cut the bones off as fliort as you can, pepper and fait them, and fry them brown in frefli butter % cat fi onions into dices and fry them brown, theit put the veal to them, with a quart pf veal broth and a fmall bottle of curric powder, (if you have no curric powder put a tea fpoonful of Cayan pepper) a little beaten mace, and a table fpoonful of yellow turmarick, cover it clofe, and ftcw it gently, for one hour; in the mean time boil a pound of rice in a gallon of water till it is tender, colour one third green with fpinach juice, another third yellow with yellow turmarick, then put a row of green, a row of white, and a row of yellow, till the dilb is full, then garniih it with hard eggs; put the veal and fauoe in another dilb and garnifii with lemon.

i4& M A D E D I 6 H E Sf.

Porcupine of a Breafi of VeaL

TAKE a fine large breaft of veal and bone it, hf it flat on a drefltr and rub it over with the yolks of two eggs, cue feme fat bacon as thin as you can and put over ir, a handful of parfley, a little lemon-peel Ihred fine, the yolks of fix hard eggs chopped fmall, and the crumb of a penny loaf foaked in cream, feafoned with pepper, lalt, grated nutmeg, and a little beaten mace, roll the breaft clofc and Ikewcr it tight) then cut fat bacon, fome boiled ham, and feme pickled cucumbers in thin flips about two inches Jong; lard it in rows, firft ham then bacon, then cucumbers, till you have larded the veal all round; then put it into a deep earthen pan with a pint of water, cover it clofe, and put it in an oven for two hours; as foon as it is done rake it out, put the veal in a di(h and keep it hot; ftrain liquor through a ficvc into a (tew-pan, flim off the fat, put in a glafs of white winiT, a little lemon pickle and caper liquor, a fpoonful of ketchup, a little pepper and fait, thicken it with butter mixed with flour, and boil it up lay the veal in a hot difli and pour the fauce over it; have ready, a roll of force-meat made thus: get half a pound of lean veal, half a pound of beef-fuet cut fmall, the crumb of a penny loaf beat in a marble mortar, put in a dozen oyfters chopped fine, fcafon it with nutmeg, Cayan pepper and fait, mix it up with the yolks of four eggs, lay it on a veal caul, roll it up like a collared eel, bind it in a cloth, and boil it one hour; when it is done cut it into four flices, lay one at each end, and one on each fide; cut the fweetbread into four flices, fry them brown with butter, and lay a flice between each dice of force-meat. You may put muihrooms, truffles and morels in the fauce if you think proper,

• When

MADE I t S H £ S 41

When game if out of feafoh thi3 will fenre u 4 grand bottom difh;

A Savory t)ijh of Feat

CUT fome thin fliccs off a fillet of veali had them with the back of a knifes rub chem over with the yolks of eggs, lay fome good veal force-nMiC over chem roll them up tight, tie them with packthread, rub them ovet with the yolks of tggi, and fpiinkle bread-crumbs ovei them; butter a di(h and put them in bake them for half an hour in a quick Oven I take a pint of brown cuHis, put in a few pickled muflirooms, a few truffles and morels boiled and walhed well, and give them a boil up fr about a dotfen force-meat balls, put the Veal irf the diih, the balls round it, and pour the cullis and nufl rooms over it i garai&i with lemdn. Be fiire to out the firings off.

Areajl of Feal caHared.

tAK£ a fine brdaft of veal, and witli a (if

knife take out the bones and the fkin of the flap eodf take care you do not cut the meat through and rub it over with the yolk of ain eggi mix a handful of bread-crumbs with half a nutmeg grafted, a little beaten cloves, mace, pepper and falr a handful of parfley, a fcW fwcec herbs, a little le- tt)onpeei (hred finfj nd fpriokle over the veal 1 roll ic up tight, run li ikewer through the middle and cut both ends even, tie it round with packthread to keep it tight, put the fpit through the! middle, wrap the caUl round, and tie it On 1 roaft it for two hours, take the caul off about a quarter of an hour before it is done, bafte it with butter and make it of a fine brown i in the mean time take

R a pint

242 M A D £ D I S H £ d.

a pint of brown cuUis, put it in a ftew-pan, mridl hf a pint of frefli, or a gill of pickled muflinxin% a tew truffles and morels, two artichoke bottoms cut in pieces,, and ftew it a quarter of an hour; take up the veal, let it upright in the diih, and pour in the fauce; have your fweetbread cut in four and nicely broiled, with Ibme fried force-meat balls, and put them round, garnilh the di(h with lemon and beet-root.

Fricandillas of Veal.

TAKE two pounds of lean veal half a pound oF the kidney fuet of veal chopped very fmall, and the crumb of a twopenny French roll (baked in hot milk; fqueeze the milk out, put it to the veal, feafbn it pretty high with pepper, fait, and grated -nutmeg, make it into balls about as big as a tea-cup, rub it over with the yolks of eggs, put half a pound of butter into a ilew-pan, and fry them of a light brown •, then put them on a fieve to drain a tew minutes, put them into a ftew-pan with a quart of veal broth, ftew them gently for three quarters of an hour, thicken it with butter mixed with flour, fcafon it with a little pepper and fait,, and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon i put them in a ho( di(h, pour the fauce over them, and garnifli with lemon and beet-root.

enderoons df VeaU

TAKE the brifket part of a breafl: of veal, put it into a fauce-pan, and cover it with water, put it on the fire, and when the fcum rifes flcim it clean, put in a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion tluck with cloves, three or four blades of mace, a little fait, and boil it till it is tender then take it up and cut it

acroia

M A D £ ti I is H E S. 243

ktrofs in thiti dices; put about two ounces of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is fmooth, but do not let it burn ftrain in about a pint of the broth and ftir it round; then put in the veal, with a few frefii mufhrooms firft ftewed, fome afparagus tops boiled tender, and fome force-meat and egg balls; give it a tofs up, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, mix the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, put it in, (hake it one way till it is,thick and fmooth and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon put it into the difli, and garnifh with lemoa and beec-root

Tenderoons another Way.

PUT the briiket end of a breaft of veal into 1 fauce-pan, cover it with water, put in a bundle of fwect herbs, fome cloves and mace, and boil it till it is tender then take it odt and cut it acrofs vtxf thin; have a pint and half of white cullisin ailew-pan put ih the veal with fome frefh muflirooms ftewed fome afparagus tops boiled, fome force-meat and e balls, and make it hot; then put it into a difh, and garnilh with lemon and beet-root

Italian Collops.

CUT ibout two dozen dices off a fillet of veal about two inches fquare and lard them with fmall flips of bacon; put fome butter into a flew-pin make it hot, and fry them; the unlarded fide of a fine brown firft then turn them, and fry them a little on the larded fide take theni out, and put them before the fire to keep hot, pour oiit the fat and put a pint of brown cullis into the pan, with fome pickled muihroomS) truffles and morels a fNveet.

R a bread

44 MADE DISHES.

bread boiled and cut into pieces, fome fmall force meat balls boiledj and give them a boil up; put the coUops into a di&i the larded (ide uppertnoft, put the fauc and ingredients over them and garaiik with lemon and beet-root.

Italian CoUops White.

CUT your coUops, and lard them as before and throw them into boiling water for a minute; put a little butter into a ftewpan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour, flir it till it is fmooth, then pour in a pint of veal broth, leafon it with nutmegi beaten mace, pepptr and lalt, put in the collops, with a few mufhrooms and afparagus tops boiled, and flew them for five or fix minutes; mix the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of cream, put it in, fhake the pan one way till they are thick and fmooth, and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon; then put them in a difh the larded fide uppermoft, pour the fauce over them and garnifh with lemoa aind beet-foot

Scotch CoUops.

CUT your collops very thin, about as broad as a crown piece, off a fillet of veal, and fome fat with them, fprinkle fome fait on them, and flour them; put into a frying-pan a piece of butter, make it hot, put in the collops, fry them on both fides of a fine brown, and then lay them in your difh; have the following ragou ready: put four ounces of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it put in a large fpoonful of flour, and ftir it till it is fmooth; then pour in a pint and a half of good gravy, ftir it till it boils up, put in a gill of white wine, fome frtfh or

pickled mu(hrooms truflies and nwrcia vafhed

clean.

1

MADE DISHES. 145

dean, a fweecbread blanched and cut in pieces artichoke bottoms cut in pieces, fomc force-meat balls boiled, (lew them for half an hour, and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon; then put it over tht collops, and garnifh with fmall rafhers of bacon toaftcd and lemon. You may cut and fry the collops, pbt in a pint of brown cullis, a few pickled mafhrooms, fome truffles and morels a fweetbread or ox-palates boiled tender, and force-meat balls boiled; give them a boil up for a minute, put them in a di(b, and garniOi wicb rafliers of bacon and lc men,

JFiite Collops.

CUT them the fame as for fcotch collops, put them into a (lew-pan, and pour fome boiling water over them, (lir them about, and (train them o(F put a little butter into a (lew-pan, melt it, put a ipoonful of flour in, and (lir it till it is fmooth then pour in a pint of veal broth, feafon it with a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, put in the coU lops, with a bundle of fweet herbs, a fweetbread boiled and cut in pieces, fome fre(h mu(hrooms (tewed firft, or pickled ones wa(hed in warm water9 a few force-meat balls boiled, and dew them about five or fix minutes; mix the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of cream, grate a little nutmeg in, put it into the pan, and keep (haking it one way till it is thick and fmooth; take out the fweet herbs, fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, put it into 4 hot di(b, and garni(h with lemon and beetroot

Scotch Collops a la Franoif

CUT large collops off a leg of veal, lard them with thin dips of bacon, put them in a pan pour

R 3 half

46

MADE DISHES.

half a pint of mild ale boiling over theoi, and kt thend lay till the blood is out •, then take out the collops, fprinkle them over with parflcy, fweet herbs, and lemon-pet flired fine, flour them and fry tbem brown in frefli butfer i taHc them out and put them into a difh; put the ale into the ftew-pan, with a little anchovy Uquor, a glafs of white wine, a litde Cayan pepper and boil it up beat up the yolks of two eggs and ftir in with a little butter, (halcp altogether till it is thick pour it over the collops, aiki garnilh with rafhers of bacon toafted and lemon.

Calf's Head Surprife.

TAKE a calf s head with the (kin on, fcald it d)C fanne as for mock turtle, and with a (harp knife raife up the (kin, with as much meat from the bones as you can, fo as it may appear like a whole head when ftuffed $ then make a force meat thus; take a pound of lean veal, a pound of fat bacon fcraped, a pound of beef-fuet, the crumb of a two-penny loaf rubbed through a cullender beat it all well in a mortar, with fome fweet herbs, parley, and lemon-peel Ihred fine, fome cloves, mace, and nutmeg beat fine, with Cayan pepper and fait, enough to feafon it, beat up the yolks of four eggs, and mix altogether; (luff the head with the force-meat and fkewer it tight at both ends, then put it into a pot or deep pan, with two quarts of water, a pint of vhire wine, a blade or two of mace, a bundle of fweet herbs, an anchovy, two fpoonsful of walnut and mufhroom ketchup, the fame of lemon pickle, fome pepper and (ait, lay a coarfe pafte over it to keep in the deam, and bake it two hours and a half in a (harp oven; when you take it out, put the head in a deep foup-di(h, (kim o(F the fat from the gravy, ilrain it through a fieve into a (lew-pan, thicken it

with

'

MADE DISHES. 147

with butter mixed with flour, and boil it up For a few minutes; mix the yolks of four egs with half a pint of cream put in, ftir it one, way till it is thick and fmooth, then pour it over the head, and gar Btih with force-met balls boiled, fome truffles boiled barberries and. pickled mufliroonis.



Ham a la Braize.

CUT off the knuckle and foak it as for boiling, lialf boil it and take off" the (kin; put fome ralhera of fat bacon at the bottom of a long deep ftewpan with flices of beef over it, feafon it with beaten cloves and mace, iweet herbs and parfley chopped fine lay the ham in with the fat fide uppermoft, and cut in fix onions, a parfnep, and two carrots fliced, with fome chives and parfley, lay them on both the fides, hut (Ktt t top, cover the ham with flices of lean beef, and fat bacon over the beef, then ibme roots fliced over all, cover it cloe and flop it with paftej put it over a gentk fire, and ibme fire at the top, and let it braise for eight hours; then carefully take it out, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, fprinkle bread-crumbs over, and brown it with a hot falamander; when cold, put it on a clean napkin, and gaFoifli wkh parfley

If it is to be eat hot, make the following ragout take a pint and a half of good brown cullis, ftrain the gravy that comes from the ham into the fl:ew pan, fkim off the fat and put it in; cut a veal fweet bread into pieces, fome cocks-combs, trufiles and morels, pickled or frefli muflirooms, and the yolks of fix hard eggs, boil it up for ten minutes put it in the di.fl), and put the hanqi on the top garnUH with lemoa and barberries.

R 4i SbouUcK

S48 MADE IS H IE 5,

$boulder cf Mutton in Epigram

TAKE a (boulder of mutton and roaft it otarif pnoigh, then carefully take off the ikin as thick a crown piece and the fhankrbone at the end ut the meat off the blade bone pepper, fait, and broil it i feafon the fkin and Ibank-bone with pepper and fait, fpme fwcet htrbs and parfley ftired fine, fprinkle fbmfe bread-crumbs on it, and broil it of a fine brown % in the mean time cut up the meatj and halh it in the fame manner as direded in the receipt for halhed mutton only put the gravy in that run from it; put the blade bone in the diil, (he haOi clofe round it, then put the fkiti oyer all, and garnifli with green pickles.

Shoulder of Mutton Surf rife.

Cut the (hank off a Ihoulder of mutlon and Jialf boil it, then put it into a ftew-pan, vith two quarts of good gravy, half a pound of rice, a tea fpoonful of mumroom powder, if you hav it, 2 little beateo mace, fome pepper and fait, and ftew k one hour, or rUl the ric is done; thn take up fhe mutton and keep it hot, put to the rice a pieCQ pf butter mixed with flour, and (hake it about pui in half a pint of good cream, ihake it cU for five or fix minuus, lay the mutton in the difli, an4 put rhe fucc and rice over it; garni(h with greei) pickles or barberriesi and fend it to table hot.

Leg of Mutton a la Royafe.

TAKt a leg oi mutton, cut ofF all he fat, (kifl, fid (hank-bone, lard it with bacon ail over, aqd -ufon it with pepper and falt take a round piece of

• ' beef,

MADE DISHES. 249

beef, or fillec of veaU of about four pounds, and lard ic; have a pan of hogs lard boiling her, flour your meat, and give it a nice brown colour in the lard; then take the meat out, and lay it on a fieve 10 drain a few minutes put ic into a deep ftcw-pan, with a bundle of fweec herbs, fome parfley an onion ftuck with cloves, two or three blades of mace, a little whole pepper, and three quarts of gravy coyer it clofe, and let it (lew gently for two hours;. in the mean time make a pint and a half of brown cttllis, put in fome mufhrooms, truffles and morels, a fweetbread cut in pieces, fome atparagus tops bailed, two fpoonsful of ketchup a gill of red viae, and ftew it for ten minutes; then lay the mutton in the middle of a difti, cue the beef or veal into dices, make a rim round the mutton with the dices, pour the ragou orer, and garniih with le mon and beetroot.

Leg of Mutton a la Ho&t GoUt.

IN cold weather hang a leg of mutton in an airf place for a fortnight, cut off the diank, (luff k all over with cloves of garlicky roaft it, bade it with red wine, and fprinkle pepper and fait on ic; while it is roafting boil a gill of gravy, as much red wine, with fix fhallots chopped fine together, pur it in the dilh, and put the leg on it-, garniih with horfe

boulder of Mutton wit 6 a Ragou of tirneps.

TAKE a (boulder of mutton, cut off the flsank, ndtake out the blade-bone as neat as poflible, and in the place put a ragou made as follows: take one or two fweetbreads cut in piecesi a dozen cock (Qfttbs haf n ounce pf truffles and morels fome

frclh

f 52 M A D E D I S H E S. frefii muibrooms, a litcte beaten mace, pepper z&i fair, ftew all thefe in a little good gravy, and thickcD it with butter misd with dour, or the yolks of two eggs, which you pleafe, and let it be cold before you put it in; then fill up the place where you took the bone rom, jufl: in the fortn it was before, and lew it up tight; take a large deep ftew-pan, lay at the botton) thin flices of bacon, then dices of veal, a bundle of parfley and fweet kerbs, fome whole pepper, two or three blades of nace, fix cloves, a large onion, and juft cover the meat with gravy, cover it clofe and (lew it gently for two hours; pare eight or ten turneps, and cut them into what different fiiapcs you pleafe, boil them in water fufficient to cover them, drain them off in a fieve, and put them ovei the water to keep hot; then take up the mutton drain it from the fat, and keep it hot and covered ftrain the grayy it wa ftwedn and (kim oflF all the fat clean, put it into a ftew-pan, ftafon it with pepper and fait, put in a glafs of white wine, two fpoops rul of ketchup, thicken it with butter mixed with flour, and boil it up till it is thick and fmooth i then put in the turneps, give them a tofs or two pour the fauce ovr (he meat and garnifh with barberries,

ojluff a Leg or Skoulder of Mutton

TAKE fome bread-crumbs, half a pound of beef- fuet, the yolks of four hard eggs, three ancliovies bpoedf &nd twelve oyftecs, all chopped fmall, a little parfley and fwcet-hcrbs ihred fine, feafon it with nutmeg, pepper and fait, work it aH up with the yolks of to raw eggs like a pafte, cut a hote in the thick pare of the mutton, or where you pleafe put in the fluffing and roaft it; for fauce, take a gill of the oyfter liquor, aa mycb Qlaret, a little anchovy

liquor

MADE D I $ H E $• 251

Jiquor, a little nutmeg, an onion, and a dozeh oy ft€n 9 ftew thefe together for ten minutes, take out the onion, pour the fauce under the mutton Knd parniQi wi(h horfe-raclin.

Oxford jfobn.

KEEP a leg of mutton till it is dale, cut it inta lu thin coilops as you can, but firft cut off the fac and finews, feafon them with pepper and lalt, a little beaten mace, and ftrew among them a little thyme and three or four (ballots (bred fine; put about a quarter of a pound of butter into a (lew-pan and make it hot, put in your coilops, keep them (tirring with 4 wooden fpoon till they are three parts done and then add a pint of gravy, a little juice of lemon, thicken it iith butter mixed, with flour, let them (immer four or five npunutes, and they will be enough i l)ut take care you do not let them boil, nor havo them ready before you want them, as they will get hard; fry fome bread fippets and put roqnd nd ovpr them, and fend (heqi up ho(.



Mutton the Turkijh Way TAKE a leg or neck of mutton and cut it intQ thin Qices, then wa(h it in vinegar, put it into a pot that has a clofe cover to it, put in to a leg three quarts of water, a quarter of a pound of rice, a litild whole pepper, and three or four onions; to a neck, two quarts of water, three ounces of rice, a Httle whole pepper, and onions; cover it clofe, (lew it gently, and allow a quarter of ah hoqr for every pound of meat; fkim it frequently, and when done take put the onions, feafon ic with fait to your palate, puc in a quarter of pound of butter, (lir it well round,

nd (ake ar the rice does not burn to the bottom i

252 MADE DISHES.

put the meat in the difh, and pour the rice and gravy over it. You niay put in a little mace and a bundle of fweet herbs if you think proper.

A Bafque of Mutton.

GET a caul of veal and lay it in a coppA dilh about the fize of a fmall punch bowl take a leg of muLton that has been kept a week, cut off the lean; and chop it very fmall with half its weight in beef marrow, the crumb of a penny loaf, the yolks of four eggs, two anchovies boned and waflied, half a pint of red wine, the rind of half a lemon grated, and a little pepper and fait $ mix it up like faufage meat, lay it in your caul in the infide of the difh, dofe up the caul, and bake it for one hour and a half in a quick oven; when it comes out turn your di(b upfide down, and turn the whole out into another difli, pour fome good gravy over it, garnifh with pickles, and fend venifon fauce in a boat.

To collar a Breaft of Mutton.

TAKE .a large breaft of mutton, and with a (harp knife take off the fkin, cut all the bones out, and grate fome nutmeg over the infide; chop fome par- ftey, fweet herbs, and a little lemon peel very fine, fome crumbs of bread mixed together, with a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, rub the infide with the yolk of an egg, Iprinkle the herbs and bread-crumbs over, and roll ic up tight, run a (kewer through to hold Vt together, tie it round with packthread, cut the ends even to make it ftand upright in the difh, fptt it, and put ft down to road, put half a pint of jt wine in the pan, and bafte it till the wine is ibaked up, then bade it with butter to make it of a 6pc fro(h (on;: hour svt a good fire will 4p it) when

it

MADE DISHES. 253

it is done take it up untie it, take out the fkewer, ' fet it upright in a di(h, with a little good gravy in the difh % garnith with green pickles, and fend veniibn fauces in boats.

If 70U o not approve of red wine, you may put a quart of ihilks and a quarter of a pound of butter in the pan and bade it with.

Mutton Kebobbed.

TAKE a loin of mutton, cut out all the infide fat and the ikin off the back, cut it in 6ve or Gz pieces, and rub them all over with the yolk of an ggs have fome bread-crumbs, fwect herbs, parflcy, and lemon-peel Ihred fine, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, mixed together, fprinkle the mutton all overj put it on a fmall fpir, bade it with butter, and fprinkle it with the crumbs and herbs fcveral times while it is rpafting; make it of a fine brown then put it in a hot difh, with fome good gravy under it I garoifh with horfe-radifb, and poveroy fauce in a boat.

Neck of Mutton called the Hajly Difh.

TAKE a large filver or pewter di(h, made like a dep foup-difb, with an edge about an inch deep ia the infide, on which the lid fixes (with a handle ac top) fo faft, that you may lift it up by that handle without letting it fall i this difli is called a necro mtncer. Take a neck of mutton about fix pounds, ake off the fkin, cut it into chops, but not too thick, cut a French roll and a large onion into thin fliccs, pare and flice three or four turneps, lay a row of mutton in the difh, on that a row of roll, then tiirneps, then onion, a little fait, then the meat, and & Oft till all is xi% put in a bundle of fweec herbs

; and

i54 M AD E D I S H E Sf.

and a blade or two of mace i have a tea-kettte of boiling water, fill the di(h, cover it clofe, and hang the di(h on the back of two chairs by the rim; havt ready three Iheets of brown paper, tear each flicct into five pieces, draw them through your hand, light eoe piece and hold it under the bottom of your difli moving the paper about as faft as it burns proceed thus tiU all the paper is burnt, and your meat will be enough, (fifteen minutes juft does it) and fend it to table hot in the difli.

This difli was firfLcontrived by the late Mr. Rich, and is now much admired by the nobility and gentry.

Mutton a ta BJaize.

CUT fix or eight chops very thin and cut off the ikin; get a double block-tin or filver pan made with a cover to fix on clofe, lay your chops in, chop fomc parfley lemon- pcel and a few fweet herbs fioe and fprinkle over them, with half a dozen fhallocs or onions chopped very fine, feafoned pretty high with Cay an pepper and fair, put in a little gravy put the cover on clofe, and ftew them very gently for ten or twelve minutes over a clear fire; (or you may ftew them with paper, as direfted in the abo?e receipt) fend them to table hot with the cover on

Mutton Chops in Difguiji

CUT as maAy chops as you want, but not too

thick, rub them with pepper, fait, grated nutmeg,

and chopped parfley; roll each chop in half a iheet

of white paper well buttered in the infide, and

rolled at each end clofe; have a pan of hogs lard or

beef dripping boiling hot, put in the chops, fiy

them quick and .of a fine brown then take them

out

M A D E D 1 S H E S. isi

Odt, and lay chccn on a fieve to drain the fat front them before the fire; fry a handful of parfley crifp, lay the chops in a hot dilh, put the parfley oVer and round them, With poveroy fauce in a boat. Yoa taiuft be careful you do not break the paper, as tbac will fpoil them.

Hefrico of Mutton,

TAKE the beft end of a neck or loin of mutton cut off the ikin, and cut ic into thick chops pepper, ialr, and flour them; fry them on both fides of a light brown in a little butter, put them on a (ieve to drain, then put them into a (lew-pan, with a bundle of fweet herbs, half a pint of white wine and as much gravy as will cover them, cover them clofe and ftew them gently for one hour; then take out the chops drain the gravy through a fieve, and Ikim ofT the fat; put fome butter into a ftew-pan, melt it, put in a fpoonful of flour, and (tir it till ic is fmooth, then pour the gravy in and keep it (lir ring all the time; in the mean time pare two carrots and fix turneps, cut them into dice, or what fhape you fancy, peel two dozen button onions, and cue the white part of two heads of celtery about half an inch long, waih them all well and boil them till they are tender; then drain them in a fieve, and put them into the gravy, put in the chops, feafon ic with pepper and (alt, and give them a ftew for fifteen minutes i take out the chops with a fork, lay them in the di(h, put the roots and fauce over them, and garnifli with beet-root

Mutton the French Way.

TAKE the two chumps off the loins together, cut off the rump with a (harp knife, begin at thi:

broad

256

MADE DISHES.

broad end and carefully raife up the ikin to tht rump-end, but mind you do not cut the ikin through then take a little lean ham or bacon, chop it very fine, a few truffles, parfley, fwect herbs, and a little lemon-peel Ihred fine, a little cloves, mace, and half a nutmeg, beat fine a little pepper and flt, mix all thefc together and ftrew over the meat where you took the ikin from; then lay on the fkin again, faden it tight with (kewers, and put a (hect of white paper well buttered over it, put it ori a fpit and roaft it two hours; then take off the paper, bade the meat with a little butter, ftrew it all over with bread crumbs, and when it is of a fine brown take it up and put it into a hot difh; for fauce, chop fix (ballots fine, put them into a fauce- pan, with a fpoonful of vinegar and two fpoonsful ot white wine, boil it a minute or two, put it into the diih, and garnilh with horle-radifh.

Another French Way called St, Menehout.

TAKE the chumps ofiT the loins together, cut off the rump, and take o£r the (kin, lard it in rows with fmall flips of fat bacon, feafon it with beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper and fait, fome fweet herbs, parflev, and young nonions chopped fine; fake a large ftcw-pan big enough to hold it, lay layers of bacoa at the bottom and thin flicesof lean beef over the bacon, lay in the mutton the larded fide upper moft; put in a pint of white wine, a pint of gravy two or three bay leaves, a few (ballots, and lay layers of bacon and beef over it, cover it dole, put fire over and under it, and ftew it for two hours •, when it is done take it Qut rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and ftrew bread-crumbs over it, put it in an oven Or before the fire to brown •, ft rain the gravy k was ftewed ia hr9Ugh a fieve 0cim off the fat

put

M A D E D 1 S H E S. s7

put it into a fauce-pan, and boll it up; put it into the dilh, put on the mutton, and lend it up hou

Loin of Muttotik forced.

TAKE the bones out of a loin of mutton, and make a iluffing with the crumb of a penny loaf, half a pound of beef- fuet chopped fine, fwect herbs, pariley, and lemon-peel fhred fine, fome grated nutmeg, pepper and fait, mix it up with the yolks of two eggs, and put it in where the bones came from, fcW .it up, raifc up the (kin, Ikewer it on, Ipit and roaft it; when it is nearly done take off the (kin, give ic a fine brown, di(h it up, with good gravy under it, and garnifh with horferadi(h.

Breqft of Mutton grilled.

Half bolI a brea(t of mutton, fcore it, feafon it with pepper and fait, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and fprinkle it with bread crumbs, fweet herbs chopped and mixed put it over a clear fire and broil ic gently of a fine browa, or put it in a Dutch oven before the fire; chop a little parflty, onion, four pickled cucumbers, and half a gill of capers, boil them five minutes in half a pint of gravy thickened with butter mixed with fiour, lay the mut ton in the difh, and pour the fauce over it.

Mutton Rumps a la Braize.

TAKE fix mutton rumps and boil them fifteen minutes in water, take them out, cut them in cwo and put them into a (lew-pan, wich half a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, an onion ftuck with cloves, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little Cay.an pep pepper and fair, cover them clofe, and ftcw them

S till

r

258 MADE DISHES.

till they are tender; take them, the fwect herbs, and onion out, Ikim ofF the fat, and boil the gravy till it b clear-, then pin in the rumps, with a fpoontul of browning, fqueeze in the juice of half a lea)on, give them a,boil up, and garni(h with beet-root.

For variety, you may leave the rumps whole; fidh fix kidnies, and lard them on one (ide, drefs them io the fame manner as the rumps, but do not boil them; put the rumps in the middle of the difti, and the kidnies round them. The kidnies make a pretty fide-dlfh of themfclves, if dreflcd as the rumps.

Mutton Rumps with Rice.

TAKE fix mutton rumps, put them into a ftcw, pan, with a quart of mutton gravy or broth, ftcw them for half an hoir, and then take them out and let them fand to cool; boil half a pound of rice in two quarts of water for ten minutes, drain it off, ikim the fat ofF the gravy, put the rice in, and ftew it gently till it is thick, but take care it does not burn; fcafon t with a little beaten mace, pepper and fall; rub the rumps over with the yolks of eggs, and fprinkle bread-crumbs over them; have a pan of hi boiling hot, and fry them of a fine brown put them on a fieve to drain the fat from them, lay the rice in the di(h, the rumps in what form you pleafe over it, and garnifh with hard boiled eggs cut m two.

Lamb's Head.

TAKE a lamb's head and pluck, cot out the eyes and gall, cut the nut ofi the liver and heart, take out the brains, wa(b the head and the reft of the pluck very clean, and boil it twenty minutes in water then take out the liver and lights,, and mince it

MADE DJ S aE S. 59

1a the fame manner as .veal, put it into a fteW-pail Vfith the Hquor it was boiled in enough to moiften it, with a little lemon-peel Ihred fine, a fpoonful of ketchups a little butter mixed with, flour, pepper and fait, and give it a boil up; take the head up and notch it acto&, rub it over with the yolk of an egg grate fome nutmeg over it, and fprinkle it with bi'ead- crumbs, put it on a clear Hre and broil it of a light brown cut the heart and the nut of the liver in Qices, the brains in four pepper, fait, and flour them, fry them of a light brown in butted put the mince in the diflis lay the head over it, and put the fry round for garniOi.

10 force a Leg of LamL

TAKE a leg of lamb and with a (harp .knife carefully take out all the meat leaving the fkin and fat whole on the bones, and make the lean into a force-meat thus: to two pounds of the meat pick and chop one pound of beef-fuet, put the lean and fuet into a marble mortar, with four large (poonsfuL of crumbs of bread, beat them well together and ftafon it with Rx blades of mace, ten or twelve doves, and half a nutmeg beat fine, a little lemonpeel, parfley, and thyme (hred fine, a little pepper and fait, mix it all up with the yolks of four raw ggs put it into the fkin again in the fame ihape that it was before the meat was cut outi few it Upi put it on a fmall fpit, roafl it, and bafte it with butter i cut the loin into chops, and fry it as direded in the chapter for frying, lay the leg in the dilh, the chops round, with good gravy under it and garnifh with Sprigs of cauliflowers boiled tender4

(

S- ft . - - Lami

26o MADE DISHES.

Lamb Cutlets with Fin Sauce.

CUT a neck, loin, or leg of lamb into cutlets, rub them over with the yolks of eggs, fprinklc them with bread-crumbs parfley, fweet herbs, and lemonpeel (hred Bnc, pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, mixed together $ broil them over a clear fire of i nice brown, put them in a hot di(h and pour fin fauce over them, made as direAed in the chapter for fauces; garni (h with crifped parfley;

Lamb Chops in Cajorole.

CUT a loin of lamb in chops, feafon them with beaten cloves, mace, pepper and fait, rub them over vrith the yolk of an egg, and fprinkle bread-crumbs on them; have a pan of beef-dripping boiling hot, fry them of a fine brown, lay them on a Ccveto drain, fry a large handful of parfley crifp, lay the chops cldfe round in a difli, and leave a hole in the middle to pour in the following fauce: chop feme parfley, fweet herbs, a little lemon-peel, and two fliallots very fine, flew it five minutes in fome good thick gravy, and garnifli with fried parfley.

Lamb Chops larded. '

TAKE the befl: end of a neck of lamb cut it into chops, and lard one fide of them, feafon them with beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, puthem into a (lew-pan the larded fide uppermofti put in half a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, an onion, and a bundle of fweet herbs, cover them clofe and flew them gently for half an hour; then take out the chops, fkim the fat off clean, take out the onion and herbs, thicken the gravy with a little

butter



MAD E DISHES. 261

better mixed with flour, put in a little browning, a fpoonful of ketchup, and one of lemon pickle, a few pickled mufhrooms, Xfuffles itid morels, and boil it up i then put the chops in the larded fide downwards, give them a boil tor a minute or two, lay the chops in the difh the larded fide uppermofti pour the fauce over them, and garnilh with greea pickles or barberries.

You may ftew the chops without larding if you think proper.

Shoulder of Lamb a la Salpicon.

TAKE a ihoulder of lamb, and take the bonea out on the under fide, but leave in the (hank-end, ftuff it with veal force-meat where the bones came out of, and feafon it with mace, pepper, and fait; put fome rafliers of bacon at the bottom of a ftewpan, pur in the lamb, with bacon over it, a pint of veal broth, and a bundle of fweet herbs, cover it dole, and (lew it gently for three quarters of an hour, then take it out and lay it in a di(h; have ready the foUawing fauce: take a pint of brown cullis, cut a fweetbread into dice, a few pickled mulhrooms, and afparagus tops boiled, boil it up a few minutes, pour the fauce in the difb and gar ni(h with lemon and beet-root

Breads of Lamb a la Paltrine

GET two fmalf breafts of Iamb and cut thenn neatly, lay fome rafhers of bacon at the bottom of a ftew-pan, put in the lamb, with a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves, and cover them with bacon, put in a pint of broth, cover them, and fbew them till they arc tender; in the mean time (nake a fauce thus; chop a few muflxrooms, three or

S 3 four



26a MADE DISHES,

four (hallots, and a little parfley very fipc, put it into a (lew-pan, with a pint of ftrong veal giravy feafon it with pepper, fait, and a little beaten niace Jet it fimmer for ten minutes, and thicken it with butter mixed with fk)ur; lay the two breafts in the diih briiket fide outwards, and popr the fauce over (hem I arniih with green pickles.



Ned of Lamh a la Glaize.

TAKE a neck of lamb, cut off the fcrag, and lard it with bacon in rrows as neat a£i you can; put fome dices of bacon at the bottom of a ftew-pan, and flices of veal over it, lay on the lamb the Jarded fido uppermoft, put in a quart of veal broth, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome cloves and mace, lay veal and bacon over, the fame as under it, cover it dole, and Hew it one hour; in the mean time make a glaze the fame as for a neck of veal; take the lamb out, put it in the glaze, the larded fide downwards, for two or three rninutes, put forrel lau.ce in the diQi,.lay the lamb on the larded fide uppermofl:, and garnifh with fried fippcts. .

You may drefs a breaft the fame way, only yoq peed not lard it.

Rth of Lamb en Gerdinere.

V

TAKE a rib of lamb,, lay it the upper fide downwards in a ilewpan, put in a iquart ot brown gravy, a bundle of fweet herbs, cover them clofi- and ftew ihcm gently for three quarters of an hour;, then take out the lamb, cover it over to keep hot, take the fweet herbs out of the gravy, and kim the fat off, put in a little butter mixed with flour, a gill of white wine, a little pepper and fait, and give it a boil up s put in. Ibme parUey, piclled cucumbers

M A D E D I 9 H E S. 263

berfi and capers chopped fine, and boil them a fevir minutes; cut feme pickled cucumben, walnuts, or any other pickles you have, lay them all round the ribs in what form you pleafe, pour the fauce under them, and fpread in the middle of the Iamb as much of the parfley, &c. as you can; fend ic to table hot and garoi(h with pickled French beans or famphire.

Lambs Ears in Bejhemel.

TAKE fix lambs ears, fcald the wool off, and waQi them clean, ftufF the infide with good veal force-nneat, put them into a ftevv pan, with a pint of veal broth, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little cloves and mace, flew them till they are tender, and then cake thtm out; in the mean time make a pint of beihemel, as diredled in the beginning of this chapttr, put them in it, with a few frefh muflirooms dewed, a dozen afparagus tops and a few fmall force meat and egg balls boiled give them a boil up for a minute, put the ears in the d?lh, pour the fauce over them, and garniih with lemon and becc-root

Calves Ears in BJhemeL

TAKE four calves ears, fcald the hair ofF walh ehem very clean, and (lufF the infide with good veal force-meat, put them into a ftew-pan, with a quart of veal broth, a bundle of fv'eet herbs, a little cloves and mace, cover them clofe, and (lew tht till they are tender; take them out, put them in a pint of befliemel, with a few fre(h mulhrooms ftewed or pickled ones wafhed in warm water, a few truffles and morels borled tendef and wafhed well a dozen force-meat and egg balls boiled, and give them a boil for a minute j put the ears in thf difhi two in

S 4 the

Si

I

264 MADE DISHES the m'uMle and tqc at each end, put the faucc over thenit and garnifh with leoion and beet root.

' Barbicued Pig.

TAKE a fat pig of ten weeks old, fcald it, and cue it open, lo that it will lay fiat in the diib, and the ikin on the back remam whole, and lay it in t deep di(h; put a pint of Madeira wine and half a pint of vinegar into a lauce-pan, with a bundle of fwtret herbs, fome cloves, mace, all-fpice, and onion, three or four fliallots, pepper and fair, fome bay and fage leaves, give it a boil for a minute, and pour it over the pig; turn it often, and with a fpoon lade the liquor on it, let it lay all night, and the next niorning wipe it dry with a cloth •, have a large gridiron over a very clear fire, put it on, broil it very gradually of a fine brown on both fides, and ask broils fcafon it very high with Cayan pepper and fait. You may put three or four Ikewcrs through the infide, put it on a fpit, and roaft ir, and as it roalts fprinkle it with Cayan pepper and lalt, bafte it with the liquor it was laid all night in and a little butter or you may put it into a deep di(h, the belly down lyarcis, feafon it high as before, puc it into the oven, 9nd bake it till it is of a fine biown; two hours will be fufficieni, but .you muft bafte it now and then with the liquor and butter, as direded for roaftingj when it is done, have a large di(h very hot and lay it in, with the following faucc under it 2 put a piece of butter into a ftew-pan, melt ir, put in a fpoonful of -flour, and ftir it till it is fmooth -, put in half pint of good gravy, a pint of Madeira wine, a doen fage leaves chopped fine, feafon it with Cayan pepper dnd fult pretty high, and flew it for a quarter of n hour; if?h?n it is $aked take the liquor from

UQdct

MADE DISHES. 265

undcrir, ftrtiio it rihrough a ficve, blow ofF the fat, and put it into the fauce; garnilh with barberries.

A Pig the French Way.

TAKE a Toafting pig that is made ready for the fpit, and make the following Huffing: take the crumb of a penny loafj half a pound of beef iuec chopped fine, fix fage leaves, fome parfley, and lemon-peel (hred fine fome pepper and filt, mix it all up with the yolks of two eggs, put it into the bellf of the pig, few it up, and roaft it till it is nearly done; cut it off the fpir, divide it into about twenty pieces, take out the ftuffing, and put the pig into a ftew-pan, with a half a pint of white wine a pint and a half of good gravy, and two onions chopped fmally leaien it with grated nutmeg, Cayan .pepper and (alt, z little thyme and lemonpeel chopped fine, cover ic clofe, and ftew it gently for one hour; then put in a piece of butter roHed in Hour, a fpoonful of anchovy liquor, and one of vinegar or mulhroom pickle, cut the (luffing in fquare prcqes and put in, and (lew it fifteen minutes longer; lay it in your difli, pour the fauce over it and garnifh with a Seville orange cue in Qices.

A Pig au Pere Douillet.

TAKE a roafting p fcald it, and wa(h it clean, cut ofF the head, and cut it into quarters the fame as lamb, lard them with bacon, and feafon them with beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and fait; lay a layer of fat bacon at the bottom of a deep iew pan, ly the head in the middle, and the qparters round it, put ill a few bay leaves, an onion diced, oneIemon cut in two, a carrot and parfnep diced, fome parOcy 4nd gives, cover the pig over with bacon,

and

266 M A D E D I S H E S.

and put in a quart of veal broth, cover ie clofe, and ftew ic gently for one hour over a flow fire; thea take it up, and put the pig into another ftew-paa with a bottle of white wine, cover it clofcj and ftew it gently for one hour longen If you fend it up cold, let it lay in the liquor till it is cold, theii drain it well, and wipe it with a clean cloth; put the head in the middle of a difli, the q Wters round it, and ftrew it over with green parfley. Any one of the quarters is a pretty difl), laid on water-crelTes, and garnifhed with parfley. If you chufe to fend it to table hot, while your pig is ftewing in the wine, take the firft gravy it was ftewed in and ftrain it, flcim off all the fat, put it into a ftew-pan„ with a fiveetbread boiled and cut in pieces, fome truffles and morels, and pickled muflirooms, ftew it a few minutes,, and ieafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, thicken it with the yolks of four eggs beat up, or with butter mixed with flour; and when your pig is done lay the head in the middle of the difii, and the quarters round it; put the wine it was ftewed in to the fauce, flcim it well, pour the ragou over it, and garnifli with lemon and pickled barberries.

A Pig Matelote.

KILL and fcald your pig the fanfic as for roafting, cut ofi the head and the petty-toes, cut the pig into four quarters, and put all into cold water; cover the bottom of a large ftew-pan with flices of fat •bacon, lay the quarters on, fplit the head in two and put on, with the petty-toes, fealbn it with pepper and fait, put in a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, fome bay icfaves, and a bottle of white wine j cover the pig ith flices of bacon, put in a quart of water, cover it clofc, and let it boil; take twp large eels, ikin and gut them cut them about five or fix inches

Jong

MADE D I S H E S 267

long, and when the. pig has boiled three quarters of an hour put in the eels, cover them dole aod (lew them three quarters of an hour longer; in the mean time boil a dozen large crawfifli, and take the meat out of the tails and claws as whole as you can; when your pig and eels are done take them up, lay the pig in the middle of the dilh, the petty- toes round ir, and the eels over it, cover it over and keep ic hot; (do not put the head in, as that will make a cold difli of itfelf, garniflied with parfley, for fuppr) take the liquor they were ftewcd in, flcim off all the fat, then add to it half a pint of ftrong gravy, thicken it with butter rolled in flour, put in a' fpoonful of browning, boil it up till it is thicic aod fmooth, (kirn it .well, pour it over the pig, and garnijIJi withhe crawfifh and lemon. You may take the brains out of the head, chop them up, mix theoi with a little floor, pepper fair, and the yolk of an Sgs have a pan of hot fat and drop' them in, fry them crifp, put them on a fieve to drain and- puc them round the pig.

Pork Cutlets Sauce Robart.

TAKE a loin of pork, cut off the (kin, and cut it into thin cutlets, lay them in a difb, put a gill of white wine, a gill of vinegar, an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, two (ballots, three or four bay leaves, a kttle all-fpice and mace, into a fauce-pan, give them a boil up, and when cold put them over the cutlets, turn them often, and let them lay all night; the next day take them out, wipe them dry with a cloth, rub them over with the yolk of an egg, and fprinkle bread-crumbs and herbs, the fame as for cutltts a la maintanon, on them, broil them over a clear fire of a fine brown on both fides; lay (hlqn in a ho& diih and pour fauce robarc, as di

268 MADE DISHES.

Ttfied in the chapter for fauces, over them s garniik with lemon

Herrico of Venifon.

TAKE a breaft of venifon, bone and fkin it, ott it into four pieces, and put it into a ftew-pan, wi(h a quart of gravy, half a pint of red wine, a bundle of fwcet herbs, a little cloves and mace, cover it clofe, and ftew it gently for two hours •, in the mean time cut . carrots, turneps, and button onions, the fame as for herrico of mutton, and boil them tender take the venifon out, (train the gravy through a ficvc, and fkim off the fat % put two ounces of butternto a ftew-pan, melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour, ftir it till it is frnpoth, pour in the gravy, and leep it ftirring till it boils; ftrain off the roots and put in, feafon ic with a little Cayan pepper and fait, and ' give ic a boil up; put the venifon in the dilh, and pour the herrico fauce over it,

A Goofe a la Mode.

TAKE a fine large goofe, pick and draw It, with a (harp knife begin at the breaft, and tak(e all the meat off the bones, but leave the rump on whole, and be as careful as you can not to cut the back ikin; bone a large fowl the fame way, boil a neat's tongue'till it is tender, peel it, and cut it fo as to fie ttic infide of the fowl, feafon them with pepper, fait, and beaten mace, put the tongue in the fowl, the fowl in the goofe, and tie it round with a thick ftring i (if you have room put fomc beef-marrow between the fowl and the goofe) put it into a deep ftew-pan, with two quarts of good gravy, half a pint of red wine, a. bundle of fweet herbs, and an onion fiuck with cloves cover it clofe and Aw it

gently

MADE DISHES. 269

gently for two hours; when done, take out the goofe, cover it over, and keep it hot; (train the gravy through a (ieve, and (kim oflT all the fat; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a llew-pan mclc it, and put in a large Ipoontul of flour, ftir it till ic is fnnooth pour in the gravy, and keep it fl-irring as before; fkim it clean, kafon it with Cayait pepper and fait, put in a fpoonful of ketchup, the fame of lemon pickle a veal fweetbread boiled and cut ia pieces, a quarter of an ounce of truffles and morels, a gill of pickled mufhrooms, an artichoke bottom or two cut in pieces, and (lew them for ten minutes; put in the goofe again for ten more, lay it in the dilh, pour the fauce and ingredients over it, and garnilh with lemon and beet-root;

Duds a la Mode.

TAKE a couple of fine ducks, pick, draw, and finge them, cut them into qartcrs, pepper, fait, and flour them put fome bujtter into a ftew-pan, and fry them of a light brown j pour the fat out of the pan, (hake a little flour over them, put in half a pint of gravy, half a pint of red wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, four fliallots chopped fine, an anchovy boned, and a little Cayan pepper, cover them ctofe, and ftew them for twenty minutes; then take out the herbs, (kim off the fat, and let the fauce be as thick as cream; put the ducks in the di(h, pour thefauce over them, and garnifli with lemon and beet root

Ducks a la Braize.

TAKE two ducks, pick, draw, and finge them, lard the breaths with (mail flips of bacon, and fill (he infides with good veal force-meat; lay a layer of

fat

270 M A D E D I S H E S.

. fac bacon at the bottom of a (lew-pan then a layer

. of lean beef or veal on the bacon, lay on the ducks with the larded fide uppermoft, put in a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion (tuck with cloves, a cairoc

. cut in pieces, two or three blades of mace, a quart of goo(l brown gravy, with a gill of red wine, Jay a

. layer of beef and bacon on the ducks, put them over a Qow fire, with fire at the top, and braize xbem for one hour then take out the ducks and keep them hot; drain the gravy through a fieve, ikim off all the fat clean, put it into a flew pan, with a piece of butter mixed with flour, a fweetbread Soilbd and cut in pieces, fome trufiles and morels blanched, fome muflirooms, if frefli dewed firft, if pickkd wafhed in warm water, feafon it with a little Cayaa pepper, and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemony put the ducks in the di(h, pour the fauce over theoi, d garnifh with lemon and beet-root.

Duck with Green Peas.

PICK, draw, finge, and fioqr a duck; pgtbalf a pound of butter into a deep ftew-pan, make it hot, put in the duck, and fry it of a light brown; pour out all the fat, but let the duck remain in the pan, put to it a- pint of good gravy, two onions chopped fmall, a pint of green peas, two or three cabbage lettuces cut acrofs very fmall and well walh ed, a little pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and ftew them for half an hour, now and then giving die

fan a fiiake; when they are nearly done grate in a ittle nutmeg, a very little beaten mace, and thicken it with butter mixed with flour, or the yolks of two eggs beat up in a little cream; then (hake it round for a few minutes, lay the duck in the dilb, pour the iauce over it, and garnilh with lemop.

MADE DISHES. ii

Duck With Cucumbers.

PREPARE your duck as for duck and peas take four large cucumbers pare them, take out the pulp, and cut them into fmall pieces, with two large onions cut in dices; fry the duck, and take it out; then put in the cucumbers and onions, give them a fry, dredge fome Sour in, put in a pint of good gravy, a gill of red wine, and fome pepper and fak, put in the duck, (lew it for half an hour, and ikim off the fat very clean; lay the duck in the •difl), pour the fauce over it, and garnifh with lemon.

Sweetbreads of Veal a la Dauphin.

TAKE three large fweetbreads and boil them for ten minutes; make aforctf-meat thus: take the fle(h of a fmall fowl, half a pound of fat and lean bacon chopped fine, and beat together in a marble mortar, feafon it with beaten mace, nutmeg, pepper and fait, and mix it up with the yolks of two eggs; cut your fweetbreads in fuch a manner as to be capable-of putting the force-meat in them without break 11% the tops, faftcn it in with fine wooden fkewers, and lard the fweetbreads •, lay a layer of fat bacon in a ftew-pan, a thin layer of veal on the bacon, and put the fweetbreads on that, feafon them with cloves, mace, pepper, and fair, a bundle of fwcet herbs, and a large onion diced, upon that lay thin dices of veal and bacon, cover it clofe, and put it over a dow fire for ten minutes; then pour in a quart of veal broth, cover it clofe, and let it ftew very gently for two hours; then carefully take out the fweetbreads and keep them hot, ftrain the gravy, dcim off the fat, and boil it up till it is reduced to about half a

pintji

572 MADE DISHES.

pint, put in the fweetbreads, and (lew them for two or three minutes in the gravy; then put them in a difhj pour the gfavy over theilij and garniihwith lemon and beet-root.

Sweetbreads en Gerdiniere.

TAKE three fine fweetbreads and parboil them; rake a Itew-pan and lay a layer of fat bacon at the bottom, and a thin layer of veal on the bacon, put the fweetbreads on with the upper fide downwards, put in a pint of veal broth, two or three blades of mace and lay layers of veal and bacon over them, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently for one hour; in the mean time make aumlet of eggs in the following manner: take the yolks of nine eggs, beat them up well, take three pewter plates and rub them with fweet oil, put one-third of the eggs in one, colour another third with the uice of fpinach, and put it in a plate, colour the other third with a little cochineal diffolved in brandy, put it in a plate, and cover them over with three plates i have a little boiling water in a (hallow ftewpan, and put the plates in one at a time till the eggs are done; take them out of the plates and cut them into diamonds or fprigs, as you fancy; take the fweetbreads up, andjput the aumlets over them in what fhape you pljpaie, put them in a di(h, with white $;uUis under tbeoi, and garniih with lemon and btbt-rbot

r

Sweetbreads a la Glaize.

TAKE three large fweetbreads, blanch them, and lard them with bacon, lay a layer of fat bacon at the bottom of a ftew-pan, and lay a layer of veal, put in the fweetbreads the larded fide uppermoft, a quart of good gravy, and an onion (luck with

doves.

Kl A IE ti 1 3 tt fi 4. 2

tldveSi put layers of veal and bacon over thtim cover thenti clofe arrd ftevr them gently for three quarters of an hour; then, take out the fwcctVeads, (train the gfavy through a fine fieve, fkim oflF the far and put it into a ftcw-pan; boil it down till it is of a ftrong glaze, put the fweetbreads in the larded fide downwards for a few minutes, and puc tbetn over a gentle fire to take the glaze put forrel fauce in a dilh, put the fweetbreads in and garnifh vith fried fippets

Sweetbreads an BeJhemeL

Take three throat and one heart fwCctbread' and boil them for fifteen minutes; rub the hearc fwcctbread with the yolk of -an egg, fprinklc bread- crumbs over it, road it, and cut the othrc into pieces; make a befhemcl as dircfifecl in the beginning of this chapter, put them in, with fome force- meat and egg balls boiled, fome pickled miifhrooms wafhed in warm water, a few afparagus tops boiled, and give them a boil up; put them in a difh, and put the FQafted in the middle; garnifh with lemoa and beet-root

Tiurkey a la Tioube

PICK and draw your turkey, and with a fliarp knife carefully bone it, (luff it with a good veal force-meat, and fkewer it at the breaft; put a layei of fat bacon at the bottom of a ftew-pan, and a layei of veal on the bacon, feaibn it with beaten mace cloves, nutmeg, prppcr and fait, put in the turkey, with a quart of good gravy, a gill of white wine, an onion and a bundle of fweet herbs, put layer of veal and bacon at the top, cover it clofe, put il over a Qow fire, with fire at the top, and flew it

T gently,

274 M A D E D IS H E S

gentl for two hours; then tak out the turkcjf drain the gravy through a ficve and Ikun off all the fat put two ounces of butter into a ftew.pao melt it, and put in a fpoonful of flour, ftir it tUl it is fmoothy and pour in the gravy, keeping ic ftirriog all the time; then put in a fweetbread cut in picctSi fome frefli mufhrooms ftewed, or pickled ones, fomc forcemeat balls, trufBes and morels, feafoned with Cayan pepper and fait; put in the turkey ftcw it for ten minutes, and fqueeze in the juice of a le mon, put the turkey in a difli, pour the fauce aod ingredients over it, and garniOi with lemon and beetroot

Turkey a la Braize.

PICK and draw a turkey, bone it, and make the following force-meat: take the flefh of a fowl, a pound of lean veal, and half a pound of beef-fuec, chop it fmall, and beat it in a mortar, vith parfley, fweet herbs, lemon- peel ihred fine, and a few crumbs of bread, feafon it with beaten mace, nut meg, pepper and fait, mix it up with the yolks of two eggs, and fluff the turkey wth it, fkewer up the breaft, dip the breail into boiling water, and lard it; lay a layer of fat bacon at the bottom of a ilew-pn, and a layer of veal on the bacoo, pot the turkey on the larded fide uppermoft put io quart of gravy, a gill of white wine, fomc cloves and mace, and a bundle of fweet herbs, put a layer of veal and bacon over it, cover it clofe, and f(ew it gently for two hours; (put fire over as well as under ic) then take out the turkey, ftrain off the gravy, and fkim off the fat; put a little butter into a flew-pan, melt ic, puf in. a fpoonful of flour, and fiir it till it is fmooth j then pour in the gravy, boil it till it is quite fmooth, and put in fome mufh roon

MADE DISHES. 875

rooms truffles and .morels artichoke bottoms, force-meat and egg balls, put in the turkey, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, and boil it up for ten minutes 1 put th turkey in a difh, pour the fauce over i and garnifh wkh lemon and beetrootn

Huriey a Ja Glaizeu

PREPARE your turkey the fame as for a h hraize, and when it is ftewed enough take it up and keep it hot s ftrain off the gravy, cake off the far, and boil it in 4 large ftew-pan till it is of a fine glaze I lay the breaft of the tuticey in to take the glaze, put forrel fauce in a difli, with the turkey on it, aad garnilh with fried fippets

Piregoe Turkey

TAKE a turkey of about eight or moe pounds height, draw and finge it, feafon the infide with pepper, fait, and mace, fwect herbs and parfley &red fine, ftuflf the belly and breaft with gopd veai force-meat, and trufs it as for roafting; cut a flit down each fide of the breail, fill it full of greea truffles waflied clean and cut in flices, put it into a dcepdilh, fprinkle a little Cayan pepper over it, pour on it a pint of Madeira wine, and let it lay in it all nights the next day butter a eet of pP'v and tie it over the breaft to keep in the truffles roaft it one hour and a half, bafte it a little with the ine, and then with butter; put the reft of the wine into a ftew pan, with a little good brown gravy feme butter.mixcd with flour, a fpoonful of India iby or mufbroom ketchup, a little pepper and fair, and the juice of half a lemon; ftew it for fifteen minutes, bafte the turkey, then take it up, take off

T 2 X)%

27 MADE D I S H E Sf.

the paper, put it into a dilhj. pdur the (auce uncicf k ana garnilh with lemofi.

Fowl a la Braize.

TttK ar fine fowl, drarw and finge it, tru6 k with the legs turned into the belly, feafon it both infide and out with beaten mace, nutmeg, pepper and fait i lay a hiyer of fat bacon at the bottom of a flew-pafi,. then a layer of veal, and afterwards the fowl; put in an onion duck with cloves, a bundle of fweet herb, a piece of carrot, and a layer of veal and bacon over it,, and fome thin flices of lean beef over all, covcf it clofe, and fweat it over i flow fire for five minutes;, then pour in a piae of broth, cover it clofe, and ftew it gcntl for one hour take out the fowl, ftrain the gravy through a fieve, and ikim off all the fat; then put it into a (lew-pan, with a little butter mixed with ficmr, a fpoonful of browning a few cocks-combs, mufliroomsy. truffles and morels, artickoke bottoms,, or afparagus tops boiled, and ftew it up y then put in the fowl, make it hot, feafon it with pepper aod fait, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon;, when all is ready, put the fowl in a di(h pour the fauce ovcf it, and garnifh with lemon and beet-root

Fowl a la Farce.

TAKE a large fowl, pick and draw it, (lit the fktn down the back, and carefully take it off, pick all the meat clean off the bones, and mince it very fmall, with half a poupd of beef-fuet, half a piot of oyfters blanched and bearded, two nchovies,- a ihallor, a few bread-crumbs, fome fweet herbs, parfley, and lemon-pccl fhred fine, fcafon it with a little mace PPPr, and falt mix it all up with the

yolks

MADE D I S H E S' %yy

ydks of eggs, lay it on the bones, put the Ikin on again, and few it up i tie feme dices of fat bacon over it Jirery tight, put feme &ewers through it ind roaft it one hour -, take half a pint of brown cullis fcit i into a ftew-pn, with fone cocks-combs molbrooms, truffles and morels, and give a boil pi when the fowl is done, put the fauce in the difli, take the bacon ofF the fowl, put it on the fauce, and garnifh with lemon and beet-rooL



Fowl 41 la Qhizi.

TAKE a fine fowl, pick, draw, and finge it, trufs it as for bdnimg, lard the bread, ftuflT the infide with good force-meat, and the bread likewife lay a layer of bacon at the bottoti) of a (lew-pan, and a layer of veal on the bacon, put in the fowl the bread uppermofl, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little mace, an onion fttick witti cloves, and a pint of good gravy, put a layer of veat and bacon over it, cover it clofe and ftew it for one hour; then cake up the fowl, drain the gravy throAigh a fiev, fkim off the fat very clean, put it into a dew- pan again, boil it till it is of a drong glase, and put the fowl in, with the bread xlownwards, to take the glaze

! iiave the following fauce ready: take half a pint of frefh mudiroom, put them into a dew-pan with a

I litde butter, and (tew them over a How fire for five minutes, then put in half a pint of white:tillis, feme truffles and morels, cocks-rombs, an artichoke bottom cut in pieces, and give them a dew for ten

' minutes s put it into a di(h, put the fowl on bread upwards, and garnidi with fried Uppets, or lemon Md beet-root,

? T 3 luUets

fl7$ MADE DISHES.

1

Pultets a la Sainte MenebouL

TAKE two fiDe pglletSy pick dran and fingt them, trufs the legs in the bodies, flic them dowo the back, fpread them open on the table and take out the thigh bones, beat them well with a rollingpin, and feafon them with beaten mace nutmeg pepper, fair, and fweet herbs llired fine; take a pound and a half of lean veal, cut it into thin fliees, and lay it in a ftew-pan of a convenient fize to hold the pullets in, cover it fee it ovei the ftove, and lhen it begins to (lick to the pn ihake the paa about till ic is of a line brown; then put in as much broth as will ftew the fowls, ftir it together, nd put in an onion, a little whole pepper,'and half a pound of lean ham or bacon j then lay in the puU lets, Cover them clofe, ard ftew them for half aa hour; then tak them our, rub the tops with the yolk of ail cggj and fprinklc bread-crumbs over them put them on a gridiron over a clear fire, and broil them of a fine brown on both fides s ftrain the grdvy, fkim off the fat, boil it till there is juft enough for fagce, thicken it with butter oiixed with 'flour, and put in a gill of pickled mufhroomsj % fpoonful of ketchup, a little browning, a litcle pep per and fait, and boil it till it is fmooth pyt the pullets in the difli pour the faucc oyer theoii, an4

garnifh with lemqn and beet-roor,



2V Marinate FowU

TAKE a fine lajge fowl or two, middKng-fizccJ ones, and raifethe (kin from the breaft-bone with your finger y then take a veal fweetbfead blanched, a dozen oyfters blanched and bearded, a gill of frcih tpulhfOQmi oe nChovy all chopped loft 4

MADE D I S HE S. 279

few fweet herbs, parflcy, and lemon-peel (hred fine, feaibn it with pepper, faltj and beaten mace, mix the ingredients with the yolk of an egg, ftuff it in between the (kin and the fieHi, (but do it very gently, for fear you ihould break the (kin) iluff the body full of oyfters well wa(hed and bearded, and lard the breaft with bacon, put fkewers in as for roafting, fpit it, paper the breaft, and roaft it three quarters of an hour; when done, put it into a hot dilb, and put good gravy under it, garnifh with lemon and beet-root. A fmall turkey niay be drefled the fame way

Fowls F ranges Incopadas.

TAKE a pound of lean ham or gammon of bacon cut in thin flices, two onions cut in thin dices, four (ballots, with two quarts of water, a little beaten pepper cloves, and mace, and a pennyworth of iaffron, (lew it gently till it is reduced to three pints, and (train it through a fievc; cut two fowls as for a frica(ee, put them into a ftew-pan with the broth, and ftew them till they are tender; mix two fpoons fol of flour with two of vinegar, beat it up with ibme of the liquor till it is quite fmooth, then mix the whole together, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait to your palate, and boil it gently for ten minutes; put (ippets in a foup-difli and put it over them.

You may add force-meieit and egg balls if you think proper.

You may make a frangas incopadas of veal, in tht form of olivSi in (lead of fowls.

Chickens a la Braize.

TAKE two fine chickens, trufs them in the fame manner as for boiling finge them, and lard the

T 4 breafts.

I

8o MADE PISHES.

breads, feafon them inlide and out with beaten mace, pep er, and falc) lay a layer of fac bacon at the bot- torn of a ftew-pan, and a layer of veal over the ba con, put in the chickens the larded fide uppennofti with an onion (luck with clove$, a bundle of fwcet herbs, a piece of carrot, and a quart of veal broth; put a layer of veal and bacon over, cover them clofe, and ftcw them gently for three quarters of aa hour; (put fire over as well as under them) have ready a ragou made thus; take a pint of brown cullis put into a (lew pan, with a veal fweetbread boiled and cut in pieces a few frelh mufhrooms ftewed, truffles and morels, cocks-combs, force-meat and egg balls boiled, an ox-pal te boiled tender and cut in pieces, and ftew thtm together for ten rni nuces i take up the chickens, lay them in a difh, cover them over to keep hot, (train the gravy through a fieve, ikim o(f all the fat, pour half a pint into the ragou, and give it a boil up -, then pour it over the chickens, and garniih with lemon and beet-rooc. Or you may make your fauce thus: take the grayy the chickens were (tewed in, ftrain it, and (kin) off the. far, put it into a (lew-pan, with half a pint oyftcrs blanched aad bearded, (id the oyfter liquor ftrained, a glais of wh.te wine, fome pepper and ialt, andapi(Ce.ot butter mixed with dour boil it up. till it is thick and fmooth, fque. e in the juice of half a lemon, pour it over the chickens, and garniih with lnion and beet-root.

Chickens Cbirinrate

TAKE two chickens, pick, draw, and fingc them, cut off the feet, and break the bread, bones flat with a rolling-pin but take care you do not break the ikins, flour them, and fry them of a fine brown in ffcih butter tha drin all the fw omc. of the pap

MADE D I tf E S. 281

. but leave in the chickens cut a piece of lean beef in chin dices and lay over theoi, wh a pound of lean veal in the fame manner, a little 0)ace and whole pepper, an onion ftuck with cloves, a bundle o fweet herbs, and a piece of carrot, .pour in a quart of boiling water and a gill of whice wihe, cover them clofe and ftw cbem for half an hpur; then take up the cliickens put them in a difh, cover them over, and keep them hot; let the gravy boil till it is rich and good, then ftraiil it off, fkirn Off all the fat, put k into your ilew-pan. again, with a gill of pickled mufhrooms, feafon it with pepper and fait, put your chickens in again, and give them a boil up ( pue them in a di(h, poor the fauce over them, and gar niih with lemon and fome dices of cold ham broiled

Chickens Surprize.

TAKEtwo fmall chickens and half roaft them take all the lean from the bones, cut it ia thin dicea about an inch long, mix it up with fix or (even fpoonsful of cream and a piece of butter rolled, in flour as big as a walnut, give it a boil up, and fee it CO cooU then cut &x:or.feven dices of bacon thin and round, place chem in a pattyptan, and put fomo good veal force-meat on each fide, work them Up in the form of a French roil, wih the )olk of a raitf egg, in your hand, but leave a hollow place in the middle; put in your chickens, cover them with fome of the lame force-meat, aad rub it fmooih with your band and the yolk of an egg; make them as high and as big s a French roll, fprinkle fome fine Bread-crumbs over them, put them on a baking-tin and bake them three quarters oi an hour; (bat mind you place them fo as not to touch one another, and jay them in luch a manner that they wilt not fail flat in the baking; or you may form them with a broad

kitchen

22 M A D £ DISHED.

kitchen knife on your drefler, and put them on the plate or dilh you intend to bake them on) when they are done take them out, put them in a difb, ftick a leg of one of the chickens in the middle of the roll you intend to fend vp and let your fauce be gravy tbiqkened with butter, and the juice of a lemon. Thii is a pretty fide-di(h for eirher fummer or winter.

Artificial Chickens or Ptgeens.

IN order to do this, you muft tzkt the flefl of a large fowl, lean veaL or lamb, and to a pound of &fh put half a pound of beef or veal fuet, and half a pound of fat bacon chopped together very fine, beat it in a marble mortar, with fome crumbs of bread, a little parfley, thyme, and lemon-pecl, (bred fine, feafon it with beaten mace pepper and fait, and vtiw it up with the yolks of eggs; then make ic into the Ihape of chickens or pigeons, pu£ them on a tin plate, and ftick in two feet to make them look like real ones, (chickens feet for chickens, and pi geonsfeet for pigeons) rgb them over with the yolk cf an egg, fprinkle bread-crumbs: over them, (take care they do not touch one another) and bake them of a light brown; put them in a diih with a little good gravy under them, or fend them up dry, and umilh with lemon and beet-root.

Pulled Chickens.

TAKE two chickens, and. either boil or roaft them juft fit for eating, cutoff the legs, rumps, and pinions, rub them over with t;he yolks of eggs, Iprinkle breads-crumbs on them, and broil them over a clear fire of a nice brown; pull the fkin ofif the cemaining part, take all the fir fli off the bones, pull or cut it about as thick as a ftraw and an inch and

a half

MADE DISHES. 283

a half long have a gill of cream boiling, with a lictlr butter aitfl fU in it, put ia the white mea, and tif gravy tjjat run from the chickens, and give it a f6fs up; ihen put it into a dilh, the rumps in the middle and the legs and pinions round it.

Pigeons a la Touhe.

PICK, draw, and Tinge fix pigeons, trufs them ai for boiling) ftuff the infides and crops with good force-meat and flatten the breaft; put a layer of fat bacon at the bottom of a dew-pan, and a layer of lean beef over the bacon, put the pons on with a quart of good gravy, a bundle of fweec herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves, a Httle mace pepper and fait, put a layer of beef and bacon oyer them, cover them clofc, put them over a flow fktt with fire at the top of the ftew-pan, and ftew thedi for three quarters of an hour then take them out ftrain the gravy through a fieve, flcim off all the fat put it into a'flsw-pan, wiclv a piece of butter itiiated with fiour, a gill of white wine, a few frefli or pickled muQirooms, truffles and morels, force-meat baUs and the yolks of fix hard egs, feafon it with Cayaii pepper and fait, put the pigeons in, cover them (:iole, and ilew them gently for half an hour 1 then Ikim the fat off clean, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, and (hake them about; put the pigeons in a diih, pour the fauce over themi and garniOx with lemon and becNrooN

•

Pigeons au Poire,

TAKp fix pigepns and bone, them, ftufl them with good forcemeat, and make them in the fliape of a pear ith one fopt ftuck in the fmall end to )oQk jike the ftalk, rub them over with the yolk of

m

a84 M A D E D I S H £ S.

an egg, fprinkle bread-crumbs 6n cbem, and frr theni of a fine brown in a pan of boiling hoc betfdripping; put them on a fieve to drain, then put them into a ftew pan, with a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, an onion ftuck with cloves, and a bundle of fweet herbs, cover them clofe, and ftew them for half an hour; then take them, th onion and fwecc herbs out, (kim the fat off the gravy, put in fomc butter mixed with fiour, a fpoonful of ketchup, the fame of browning, fome trufBes and morels, pickled mufhrooms, two artichoke bottoms cut in fix pieces each, and a few force-meat and egg balls; feafon it with Cay an pepper and fait, put in. the juice of half A kmofi, and Hew it tre minutes; then put in your pigeons, make them liot, hy them with the fta1k en in wards and the breaft outwards, pour the fauce ver them, and garnifli with lemon and bect-rooc.

. . . Pigeons Jioved.

TAKE fix pigeons, pick, and trufs them with die legs in the fides; take a fine cabbage lettuce, cut out the heart, wa(b it clean, and chop it very fine, mix it with good force-meat, force the infide of the pigeons and the lettuce, tie the lettuce acrofs to keep in the force--meat, and fry it of a light bron in frefh butter pour out all the fat, lay the pigeons in round t-he lettuce, feafoh them with beaten niAore, pepper and fait, and put in half a pint of Rhcnifh wine, cover them clofe, aftd ftew them five or fix minutes; then put in a pint of good gravy and a piece of butter mixed with flour, cover them clofe, and ftew them half an hour; uncover them, Ikim off all the fat very clean, fqueeze in the juice of half a lemori and give them a fhake round; put ihe icttuce in the middle of the dilh, the pigeong

round

MADE DISHES. 25

round it, pour the fauce over all. and garnUh with pickled red cabbage.

For a change you may ftufF the pigeons vrnh force-meat; cut two or three cabbage lettuces in quartersi and ftew with them as above; lay the let- tuce between each'pigeon in the difh, andpour the fauce over cbem

Pigeons Surtout.

TRUSS fix fine pigeons for roafting and ftuflF the infides with force-meat, then put a thin (lice of &t bacon on the breafts, and a thin ffice of veal over that, fealbned with mace PPPi "d fah; tie the veal aiid bacon on with packthread, put them on a btrd-fpit and tie them on another, rub them aH over with yolks of eggs,, and fprinkle bread-crumbs and fweet herbs on them, roaft them and bafte them well with butter i when they are done take them up, cut off the packthread, lay them in a diih, and have

food gravy, with mufbrooms, truffles and morels ewed in it, pour it in the difb, but not over the pigeansj and gamifli with lemon arni beet-ioot

Pigeons Compote

TAKE fix young pigeons and trufs them as for boiling, fiuff the infides and the crops with a light force-mear and lard the breafts, put tbcm into a ftew-pan with a quart of brown cullis, and (lew tncm for one hour; put in a few Nckled mufliroomsy truffles and morels, two artichoke bottoms cue in pieces, the yolks of fix hard eggs feafon them with Cayan pepper and fair, and give them a (lew for five minutes; then put the pigeons in the difii, pour the £iuce over tliem and garniih with lemon and beet loot

French

£6 M AD E D IS HES.

Frerfcb Pupton of Pigeons.

TAKE a tin or copper patty-pan and butter it i make a large piece of favory vea! force-meatj roll a Ihecc out like a pafte and put in, lay a thin layer of £it bacon on the force-meat, then put in fquab pi geons, as many as you want to fill the patty-'pao, and icaibn them with pepper and fait; lay over them a fweetbread cut in flices afparagus topSj mtiflirooms, cocks -comb, and an ox-palate boiled tender and cut in pieces, with the yolks of fix hard eggs; roll another piece of force-mdit and put over, clofe it like a pic, ornament the top as you pkafe, and bake it in a gtleoven for two hours; when it is done flip it into a diffi, make a hole in the top, pour half a pint good gravy in, and fend it up hot to tAble

Pigeons franfmograpbtedm

TAKE four pigeons, cut o(F their legs, and truTs them 'a neat as you can, feafon them with pepper and fait; take a pound of butter and rub it in a pound of flour, make it into a fl:ifF pafie, and roll each pigeon in a piece of pafte i tie them feparate in a cloth fo as the pafte will not break, boil them one hour and a half in a large pot of water; then cake them up, untie them, take care that they do not break, lay them in a diih, and pour in a little gravy; You may leavethe gravy out, for when they re cut there will be plenty of gravy

Pigeons in Fricandeux.

TAKE four fine large pigeons, trufs them as for

roafting, ftulF the infides with force meat, cut off

(he pioknB and feet, and lard the breafls; lay a

layer

MADE DISHES. iSy

layer of fat bacon at the bottom of a ftew-pan, and a layer of veal on (,be bacon, put in the pigeons, with a pint of gravy, a jgiU of white wine a little beaten mace, pepper andMlait, and a bundle of fweec herbs put a layer of veal and bacon at the topt cover them cloie, put fire under and over (bem, and fiew them for one hoir; then tdce out the pigeons, ftraia off the gravy, (kirn off the fat, put the gravf into a ftew-pan, and boil it till there is juft eocMJgh ibr fauce, put in the pigeons breaftfide downwards and give them a boil up for five minutes; then put them in a diih bread upwards, pour the fauce over chenti, and garnilh with lemon and beet-root.

You may put a few large trufiks and the yolks of four hard eggs into the lauce, and lay them found fhc pigeons in the diib



Pigeons with a Farce.

TAKE four or fix large pigeons, make a farce tvith the livers minced fmall, as much becf-fuet marrow, a few bread-crumbs and hard eggs, of each an equal quantity, feafon it with beaten mace nutmeg, pepper, and fait, fweet herbs chopped fine, and mix them all together with the yolk or an egg % then cut the Ocin of your pigeons between the legi and the bodies, and with your finger very carefully raife it frooi the fiefh, but take care yon do noc break it, then put in the farce, trufa the legs clofe CO keep it in, fpit, roafl:, and bade them well with butter fave the gravy which runa from them, and mix it up with a Utcle red wine and fome of the farce, (if not enough for fauce put in a little made gravy) a litde mitnoeg, pepper and fa)t, thickened with the yolk of an egg beat up, and give it a boil t lay tbe pigeons in a di(b pour the fauce in ir and gamifla with double parJOey

88 MAIEDISH£S.

Pigeons a la SouJfeL

TAKE four large pigeons and bone them, fluff them with veal fence-meat put them into a ftewpaa with a pine ot veal gravy, cover them clofc, and ftew them gently for half an hour; then take them out and let them ftand a little time, rub them over with the yolk of an egg, wrap them up in good veal force-meat) rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and fry them brown in a large pan of beef dripping, put them on a (ieve before the fire to drain, take the gravy they were ftewed in, (kim off the fat, thicken it with butter mixed with floCir, and iealbn it with pepper and fait, beat up the yolk of an egg in a little cream and put in, and fliake it one way for a minute; put the pigeons in the difh, drain the fauce over them, ahd garnifh with fried parfley.

You may leave out the egg and cream, and put in afpoonful of browning, one of ketchup, and one of lemon pickle, if you think proper Pigeons in Pimlico.

,TAKE five large pigeons, pick, draw, trufs, afid finge them; take the livers, with fome fat and lean ham or bacon, mufhrooms, a few trufiles, parfley, and fweet herbs, all fhred fine, feafoned with pepper and fait, mix it up with the yolks of two raw eggs, fluff the bellies with it; roll them in a thinflice of veal, and over that a thin flicepf bacon, put white paper only overall, tie iron with packthread, put them on a fmall fpit, and roaft them for one hoiir, iut mind and bade them well with butter in the mean time make for them a ragou thus: put half a pint of good gravy into a flew- pan, with a glafs of white wine, fome iruffles frelh mulhroomsi and parfley

chopped

M A D E D I S H E Si a8f

popped fmallf a little pepper and falc thicken ic with a piece of butter mixed with flour, and ftew it for a quarter of an hour; when they are done cake them up, take ofF the paper, put them in a difh ))our your fauce over them and garni(h with fix iforcemeac pcttit patties.

Jugged Pigeons

PtCit and draw fix pigeons, but do hot wa(!i them, boil the livers a minute or two, then take them our, mince them fmalJ, and bruife chem witi the back of a fpoon, mix them with, the yolks of two hard eggs, parQey, and lemon-peel ihred very fine, as much beef-fuet as liver (haved very fine, the fame quantity of crumbs of bread, feafoned with pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, work it up with a raw egg and a little frefh butter, (luff the crops and, bellies with it, few up the necks and vents, then dip youf pigeons in warm water, and feafon them with pepper and fait as for a pie, put them in a jug, with a head of cellery, a bundle of fweet herbs, a &w cloves and mace beat fine, and a gill of white wine, tie them down clofe with ftrong paper, and put the jug into a pot of cold water up to the top, but not to run in or wet the paper, put a tile over the Jug, and boil them gently for three hours; then take t)iem out of the jug, drain the liquor into a ficw-pan put in little butter mixed with flour give it a boil up till it is thick, pour it over the pigeons and garnifh with lemon

Pigeons a ta Italienni.



• TAKfi four young full-grown pigeons pick, draw and truis them, put a gridiron over a clear e, put them on, and turn them round two or

U three

ft90 IVt A D E D IS H E S.

three times for two minutes, then take them off, tie the legs to the bodies, that they may be rouod iind tight; take a ftcw'-pan, and. lay at the bottom and round the (ides fome dices of veal and ham put the pigeons in, and fprinkle them with pepper and fait, put in fome blades of mace, a fprig of bafil, fome coriander- feeds, fome flices of lemon, an onion a little garlick, a glafs of ftrong white wioe, and half as much oil; then lay over them fome flices of ham and veal, cover them cloie, put them' on a flow fire, and ftew them one hour; in the mean time make a ragou thus: cut fome frefh mufhrooms and champinions fmall, put a gill of oil into a ftiew-pan, a little garlick and fhallot chopped fine, with the mulbrooms and champinions, and fet them over the fire one minute; then pour in fome veal gravy, a glafs of white wine, little eflence of ham, and let all thefe heat together; then put in a' fliced lemon, ftir it aboutj and fkim off the fat; then put the ragou into a well-tinned flew-pan, take the pigeons out of the ftew-pan thty were ftewed in and wipe them, that they may be quite dry, put them into the ragou, make them quite hot, put them into a difh, and garnifh with lemon

Partridges a la Braize.

TAKE two brace of partridges, trufs the legs into the bodies, lard the breads, feafon themwidi pepper, fait, and a little beaten mace i take a ftewpan, lay flices of fat bacon at the bottom, then thin flices of veal and beef, a piece of carrot, an onion cut in flices, a bundle of fweet. herbs, a little mace and whole pepper, lay the partridges in with the brcafts upwards, lay fome flices of veal and beef over them, and ftrew chopped parfley on cjiem, cover them clofc,. and put them over a flow fire for ten

minutes s

MADE DISHES. 91

hvmutcs; give your pan a fhake, jpour in a pint of boiling water and a gill 6f white wine, cover it clofe, aiKl (lew it a little quicker for half an hour; then take out tht birds, ftrain the liquor off, afld Ikim off the Fatj put it to a pint of good brown cullis with a fwcetbread cut in pieces, forhe truffles and morels, cocks-combs, two or three fowls livers if you can Tgct them, two artichoke bottoms. cut in pieces, afpa ragus tops boiled, and mulhrooms, frclh or pickled ftcw them for a quartet of an hoUrj then put ih the

Eartridges, nftke them hot, fqueeze in the juice df alf a lemon, put the partridges in the dilh breafts Upwards, pour the ragou over them, and garnifh with lemoD and beet-root;

Partridge Pants.

TAKE two partridges and roaft theni, parboil a large fowl, pick the flefli off the bones and chop it fine, with half a pound of fat bacon boiled, a few frefh mulhrooms, truffles and morels, to artichoke bottoms boiled tender, feafbn it with beaten mace nutmeg, pepper and fait, fome fweet herbs and parflcy chopped fine, foak the crumb df a penny loaf in hot graty, and mix all well pgether with the yolks of four eggs; make your panes on white paper of any Ihape or figure you fancy, the thicknefs of an eggj and at a proper diftance from one and ther, rub therrt over with the yolks of eggSj fprinkk bread-crumbs over them and bake them a quarter of an hour in a duick oven; when they are done pot them in a hot diflii with good gravy undef thenii

U a tbefijknti

.

89? MjA D E D IS HE- 3.

Pbeqfants a la Braize,

TAKE a brace of pheafants, pick draw, and trufs them as fqr boiling, lard the breads, and fluff the infides with good force meat; lay a layer of bacon at the bottom of a (lew- pan, and a layer of veal on the. bacon, put on the pheafants breads uppermofl, with a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion fluck with cloves, a quart of good gravy, al of red wine, a little beaten mace, pe;ppei and fait, put a layer of veal and bacon at the top cover them clofe', fet them over a gentle fire, put fire at the top, and let them braize gently for one hour and a halt; then take out the pheafants, drain the gravy through a fieve, and (kirn the fat off clean; put about two ounces of butter into a dew-pan, melt it, put in a ipoonful of flour, dir it till it is fmooth, pour in the gravy, and boil it till it is fmooth-, then put in a fweetbread, boiled and cut in pieces, an artichoke bottom cut in pieces, a few truf&es and morels, frefli muflirooms dewed, or pickled ones, fome afparagus tops boiled, if you have them, the yolks of four hard cggS) and a dozen force-meat balls boiled dew them altogether for fifteen minutes j then put in the pheafants and make them hot, fqueczc in the juice of lialf a lemon, put them in a difh breads upwards, pour the fauce and ingredients over theoi, and garniib with lemon and beet-root

Florendine Hare.

TAKE a full-grown hare and hang it up four or five days, then cafe it, leave the ears on whole, take out all the bones except the head, lay the hare on thc dreiTer, and put in the following force-meat: takfehalf a pound of lean Veal, half a pound of fat

bacon

MADE DISHES, 29J

bacon, beat it well in a mortar, with the crumb of a penny loaf, the liver fhred fine, an anchovy, a little parfley and fweet herbs Ihred fine, feafon it with pepper and fair, mix it up with a glafs of red wine and the yolks of two eggs, put it into the hare's belly, roll it. up to the head, and flcewer it with the head and ears leaning back, tie it with packthread as you vould a collar of veal, wrap i( in a cloth, and put it into a dew-pan with two quarts of water, (lew it one hour and a half, and when the liquor is reduced to one quart, put in a pint of reef wine, a fpoonful of lemon pickle, one of ketchup, and one of browning •, then take out the hare and keep it hot, ftew the liquor till it is reduced to a pint, thicken it with butter mixed with flour, feafon it with Cayan pepper and fait; take the hare out of the cloth, untie it, and lay it in a diih, pull the jaw- bones out, ftick them in the eyes, and a fprig of myrtle in the mouth, pour the fauce over it, and garnifli with fried force-meat balls.

I'ofcare a Hare.

CASE a fine hare, trufs and ftufF it the fame as for reading, lard ir, put it into a long flew-pan or fifii -kettle, with two quarts of good gravy, one of red wine, a lemon cut in two, a bundle of fweet herbs a little whole pepper, fait, nutmeg, and a few cloves, cover it clofe, and (tew it over a flow fire till it is three parts done; then take it up, put it into a di(h, and drew it over with crumbs of bread, fweet herbs chopped fine, fome lemon-peel grated, and half a nutmeg, fet it before the fire and bade it with butter, keep turning the di(h roui)d till it is of a fine brown; in the mean time take about a pint of the gravy it was dewed in, free from fat, thicken it with butter mixed with flour, take fix eggs boiled

U 3 hard

?5+

MADE DISHES

bard and chopped finc fix pickled cucumbers cut in thin dices, and mixed with the fiuce pour it ii the dilbi, and put the bar? in j garnifh with water? creflcs

Hare Cruet.

m

CASE and bone the hare, xx2kt gravy of the bones and a pound of lean beef Re w the head whole in the gravy, cut one half into thin dices, and the Other half in pieces an inch thick, dour and fry them quick in frefli butter, in the fame manner as collops-, put a pint of the gravy into the pan, a fpoonful of made muftard, a litile elder vinegar, cover it elofe, and let it (lew gently till it is as thick as cream j fplit the head in two, lay the hare in the difii, and put the head in the middle garnidi yith lemon and beet- root,

Rabbits Surprife

TAKE two half-grown rabbits and roaft thera, cut oflf the heads cloie to the flioulders and the firft joints, then take all the lean meat oflf the back bones, cut it fmall, and tofs it up with fix or feven fpoonsful of cream or milk, and a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with dour, a little grated nutmeg and falr diake altogether till it is as thick as good cream, and fct ic to cool; then make a force-meat with a pound of lean veal, a jund of fuer, as much crumbs of bread, two anchovies chop f)ed fine, and btrat all in a marble mortar, with a ittle lemon-peel, pardcy, and fweet herbs (bred fine, feafon it with pepper, fair, and grated nutmeg, mix it up with the yolks of two raw eggs, place it all jound the bones of the rabbits, leaving a long trough in the back-bone open, fo that it will hold

tkc

MADE DISHED. 95

thd meat you cut out whh the fauce, pour it in and cover it with (orce-meat, fmoorh it all over wkh your hand as well as you can with a raw egg, fquare it at both ends, and fprinkle on fonie fine breadcrumbs; butter a mazarine or pan, take them from the dreiier where you formed them place them on it very carefully, and bake them three quarters of an hour till they are of a fine brown; then put them in a difh, and let your fauce be gravy thickened with fiour and butter, and the juice of a lemon, pour the fauce in the difli; garniih with Seville orange cut in quarters and fend it up for a firO: courfe

Rabbits in Caffbrole.

TiKE two young rabbits and cut them in quarters, (you may lard them or not, as you think pro per) (hake fome fiour over them, and fry them of a light brown with frefli butter; then put them into an earthen pipkin, with a quart of good broth, a gill of white wine, a little pepper and fait, a bundie of fweet herbs, and about two ounces of butter mixed with flour, cover them cloite, and ftew theni for half an hour; fkim them clean take out the fweet herbs, then dilh them up, pour the fauce over them, and garniih with Seville orange; notch and cut in flices the peeling that is cut ofi d lay it be tween the flices of orange.

Florendine Rabbits.

TAKE three young rabbits, flcin them, but leave on the ears, wafli them, dry them with a clothj and carefully take out all the bones, but leave the head whole, fl:uF and treat them in the fame manner as a hare florendine, and boil them one hour; have ready a white fuce, made with a pint of veal gravy,

U 4 % little

a5+ M A P E D I S H E S,

bard and chopped finc fix pickled cucumbers cui in thin dices, and mixed with the fiuce pour it ii the dilbi, and put the bar? in garnifh yf'nh wa;er? creflcs



•

Hare Civet.

m

CASE and bone the hare, nake gravy of the bones and a pound of lean beef, ftcw the head whole in the gravy, cut one half into thin dices, and the Other half in pieces an inch thick, dour and fry thca quick in frefli butter, in the fame manner as collops; put a pint of the gravy into the pan, a fpoonful of made muftard, a litile elder vinegar, cover it dofe, and let it ftew gently till it is as thick as creamy iplit the head in two, lay the hare in the difii, and put the head in the middle y garnidi yith lemon and beet-root, Rabbits Surprife

TAKE two half-grown rabbits and roaft them, cut oflf the heads clofe to the flioulders and the firft joints, then take all the lean meat pflf the backbones, cut it fmall, and tofs it up with fix or fevcn fpoonsful of cream or milk, and a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with dour, a little grated nutmeg and faltj diake altogether tiU it is as thick as good cream, and fet it to cool then make a force-meat with a pound of lean vealj, a sound of fuer, as much crumbs of bread, two anchovies chop fed fine, and btrat all in a marble mortar, with a ittle lemon-peel, pardcy, and fweet herbs (bred fine, feafon it with pepper, fair, and grated nutmeg, mix it up with the yolks of two raw eggs, place it all jound the bones of the rabbits, leaving a long trough in the back-bone open, lb that it will hold

' " tkc

F

MADE DISHES. 95

thd meat you cut out with the fauce, pour it in and cover it with (orce-meat, ftnoorh it all over with your hand as well as you can with a raw egg, fquare it at both ends, and fprinkle on fome fine breadcrumbs; butter a mazarine or pan, take them from the dreiier where you formed them place them' on it very carefully, and bake them three quarters of an hour till they are of a fine brown; then put them in a difh, and let your fauce be gravy thickened with flour and butter, and the juice of a lemon, pour the ikuce in the difli; garniih with Seville orange cut io quarters and fend it up for a firO: courie

Rabbits in Caffbrole.

TPiKE two young rabbits and cut them in quarters, (you may lard them or not, as you think pro per) (hake fome flour over them, and fry them of a light brown with frefli butter; then put them into an earthen pipkin, with a quart of good broth, a gill of white wine, a little pepper and fait, a bundle of fweet herbs, and about two ounces of butter mixed with flour, cover them cloite, and ftew them for half an hour; fkim them clean, take out the fweet herbs, then dilh them Up, pour the fauce over them, and garniih with Seville orange; notch and cut in flices the peeling that is cut ofi, and lay it be tween the flices of orange.

Florendtne Rabhits.

TAKE three young rabbits, flcin them, but leave on the ears, wafli them, dry them with a clothj and carefully take out all the bones, but leave the head whole, ftuF and treat them in the fame manner as a hare florendine, and boil them one hour; have ready a white fuce, made with a pint of veal gravy,

U 4 a liitW

296 M A D E D I S H ',

a little anchovy liquor, thickened with butter miied ith flour beat up the yolk of an egg in a giH of cream, grate a 4ittle nutmeg in,, and put it to the gravy i let it fimmer two or three minutes, but doc lxil9 and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon put the rabbits in the difh, pour the faucc over them, and gamifli with Seville orange cqt in fliccs or quarters.

Portugal Chickens.

AT a time of the year when chickens are fcarcft take two young rabbits, (kin then cut off the heads, turn the btcks upwards, and two of the legf on the rabbit dripped to the claws, trufs them with fkeweis like chickens, lard and roaft themj put them in a difh, with good gravy under them, and garnifh with lemon and beet-root, with parfley an4 butter and gravy in boats,

Currey of Chickens.

TAKE two chickens, (kin them, cut them up as for a fricafee, w them clean, and ftew them in a pint and a half of water for about five minutes; then ftrain off the liquor, and put the chickens in

clean dilh; chop three large onions Imall, and fry them in two ounces of butter, then put in the chickens, and fry them together till they are both brown; get a bottle of currey powder, ftrew it over the chickens when frying, pour in the liquor they were ftcwed in, and (lew them for half an hour -, if it is not leafbned high enough, put in a little Cayan pepptrr, as fometimes the currey powder is not hot

'Enough, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon; then difh them up, with the fauce over them, andgamifti

ith lemon.

Walh

Si A D E 15 I fe H ES: iy

J "Willi and pick a pound of ricf put it into twd quarts of boiling water, with a piece of buitcr and a little fait, and boil it gem! v till it is tender j thea ftrain it in cullender, put it before the firt for tea minutes to drain and dry; have fix eggs boiled hard, put the rice in a diih, garni(h it with tb eggs cue

in two, and fend it up with the currey,

.... .

Larks Pear Fafiion

TAKE twelve larks, trufs them clofr, and cut off the legs, feafon them with beaten cloves, mace, pepper, and fait, wrap them up in good veal force imeat, and (hape them like a pear, fticking one le at the fmall end like the ftalk, rub them over with the yolk oP an egg, and fprinkle bread-crumbs over therp butter a difh, put them in, and hake them half an hour; put them intQ a hot di(h, with gravf jn a boat. They are a fine garnifh for large diftes

Woodcocks or Snipes in a Surtout.

TAKE three woodcocks, or five fnipesj take out .the trails, and half road them r make a large quaO' tity of good veal force-meat, roll a (heet out, put it •ac the bottom of a difh, and lay in the woodcocks or fnipes, chop the trails and throw over (hem i take a pint of good gravy, a gill of fre(h muQirooms, a few truffles and morels, a fwectbread boiled and cut in pieces, artichoke bottoms cut in little pieces, dew hem altogether for ten minutes, and fhake them round often; beat up the yolks of three eggs with a little white wine, and ftir altogether one way till it is thick •, then 'take it off and fet it to cool j when cold, pour it into the furtout, put in the yolks of hard eggs here and there, feafon it wkh beaten inape, pepper and fait to. your taite, cover kover

with

98 M A P E DISHES;

with fofcc-meat, and orimment it with a knife as yoo imcj; nib it Oyer with the yolk of an egg, fend k to the oven, and bake it half an hour when doQe fend them to table hot.

7j Salmee Woodcocks or Snipes.

TAKE the trails put, half roaft them, cut them in quarters, and put them in a ftew-pan, with a little gravy, two (hallots (hred fine, a glafs of red wtne a little fait and Cayan pepper, the juke of Ikalf a lemon, the trails chopped fine, cover tbeoi dofe, and (lew them for ten minuses; make a dry ioaft cut it in quarters, pour the falmee over it, aAd garnifh with lemon and beetroot.

Tb Salmee a wild Duck or any Sort of wild

Fowl.

HALF roaft them, and cut ohem up as for eating; put a gill of gravy, a gill of red wine, fix ftallots chopped fine, the juice of a Seville orange %r lemon, fome Cayan pepper and fait, into a lilver cbaffing-di(h, and fet it over a lamp till it boils ap; then put in the wild fowl, put on the cover, make k thoroughly hot, and fend it to table in the chafSngA&k. If you have not a chaffing-dilh, ftew it in a ftew-pan, pour it into a hot di(h, cover it over, and iend it to uble as hpt as you can.

Macaroni a la Parmazan.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of fmall pipe macaroni put it into two quarts of boiling water, with a iit of butter and boil it till it is tender; then ftrain it in a fieve and let it drain, grate half a pound €f Parmazjin cheefe, put the macaroni into a ftew pan,



f.

MADE P I S H E $• 299 .

an, with a gill of cream, two ounces of butter, a tw bread-crumbs, and half the chccfe, ftirit about till the cheefe and butter arc mekcd; then put the macaroni ibto a dilh, fprinkle the reft of the cheefe over it, and with a lalamander or hot iron make it of .'ne brown, and fend it to table a$ hot as polliblc.

ji Mock turtle,



TAKE a fine large calf's head with the ikin 00 fcald it and wa(h it clean, and boil it three quarters of an hour; then take it up and flit it down theface, take the ikin and meat off the head as whole and clean as poflible, but be careful you do not break the ears, lay it on a drefler, BU the ears with force-meat, and tie them round with cloths; taka out the eyes, and cut the meat from th bones % peel the tongue and cut it in flices, with the fat and belt parts of another head, without the flcin and boiled as Jong as the above, cut in flices, put the flicea into a ftew-pan with the flcin on, (the fkin fide downwards) three quarts of veal gravy, cover t clofc and ftc it gently for one hour over a gentle fire; then put in three fweetbreads boiled and cut in pieces, half a pint of fre(h muftirooms, one ounce of truffles and morels, four artichoke bottoms, each . cut in four, an anchovy boned and cut fmall, arul feafoned high with Cayan pepper and fait; put ia three pints of Madeira wine, two fpoonsful of ketcht up, one of lemon pickle, a quarter of a pound of butter mixed with flour, and let it all (lew half an hour longer; (kim it well, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, and put in the yolks of fix hard eggs; boil •' the twQ brains, cut them in fquare bits about ajbig as a large nutmeg, and dip them in a ftiff batter luvc a pan of hot fat, fry them of a nice brown,

and

t •

30O R A G O U S.

ind put them on a ficve before the fire to drain; make a rich force-meat, roll it in a veal caul, then in a cloth, and boil it one hour cut it in three parts, the middle piece the largeft, put the meat in the di(b, lay the head over it the fkin fide uppermoft, take the cloths off the ears, put the largeft piece between them, and make the top of the ears to meet round it, which is called the crown of the turtle 5 lay the other fliccs of force-meat on the narrow end, put fome of the artichoke bottoms, eggs, mufiirooms, and brains all over it, put the gravjr boiling hot over it, and fend it away as quick u pofliblei as it foon gets cold.

C H A. P. XII.

R A G O U

Beef.

TAKE about fix or eight pounds of the thia flank of beef, that has fat at the top, cut Iquare, or any piece of beef that is all meat and has fat at the top, the rump will fuit well, cut the meat from the bone, and flour it all over -, put half a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, and fry it of s nice brown all over; pour out the fat and put in two quarts of good gravy, a pint of white wine, a bundle of fwect herbs, two or three (ballots, and a blade of garlxck chopped fine, fome whole pepper,

clovci



Jt A O O U S. 301

cloves, and mace, cover it clofc, and ftcw it gendf for four hours; then take out the beef, ftrain off the gravy, and fkim off the fat; put four ounces of gutter into a ftew-pan and melt it, put in two fpoonaful of flour, aod (lir it till it is fmoothj then with one hand pour in the gravy, and keep it ftirring with the other as before; feafon it vrith Cayan pepper and fak, put in a veal fweetbread cut in pieces an ox palate boiled tender and cut in pieces, a giU of pickled mufhrooms, half an ounce of truffles and morels blanched and walhed well, two dozen force meat balls boiled, and an artichoke bottom or two cut in pieces; then put in the beef, with a fpoonful of elder vinegai;, (lew it fifteen minutes, and fkim K well; put the beef in the difh, pour the fauce over it, aqd garniih with lemon and beet-root. .

For variety, you may cut the white part of a dozen heads of cellery about two inches long, boil it in water till it is tender, and put it in inllead of the other ingredients; or when cucumbers are in feafon pare fix of them, take out the cores, ftew them ia fome of the gravy, and put them over the beef.

Ox Palates.

TAKE four ox palates, put them into a pot of water, and boil them till the two fkins will come off take off the fkins, wafli them clean, cut two ia fouare pieces and twq in long pieces; take a quart of good brown culjis and put them in, with fome frclh or pickled mufbrooms, truffles and morels, the yolks 0 four hard, eggs, a dozen force-mea( balls boiled, two artichoke bottoms boiled tender, and ftew them for twenty minutes; put them into a hoc di(h, pour the fauce over them, and garnilb with beet-root and lemon.

Neck

Jl A G 6 U

Neck of VeaU

' I

, .TAKE the bcft end of a neck of veat, tdt u intd chops, flatten them with a cleaver, feafon chem with beaten cloves, .noace prpper, and ralt and lard -tbem on one (ide, fprinklc thenn over with lemon-peel weec herbs and parfley fhred fine; batter half fteets .of paper, wrap rhem in and broil them very gently ."•vera clear fire for half an Ivour; iri ihe mean time •take a prnt of brown cullis, put in trulBes and morels, pickled mtc&rooms, aii . artichoke hottom cue in pieces, fome force-meat and egg balls boiled and boil them op five minutes -, put it in a -dHb the iarded fide uppermoft, pour the ragou over it, an garnifh with fried oyfters, beetroot; or lemotii.



, Breaft of Veal.

. . TAKE about fix pounds of a brcaft of veal, cut it in fquare pieces, pepper fait, and fiour it, fry it brown in freib butter; then pour ia a quart of good gravy and a gill of white wine, put in a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion chopped fine, cover it clofcj and (lew it till it is tender; fkim it well and take out the fweet herbs; if it is not thick enough, put,in fome butter mixed with flour fome truffles and jnorels, pickled or frcfh mulhrooms ftcwed, the fweetbread boiled and cut in pieces, an ox palate boiled tender and cut in pieces, fome force-meat and egg balls, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, feafon it -with pepper and fait to your palate, and ftcwitfbr fifteen minutes longer; put the meat in the dilhf pour the ragou over it, and garnifh with lemon and bcet-roor, fried oyfters, or fmall patties

R A G O U S. 30

Another Way.

HALF roaft a bread of veal, cut it in fquare pieces, and put it into a ftew-pan, with a quart of gravy, half a pint of white wine, a bundle of fweec herbs, an onion ftuck with- cloves, fome pepper and lalt, cover it clofe, and ftew it one hour; theii take out the veal, pull the bones out, drain off the gravy, and flcim it clean from fat; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, melt it, and put in two fpoonsful of flour; ftir it till it is fmooth, and pour in the gravy; put in a fweetbread cut in pieces, half an ounca of truffles and morels blanched and wa(hed clean, fome pickled or frefh mu(hrooms fiewcd, the yolks of fix hard eggs, fome force meat balls, and an ox palate boiled tender and cut in pieces; ftew it up for fifteen minutes, feafon it witk Cayan pepper and fait, fqueeze in the juice of a le moo, put in the veal, and make it very hot; put the veal in a difli, pour the ragou over it, and £ar nifli with lemon and beet-root.

Sweetbreads.

TAKE three fweetbreads and blanch them, cut two of them in fquare pieces, rub the other over with the yolk of an egg, and roaft it of a fine brown 5 make a pint of brown cullis, put in the cut fweetbreads, with a gill of frelh mulhrooms, a few truffles and morels, two artichoke bottoms boiled and cijt in pieces, a dozen force-meat and egg balls boiled, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently for twenty minutes; fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, and give them a tofs; then put the ragou ia the difli, the roaft inv the middle, and garniih with lemon and beet-root.

r

r

J

fm.

194 t A & O U Si

jL Mutton.

TAKE % iiiiall leg of inutcon, cut off the fat anfd fkin, and cue it very thin the right way of cbo grainy put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pn fhake a little flour over the meat and put VL in with half a lemon half ap onion chopped fine, afmall bundle of fweet herbs, a liule mace, pepper aind fait, and ftir it a minute or two; then put. in as much vy as will moiften it mince an anchovy imall, mix it with a little flcAar and butter, and put ui, itir it well together over the fire for fix minuta, then throw in a few whole capers, take out the fwtct'' breads, and piit it in a hot difb.

Livers.

TAKE fix large fowl livers and one turkey livcfi pick out the galls and throw them into cold water; take the fix livers and put them into a ftew-pan, with fialf a pint of gravy, a gill oi frefli mulhrooms cut fmali, fix cocks-combs or Hones, a fcV truffles boiled, a fpoonful of ketchup, a little pepper and ialt, a piece of butter mixed with flour as big as a Cht;fnut, cover them, and ftew them for fifteen minutcs; butter a piece of paper, wrap the turkey's liver in ir, and broil it of a fine brown ) take oW the

apcr, put it in the middle of a dUb, the ftewed iyers round it, pour the fauce over all, and garnifb with lemon and beet root

• ft

Pigs Feet and Ears

TAKE two pigs feet and tyo cars, fcald thcin fplit the feet in two, and put a bay Itaf between, tic ihcm up and boil them till they are tender ) boil

the

ft A GJ 6 tJ S

305

ihie tars for a quarter of art hour, then cut them in tlips about two inches long and as thick as a quill pit them into a lew-pan with a pine of good gravy, an onion chopped fine and ftew them till they are tender; feafon them with pepper and falt and put in a piece of butter mixed with Hour, a fpoonful of muftard and a little elder vinegar, ftew them five ininutes longer and Ikim them; rub the feet ovef ith the yolk of an egg fprinkle bread-crumbs on them, and fry them in plenty of far, or broil them bf 1 hice brown; put the ears in a dilh and lay the feet roubd them:.

n

TAKE i fmall fore-quarter of houfc lanAb cut bff the knuckle- bone take off the fkin lard it with bacon, and half roaft it ) then put it into a ftewpan, with a quart of brown cullis, a pint of frelh muihrooms, fome truf&es and morels, two or three lambs fwcctbreads, cover It clofe, and ftew it one hour very gently •, fry a dozen oyftcrs and a dozett force-meat balls, lay the lamb in the di(h fkim the fat clean from the ragou pour it over the lamb, liay the oyftcrs and balls round it, and garnilh with watcr-creffcSi

Lamb another W'ay

CUT a ribs of lamb in fix or eight pieces, feafon them with beaten mace, cloves, pepper, and fait; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan flour the laaib) and fry it of a light brown; duft in fome flour, and put in a pint and a half of gravy, a gill of hite wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, half a pint of ffeQi mulhfboms, a few trufBes and morels a fpooq

X ful

3o6 R A Q O y S.

fill of ketch up cover it clofe, od dew it till it if tender s then flciin the fat oflT very ckan, feafon it with Cayan pepper and falt fqueeze in the juice of half a iemon, and let it fimoicr up then put the lamb in the difhj pour the fauce over it, lay dozen fried force-meat balls round it, and garnilh with lemon and beetproot,

Breajl of Lamb.

TAKE a breaft of lamb, feafon it with beateo cloves, mace, pepper, and fait, flour ir and fry it of a light brown in frefh butter put in a pint of .gravy, a glafs of white wine, an onion, a bundle of fweec herbs, cover it clofe, and dew it half an hour; then take out the lamb, fweer herbs,- and onioo; fkim off the fat, put in a little butter mixed with flour, a few pickled muflirooms, truffles and morelsi feafon it with pepper and fait, fqueeze in half a lemon, boil it up, put in the lamb, and make it hot then put it in a difli, pour the iauce over it, lay fried force-meat balls round it, garnilh with lemin asd beet-root, and fend it for a fide-dilb

CHAP.

t 37 1

CHAP. XIIL

PRICASEES.

Neats Tongue.

BO 1 L a frefli neats tongue till it is tender, peel it, cut it into thin dices, flour it, and fry it in frefli butter; pour out the butter and put in a pine of white gravy, a lafs of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, and llmnrier all fogecher half an hour $ then take out the tongue (train off the gravy, and put it into the ftew-pan again; beat up the yolks of two gg$ little grated nutmeg, a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with flour, put in the flour and butter, Ihake it about till the butter is melted' then the eggs, and ihake it together about a minute; put it into the diih, and garnifh with lemon and beet-root.

Ox Palates

TAKE four ox palaces, wafh them well, and boil ibem till they are tender; take the fkins off, cue them in fqu are. pieces, and put them into a ftewpan, with a pint of veal broth, . a bundle of fweet herbs, a few frcfh mufbrooms, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, fome butter mixed with flour, and ftew them gently for twenty minutes; ikim them and take out the herbs; mbt the yolks of two eggs with a little cream, grate in a littic nutmeg, put it

X a in.

3o8 P k I C A S E E S.

in, and keep (hak'mg the pan one way till it is thick; fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, di(h it up, and garniih with Icmon

Lamb Cutlets.

' V

TAKE a leg of houfe lamb and cut it into thin cutlets acrofs the grain, put them into a. ftew pan, and make fome good broth with the bones, (bank, &c. enough to cover the coUops, drain it into the ilew-pan with the collops, with a buidlp of fwect •herbsj an onion, a little cloves and mace tied in a muflin rag, a few frefli mufhrooms, and ftew them gently for ten minutes; then take out the fweet herbs and onion, fkim off the fat, and put a piece of butter mixed with flour, a few truflSes and moreb boiled and wafhed clean, a dozen force-meat balls boiled, and feafoned with Cayan pepper and fait to your palate; give it a boil up, and if there is any fat on (kirn it ofFj beat up the yolks of three eggs with half a piit of cieam, grate in a little nutmeg, and keep Ihaking the pan one way till it is thick and fmooth •, then put the cutlets in the di(h, pour the fauce over them, and garnifli with lemon and beetr root.

Lamb Stones and Sweetbreads.

TAKE a dozen lamb ftones and fix fwectbrcads and parboil them, (kin the ftones, flit the fweetbreads in two, and put them into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of veal broth, a bundle of fweet herbs and a few frefli muflirooms, cover them clofe, and ftew them for ten minutes; then put in a Iktle buner mixed with flour, boil it up, and flcim the fat off; take out the fweetbreads, and put in Tome afparagus

tops, boiled tender, 4 few force-meat and egg balls

boiled

F R I C A S E E S. 309

boiled, beat the yolks of two eggs with half a pine of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, with fome fair, put thefc in, and keep the pan fliaking one way rill they arc thick and fmooth; fquecze in the juice of half a lemon, then difh it' up, nd garnifli with Ic cnon and beet root,

Tripe.

TAKE a piece of double tripe, cut it in pieces about two inches fquare, and put it into a ftew-pan of wate-r, with a bundle of fweet herbs and an onion, and boil it till it is quite tender; in the mean time make a quart of beftemeU as dire&ed in the chapter for nnade difiies, ftrain off the tripe, and put it in, with fome pickled muflirooms, oyfters blanched, and' force-meat balls boiled; give it a boil up, then put it into the dilh, and garnilh with lemon.

Another Way.

TAKE a piece of double tripe and cut it in fquare pieces, put it into a ftew-pan with a pint of veal broth, a bundle of fweetherbs, two (ballots chopped fine, and a few frefh muflirooms, cover it clofe, and Hew it half an hour; then take out the fweet herbs, Ikim it, and put in a piece of butter mixed with flour, a dozen oyfters blanched and bearded, a dozen force-meat balls boiled, Ihake them round till the butter is melted, and feaibn it with pepper and fait; mix the yolks of three eggs with half a pint of cream, and put in a littled grated nutmeg, keep it Ihaking one way till it is thick and fmooth fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, difli it up, and garnifli with lemon.

310 f R I C A S E E S.

Tripe a la Kilkenny.

FARE a dozen large onions and wafh chem weR put them into two quarts of wacer' and boil them ttU they are tender s cut about twp pounds of doubie tripe in fquare pieces put it in, and boil it Mth the onions a quarter of an hour; then draiR off almofl the whole of the liquor from itv put in a quarter of a pound of butter, ihake in a little flour put in a large fpoonful of muftard, a little fait, and fbake it all over the fire till the butter is melted; put it into the di(h, and garnifli with lemon and barberries.

This is much efteemed by the Iri(b nobility anc) gentry.

Chickens brown

TAKE two chickens, draw and finge them, cue them- in pieces, pepper, fair, flour, and fry them of a nice brown in frc(h butter drain out the fat, and put in a pint of good gravy, a bundle of fweet herbs, half a pint of frefh mufhrooms, a few truffles and morels walhed clean, two (ballots chopped fine, a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with flour, a little pepper and fair, and flew them for half an hour; take out the fweet herbs, jfkim them cleao from fat, fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, fliake them about, put them into a hot dilh, and garnifli with lemon and beet-root.

Chickens white.

m

TAKE two chickens, draw and finge tfiem, cue them in fmall pieces, and put them in warm water to draw out the blood; put them into a ftew-pan, with three quarters of a pint of veal broth, (if you

have

F R I C A S E E S. 711

have no veal broch water will do) a bundle of fweec herbs, a little beaten mace and fait, half a pint of frefli muflirooms, two. ihallots chopped fine, and a little lemon-peel, cover them clofe, and ftew them half an hour; then take out the. herbs and lemonpeel, put in a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with flour, a few truffles and morris boiled and walhed very clean, boil it till it is thick, and ikim off all the fat; mix the yolks of two eggs with a gill of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, puf. it in, and keep the pan fhaking one way till it H thick and fmooch, fqueeze in half a lemon, fhake it round, difh it up, and garnifh with lemon and beet-root.

If you have no frefh mufhrooms, put in ai gill of pickled ones waQiied in warm water, to either of the above receipts.



Rabbits brown.

TAKE two young rabbits, cut them in fmall p?etcs, flit the head in two, throw away the bloody pan. of the neck, pepper, fait, and flour them, and' fry them of a nice brown in frefli butter; pour out the fat and put in a pint of gravy, a bundle of fweet herbs, half a pint of frefli muflirooms, a few truffles and morels waflied clean, four fliallots chopped fine, a little pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and ftew them for half an hour; then flcim them, put in a ipoonful of ketchup, fqueeze in half a lemon, take' out the fweet herbs, and put in a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with flour, boil them up till they are thick and fmooth, ikim oflF the fat, put them in a hoc difl) and garnifli with lemon and beet- root.

X 4 RabbiU

jia r R I C A S E E 8,

Rahhits wiute,

TAKE two young rabbiu and cut them in fnidl pieces, cut off the heads and bloody part of the necks, and do not ufc them, put them into warm watcf to foak out the blood, then pMt them into a (lew-pan, with a pint of veal broth, (if you have no broth water will Ao) a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, a little beaten mace, four (ballots chopped fine, half pint of frefti mufbrooms, a little fait, nd a litrle lemon-peel, cover them clofe, anc) ftew them half an hour; then take out the fweec herbs, Icmon-pcel, and onion, and put in a piece of butter as big as a walnut mixed with flour, a few irijffjes and morels boiled and wa(hed cjean, boil it up, and Ikim the fat off clean % mix the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of Cream, grate in a liftte nutmeg'and keep jhaking the ftew-pan one way till it is thick and fmooth fquceze in the juice of half a leipon, give it a Ibake about, then dilh i( pp apd gacniQi vfith Icmoq aocl licet roo(.

TAKE fit pigeons and cut them in qiiartcrs, fca:

fpn them wjth bcateq mce, pepper and fait, flour

them, fry them of a light brown in f(c(h butter, and

put them on a (leve to drain j then pu( ihem into a

ftew'pan, with a pint of gravy, a gill pf red yvinc,

1. . . ji _f j-j,gg( herbs, a piece of (t mon-pecl, four

pped fine, cover them clofc, apd ftcw

n hoyr t then put ir a piece of butter

flour, fcafon it with pepper and fatt,

nr truflles and morels boiled and walheq

w force meat, balls boiled, and lome

(hrooms, fuec?e in the jvice of half a

• F H I C A S E E S. 313

lemODt cover them, and ftew them for ten minutes (kim them dean, put them in a di(b, 4nd garnifb wjth lmon and beec-root;

pigeons wbite

TAKE fix young pigeons, draw and finge themcut them in quarters, put them inpo warm water to foak out the biood, thn put them irito a (tewvpan, vith a pint of yeal broth, a gill of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, four (hllots chopped fine, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, 9 little lemonpeel, half a pint of frefh muQirooms, and a piece of butter mixed with flour, cover them clofe, and ftcw them hlf an hour; then take out the fweet herbs and lemon-peel, fkim the fat off clean, put in fpme afparagus tops boiled tepder, mix the yolks of two eggs with a gill of cream, grape in a little nut, meg, nd put it in, (hake the pan one way till it is, thick and irnooth, fquecze in the juice of half a le pion, give ic ihake round, put then) in a di(h, and. armi) with lemon nd bect-foot.

Pigeorfs tibe Italian Way.

•

TAKE fix young pigeons, draw and fmge them,. cut them in quarters, feafon them with beaten mace pepper and fialt; put h$ilf a pint of fwee( oil into a fiew-pan, and fry them brown; then put in a pint of green peas, an onion, a little garlick fhred fine, and fry them in the oil till the peas are ready to burft; then put in a pint of boiling water, a gill of oil, fome parQey Ihred fine, pepper and fait, and (lew them for half an hour; then beat up the yolks of three eggs with a fpoonful of vinegar and put in, (eep (baking the pan for a inoment then put them

ia

'J4 FRICASEES.

in a di(h, with the fauce over them, and garniih with lemon

BOIL twelve eggs hard, take off the fliells, cut four in halves and four in quarters; have ready half at pint of cream and a quarter of a' pound of frcih butter, ftir it together over the fire till it is thick and fmooth; grate in a little nutmeg, lay one whole egg in the middle of the dilh, place the others all round, pour the fauce over, and garni(h with the yolks ol: the other three cut in two.

Calves Feet and Chaldron tbe Italian Way.

RUB the crumb of a three-penny loaf through a cullender, (hred a pound of beef-fuec very fine, t Jarge onion, four cloves of garlick, and a handful of parfley, fcafon it with pepper and fair, mix it up with eight eggs well beaten, and (luff the chaldrbn, tie it up, and boil it in a pot of waterfor two hours take the four feet, fplit them, put them into a deep ftew-pan, (lew them with three pints of water till almoil tender, and feafon them with beaten mace, pepper and fait; take two quarts of green peas and anonion (hred fine and put in, and ftew them till' the peas are done, beat up the yolks of four eggs and put in, ftir them round a moment; put the chaldron in the middleof the dilh, the feet round it, fquceze in a lemon, and pour the reft over it.

CHAP

1

J

t 3S

CHAP. XIV.

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

r Rules to be obferved in drejjing Roots and

Vegetables.

IE fure to be very careful that your greens, cabJ bages, cauliflowers, &c. are picked free from flugs or filth, and well waflied in plenty of water; fpinach fhould always be wafhed in three or four different waters, as it contains the fand more than any other vegetable 5 your roots pared clean, or ftraped, and well wa(hed;, then put them in a ficve, cullender, or earthen pan, for fear of fand or duft, which is apt to hang about wooden tubs. Boil all your greens by themfelves in plenty of fpring water with fait in it boil no kind of meat with them, as it will make them greafy and difcolour them; and never ufc iron pots or pans, as they arc very improper vcflels for the purpofe; let them be copper or brafs well tinned, or filver. Tike care you do act boil them too much, but let them have a little crifpnefs; for if you boil them too much, you will deprive them of their fweetnefs and beauty. Let them be well drained before you put them in the di(h, as. nothing is more difgreeable than to fee the diOi floating, with water,

Greem

3i6 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Greens and Sprouts.

AFTER you have picked and wafhed them as direftcd, put plenty ot fpring water in a pot or ftcwpan, and when it boils throw in a handful of falt put in the greens or fprouts, and make them boil up quick; while they are boiling prefs them down with a (kimmer, and try them often, that they may not be boiled too much; when done, take them up in a clean fieve or cullender, and put xhem over the hot water a few minutes to drain, but not too long, as the (team will make them yellow; then put them in a di(b, and garnilh them with boiled carrot cut ia any fliape you pleafe, with melted butter in a boat,

Cabbages.

IF your cabbages are young, fplit them in two 5 if old, cut them in quarters; wafh them clean, boil them in plenty of fpring water and fait, as direScd for greens j when they are done put them on a ficvc oh cullender to drain, (the fame if they are young fummer cabbages or favoys) fend them in a diih in halves or quarters. If rather old, chop them up, put them into a ftew-pan, with a piece of butter, a little pepper and fait, ftir them about till the butter is melted, then put them in a difli, and garniib with boiled carrot, with melted butter in a boat

Cauliflowersn

GUT the ftalks and coarfc leaves off you cauliflowers, but leave on the tender leaf round the flower, and wafh them clean have a kettle of fpring water boiling, put in a handful of fait, put in the cauliflowers, but do not let them boil too faft, as

that

ROOTS AND VEGEtABLES. pf

that will break the flower, and fpoi) the beauty d( them i (you may know when they are done, by trying them with a fork in the middle of the flcfwer) then take them up and let the water drain from them, put one whole in the middle of a difh cu( the reft in fprigs and lay round it, with melted but ter in a boat.

Jbiotber Way.

AFTER you have boiled the cauliflowers as before directed, put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan with a fpoonful or two of water, duft in a little flour, and melt ic add a little pepper and fait, cut one cauliflower into fmall fprigs and put in, and keep (baking ic for a few minutes; lay the dewed in the middle of the dilh cut the reft in quarters and lay round it.

Broccoli.

TAKE a dozen heads of broccoli, (trip oflF all the fprigs up to the heads, and with a knife cut off all the hard outfide (kin and fprigs and throw them into cold water; have a ftew-pan of fpring water boiling, put in fome fair, then the broccoli, and when the ftalks are tender the broccoli is done; put a piece of toafted bread in a di(h foaked in the water the broccoli was boiled in, put the brpccoli on it, and fend melted butter in a boat.

Spinach.

PICK the leaves from the ftalks wa(h it in plenty of water three or four different times, and put it into a cullender to drain; have half a pint of boiling water at the bottom of a ftewpan put in the

ipinacb

3i8 R00t ANi) VEG£TABLES.

fpinach, put Ibme lalt on it covet it clofe, andbQil ic up quicks Cas. it fwells up prefs it down with tiie back of a fpoon) when it is tender drain ic oiF and fqueeze it between two plates till the water -is fqueezed out 3 then cut it in what form you plcafe and put it in a difh with plain butter in a boat

CarroHk

IF they are young fpring carrots put them in i large fauce-pan of foft water, with their (kins 00 and boil them till they are tender then take them out, and with a clean cloth rub the (kins off, and put Tome whole and fome in dices in the did). If old or Sandwich carrots, with a diarp knife pare the Ikins off very clean, and boil them in plenty of foft water till they are tender; cut them in dices, or what fliape you pleafe, put them in a didi, pour mdtcd butter over them, or fend it in a boat

TAKE as many as you want, pare the rinds otf clean, wadi them, put them into a large fauce-paa of foft water, and boil them quick till they are tender; then drain them into a fieve or culleoderi fqueeze the juice out between two plates, and put them in a didi, with melted butter in a boat. Tou may madi them in a dew-pan, diake in a little flouTi put in a gill of cream, a piece cf butter, a littk fair, and dir them till the butter is melted; then put them in a di(h or bowl, with a piece of butteri a little pepper and falti and madi them up till the butter is melted.

farfnefs.

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES 319

Parfneps.

PARE the fkins off very clean, and flit them half way down the middle, put them on the fire in a large pot of foft water, and boil chem till they are tender which you may know by running a fork through them; when they are done (train them off, cut them io quarters, or any fhape you pleafe, sind put theoEi in a diih or round fait fifli, with melted butter in n boat.



Majhed Parfneps.

AFTER they are boiled tender bruife them finft in a mortar or on a clean dreifer with a broad knife, put them into a llew-pan, with a piece of butter, a lictle cream and fait, and ftir them about till the butter is melted; put them in a di(b, with fome cut in flips and put round them for garniib.

Potatoes.

WASH them very clean, put them inta a fauccptn, nearly cover them with cold water, put in a little fait, cover them clofe, and boil them very gently, but look at them often; when the fkins begin to break try them with a fork, and if they are 4one flrain the water from them, cover them clofc to fleam for a few minutes, then peel them, and put them in a di(h, with melted butter in a boat. Or thus: pare them firft, wafh them clean, and put them into a fauce-pan with a little cold water, cover ihcm clofc, boil them very gently, and look at theqi often, that they do not break to pieces j ftrain the water off, and put them into a difh, with melted butter in a boat.

Majhe4

26 R66tS AND VEGEf AbLE.

Mafhed "Poiaioeu

AFTJER they are boiled and ptfclcd mith them Id a mortar, or on a clean board with a broad knife,, and put them into a Ilew-pan; to two pounds of potatoes put in half a pint of milki a quarter of a pound of butter a little falc put them over the fire, and keep them Airring till the batter is meked -but take care they do not burn to the bottom; put them in a fmall diih and with a knife (hape them in any form you pleaftA

tVindfor beans

NEVER fhell them till near the time you waii to boil themj for if they are young they will turn red; have a pot of fofc water boiling, put in a liitk •fait and a large bunch of parfley, put in the beanSj and boil them quick; as foon as they are tender ftrain them in a cullender or fieve j (take care they do not fall to the bottom, for that will caufe them to be red) put them in one difh, with a piect of boiled bacon in another, and parOey and buttct in a boati

French IBeani.

TAKE as many as you want firing them, flit them in two, cut them acrofs and throwtfiem into fpring water as you cut them •, have a large Hftcwpan of Ipring water, when it boils put in a handful of fait, drain the beans out of the cold water, put them in, and boil them quick; as foon as they are done ftrain them in a ficve or cullender, let therti drain a moment, and put them in a difh, with plaia butter in a boat.

Afparagus,

ROOTS AND Vegetables h

Afpardui.

SCkAPE all the white part of the italics very dean, pick off the buds clofe to the heads as you fcrapc them, throw them into cold fpring wacer and waih them out clean; tie yoiir afparagus up in bundles with bafs, if you dan get it, as packthread cuts it to pieces, and cut the root-ends even i have a wide pan of fpring water, when it boils put in fome fait, put in the afparagus, and boil it moderately; (be careful ie is not done too much, as that will fpoil both colour and tafte) have a thin toaft rotind a loaf nicely toafted, cut it in fquare pieces, dip them in the afparagus water, and put them in the difli; take up the afparagus, lay it on the toaft with the white ends outwards, and plain butter in a boat Never pour any melted butter over, as that makes it greafy to the fingers.

Artichokes.

m

Wring off the ftalks, mind you pull out thi ilrings, and wafli them well in plenty of water; have a large pot of water, when it boils put in fait, put them in tops downwards, and boil them but not too faft i one hour and a half iitrill boil them, but that you will know by pulling out one of the leaves, if it comes out eafy they arc done % then take them out, and lay them upfide down to drain, put them in a dilh, and for every artichoke have a tea-cup full of melted butter.

Green Peas

Have your peas ihelled as near the time yoti I'aAt to dreis them as pofllble have boiling water

in

322 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

in a fauce-pan, put in the peas, a little fait, a fmatt knob or two or I'ugar, and a fprig or two of minC boil them quick, and when they dent they are done; llrain them in a fieve, take out the mint, and put them in a di(h; have a little mint boiled by itfdf, chopped fine and put round j or you may put fomc butter in the diih, and ftir them up till it is meked. You may broil fome thin dices of ham and lay round if you pleafe.

Mujhrooms broiled.

TAKE the large flaps and peel off the outfide ikin, fcrape out the black in the infide, pepper, fait, and broil them gently over a clear fire; take a fit of writing paper make it in the form of a coffiD . brown it before the fire, put it in a fmall diib). aod put the mufhrooms in

Mujhrooms Jlewed.

CLEAN a quart of mulhrooms, put them into a ftew-pan, with a fpoonful of water, a little piece of butter, a little beaten mace, cover them clofe, and fiew them gcntly fbr twenty minutes; (take care to (hake them often to keep them from (ticking) then piu in a gill of good gravy, a little butter mixed - with flour, pepper and fait, and the juice of half a lemon; ftew them till they are thick, fkim tben clean, and put them in a dilh, with fried fippcKi round them.

Mujhrooms frtcafeed.

TAKE a quart of button mufhrooms, make them very clean, and as you clean them throw them into cold foft water, wafh theca out. put ibem inGo

ftew-pant

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 32

ftew-pan, with a little water, a blade or two of mace a little lemon-peel, cover thecn clofe, and ftcw them very gently over a flow fire for twenty minutes; mix up the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of creatn grate in a little nutmeg, take ous the lemon-peel and mace, put in the eggs and cream a little fait, and keep them ftirring one way till they are thick and fmoothi toaft the top of a French roll crifp, dip it in hot water put it in . the di(b fquecze in the juice of half a lemon, put them over the roll, and fend them to table as hot as poffible

Mujhrooins RdgdU.

TAKE a quantity of large muflirooms, peel them, and take out the infide, put them into a ilew-pan, with a little water and fait, and let thern boil up; take them off and put in a gill of red wine a little butter mixed with flour, a little beatea mace and nutmeg, fet them on the flre and keep them ftirring for ten minutes; in the mean time broil a dozen, put the ragou into the difli and gar fii(h with the broiled ones

PeM and Lettuces Jiewedk,

Take a quart of green peas, and two cabbage lettuces cut fmall acrofsj and waflied very clean, puC them into a ftew-pan, with a pint of gravy, a piece of lean ham or bacon an onion chopped flne cover them clofe, and ftew them for half an hour j theii put in a piece of butter mixed with flour fome pepper and fait, cover them, and ftew them till you find they are very tehder and of a proper thicknefs; take out the bamj put them in a diOi, and fend them to Uble%

V a Pw

324 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Peasjiewed anotbtr Way.

TAKE a pint of peas, put them into a ftewpan, with Ibmc parflcy chopped very fine, juft cover them with water, ftcw them till they arc very tender, and then fweeten them with fine fugar be&t up the yolks of two eggs, put them in, and with a fpoon keep them ftirring till they are thick then difh them up:

Peas Frangoife.

TAKE a quart of green peas, put them in a ftew-pan, with a large Spanifti onion, if you have one, or Englifti ones chopped very fine, and two cabbage or Silefia lettuces cut acrofs veryfmall, with half a pint of water, fealbned wkh beaten mace, nutmeg, pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and kt them flew gently for half an hour $ then put in a quarter of a pound of butter mixed with half a fpoonful of fiour, a fpoonful of ketchup, cover them clofe, and let them fimmcr half an hour then dilh them up.

Green Peas with Cream.

TAKE a quart of young green peas, put thera into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of water, a piece of butter as big as an egg mixed wkh a little flour, feafon them with a little nutmeg and fait, a knob ot fugar, a little bundle of fweet herbs, fome arQey chopped fine, cover them dole, and ftew them for halt an hour; (hake the pan often, put in half a pint of good cream, and give them a boil up; then put them in a dilb but be lure to take out the fwcec Jberbs.

Cucwniers

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 315

I

Cucumbers ftewtd.

TAKE fix cucumbers, pare them, and cut them in three lengthways, take out the feeds, and cur three of theoi acrofs; peel a dozen fmall round-headed onioAs, piK about two ounces of butter into a (lew pan, nake it hot, put in the onions, and fry them of a light brown; fhake in a little flour, (tir it till it is fmooth, put in half a pint of brown gravy, a gill of white wine, put in the cucumbers, feafon tben) wkh Cayian pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently till they are tender; fkim off tke fat, Ajueeze in a litde lemon, and then difh them up.

Cucumbers Jiewed another Way.

TAKE twelve cucumbers pare and (lice ihem as thic as a crown piece but leave one whole, lay thecn on a coarfe cloth to drain, flour and fry them in frefh butter of a light brown; take them out ith a (lice, and lay them on a plate before the iire; take the whole one, cut a long piece out of the (idcj and fcoop out all the pulp; peel and flice fix large onions, and fry them brown, feafon them with pepper and ialt, (luff them into the cucumber put in the (lice, tie it round with packthread, flour it, fry it brown, and put it before the fire to keep hot; keep the pan on the fire, and with one hand put in a little flour and ftir it with the other till it is thick, put in a gill of water, half a pint of red or white wine, two fpoonsfulof ketchup, a little beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepperj and fait, and ftir it all together; then put in . your (liced cucumbers, give them a tofs or two untie the whole cucumber,

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326 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

and Uy it in the di(h, pour the reft all over ic, and garoifh with fried onions.

Cucumbers in Ragou.

PARE fix large cucumbers cut a flice out of the fide of two of them, and fcoop out the pulp fill the infide with a light veal force-meat put in th piece you cut out, and tie it round with packthread, cut the other four in two (coop out the pulp, and cut them in fquare pieces; put the forced ones into a ftew-pan, with a pint of good gravy, a gill of white wine, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, a dozen of fmall button onions peeled, cover them clofe, and ftew them fifteen minutes; then put la the reft of the cucumbers, with a little butter mixed with flourj a very little Cayan pepper, cover theoi and ftw them half an hour longer fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, Ikim off the fat, take the whole cucumbers our, untie them, lay them in the middle of the di(b and pour the remainder o?er then).

Cucumbers a la Farce.

PARE fix large cucumbers, cut a long flip out of the fide of every one and fcoop out the pulp; boil a whiteheart cabbage very tender, cut out the heart only, and chop it fine, with a large onion, fome parfley, pickled mufiirooms, and two hard eggs chopped fine, feafon it with pepper, fait, and nutmeg, mix it up with the yolk of an egg, and ftuff the cucumbers with it, put in the pieces you cut out, nd tie them round with packthread peel a dozen button onions, put half a pound of butter into a flew- pan, and fry the cucumbers and onions c a fine brpn ppur out the fat, and put in half a pint

of

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 327

of good gravy, a glafs of white wine, a little butter xnixed with flour, a little Cayan pepper and falt cover them, and ftew them gently till they are tender; then take out the cucumbers, untie them, lay theoi in the diftit flcim the fat off the faucc, if there h any, fqueeze in a little lemon, and pour the fauce over them.

If it is for a Lent or Faft dinner or fupper, you may ufe water and red wine, inftead of gravy and white wine.

Siirrets fricafeed.

WASH fix roots very clean, and boil them in plenty of water till they are tender; then take off the fkin, and cut them in dices: in the mean time have ready a little cream, a bit of butter mixed with flour, the yolk of an egg beat up in a glals of white wine, grate in a little nutmeg, a little fait, and mix all well together; put it over a flow fire, and keep it Airing till it is thick and fmooth; lay the roots in the difli) and pour the fauce over them.,Toy my drefs roots of lalfify and fcorzonera the fame way.

jijparagus a la Petit Pay.

TAKE a large bundle of afparagus, cut off the green part as big as a pea, wafh it dean, boil it tender in fpring water, then ftrain it off in a fieve; put half a pint of veal broth into a flew-pan, with a knob or two of fugar, a little butter mixed with flour, and boil it up till it is thick and fmooth; put in the afparagus, give it a boil, mix the yolks of two eggs in a little cream, grate in a little nutmeg, put i; in, and keep the pan fliaking one -way till it

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38 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

is thick and fmooth; crifp the top cruft of a fttndk rcil put it in the di(b and pqt the fparagus over

Jparagus in Ragou.

PICK the buds off a hundred of afparagus as far us it is green, cut the green part off about an inch long, throw it into water, and boil it but not too much; take two heads of endive and two young lettuce., well wafhed and cut fmall, and an onion chopped fine; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a (lew-pan, make it hot, fry the endive, &c. for ten minutes, and keep the pan in Diction, fliake in a little flour, ieafon them with pepper and fait, and pour in half a pint of gravy, a glafs of white wine, and let them (lew a few minutes i then put in the afparagus, leaving out a few for garni(h; pul the toprcrufl of a French roll in the difli, pourtfaf agpu over, and garni(h with the reft,

Afparagus the Italian Way.

CUT off the green part of half a hundred of afparagus, wa(h them, boil them tender and ftrain them in a fieve to drain; put a little oil, water, and vinegar into a fitw-pan, with a little pepper and fair, make it toil, and put in the afparagusi beat up the yolks of two eggs and put in, keep it ftirnng for a moment, then put it in a fmaU dilh.

Afparagus in French Rolls.

CUT the green part off a hundred qf afparagus, wafh them wrll, boil them, but not too much, and flrain them off-, take three French rolls, cut a piece pyt of the top-crufts, (but take care CQ cut them

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 329

in filch a manner that they will fit agdn) prek all the crumb out of the infide, and crifp them before the fire; then take half a pint of creanr, with the jrolks of four eggs, beat up in it a little falc and nutmeg, and ftir it well together over a (low fire till it begins to thicken; then put in three parts of the afparagus cut fmall, fill the rolls with them, put on the tops, and with a (harp fkewer make holes all round the tops, and ftick the reft of the afparagus in, as if it were growing; put them in a fmall di(b and lend them to table hot

Jrencb Beans in Raou,

TAKE a quarter of a peck of good fized French beans, ftring them, but do not flit them, cut them in three acrofs, and lay them in fait and water for one hour; then take them out, dry them in acleaa cloth, and fry them brown in frefli butter; pour out the fat, dufl: in a little flour, put in a gill of hot water, ftir it into the pan, and by degrees ct it boil; put in a quarter of a pound of frefli butter, two fpoonsful of ketchup, one of mufliroom pickle, a gill of white wine an onion ftuck with cloves, a little beaten mace nutnieg, pepper and fait, and ftir it all together a few minutes; then throw in the beans, and fliake the pan round a minute or two take out the onion, pour them into the difli, and garnifli with pickled French beans, muflirooms, or famphire,

Beans in Ragou with a Farce.

RAGOU them as above; take two large carrots, pare and boil them tender, then mafli ihem in a pan, feafon them with pepper and fait, and mix them up with 4 little piece of butter and the yolks

Qf

33 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

6f two ra eggs; make it into what (hie yoa pleafe, and bake it a quarter of an hour in a miick oven, or in a tin oven before the fire; put it inthe iniiidle of the difli, put the ragou round ir ferve it up hor and garniOi as before.

French Beans ragoued ivitb Cabbage.

MAICE the ragou as before; take a nice little cabbage, about as big as a pint bafon when the ouciide leaves, top, and (talks are cut ofF half boil itt and cut a hole in the middle pretty big; take what you cut out and chop it very fine, with a few French beans boiled, a carrot, and one turncp boiled and mafhed all together, put them into a ftew-pao, feafonthem with pepper, fait, and nutmeg, and a good piece of butter, (lew them a few minutes over the fire, keep ftirring them all the time; in the mean time put the cabbage into a flew pan, but take great care it does not fall to pieces, put to it a gill of water, two fpoonsful of white wine, one of ketchup, one of mufhroom pickle, a little butter mixed with flour, a very little pepper, cover it clofe, and let it flew till it is tender; then take it up carefully and lay It ill the middle of the difli,' put the maihed roots in the middle, heaped as high as you can, and put the ragou round it

French Beans ragoued with Parjheps.

PARE two large parfneps and boil them tender then fcrape off all the tender part, and ma(h them in a fauce-pan, wich four fpoonsful of cream, a piece of butter as big as an hen's egg, and a little pepper and fait; when they are quite thick, heap them up in the middle of the difii, and pour the ragou round,

French

r

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 331

French Beans ragoued with Potatoes

BOIL two pounds of potatoes ibft, peel them and mafli them fine in a mortar, put them into a iauce-pan, with half a pint of milk and a little fair, ftir them about, and put in a quarter of a pound of butter, keep ftirring all the time till it is fo thick that you can hardly (lir the fpoon in it for ftiffhefs; then put it into a little Wellh di(h, firft buttering it make it as high a pyramid as you can, pour a little melted butter over, and fprinkle a few bread crumbs on it, put it into a tin oven, and bake it before the fire of a nice brown % then put it into the middle of the difli, but take care you do not break ic, pour the ragou round it and fend it to table as hoF as pofliblc

Kidney Beans in Ragou

TAKE a quart of the feed, and foak them all flight in foft water, then boil them till they are tender, and take off the (kins; peel two dozen fmall 'button onions, put a little butter into a (lew-pan, and fry the onions of a nice brown; (hake in a little flour, and put in a pint and a half of good gravy, a glafs of white wine, pepper and fait, and give it a boil up then put in the beans, cover them clofe and ftew them gently for ten minutes •, fkim them clean, put tliem in a di(b, and gamifh with pickled French beans.

If you have any French beans, cut a few in three pieces, boil them tender, and put them in a minute before you fpnd them to table,

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33t ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Wbite Kidney Beans fricafeed

TAKE a quart of the white kidney beans, if tbqr are dried, foak them in fofc water all night $ if fre(h gathered blanch them and take off the (kins; the dried ones muft be boiled till they are tender and the Ikins flip off; put them into a dew-pan with half a pint of veal broth or water, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little beaten mace, nutmeg, and fah, a glafs of wbite wine, cover them clofe, and let them ftew very gently for a quarter of an hour; then take out the fweet herbs, put in a little butter mixed with flour, and fliake thena about till they are thick; mix the yoHcs of two eggs in half a pint of cream, put it in, and keep fhaking the pan one way till it is thick and fmooth; fqueeze in a little lemon, put the top-cruft of a French roll in the difb, and put the fricafee over it garnilh with French beans, frclh or pickled

Endive in Ragou

TAKE three heads of large white endive and lay them in fpring water for two or three hours; take a hundred of Imatl afparagus, cut off the heads as far as it is green, and put them in fpring water; take the white part of fix heads of cellery cut it about two inches long, wafh it clean, put it into a ftew-pan with a pint of water, four blades of mace, a little whole pepper tied in a rag, and let it ftew gently till it is quite tender; bo.il the afparagus heads in water, drain them off, put them in, and let it fimmer a few minutes; take the endive. out of the water, drain it, leave one large head whole, pull the other leaf by leaf, put it into a (lew-pan with a pint of white wine, cover the pan clofe, and let it ftew

till

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 333

till the endive is tender 1 then put the whole head in the middle of a diih, the leaves round it, lay the afparagus and cellery all over, and cover ir to keep k hot; then put the two liquors together, put in a piece of butter mixed with flour, a little fait, and boil it up till it is thick; beat up the yolks of two eggs with a ill of cream, and half a nutmeg grated, mix it with the fauce, and keep it ftirring one way till it is thick; then pour it over the ragou, and fend it to table hot.

Cbardoons Jlewed.

TAKE four chardoons, pull off the outfide leaves, ftring the white part, cut them about two inches long, wafh them very clean, and put them into a (lew-pan, with a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, a bundle of fweec hrbs, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently till they arc tender then put in a piece of butter mixed with flour, and boil it gently till it is of a proper thick- nefs; fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, take out the fweet herbs, and difh it up for a fide-diih.

Chardoons fried and buttered.

CUT the bed parts about fix inches long, ftring them, and boil them in water till they are tender % then have plenty of butter in a ftew-pan, flour them, and fry them of a nice brown; put them on a fieve to drain, then pur them in a fmall difh and pour melted butter over them.

You may tie them in bundles, and boil them like afparagus, put a toafl: under them, with plain butter in a boat

334 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Cbardoons a la Petit Pots.

TAKE three chardoons, pull off the outlide leaves, firing the whice part, cut them in long flips, and then acrofs, about the (ize of a marrowfat pea, waQi them clean, and boil them in water till they are tender; ftrain them in a lieve, put them into a ftcw pan, with fome good white gravy, a little beaten ' jnace pepper and falt a piece of butter mixed with flour, and give them a boil up a few minutes; mix the yolks of two eggs with a gill of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, put it in, and keep it ftirring one way till it is thick and fmooth crifp the top-cruft of a French roll, lay it in the dilh and pour the petit peis over it.

Cbardoons a la Fromage.

AFTER they are ftringed cut them an inch long put them in a ftew-pan, and nearly cover them with red wine, feafon them with beaten mace pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and ftew them gendy till they are tender; grate a pound of Parmazan cheefe, if no Parmazan, fome godd Chefbire cheefe, put half to the chardoons, with a few bread-crumbs, a bit of butter as big as a walnut, and (bake it well till the cheefe is melted, or you m ftir it about with a wooden fpoon; then put it in the diih, put the remainder of the cheefe over, and brown it with a very hot falamander, or in a quick oveni fend it to table as quick and hot as poflible.

Artichoke Bottoms Fricqfee.

BOIL the bottoms till they are tender, 4nd cut cbtni in four pieces each i ha ready half a pint of

creams

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 335

cream, with a piece of butter, a little grated nutmeg and fait, put it over the fire, and keep it ftir- ring one way till it is thick; then put in the bottoms, give them a tofs or to, and difii them up.

Artichoke Bottoms a la Cap.

TAKE fix artichoke bottoms, and boil them tHI they are tender; take fome beef-marrow, chop it very fine, and put it at the top of the artichokes; put them into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of gravy, a glafs of white wine, a little pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and fimmqr them tor half an hour; tn the mean time make a pufF-pafte, roll it out thin, cut it in round pieces as big over as the bottoms, and bake it; take the bottoms out of the flew-pan, put them in a difh, ikim the fat off the gravy, put it into the dilfa, and put a piece of paftry on each of the bottoms.

This is a very good fecond courfe difli.

Artichokes au Barigoult.

TRIM four artichokes, boil them in warter till you can pull out the chokes, and drain them well; put a layer of fat bacon at the botton of a ftew-pan, with a pint of broth, fome parflty, fweet herbs, chibol, and (hallots chopped fine, the yolks of eggs beat up with a fpoonful of oil, pepper and fair, cover them clofe, and put fire under and over them, and flew them gently for half an hour -, have half a pint of white cuilis, take the artichokes out, lay them in a difli, and pour the cultis over them.

You may fqueeze the juice of half a lemon into the cuUis.

Broccoli

336 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Broccoli in SaUad.

TklM about eighteen heads of broccoli, waih them, boil them green as you can, and lay them in a di(h; mix the yolk of a hard egg mxh a cruet of oil, a little vinegar, a fpoonful of muflard, a Hitk faltj and pour it over them.

Cauliflowers in Ragou.

TAKE one fmall cauliflower and trim it doTc) pull a large one into fprigs, put them into a ftewpan with a quart of good brown cuUis, cover them clofe, and ftew them gently till they are tender; then put the whole one in the middle of a di(h, lay the fprigs all round, pour the fauce over it, and gamifli with little fprigs of cauliflower, plain boiled, all round the rim of the difh.

Cauliflowers Jiewed.

TAKE a large cauliflower, trim and w it well) •pull it in fprigs, and put it' into a ftew-pan, with a pint of gravy, a little beaten mace, pepper and falt a piece of butter mixed with flour, cover it clofe, and flew it gently till it is tender; uncover it, ikim it clean, and fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon; lay it in the difh, pour the gravy over it, and garnilh with a few fprigs boiled plain.

Cauliflowers iEJanole.

TAKE two cauliflowers, half boil them, and pull them into fprigs; put half a pint of fweet oil into aftew-pan, make it hot, and fry the flowers; then fuc in- a gill of vinegar, two cloves of garlick chopped

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, j;

pei fine, fealon them with pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and fimmer them gently for one hour i then put them in a di(h.

Green truffles hotleL

TAKE twelve large green truffles, pare the outfide ikins off very thin wafli them, put them into a fauce-pan that will juft hold thern and cover them with half white wine and half water, a little cloves, mace, and fait, cover them cloie, and boil them very gently for one hour; then fold a fmall napkin, lay it in a di(h, put the truffles on, and fend them for a fecond courfe dUh.

Grten truffles Jliwed

TAKfi fix or eight large green truffles, pare off all the outfides, cut them in thin flices, and put them into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of good grary, a gill of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and fimmer them one hour very gently; then put in a little butter mixed with Sour, fiew them up till' they are thick, and fqueczein the juice of half a lemon % crifp the top-cruft of a French roll, put it in the diih, and put the truffles over it. Be fore you lake out the fweet herbs.

Green Trufjtes a la ttaliane

TAKE XxyL or eight green truffles pare the out fides off, and cut them in thin dices; put a gill ot oil into a ftew-pan, and fry the truffles in it; then put in a gill of white wine, a little water, two or three cloves of garlick chopped fine, a little beaten c, pepper and fait, cover them clofe, and ftew

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338 ROOTS AND Vegetables.

them gendy for three quarters of an hour; then pot theoi in a didi.

Green Morels Jleoed.

TAKE what quantity you want, wafh them very clean cut the large ones in quarters, and let the fmall ones remain whole, put them into a (lew-pan, with good gravy, enough to (lew them in, a glafs of white wine, a little beaten mace, pepper and iak, cover them clofe, and dew them very gently (or one hour; then put in a little butter mixed with fiour, the juice of half a lemon, and boil them up till they are of a proper thickneis put the top-cruft of t French roll in a difh, pour the morels over itj suxl lend them up for a fecond courfe dilh.

Green Morels Fricafee.

TAKE what quantity you want, wafh them very clean, cut them in thin (lices, and put them into a flew-pan with white gravy enough to (lew them in a glafs of white wine, a bundle of fweet herb$ t little beaten mace, pepper and fait, cover them dolct and dew them half an hour; then put in a piece of butter mixed with flour, boil it up, chop fome green parflcy very fine and put in, mix the yolks of tivo eggs with a gill of cream, grate in a little nutmeg, put it in Co the dew-pan, and keep (baking it one way till it is thick and fmooth; crifp the topcruftof a Frepch roll, lay it in the difh, fqueeze in a little lemon, and pour the morels over it.

Green Morels forced.

TAKE eight or nipe larpe morels, cut off the ilalks, wafh them very clean, Kafon tjcm with beaica

clovcsi

ROOTS AND VEGE

doves, mace, pepper and fait,: with a light veal t'orce-meatv bacon at the bottom of a ftcw-pai ith.a pint of good gravy a g bundle of I'wcet herbs, an onion layer of bacon at the top, fet th put 6rc at the top, and ftew t hoar; then take them out, fl fkim off the fat, put it into t thicken it with butter mixed wit and put in the morels to mak done, lay them in a dUb, and ' them.

Cabha%e forcei

TAKE a fine large white-hear (talk even at the bottom, cut kaves, and lay it in water two c half boil it, put it in a cullender carefully cut out the heart, but to break off any of the oucflde with force-meat made thus: take a pound ot lean veal, half a pound of baconj fat and lean together cut it fmal), and beat it fine in a mortar, with four e boiled herd, feafon It. with beattn mace, pepper and fait, lemon-peel fhrcd fine, a little pardey and thyme chopped fine, two anchovies, the crumb of a ftale roll, a few mufhrooms, either pickled or frcfh, all beat well together, and the hrart of the cabbage chopped fine; mi)t it ail up with the yolks of three raw eggs, fill the hollow part of the cabbage, put the leaves over, and tie it round with packthread put a layer of fat bacon at the bottom of a fteW'pan, and a pound of lean beef cut in thin niccs, put in the cabbage, a bundle of fweet herbs, fame cloves and mace, cover it clofe, and li:t it over Z a a aow

J40 RObTS AND VEGETABLES

n flow fire; when the bacon begins to ftijck pour un a quart of broth or gravjr, a gill of white wiiie, cover it clofe, and let it ftew for one hour and a half; then very carefully take out the cabbage, put it into a di(h, cover it over and keep it hot-; ftrain off the gravy, (kirn off the fat, thicken it with butter Vnixed with flour, and boil it up in a ftew- pan till it is thick; pour it over the cabbage, and lend it up for a firft courfe dtdb.

Cabbage Farce Maigrje.

TAKE a fine white-heart cabbage, trim and wafii it clean, boil it Bve minutes in water, drain it, and cut the ftak flat, that it may ftand upright in the difli i then carefully open the leaves and cut out the rnfide, leaving the outflde leaves whole, and chop what you take out very fine; take the flefli of two flounders or plaice clean from the bones, chop it with four hard eggs, fome parflcy flired fine, the cfumb of a ftale roll, feafoned with beaten mace, pepper and fait, beat it all well together in a nKM tar with a quarter of a pound of butter, and mix it up with the yolks of two eggs; fill the cabbage, de it together, and put it into a deep ftew-pan, with half a pint of water, half a pint of white wine, a piece of butter mixed with flour, the yolks of four hard eggs, an onion ftuck with cloves, a little mace and Whole pepper in a rag, half an ounce of truffles and morels, a fpoonful of ketchup, and ibme frtih or pickled muflirooms, cover it clofe, and Jet it fimmer an hourj (if you find it is not done let it fimmer longer) when it is enough put it in the dilhf zhd pour the fauce over it, but mind you take oiK the onion and fpice.

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 341

Savoys forced andewed.

TAKE two fine fayoys, wafh them well, arid fcald them in boiling water; force one in the fame msn ner as cabbage forced and cut the other in two, put them into a ftew-pan with a pint of gravy, a little beaten mace, pepper and fair, a gill of white wine cover them clofe, and flew them till they are tender thicken the gravy with butter mixed with flour, and fiew them up till the gravy is thick; put the forced one in the middle of the difb, and a half on each end or fide, pour the fauce over them. Thele diOies may be garniflicd with greep pickles;

Red Cabbage a la Hajlang.

TAKE a nice red cabbage, trim off all the out fide leaves, cut it in two, and then acrofs in thin flices, put it into a ftew-pan, with a pint of gravy, fome pepper and fait, a little beaten mace, cover it clofe, and (lew it gently till it is tender; then put in a little butter mixed with flour, boil it up till it ii thick, and put in a fpoonful of vinegar; have a pound of faufages, either broiled or fried, put the cabbagt in the di(h, and lay the faufages over it.

Spinach Jiewed.

PICK and wafli your fpinach very clean put it into a fauce-pan with a little fair, cover it clofe, and ftew it till it is tender; then ftrain it in Jkficve, fqtiee2e the juice out between two plates, and chop it fmaH 1 put it into a ftcw-pan, with a little pepper and falr a quarter of a pond of butter, ftew it for ten mi notes, and then put it in the difii, with fried fippen for garnifix.

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342 ROOTS AND VEGETABLES.

Spinach a la Cream.

PICK, wafli, and ftcw your fpinach, fqueeze it between two plates, chop it, and put ic into a ftcwpan with a piece of butter, a gill of cream, a little nutmeg, pepper and fait, (tew it for ten minutes; then put it into the di(h in what form you pkafc, and garniOa with fried (ippets.

Parfneps ftewed.

PARE and boil four parfneps tender, cut them in thin dices, and put them into a flew-pan, with half a pint of cream, a little butter mixed with flour, grated nutmeg, and fait, keep fhaking the pan round till it is thick and fmooth, then put them in a fmall di(h,

Cellery in Ragou.

TAKE a dozen white heads of cellery cut about two inches long, wa(h them very clean, put them into a (lew-pan, with as much water as will co?er them, a bundle of fweet herbs, a few cloves aod mace, a little whole pepper tied in a muflin rag, aod an onion, cover them clofe, and ftcw them gently till they are tender-, then take out the fpice, onion, and fweet herbs, put in half an ounce of truifies aod morels waQied very clean, twofpoonsful of tcetchupi a gill of red wine, a piece of buter mixed with flour, feafon it with pepper and fait to your palate, put in the yolks of fix hard eggs, ftir it altogether, cover it clofe, and let it (lew till the fauce is thick and good; then put it in a difli, and fend it for a firft courfe dilh,

Olkrf

AOOTS AND VEGETABLES. 343

Cellery a la Cream.

TAKE a dozen white heads of cellery, cut them about two inches longj wafli them very clean, and boil them in water till they are tender; have ready half a pint of cream, with a little butter mixed with flour, a little nutmeg and falc, boil it up till it is thick and fmooth, put in the cellery, give it a tofs or two, d then di(h it up.

Celleryewed.

TAKE a dozen white heads of cellery cut about two inches long, wafli them clean, and put them into a ftew-pan, with a pint of gravy, a glafs of white wine, a bundle of fweet herbs, pepper and fair, cover them clofe, and ftew them till they are tender; then take out the fweet herbs, put in a piece of butter mixed with flour, let it ftew till it is thigk, and then difli it up.

Sorreljiewed.

PICK and wafh. a good quantity of forrel, put it into a iauce-pan with a little fait, and boil it till ic is tender; then ftrain it, Iqueeze it dry between two plates, chop it fine, and put it into a ftew-pan, with a little gravy, a piece of butter, a little pepper and fait, and ftew it for ten minutes put it in the difli, and gamifli with fried fippets

Potatoes in Imitation of a Collar of Veal or

Mutton.

BOIL four pounds of potatoes, peel them, beat them in a mortar, with a little fack or mountain,

Z 4 fugar

I

I

344 ROOTS ANp VEGETABl.ES.

fugar, grated nutmeg, and a little beaten mace, rail it up with the yolks of raw eggs and melted boncTi make it like a collar of veal, rub it over with yolki of eggs, aod ftrew a few bread-crumbs over ic, butter an earthen difh, put it on, and bake it of a nice brown; when done, put it m a di(h; have resdy for fauce half a pint of white wine, fweetened with fugar, beat up the yolks of two eggs, and a little gratd nutmeg, put the eggs to the wtoe, and keep ic ftir ring xill it is thick, then pour it over the collar.

Potatoe Cakes.

PREPARE them as before, work it up into a pafte, and make it up into round cakes, or any fhape you pleafe, with moulds, put plenty of butter into a pan, and fry them brown; put them in a diib, wuk melted butter, fweet wine, and fugar mixcdji poured over theoi for iauce

Onions in Ragou.

PEEL a pint of fmall button onions, take four large ones, peel them, and chop them fmall; put a iquarter of a pound of butter into a dew-pan, vfatn it is meked and done making a noife put in iot onions, and fry them of a nice brown, put in a little fiour, and ihake them round till they are tbick; then put in half a pint of gravy, a little Cayao pepper and fait, a tea fpoonfol of muftard, and ibake the pan round; when they are thick and weil-tafttd put them in a di(h, and garnilh with fried crumbs of Iwread,

CHAP'

( 345

-CHAP. XV.

AUMLETS AND EGGS.

Plain Aumkt.

TAKE Hx eggs, beat them up well, ftraia them through a fieve, put in a little pepper and fait, and about two ounces of frefh butter in little bits, put four ounces of butter into a ftew-panj make it hot, tshen put in the eggs, and fry them gently till they arc of a nice brown on the under fide; do not turn the aumlet, but put it double, lay it in the dilh, and garniih with curled parfley ftuck in it,



Aumkt witbjweet Herbs.

BEAT and drain the eggs as before, chop a handful of parfley and a few fweet herbs very fine and put in, with two ounces of butter in bits, and fome pepper and fait; put a quarter of a pound of butter in ii pan, and fry it of a nice brown; (but take care it does not (tick to the pan) double it, and lay it in a difl), with a little good gravy in it, or ibme melted butter, fack, and fine fugar mixed in a boat; garnifli with parfley.

You may flired fome cold ham very fine and put in, with the parfley and herbs, or without, only the eggs, butter, and ham; or you may make them with two onions chopped very ficjc, clary or chives chopped fine.

Aumkt

t

T

346 AUMLETS aUd EOGS.

Aumkt with AJparagus.

BEAT up Gj eggs very well with a fpoonful of cream, and ftrain them through a fieve boil half a hundred afparagus tender, cue the green part as big as a pea and put in, with a little pepper and fait; put about a quarter of a pound of freOi butter into a ftew.pan make it hot, put in the ingredients, and fry it as before; double it, put it into a difh and garnifli with the heads of afparagus boiled.

Aumkt toitb Green Fea.

BEAT up fix eggs with a fpoonful of cream, boil a pint of young green peas and put in, with a little pepper and fait, and fry it as before; put it io a diib, and garniih with fpriga of parfley



Aumlet with Sorrel or Spinach.

BOIL the forrel or fpinach well, Iqueeze out the juice between two plates, chop it fine, imd put it with the eggs as before.

You may boil two artichoke bottoms very tendcfy chop them fine and put in for artichoke aumlet.

Aumlet with Parmazan C&eee.

BEAT up fix eggs well, ftrain them through a

fieve, mix a couple of fpoonsful of Parmazan cheefe

grated, a little pepper, but no fait, about two

ounces of butter, put butter into a pan and fry ic

as before; then fpr inkle fome more grated Parma

aan cheefe over ir, cut it out in flices about two in

ches wide, roll it up put it into a dilh, pour a lit

tie melted butter over it, and fprinklc fomc more

Parmasaa

AUMLETS AND EGGS. 347

Parmazan cheefe on it, put it in the oven a quarter of an hour to colour, and fend it up in a hot diilu

Aumlet qf Beattf.

BOIL fomc beans of any fort till tender, and then chop them firfej beat up fix eggs very well, drain them through a ficve, and put in the beans ₯ich a little pepper and fait, and two ounces of but ter fry them as before dire(fted, and garnilh with parfley.

A pretty Dijh of Eggs.

BOIL fix eggs hard, peel them, and cut them acrofs in thin flices; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftewpan, make it hoc, put in your eggs, and fry them quick half a quarter of an hour; (but be careful not to break them) fprinkle them with pepper, fair, and nutmeg, put them in a dilh before the fire pour out all the fat, and (hake in a little floury havd'ready two (ballots ihred fine, puc them in, with a gill of white wine, a fmall piece of butter, the juice of half a lemon, and ftir it all to gether till it is thick; (if you have not fauce enough put in a little more wine) toaft feme thin flices of bread, cut them three corner- ways, lay them round the difli, pour the fauce over, and fend it to table hoc.

Eggs a la Tripe,

BOIL eight or ten eggs hard, take oflF the flelk, and cut them in quarters lengthways; put fome but-. ter into a flew-pan, melt it, put in the eggs, with fame (hrcd parfley, pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, put in a litde flour nd fliake the pan round j pour

in

34 AUMLETS and EGGS

in as much cream as will be fufficient for fauce, tofs the pan round carefully, but mind jou do not break the eggs; vyhen the fauce is thick and fine, puc the eggs in a difh, pour the fauce over them, and garnilh with lemon.

Eggs in Ragou.

Soil twelve eggs hard, take off the IhcIIs, and with a little knife very carefully cut the whites acrols longways, fo that the whites niay be in two and the yolks whole, and be careful neither to break the whites nor the yolks; chop a gill of pickled mulbrooms very fine, half an ounce of truffles and morels boiled in three or four fpoonsful of water, favc the water, wafh the truffles and morels, chop them fine, boil a little parflcy and chop it fine, mix all thcfe together with the truffle water ycu favcd, grate in a little nutmeg, beaten mace, pepper nd fair, put it into ftew-pan, with a gill of water or gravy, t gill of red wine, a fpoonful of ketchup, a little butter mixed with flour, ftir altogether, and let it boil up; fry a good quantity of crumbs of bread, lay the eggs in order in the difti, the hollow fide of the whites uppermoft, that they may be filled; then fill them with the fried crumbs of bread as high tf they will lay, pour the fauce all over them, garnilh whh fried crumbs of bread.

Eggs poached

HAVE a ftew-pan of fpring water boiling gently put in a fpoonful of vinegar, break half a dazM eggs into feparate cups, put them in, and boil them up a moment; then take them ode with an e dice, cut the ragged ends off with a fliarp knife, and pm them in fpoons in a difh i or toaft a tbio td

J

AUMLETS AND EGGS. 349

rouad a loaf butter it, cut off the cruft cut it ia fix pieces, and lay an egg on each piece.

Eggs hut teredo with a Toajl

CUT a thin toaft round a loaf, butter it on both fides, and cut it in fquare pieces; break fix eggs into a ftew-panj beat them up well, put in a little pepper and fair, a quarter of a pound of butter and a little cream put them over a (low fire, and keep them ftirring till the butter is melted, but take care they are not done too much, and then pu€ them on the toafl:. You may brown them at the top with a hot iron or falamander if you pleafcj or fend them to table without.



Eggs and Collops fried.

CUT half a dozen rafliers of ham, bacon, hung beef, or hung mutton, fry them, and put them be fore the fire to keep hot; have plenty of good fat boiling in a pan, break fix eggs into feparate cups put them in, and fry them quick, but not too much) cake them out with a flice, drain the fat off them put the coUops in the difh, and lay an egg on each.

You may broil the collops, lay them in a diih vith a poached egg on each.

Eggs with Breads

TAKE the crumb of a penny loaf and foak it ia a quart of hot milk two hours, or till the bread it foft, then rub it through a coarfe fieve, put to it two fpoonsful of orange flower or rofe water, fweeten it with fugar, and grate in a little nutmeg; take a deep difli and butter it, break as many eggs as will cover the bottom of the difii, pour in the bread and

milkt

350 A'OMLETS and EGG?r

mik fee ic in a tin oven before the fire and hif an hour will do ie or bake ic in a flow ovcnr

TAKEt two cabbage lettuces and fcald theili, trlth a few mufhrooms, parfley, forrel, and chervil, chop fbcm very fine with the yolks of fix hard eggs, put ibem in a ftew-pan, feafon them with nurmeg and ilk, and Itew them in butter when enough, put in a little cream, ftir all about, and then pour it into the bottcnl of a difh; take the whites and chop them fine, with a little parfley, nutmegs and fakj lay this round (he brim of the di(h, and brown ic over with a hot iron or falamander.

Eggs nvhb Lettuces.

TAKE fix cabbage lettuces and fcald them in &ir waterV fqueeze them well, cue them acrofs and puc them into a ilew-pan) with a good piece of butter, Ibafoned with pepper fait, and nutmeg, ftew them ntly half an hour, and chop them well together; vvhendoney lay them in a di(h, and put fix eggs fried in butter over them, or fix poached egg% and gniih with Seville orange.

Biggs ivitbjlewed Spinach.

PICK, wafli, and boil as much fpinach as you want, fqueeze it between two plates, chop it fine and puc it into a ftew-pan with a piece of buttery a Kitle pepper and fait, ttir it well over a flow fire for ftn minutes, put it in a diih, and put the poached

rggi 6n it.



•

"•"

AUMtETS AND EGGS. 31

Eggs With Sorrel.

PICK, walh, and boil as much forrcl as you want, fqueeze Jc between two plates, chop it, and put it into a ftew-pan, with a piece of butter, a lit' fie pepper and fait, ftir it over a flow fire for ten miniitesj and put it in the bottom of a dilh; have ready three eggs boiled hard, take off the (hells, and cut them in two, poach three eggs, lay them over the (brrtl, and the hard ones between; garniih the difli with fried fippets and Seville orange cut ia quartersn

Eggs with Broccoli.

TAKE a large bunch of Broccoli trim it, and boil it, as dire&ed in the chapter for roots and ye getables cut a toaft round a loaf, or as big as the difli you intend to fend it on, toaft it brown on botli fideSt butter it, cut it in four pieces, and lay it in the difli; put fix eggs buttered on it, lay a large bunch of broccoli in the middle, put fprigs all round, and garnifli the edge of the diflii with £mall ftrigs.

Eggs with jijparagus.

TAKE a large bundle of fmall afparagus, cut the green part the fize of a pea, and boil it till tender; in the mean time have a toaft round a loaf buttered, cut oflF the cruft, cut it in four pieces, and put it in the difli; put fix eggs buttered on ir, ftrain off the afparagus in a fieve, put it over the eggs and toafti aiKl lend them up to table as hot as poffible.

r

352 AUMLETS and EG0$

Eggs fried at round as Balls

TAKE a deep frying-pao, .put io three pounds of buctcr clarify it, and ftrain iC; clean out the frying- pan puc in the butter, make ic boiling hoc, and ftir ic with a fticlc till ic runs round 1 then bretk an egg in the middle, and turn it round with a ftick till it is as hard as a poached egg, for the whirling 4)f the butter will make it as round as a balU thcs take it out with a flice, and puc it in a dilh befoce the fire They will keep hot half 4n hour, and yet remain fofc, fo you may fry as many as yeu waoc You may ferve them on toafts, dewed fpinach, or ibrrel, and garnifh with Seville orange cut in dices.

An Egg as big as twenty.

TAKE twenty eggs, feparate the yolks from the whites, beat the yolks, but not the whites, and ftiaiii them both through a (ieve % tie the yolks in a bladder as round as a ball, and boil them hard; put this ball into another bladder, put in the whites, tie them up oval boil them half an betir, and tfaeo throw them into cold water. When you have a grand fallad, cut them into quarters, and put round it. You may boil five or fix in the fame manner, or any quantity you pleafe, to put in the middle of any ragou or fricafee of eggs.

Whites of Eggs a la Cream.

TAKE the whites of twelves eggs, beat them up well with four fpoonsful of rofc water, a little grated Icmon-pcel and nutmeg, fwcctencd with fine fogar; put them in four bladders, tic them in the (hape of an ego:, and Doil them half an hour; lay them in a

i

ih when told; mix half a pint of cream, a gill of fsLck and half the juice of a Seville orange fweet4cned with fine fugar i pour it over te eggs and fcrVc it asr & fide-idifli for fuJ)J)er.

i PQAGH fik new-laid gs, and lay thnl nefttly madilhi make a gill ot good gravy hot With a little nutmeg, pepper fait, and a tea fpoonful of Vinegar; pour it over the cggs and fend them to table hot.

iSgs in Marina f POACH fix eggs nicely trim thenh an lay thetti in the difli which you intend to fend them to tabte in; make. a fauce for them in the following manner i put two or three fpoonsful of water into a ftew-pan,, with a gill of white gravy a tea fpoonful of vinegar a little pe)per and iik beat up the yolks of two eggs and put in, ftir it over the fire till it begins tp thicken, but not boil, and pour it over the eggs i When they are cold, garnifh with parfley, and fend em up for a fecond-Courfe or fide-diih for fupptn

Ai CMEfeSE.

354 1

J

I

CHEESE.

Ramaquins of Cheefe.

GRATE half a pound of Chefhire and half a pound of thin Gloucefter checfe put it into a ilew-pan with a gill of white wine, and keep u ftirring over the fire till it is melted i then put in a fpoonful of tnuftard, a little butter and the yolks of four eggs beat up, ftir it round till it is thick, and fee it by to get cold 5 butter fome fmall pattypans, put it in, and bake it in a gentle oven till it is brown; then put it in a very hoc di(h, and Icodic away quick: or have a large pan of fat boiling, and drop it in with a Ipoon in drops fry them quick and . brown, put them on a fieve to drain, and then dilh them up.

You may make them of Parmazan cheefe if you Jiave it.

Ramaquins on I'oals.

PREPARE your cheefe as before; toaft fornc thin toads, and cut them in what Ihape you plcafe; put them in the di(h' and while your eheefe is hot put it on the toafts, and brown it with a hot iron or falamandcr, or put it in theoven a quarter of 2H hour, and fend it to table hot and quick as it foofl gets cold.

Cheefe in Pondeusc.

CUT half a pound of Cheftirc and thin Glofl ccfter cheefe as thin as you can, put it intoafte'

pafii

ba

liti

d H fi E S Ei 35

h, with a glafs of white wine as much cream, a ittle piece of butter, a few fine bread-crumbs, and keep it (lirring over the fire till the checfe is melted; then put in a fpoonful of muftard the yolks of two fcggs beat up, and ftir it a moment; then piit it into a filver diih, and brown it with a very hot iron of falaaiander; have toafted fippets cut three corner WayS and ftick them round it for garniOiw

SfeweJ Cheefe.

CUT half a poijnd of Chefhil-e and Glouceftcf thtefe in thin dices, put it into a ftew-pan, with a litde ale or white wine, ahd keep it ftirring over the fire till it lis melted; theii put in a fpoonful of niuftard the yolks of two eggs beat up, ilir it a moment over the fire, then put it in a fmall deep tiifli, or foup-plate, and brown it with a very hot -iron or faUmander s have ready thin toafted fippets, Or fried ones, cut three-cornerays ftick theno all round add in the middle fend it up hot and quick.

Heicb Rabbit.

CUT a nice of bread a littlie wider than thift theefe, cut ofF the cruft and toaft it on both fides i tut a flice of cheefe moderately thick, put it in a 'Chcefc-toafter, ahd toaft one fide 5 then put the toaft- d fide downwards on the bread, and toaft the other fide; put pepper, fait, and muftard over t, cut t in pieces about an inch long, and fend it Up quick,

•

Scotch Rabbit.

TO AST a piece of bread nicely on Dbth fides and butter it cut a flice of cheefe nearly tne fize of the

A a 1 breads

36 C H E E S E.

hrtzd put it in a cbeefe-toafter, and toaft one fide; then put the toafted fide on the bread, and toaft the other fide nicely.

Engtyh Rabbit.

TOAST a flice of bread on both fides, put it into a cheefe-plate, pour aylaTsof red wme over it and put ic to the fire till it foaksupc the wioc; then cut fome cheefe in very thin Dices, and put it thick on the bread put it in a tin oven before the tCy toitft it till it is brown, and ferve it up hot.

Or this way: toft your bread, foak it in the wine, and fee it before the fire to keep hot; cut the cheefe in vcfy thin flices, rub fome butter over t pewter plate, lay the cheefe on it, poor in two or three fpoonsful of white wine, fct it over a chaffingdifli of coals, and cover it with another pktefor two or three minutes; uncover it, and ftir it till it .is done and well mixed; put in a little muftardi put it on the bread, brown it with a hot iron or b lamander, and fend it away hot.

CHAPi

•



357 3

CHAP. XVi.v

PUDDINGS.

Propfr Rules to be obferved in making Fuddingj



WHEN you proceed to make your different puddings, have ail your ingredients properly prepared in readinefs before you begin to nix them; take particular care that your bag or cloth is clean, and not foapyi dip it in boiling water, give it a ihake,.and flour it well, before you put in the pu4' ding. If ic is a batter pudding, tie it clofe; if a bread pudding, tie it a licde oofe to give it room to fwelU if you boil it in a bafon, mould, or bowl, befurc to butter it before you put in the pudding, and tie a oloch oyer the top; always have plenty df water in the pot, and mind it boils before you put in the puddings fee that it keeps boiling, otherwifeJWur pudding will be full of water and fpoiled j turn it often, to prevent its fticking tothc bottom. When It i$ done take ic up i if in a bafon, mould, or bowl lt it (land two or three minutes to cool if in a cloth or bag, put it in any thing deep enough to held it then untie it, ke the cloth oflF the mould, &c lay the upper Qde of the di(h upon it, and turn it over I raifc the mouldy &c. gently up, if in a cloth UQtie if, and put the cloth over the edges of while ' it is in, turn the difh on it, turn it over, and taka the cloth gently off for fear of breaking it. When you make a batter pudding, firft mix (he flour well with a little milkj then put in the ottier ingredient,;

Aa 3 uttH

358,, PUDDINGS,

mix thrtn well together, and it will be fmooth ao4 free from Igmps. The bcft method for plain baiter pudding is, to (train it through a coarfe- fieve, to prevent its being Iqmpy, or having the treadles of the eggs in it: and for all other puddings, drain the ggs after you have beat them. Batter and rice puddings baked, require a brilk oven to raife them; bread and cuftard puddings, time and a moderate oven. Remember to butter the bottom of your dilh or pan all round, before you pour your pudding into it

$teak Pudding,

TAKE a pound of bceffuet, (bred it very fmall, mix it up with fine Bour and cold water into good fli pade, and roll it out, dip your cloth in hoc vtater, flour it well, put it into a deep difh or round pan, and put the pate in the cloth have beef, routto, or pork (leaks cut very thin, pepper and lal( them, put them in the pafle, and dole it at the top; (ie the cloth oyer it tight, put.it into a large pot of boiling water, (if it is a large pudding it will take five hours boiling, if a fmall one three hours) and aa yourwatcr waftes away put in more boiling water, to keep the pudding fwimming when it is done take it carefully up, and turn it out into a deep dilh, foi Whep it is cut it will fwini oyer with gravy.

Pigeon pudding.

MAKE the cruft as direfted for fteak pudding, artd put it in the cloth j cut fome beef fteaksverj thin and lay in, pick, finge, draw, and wa(h ilix pigeons, pepper and fait them chop fome parfley, fxiix it up wjth butter, and ftuff the infide of the pigeons, put them on the (leak?, lay a thin beef " • 'fteak

T • •

PUDDINGS. 359

ftcak over them, clofe up the cruft at the top, and tie the xloth tight; (it will take five hours boiling) when done, turn it carefully out into a deep di(h.

You may make it of larks, or any other fmall birds, the fame way. •

Ox-Pitb Pudding.

GET a quantity of ox-piths, and let them lie all jnight in foft water to foak out the blood; the next morning wafh them clean, ftrip off the (kins, and beat them with the back of a fpoon in orange Bour water till as thick and like pp then take three pints of thick cream, and boil it with two or three blades of rpace, a nutmeg quartered, and a ftick of cinnamon y take half a pint of the bed Jordan al mends, blanch and (kin them, beat them in a mort tar with a little of the cream, and as it dries put in more cream, (irft drain it from the fpices, and when it is well mixed ftrain it through a (ieve to the piths; take the yolks of ten eggs, the whites of but two, beat them very well, and ftrain them to the ingredients, with a fpoonful of graced bread, or Naples bifcuit, half a pound of fine fugar, the marrow of four large bones (hred very fmall, a little fait, and mix all well together; put it in a fmall ox or hogs guts cleaned properly, and boil it very gently three quarters of an hour or put a pufF-pafte round the edge of a deep di(h, put it in, and bake it.

Calfs Foot Pudding.

TAKE two fine calf's feet, and boil them till they lU'C tender, cut out the brown and fat, and mince them very fmall take a pound 'and a half of fuer, pick off the (kins, and (hred it very fine, fix yolks nd three whites of eggs beat well, the crumb oP a

A a 4 halft

i

56a P U D D IN G S.

penny roll grated a poynd of currants clean wafiied picked aod rubbed in a cloth, as much milk as wiU mbi(te it,.vith the cggsa handful of flour, fomc ne fugar, half a nuioieg grated, And a little falc snix it all well together, piic it in a clotht and boil i live hours ' when it is done put it in the diihL with plain butter, or butter fack, and fugar mY am) poured over it. Or put a thin pufi-pafte rjtbnd the edge of a diQjit put in the puddings andly it (wq bours

Hunting Pudding.



PUT %, fpoonsful of fine flour into a pan, with 9 gill of cream or new milk and mix it up beat ' pp the whites of fix and the olks of ten eggs an4 put in, with one pound of beef-fuet (hred fine, a pound of currants well waQied and picked, a pound of jarTraifins ftoned and chopped fine, two ounces of candied citron, orange and lemon-peel, cut in thiq flips, a little lemonpeel fiired fine, about two ounces of fine fuar, a fpoonfiil of rofe-water a glaf of brandy, a little grated nutmeg and beaten ginger, ix it all vell together, tie it up in a cloth, and boil x. five hours i when it is done take it up very carefully, turn it into the difh and arnilh the ed wit powder fugar.

Plum Pudding hgUd

. TAKE a poun of flour, and mix it into baiter with half a pine of milk; beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggsi, a pound pf beef-fiiiet flircd fine, a pound of raifins picked, a pound of currants waflied and picked, half a nutmeg grated, a tea-fpoonful of beaten ginger, a little moid fugar,? j;Iafs of brandy apd a liitle koapo-petl xt &)e,

nil

PUD D,N Q Sv 361

Six ic all ell together, tie u up in a clothj and. nl it four hours, when it is done turn it out into a difii, and, garnifli ith powder fugar with intcd butter fweet wine, and lugar oiixd in a boar

jplum Pudding iakcd. •

TAKE the crumbf of a two-penny loaf and rub it, through a cullericjer, boil a pint of milk with a Ijtde.lecnon-peel cinnamon, and a laurel' leaf in it, ftrn it on the bread, cover it over, and let it (land till it is cold have a pound of beef-fuet fiired fine, half a pound of raiOns picked, a pound of currants waflied and picked, fix eggs, two fpoonsful of flour a little nutmeg and ginger, a fpoonful of rofe wateri a glafs of brand, a little lemon-peel flired fine, and half a pound of moid fugar mix all thefe well to- gethefi butter the diih, pour it in, and bake it when it is done turn it upfide down in a hot diib, and jprinkle powder fugar over and round ttv

Suet Pudding boiled.

SHREI) pound of beef-fuet fine, mix it with a pound of fiour, a little falc and ginger fix eggs, and as much milk as will make it into a ftijBf batter, put it in a cloth, and boil it two hours; when it is onc turn it into a diih with plain butter in a boat.

Torkjhire Pudding.

TAKE a quart of new milk and fix eggs, beat them welt together and mix them with flour to a good batter, rather thicker than pancake batter, beat It well till it is fmooth and put in a little fait, grated liutmeg, and ginger; butter a dripping or fryingpan, put it under a piece o beef noutton, or a loin

of

IP-""""! •

362 PUDDINGS.

of veal that is roafting; put in the batter, and a foon as one part is done turn the other to the fire, till the top is all brown alike; then cut it in fquans, and turn it-till the other fide is brown; put a fi(hidrainer in the difli, put the pudding on it, and fcod 11 to table hot.

Marrow Pudding.

TAKE half a pound of Naples bifcuir, or the feme quantity of ftalc diet bread, rub it through a cullender, put it into a (lew-pan with three pints of new miH, put it over the fire, boil it up, and ftir it cften to keep it from burning; beat up nine eggs, ftrainthem through afieve, put them in, and fwcctcn it with iiigar to your palate; put in a quarter of a pound of butter, half 3 nutmeg grated, a little lemon-peel (hred line;' put it over the fire, and keep it ftlrring till it is thick; then take it off, and ftir it till it is cold; put in a fpoonful of rofc watef, a glafs of brandy, and a very little powdered cinnamon I put a puff-pafte roCind the.ge of your dilb, a very thin piece at the bottom,, pour in the hatter, and fprinklc on it a handful of currants clean picked arid walhed; take the marrow dlit'of z, large beef marrowbone, cut it in fl ices, wa(h it in water, and put it on as you fancy; cut fome candied citron, Jemon aiid orange-peelvery thin; and lay round or over it, as you think proper, then bake it; when it is done fend it to tabic hot.

Ybu may make a larger or fmaller quantity in the fame manner, only adding or diminifliing as borc.

Marrow Pudding another Way.

TAKE a quart of new milk and boil it, with a ftick of cinnairiOn, a little Icmon-pcel, and a la'jrd

leaf i

PUDDINGS. 363

Jtaf 5 rub the crumb of a penny loaf through a cullender, put it in a pan, flrain the milk through z fieye over ir and let it ftand till it is cold; beat up ' fix egg$, put it into a ftcw-pan with the eggs, and fweeten it with fugar; put in a quarter of a pound of butter, a little rnarro chopped fine, a little lemon-peel ihred fine, half a nutmeg grated, put ic over a gentle fire, and keep it (lirring till it is thick 1' then taice it pfT, (lir it till it is cold, put in a fpoon- ful 6f rofe water, and a glafs of brandy; lay a puf?pafte round the edge of your difli, pour it in, pu(' on currants marrow and fweetmeats as before, and take it, 1



Vermicelli Pudding.

TAKE a quarter of a pound cff vermicelli, and boil it. in a pint of milk till it i tender, with a (lick of cinnamon and a laurel leaf or twoi then take out the cinnamon and laqrel leaf, and put in half a pine of cream, a quarter of a pound jof butter melted, the fame weight of fugar, with the yolks of fix eggs well beat •, lay a puflf-paftc round the edge of your diih, pqt it in, and bake it three quarters of an hour in a moderate cvea. For variety, you may add half a pound of currants clean waihed and picked, or the marrow of a beef-bone, or both, if you wifli tor make it rich.

Oat Pudding.

TAKE of oats decorticated one pound, and new milk fufficicnt to coyer it, fix ounces of fine raifins ftoned, the fame' quantity of currants clean wafiied and picked, a pound of beef-foet ftired fine, fix newjaideggs beat fine, a little nitnieg, "beaten ginger

an4

34 PUDDINGS.

and fait, mix all well together, put it into acl€Cl iib, aJi4 bake k id a moderate oven two hours;

fTew College Puddings.

TAICE 1 quarter of a pound of Naples bifcuit

and rub it through a cullender a quarter of a pouad

of currahtfi clean wafhed and picked, the fame quin

Wf of 'becf-fuec (hred iine a fpoonful of fugafj a

Yery little fak, a liule iemonpeel (hred fine, tnd

all tie grated nutoi; mix all well together with

e olk of two eggs and a fmall glafs of brandy,

ancfcQaJce them about the fize of turkies eggs, ia

t what ihape or form you pleafe i put a quarter of %

. - pound' of butter in a paiii make it hot, and fry tbcm

of a fine brown all round; then put theoi on a ficve

to drinj and lay chem in a hot difb. For fauce,

have melted butter, fweet wine, and fugar, mixed io

9 boat.

By obferving the above diredion you make wiM quantity you want,

I Orange Pudding.

TAKE.the yolks of twelve and hc whites of foor ggi&t nd beat them well, put half a pound of I butter into a itew-pan and melt it, put it to tbo

ggS) them well together grate in the rind of two fine Seville oranges, half a pound of fio powder fugar, a fpoonful of orange-flower water, oofl of rofe water, a gill of fack; and. half a pioc creafil, with two Naples bifcuits foaked in C ail well together, and fqueeze in the juice of ooo orange; lay a pufF-pafle round the rim of the di(bi

gut it io, and bake it; when it is done fend it up ot to table.

f

'

mmm' rWVIlNMMr

PUDDINGS. 365

Orangi PuJding aficond Wa. %

' BEAT up the yolks of twelve and the whites of feur eggs, with half a poand of frefti butter meed; the fame quantity of fine powder fugar, half a pint of creamy a fpoonful of rofe water, and a little grated nutmeg; cut the peeling of a fine Seville orange as thin as poflTible, and Ibak it in water focL three at four hoursj then beat it fine in a mortar tiH it is like a pafte, mix it well with -the ingredients, and fqueeze in the juice of half an orange; put a puff pafte all round the edge and bottom of your diih, pour it in, and bake it.

Orange Pudding a third Way

CUT the rind of two fine Seville oranges as thiit as you can, boil it till it is very tender in two or three different waters, then beat it fine in a mortair i

or rub it through a fievc, boil a pint of new milk or . creanri and put over, take a quarter of a pound .

of Naples bifcuit, beat up the yolks of eight and .

the whites of four eggs, with a quarter of a pound of frelh butter nielted, mix it with the milk and' bifcuit, a quarter of a poUnd of fine fugar, a fpoonful of orangie-flower or rofe water, a little grated nutmeg and lemonpeelj mix all the ingredients with the bciten 6rangepeel, and fqueeze in the juice of one orange; lay a puff'-pafte round the edge of your difli,

pour in the mixture, cut fome candied citron, orange or lemon-peel', and put over it, in any ihape you fancy and bake it three quarters of an hour. Take care that it is cold before you put it in the difh you intend to bake it in.

OfMit



PUDDINGS

Orange P lidding d fourth Way.

Take the omfide rind of two fine Seville oradgti jcut very chin, boil it till it is tender in three feparate waters and rub it through a fine fieve, blanch half a pound, of fweet almoads, pound tbem in 4 morur, and keep adding a little rgfe water to prevent their oiling, put in the orange-peel and half a poood jof Bne fugar; beat up the yolks of twelve and the whites of fix eggs with half a pound of butter, and mix all the ingredients well together till it is light and hollow lay a pufF-pafte. round the edge of your di(h and pour it in, cut lome candied citron oraogT) or lemon-peel in thin flips and put over it andbak: K three quarters of an hour

Lemon Fuddlng.

CUT the rind of three leoions as thin as you can, boil it in three feparate waters till it is very tender and beat it fine like a pafte in a mortar; boil a.pioc and a half of milk with a quarter of a pouad of Naples bifcuity and put the lemon- peel to it beat up the yolks of nine and the whites of fix eggs, with a quarter of a pound of frelh butter melted, half a pound of fine fugar and a fpoonfui of orangeflower or rofe water; mix all well together, put it over a gentle fire, keep it ftirring till it is thicks .fqueee in the juice of half a lemon, and fet it by till it is cold; lay a puflf-pafte round the edge of -the dilh, put in the pudding, cut fomc candied citron orange, or lemon-peel, and put over it, bake it three quarters of an bour and fcnd.it up hot

PUDDINGS. 367

Lemon Pudding nfecond Way.

GRATE the rind of three fine lemons beat the yolks of twelve and the whites of fix eggs put in half a pint of cream, half a pound of fine fugar, a fpoonful oi orange-flour water, and a quarter of a pound of frefii butter melted, beat all up well to gether, put it over a flow fire, and keep it ftirring till it is thick; then take it oflT, fqueeze in the juice of one large or two fnnall limons and ftir it till it is cold; lay a pufF-pafte round the edge and bottom of a difl), pour it in, with fonic candied citron lemon, or orange-peel, cut thin and put over it, bake it three quarters of an hour, and fend it to table hot.

Almond Pudding baked.

TAKE half a pound of Iweet and fix bitter almonds, blanch them, take the flcins off, pound them in a mortar, and as you pound them put in a little cream to keep them from oiling; grate a quar- ter of a pound of Naples Bifcuit, put it into a quart of new milk or cream, and boil it up; beat eight eggs well, with a fpoonful of orange-flower and one of rofe water, a little beaten cinnamon, half a nut tteg grated, half a pound of fine fugar, and the fame quantity of frefh butter melted; mix all the ingredients well together, put it over a gentle fire, and keep it ftirring till it is thick; then take it oS, put in a gill of fack, and ftir it well till it is cold; lay a puff-pafte round the edge of a difli, put in ilie pudding, bake it three quarters of an hour, and fend it to table hot

Almond

36d

1? u r t I Itf c fi.

AlmoAd Pudding BaiitJ.

ITAKE a poumi of fweet almonds, blanch tteiBj . take off the ikins and beat them fine in a roortiTi with two fpoonsful of rofe water and a gill of fack or mountain wine beat up the yolks of (it and the whites of three eggs and put in, with half a pound of frefh butter melted, a quart of cream, a quarter of a pound of fine fugar, half a nutmeg grated, one fpoonful of fibur, and thiee fpoonsful of crumbs of white bread i mix all well together, dip a cloth io hot water, flour it well put in the pudding, and boil it one hour; when it is done turn it into the . dilb, and put luelted butter, fack, and fugar miifid over it.

Ipjwicb Almond Pudding.

GRATE about a quarter of a pound 6i ifK bread into a pint and a half of cream blanch half

. a pound of fweet almonds, take off the fkins, beat them fine in a mortar, with a fpoonful of oraiflower water, till, they are like a pade; beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs, a quarter of a pound of frelh butter melted, and the to quantity of fine fugar, -"mix all. well together, put it over a flow fire, keep it ftirring till ic is thickj tfi then put it away till it is cold; lay a Iheet of pffpafte at the bottom and round the edge of your dilh, pour in the ingredients, and bake it half afl

, koiir.

Sago Puddings.

TAKE half a pound of fago, and wait it wdl Jn three hot waters, then put ic in a faucc-pan, i"

a qw

PUDDINGS. 6g

A quart of new milk and a (lick of cinnamon, and boil ic gently till it is (hick; (but mind and ftir it often, for it is ape to burn J then take out the cinna men, ftir in half a pound of frefh butter till it is melted, and then pour it into a large ftew-pan; beat up the yolks of nine and the whites of five tggf with a gill of fack, fweeten it with fugar to vour tafte, put in a quarter of a pound of currants clean walhed picked, and plumped in two fpoonsful of ikck and two of rofe water, and half a nutmeg grated i mix all well together, put it over a flow fire, keep it ftirring till it is thick and then put it awy tp cool; lay a puff'pafte round the edge of a difli, pour in the ingredients bake it three quarters of aD hour, and fend it up hot to table

Milet Pudding.

TAKE half a pound of millet feed, wafh and pick it very clean, put to it a pound of coarfe fugar three quarts of milk,, a whole nutmeg grated, break in half a pound of frefli butter in little bits, and mix it all well together; butter the bottom of a deep difli big enough to hold itj pour it in and bake it.

Carrot Pudding.

TAKE (ame carrots, pare and wafh them wel) and grate them i take half a pound of grated car rot and one pound of bread-crumbs, beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs with half a pint of cream, then ftir in the carrot and bread crumbs with half a pound of frefh butter melted half a pint of fack, three fpoonsful of orangefiower water, half a nutmeg grated fweeten it with fugar to your palate and mix it all well together j (if it

B b is

370 PUDDINGS.

IS too thick put in a little more cream) lay a pofi pafte round the edge' of your dilb, pour in the ingredients and bake it one hour; (or you may put it in a cloth and boil it) when it is done put it in a di(h, and pour melted butter, fweet wine and fogar mixed over it.

Carrot Pudding afecond Way.

TAKE the crumb of a two-penny loaf, rub it through a cullender and put it into a pan; boil a quart of new milk, with a dick of cinnamon, two laurel leaves, and a little lemon-peel, ftrain it through a ficve over the bread, cover it over, and let it ftand till it is cold; in the mean time boil two or three carrots till they are very foft, bruife them, and rub them through a fieve; beat up eight eggs well, with two fpoonsful of orange-flower water, and half a pound of frefli butter melted-, mix all the ingredients well together, fweeten it with half a pound of fugar, and grate in half a nutmeg; lay a pulF- pafte round the edge of the difti, pour the ingredients in, bake it one hour, and fend it CO table hot.

Rice Pudding.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of whole rice, walh and pick the dirt from it clean, put it into a fauce pan, with a quart of new milk, a ftickof cinnamon a little lemon-peel, boil it gently till the rice is tender and thick, and ftir it often to keep it from burning; takeout the cinnamon and lemon-peel, put (he rice into an earthen pan to cool, beat up the yolks of fix and the whites of three eggs, ftir them into the rice, with fugar to fweeten it to your palate, a littk icmon-pccl (hrcd very fine, and a little grated nut

P U D D I isr G S 71

meg and ginger, mix all well cogethec; lay a pufl pafte round the edge of the difh pour in the ingre diencsj and bake iu

Rice Pudding dfecond Wai

TAKE a quarter of a pound of whole rtce, w4lh and pick it clean, boil it in a quart of new milk till it is tender and thick, and put if in a pan to cool; beat up the yolks of fix and the whites of three eggs, melt half a pound of frefli butter ana put ini with a little beaten cinnamon, grated nutmeg, and lemen-peel ihred fine a quarter of a pound' of fugar, a fpoonful of rofe water, a quarter of a pound of currants clean walhed and picked, and a glafs of mountain wine, mix all well together lay a puflT-pafte round the edge of the dilh, pour in thd ingredients, and bake it one hour

Rice Pudding a ibird Wap

TAKE half a pound of rice, wa(b and pick it 11, boil it in two quarts of water for half an hourj then ftrain it into a fieve and let it ftand till it is cold % Jay a pufif-pafte round the edge of the difli, put in the rice beat up four eggs, with a pint and a half of tnilk, a quarter of a pound of fugar, a little le nion-peel ihred fine, halt a pound of beef or veal . fuet Ihred fine, pour thde ingredients over the rice, and bake it one hour and a half. You may put in ft quarter of a pound of currants, well washed and picked, if you think proper

Rice Pudding afoUrtb Way,

Take half a pound of ground rice, put it into a f(U)ce-pao, with three pints of milk, a ftick of cinna fi b a mon.

372 PUDDINGS.

mon, and a little lemonpcel boil it gently tiD it is thick, and ftir ic often xo keep it from bora ing; uke out the cinnamon and icmoi-peeI fiir io half a pound of butter till it is melted, and then psc it away to cool i beat up the yolks of fix and the whites of three eggs, with a ipoonful of rofc water, a little lemon-peel flired fine, and a little grated nutmeg; when the rice is cold mix all well togbeTi and fweeten it with fugar to your palate; lay apuffpafte round the edge of the di(h, pour in the iopf dients, bake it one hour, and fend i to tahk bou

Rice Pud(Ung Boiled.

TAKE half a pound of flour of rice, put it inn a fauce-pan with a quart of milk, boil it gently till it is chick keep it conftantly ftirring, that it intjr not clot nor burn, then ftir in lutlf a pound of boner, and put it in an earthen pan to cool; beat up the yolks of ten and the whites of five eggs, with bilf a pint of milk or cream, the rind of a lemon grated, and a little nutmeg; when the rice is cold mix ail well together, and fweeten it with fugar to your pi late; butter fonne fmall moulds, China bafons,or wooden bowls, put the pudding in, and tie cloths over them, and boil ihem half an hour, if fmall if large three quarters of an hour; when thcjare done turn them into a di(h, and pour melted butter wine, and fugar mixed over them.

You may make half the quantity if you pleafe.

Rice Pudding Boiled afecond Way.

WASH and pick a quarter of a pound of rieff tie it in a cloth with half a pound of raifins ftoned, give the rice plenty of room to fwelli and boil it three hours in plenty of water v when

J

PUDDINGS. 37:f

it Is done turn it into a di(h pour melted butter and fugar on it, and grate a little nutmeg over all.

You may make it this way: wafli and pick a quarter of a pound of rice tie it in a clothy but give It room to fwell, and boil it one hour i then take It up, untie it, and with a fpoon ftir in a quarter of a pound of frelh butter, grate in a little nutmeg, fwerten it to your laftc, tie it up very clofe," and boil it one hour longer; take it up, and put it into the difli, with melted butter over it

The Indians tie it up, and boil it three hours in a doth; then turn it into a difh, and eat it with oil or butter mixed with it.

SimoKna Rice Puddings

A PERSON has obtained a patent for making this rice, and is to be uled without eggs in the foU lowing manner: put a quarter of a pound into a fauce-pan with a quart of new milk, IkmI it gently till ic is thick, and keep it ftirring all the while, t6 prevent its being in lumps and burning; then ftir in a quarter of a pound of freih butter, a little grated nutmeg and ginger, a little lemonpeel flired fine, fweeten it to ycur palate, and put it in a pan to cool; lay a pufF-pafte round the edge of the difh and when the pudding is cold pour ic in, put fome candied fweetmeats over it, bake it in a gentle oven three quarters of an hour, and fend ic to table hoc.

Spinach Pudding.

TAKE about a quarter of a peck of fpinach, pick and wafh it very clean, put it into a fauce-pan with a very little fait, cover it clofe, and boil it till it is tender; throw it in a fieve to drain, fqueeze t between- two plates, and chop it fine beat up fix

B b 3 eggs

574 PUDDINGS.

eggs wich half a pint of cream and the crumb of % ftale roll grated fine, a little grated nutmeg, and a quarter ot a pound of melted butter qiix tbefe all yrtll in a fauce-pn keep it ftirring till it is thick, and let it ftand till it is cold; then butter a cloth, put itin, tie it tight and boil it one hourj turn it into your difh pour melted butter over it, and (qutrte on it the juice of a Sevilie orange if you think proper. You may fweeten it or not, as you pleafe. If you bake it, you muH: put in a quarter of 9 pound of iugar, an4 ufe laples bifcuit infte94 of

bfc4dT

faking Pudding.

TAKE the crumb of a penny French roll, cut it in thin flices, boil a pint and a half pf new milk of cream, wjth a Uick of cinmrnon, two laurel leaves, find litclc lemon-peel; put the bread into a pan, (train the milk on it, cover jt over, nd lt it ftand ttill it is cold then beap up the yolks of ten and the whites of fix eggs, and mix it ith a fppontul of flour, littlfs fait and grated nutmeg butter a mould, put it in, tie a cloth over the top, and boil it gently one hour j when it is done turn it very carefully into the difh, and fend (nelted butter, fiick, aD4 fugr mied in a boat.

Cream Pudding.

BOIL a quart of cream with a (lick of cinnamon,;rate in half a nutme-g, and fet it away to cod j lanch a quarter of pound of almonds, takeoff the nins, and beat them in a mortar, with a fpoontul of orangt-flowcr or rofe water; beat up the yolks of right and the whites of four eggs, ftrain fhcra through a ficvc tp the cream, take out ihc

(rinnamon

PUDDINGS. 37

cinnamon, mix in th almonds, with two fpoonsful of flour, and beat all well together; take a thick cloth, vyct and flour it, pour in the pudding, tie it clofe, and boil it three quarters of an hour pretty faft; when it is done take it out, turn it into the jdifli very carefully, pour melted butter and fack mixed on itj'iand fprinkle powdered fugar over alU

Oatmeal Pudding.

TAKE a pint of fine oatmeal, mix it with three pints of new miik till it is quite fmooth, and boil ic in a fauce-pan till it is fmooth and thick, keeping it ftirring all the time; put in half a pound of frefli butter, a little beaten mace and nutmeg, a gill of fack, and fet it away to cool; then beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs, and mix it well with the other ingredients; lay a puflvpafte round the edge of the difh, pour it in, and bake it half an hour. You may put in half a pound of currants clean waflied and picked, and boil it one liour, put it in the difli, and pour melted butter over it.

Cujlard Pudding boiled.

TAKE a pint of cream or new milk, boil it with ft (kick of cinnamon, a little lemon-peel, and let it ftand to cool; beat up the yolks of five and the whites of three eggs, mix a fpoonful of flour with the cream, then put in the eggs, with a gill of fack, drain it all through a (ieve, grate in a little nutmeg, and fweetcn it with fine powder fugar to your palate; wet a cloth, flour it, pour in the pudding, tie it, buf not too clofe, and boil it three quarters of an hour; or butter a mould, bafon, or fmall wooden bowl, ppt in the pudding, tie a cloth over the top, and tK)il it one hour when it is done turn it gently into

B b 4 the

37 PUDDINGS die difti, Md pour meked butter and fugar miiEei over it,

Cuftard Pudding baked.

TAKE a quart of new milk and boil ic with a (lick of cinnamon, a little lemon-peel, a laurel leaf, and a few coriander- feeds, fweeten it as it boils with loaf fugar, and then let it ftand to cooli beat up cighr eggs well with a little of the mi)k and pour ic backwards and forwards, in two pans, tiU the m Ik and eggs are well mixed, put in a fpoonful of roie water, and (train it all through a fievej lay a pu(F- pafte round the edge of your di(h, pour in tke pudding, bake it, and fend it up hot or cold to table.

Flour Pudding.

TAKE, a quart of new milk, beat up the yolb of eight and the whites of four fggs with a quarter of a pine of the milk, ftir in fpur large fpoonstul of flour, and beat it wrll together till it is fmoothj boil fix b tter almonds in two fpoonsful of water, pour the water to the egg, take the Ikins off the almonds, and heat thtm lane in a mortar with a fpoonful of milk; then mix it with chr reft of the milk, a tea (poonful of fait, one of beatrn ginger, and a little nutmeg grated, nux all well together; dip your cloth into boiling water, flour it, pour in the pud ding, tie it rather flack, boil it an hour and a quarter, turn ic into the difla, and pour melted butur over itf

Batim

P U D D IN G S 377

Batter Pudding.

PUT fix large fpoonsful of Bour into a pan, and mix it with a quart of milk till it isfmooth, beat up the yolks of fix and the whites of three eggs and puc in, ftrain it through a fitve, then put in a tea fpoon- ful of fait, one ot beaten ginger, and ftir it well together; dip 3rour ckxh into boiling water, flour it, pour in the puddingy tie ic rather clofe, and boil it ooe bour; when it is done put it into the dilh, and pour melted butter over it.

You may put in ripe currants, apricots, fmall plums, damfons, or white bull is, for a change, when in feaibn; but it will require half an hour's mons boiling with the fruit in it.



Batter Puddmg another Way.

PUT fix (poonsful of flour into a pan, and by degrees mix in a quart of new milk, put in a tea Monful of fait, one of beaten ginger, two ipoonsful of the tioAure of fiiflTron, and ftrain it thnoogh a fievc; dip your doth in belling water, flour it, pQur in the podding, tie it ciofe, and boil it one hour and a quaner % put it in the difli, and pour melted butter over it



Grateful Pudding.

&UB a pound of the crumb of white bread through a fine cullender, put to it a pound of flour, a pound of raifins ftoned, a pound or currants df aa waihed and picked, half a pound of moift fugar, a little beaten ginger, and eight eggs beat up with a pint of milk, mix all the inzredients well together, and boil or bake it. If you boil it, it will take two

hours I

378 P IT D D I N G S:

hours; if you bake it, one hour will do: You may ufe cream inftead of milk if you have it.

r

Bread Pudding.

TAKE the crumb of two penny French rolls and cut it in thin flices, boil a quart of milk with a ilick of cinnamon, two laurel leaves,, and a litde lemon-peel, drain it on the bread, cover it over, and let it ftand till it is cold, beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of tour eggs, drain them through a fitve to take out the tieadies, put them to the bread and milk, with a fpoonful of flour, half a pound of fugar, and a little grated nutmeg and ginger, mix it all well together; dip the cloth into boiling water, flour it, put in the pudding, tie it clofe, %nd boil it one hour; then put it into the dilb, with melted butter and fuar in a bQat.

Bread Budding afecond Way.

TAKE the crunib of a dale penny loaf, rub it through a cullender, and put it into an earthtn pan; boil a quart of cream with a ftrck of cinnamon, a little lemon-peel, and twolaurd leaves, drain it on the bread, cover it over and let it ftand till it is cold take twelve bitter almonds, put them in hot water, take off the (kins, and beat them fine in a mortar, with two fpoonsful of rofc water, till they are of a fine pafte; beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs, beat up the bread and cream, drain the eggs through a fieve to it, with half a pound of fugar, put in the almonds, with half a nutmeg grated, a fpoonful of flour, and half a pound of currants clean wafhed and picked, mix it all well together; dip the cloth into boiling water, flour it, put in the pudding, tie it, but not too clofe,

and

PU D D I N G S 379

und boil it one hour; or butter a mouldy china or woodrn b wU put it iir tie a cloth over the topj and boil it one hour; when it is done turn it into the di(h, pour meired butter, wine, and fugar mixed on it, and fprinkle it and the difli all over with powder fugar.

Bread Pudding a third Way.

TAKE two halfpenny rolls, and flice them very thin, cruft and all, (if they are ftale grate them with a grater) boil a pint of new milk and pour on them cover ihem over, and let them ftand to cool % then beat the bread and milk well, put in a little melted butter, beat up two eggs and put in, with a little fair, nutmeg, and ginger, mix all well together, put it in a cloth, and boil it three quarters of an hour i then turn it into the di(b, and pour melted butter, fpgar, and a fpoonful of vinegar mixed over it.

Bread Pudding baked.

TAKE the crumb of a two-penny loaf, cut it is thin dices, and put it into an earthen pan; boil % quart of milk, with a little cinnamon, lemon-peelt and a laurel leaf, ftrain it to the bread,, cover it over and let it ftand till it is cold; beat up four eggs and put to it, with two fpoonsful ot flour, half a pound of fugar, a fpoonful of ginger, and a pound of curv rants waflied and picked clean, all mixed well together; butter a pn or diih pour in the pudding, iind bake it

Bread

-.

380 PUDDINGS,

Bread and Butter Pudding.

TAKE a penny loaf, and cut it into thin llices of bread and butter, the fame as you do for tea, butter the bottoiu of the di(h, and cover it with the flices of bread and butter, then fprinkle a few currants on them clean waihed and picked, then a layer of bread and butter, and then currants, till you have put all the bread and butter in; beat up four eggs with a pint of milk, a little fait, grated nutmeg, fweeted it to your palate, put in a fpoonful of ro(c water, pour it over the bread and butter, and bake it half an iQXxr.

TranJarent Budding.

BREAK eight eggs into a ftew-pan, and beat them well with halt a pound of frefli butter, the fame quantity of fine powder fugar, and half a nutmeg grated, put it on the fire, and keep it ftirring till it is the thtcknefs of buttered es, then put it away to cool i put a pufiF-paite round the edge of the difl), pour in the pudding, bake it half an hour in a moderate oven, and fend it to table hot.

Buddings in little Dijhes.

TAKE the crumb of a penny loaf and rub it through a cullender, boil a pint of cream and pout over if, cover it clofc, let it Itand till it is cold, beat it fine, and grare in half a nutmeg; beat up the yolks of four and the whites of two eggs and put in, with a quarter of a pound of fugar, beat all well together; have five little wooden difties with tops to them, one larger than the reft, and fill the large one wich the following ingredients: blanch and ikin an

ounce

i

PUDDINGS, 381

ounce of fweet almond s beat them fine with a fpoonful of rofe water, and mix with it as much puddir as will fill the diih; colour one yelkw, with faflfton tied in a bag and I'queezed through; one red with a little 4:0c bineal bruited and put in a fpoonful of boiU iiig water; one green with fpinach juice; and one blue, with fyrup of violets i tie the covers on with packthread, when your pot boils put them r, and boil them one hour when they are done turn them out into a di(h the white one in the middle, and the coloured ones all round, pour fome melted butter and a glafs of fack mixed on them, and fprinkle powdered fugar over them and the di& Be fure to butter your diihes well before you put in the puddings.

Sweetmeat Pudding.

LAY a thin puff-pafte all over the did); theo take candied citron, lemon and orange peel, an ounce of each, cut them in thin dices, and lay theoA all over the bottom of the di(h; bat up the yolks of eight and the whites of two eggs, with a gill of creaoi, half a pound of Bne fugar, and the fame quantity of fre(h butter melted, beat it all well together and when the oven is ready pour it over the fweecmeats and bake it one hour in a moderate oven.

Ratifia Pudding.

BOIL a quart of cream with a ftick of cinna mon and fix laurel leaves; then cake out the cinnamon and laurel leaves, and break in half a pound of Naples bifcuit, the fame quantity o( butter, half a nutmeg grated, and a quarter of a pound of fugar te two ounces of fweet almonds and four bitcer

ones.

382 PUDDINGS.

ones, (not four ounces) blanch them, take off the flcins, and beat them fine in a mai:ble mortar with two fpoonsful of orange-Hower yater; beat up the yolks of five eggs, mix all well jethtr put it o?cr the fire, keep it ftirring till it is thick, and then put it away to cool; when it is cold put it into a di(h, with a puff-pafte round the edge of it, fprinklc powder fugar over the pudding, and bake it half ao hour in a moderate oven.

Plain Pudding.

BOIL a quart of cream with four or five laurel leaves; then take out the laurel leaves, and ftiria as much flour as will make it a thick hafty puddiog, take it off, then ftir in half a pound of freili buucr, a quarter of a pound of fugar, half a nutmeg grated, a little fait, and twelve yolks and fix whites of e well beaten; mix all well together, butter a dilb, pour it Ir, and bake it three quarters of an hour in ft moderate oven.



Chefnut Pudding.

PUT two dozen chefnuts into a fauce-pan of wa ter and boil them half an hour; then take off the (hells and (kins, and beat them fine in a marble mortar, with a little orange-flower or rofe water and fack, till they are of a fine pafte; beat, up the yolks of twelve and the whites of fix eggs, mix them with three pints of cream or new milk, grate in half a nutmeg, put in half a pound of frefii butter melted, the fame quantity of fugar, and a tea fpoonful of fait, mix all well together, put it over the fire, and keep it fllrring till it is thick, then take it ofi; and fet it away to cool lay a puflf-paftc round the edge

of

PUDDINGS. 383

cf the difli pour in the pudding, and bake it one

hour.

CoUBjlip Pudding.

GET about half a peck of cowfllps, pick the flowers off, chop and pound them fine, with a quarter of a pound of Naples bifcuic grated, and a pint and a half of new nulk or cream, boil them altogether a little, and then take them off the fire; beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs with a little cream and a fpoonful of rofe water fweeten it to your palate, ntix all well together, put kover a flow fire, keep it ftirring till it is thick, and then fet it away to cool; lay a puff-pafte round the edge of the difti, pour in the pudding, and bake it half an hour 5 when it is done fprinkle fome fine powdered fugar over it, and fend it to table hot.

Apricot Pudding.

?

TAKE a dozen aprfcots and coddle them till they arc tender, take the ftones out, bruife them, and rub them through a fieve; beat up the yolks of fix and the whites of three eegs, with a pint of cream and a quarter of a pound of fine fugar, mix them altogether; lay a puff-pafte all over tlvc di(h, pouf in the ingredients, and bake it half an hour in i. moderate oven; when it is enough fprinkle fomc fine powder fugar over it, and fend it to table hot.

You may drefs white pear plums in the fame ftianncr,

m

ince Pudding.

TAKE fix quinces, pare them very thin, cut them in quarters, put them into a faucc-pan, with a

little

384 PUDDINGS,

little water tnd lemon-peeU cover them clofe, and ftew them gently till they are tender; then rub them through a fieve, mix it with fugar very fweec and put in a little beaten cinnamon and ginger; beat up tour eggs with a pint of cream or new milk, and tdr ic well into the quinces till they are of a good tbicknefs 1 lay a puff pafte round the edg of the diih) or butter it pour in the pudding, bake it three quarters of an hour in a moderate oven and fend it to (able hot.

Italian Pudding.

LAY a puff-pafte over the bottom and round the edge of the difb, pare and flice twelve pippins and lay in it, cut fome candied orange-peel fine and throw over them, with a quarter of a pound of fugar and half a pint of red wine; take a pint of cream, and dice fome French rolls very thin into it, as mucb as will make it thick, beat up ten eggs well and put into the cream and bread, pour it oyer the reft, and bake it one hour in a moderate oven.

Pearl Barley Pudding.

TAKE half a pound of pearl barley, waih it clean, and put to it three pints of new milk, a quarter of a pound of fugar, and half a nutmeg grated, put it into a deep earthen pan, and bake it one hour with the brown bread; take ic out of the oven, and let it ftand till it is cold; then beat up fix eggs and mix with it, butter a di(h, pour it in, and bake it one hour longer.

Pearl

PU D D IN G .S. 385

Pearl Barley Pudding afecond Way.

• TAKE half a pound of pearl barley, and boil it in two quarts of water till ic is tender, ftrain it in a iieve, put it into a fauce-pan with a quart of milk, aod boil it a quarter of an hour put in a little beaten cinnamon grated ginger and nutmeg, and fweeten it to,your palate, put in a quarter of a pound of melted butter,, beat up eight eggs with a ipoonful of rofe water, mix all well together, put ic over a flow fire, keep it ftirring till it is thick, and then let it ftand to cool; when it is cold butter n difl), pour it in, and bake it one hour

French Barley Pudding.

TAKE half a pound of French barley, and boil it in two quarts of milk till it is tender % beat up fix egg well and mix with a quart of cream, a fpoonful of orange-flower or rofe water, and a pound of frefli butter melted, ftrain off the barley and mix with it, with half a pound of fugar; butter the bottom of a deep di(h, pour it in, and bake it two hours.

Apple Pudding baked.

PARE twelve large pippins, cut them in quar ters, and core them, put them into a faucepan, with a little water and a piece of lemon-peel, cover them, and ftew them till they are tender thea beat them well, fiir in half a pound of loaf fugar, the juice of a lemon, fome lemonpeel Ihred fine, half a nutmeg grated, beat up the yolks of eight eggs and put in, with a ghfs of fack, and mix all well together i lay a puflT-pafte round the edge of the

C c difh.

586 P U D I N S.



di(h, pour in the pudding, and bake it half an hour in a moderate oven 9 when it h done ftrew ibaie fine powdered fugar over it, and lend it up hot.

Apple Pudding boiled.

TAKE about a pound of fldur dnd half a pound of butter, and rub it fmooth, 6r half i. pound of beef-fuet (bred vefy fine make it into a ftiff pafte with cold water, and roll it out rdund about half an ihch thick; lay the cloch in a "round deep pan or ileve, fiour it and put the crull on it; pare is . mafiy apples that will boil well as will fill the cnifti cut them in quarters core them, and put them in till the cruft is full, chop fome lemon-peel very fine and put in, with a little quince marmalade, clofe it at the top, an tie the cloth tight; if a fmall ope, boil it two hours; a large one, three or four; when it is done take it up, turn out the part that it was tied at downwards in a deep di(h, cut a piece off the top, malh the apples with a.fpoon, and mix in t little butler and fugar; put the piece on the top again, and ftnd it to table hot. with fine powder fugac and dices of cold butter in plates.

, Pruen Pudding.

MIX pound of flour with a quart of milk, beat up fix egs and mix with it, with a little fait and a fpoonful of beaten ginger; beat it well till it Is t fine ftiff batter, put in a pound of pruens, tie it in a cloth, and boil it one hour aild a half; when it is done put it in a dilh, and pour melted butter over it. If damfons are in feafon you may ufc them the fame way.

t

c



Mt!S ii ipootiful of flour with the fame quantity tf creabf, ond egg a little gfated nutrne ginger ind(aAn nt'ije it well together i butter a little wocen bdl of fmall bafoir put in the pudding, tie a clotk 4Mr the tdp) and boil i half an hoUh Ifou ma 4dd a ftw etirrants cleaM walked and pibkedi

Citron Puddings

MIX half a pint of cream with a fpoonAil of n fioui two ounces of fin powdet fqgar, a little grated nbtng, and three eggs beat Up fine mil the 01 ali well pthelr; butter Ibtne fmall moulds or cupS) pour in the ingredients, cm two ounces of candied citron in flips and put in, and bake them a quarter of an hour in a quiek oven; then turn them ' out into a dim, fpririkle powder fugar over them, ifid ftnd them td latfle hot;

Lenton Tontier Puddingk

TA%R three fine lemons and grate the outward rind off put it intd a marble mortar with three quarters of a poiind of powder fugar, th fiunt quantity of freih butter, the yolks of eight eggs and the juiee of one lemon, beat it well for one hour; lay a thin puf-pafte all over a deep dilh, and HUr in the pudding, put fome thin flips of piifF taft, or pafle cut in the Ihslpe of leaves over it tad bake it three quarters of an hour

Yovi may make an orange pudding the (ame way only you muft pari the rinds off very thin, and boil Miem in three different waters till they are tender and the bhteinds i$ gone off.

C c a Petatof

388 PUDDINGS.

Potatoe Pudddirig.

TAKE two pounds of potatoes boil tbem peel them bruife them fine and rub them through a fiert with the bck of a wooden fpoon, mix them witk half a pound of fine fugar, a pound of frelh butter melted, a glafs of fack or brandy, half a nutmeg;rated, a little lemon-peel Ihred fine, and beat op ixeggs well and put in; mix all the ingredienti well together, and put in half a pound of currants clean walhed and picked; dip your cloth into boiling water, put in the pudding, tie it clofe and boil it one hour $ when it is done turn it into the di(h, pour melted butter, fack, and fugar mixed over it, and fend it to table hot. Tou may leave out the currants if you pkafe.

Potatoe Pudding afecond W(y.

BOIL two pounds of white potatoes, peel them, and bruife them fine in a mortar, with half a pound of melted butter, and the yolks of four eggs put it into a cloth, and lx)il it half an hour; then turn it into the di(b, pour melted butter, with a glals of fweet wine and he juice of a Seville orange mixed over itj and ftrew powder fugar over all.



Potatoe Pudding a third Way.

BOIL two pounds of mealiy potatoes, peel them, bruife them in a mortar, and rub them through a fine fieve with the back of a wooden fpoon; thea mix them up with half a pound of melted butter, beat up the yolks of eight and the wjiites of four ggS) with half a pint of cream, half a pound of fine fugar, half a nutmeg grated, a gill oH fack, and

a gla&

P U D D I NO S. 389

Jlglafs of brandy, mix the ingredients all well toge Cher; lay a puflT-pafte round the edge of the difb pour in the pudding, make it fmooth at the top and put on fome candied citron, lemon, or orange-peel cut in thin flips, and bake it one hour in a moderate oven. Yo.u may put in half a pound of currants clean walhed and picked, or ftrew a few currants on the top with the fweetmeats

Tarn Pudding.

TAKE about two pounds of yam, pare it, boil it till it is tender, maflx it, and rub it through a fie ve; beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs, with half a pint of cream, half a pound of melted butter, the fame quantity of fugar, a gill of fack, a fmall glafs of brandy, a little grated nut meg and ginger, a tea-fpoonful of fair, a fpoonful of orange-flower or rofe water,' put in the yam, and mix all well together; either put it in a cloth, and boil it one hour, or lay a pufl-pafte round the edge of the difli, pour it in, and bake it three quarters of an hour.

You may put in half z pound of currants well walhed and picked.

Flour Hqfty Pudding.

TAKE a quart of milk, put in four bay leaveit and fet it on the fire to boil; beat up the yolks of two eggs with a little cold milk and fait, ftir theia into the milk, take out the bay leaves, then with a wooden fpoon in one hand, and flour in the other, ftir It in till it is of a good thicknefs, but not too thicks keep it (tirring, and let it boil; then pour it into a deep di(h, and put pieces of butter here aod these on iu

C c 3 Yom

399 P U D D r N O 9

You may put a piece of bqcttr in tb mk iflfttii of the eggs if you like ic lefl:

Oatmeal Kafiy Pit44in

PUT a quart of milk on the fire, and iivhcii ijl boils put i(i a picfce of butter and a little ialc, thcQ ftir in the oatmeal as you do the floiu fill it is of die fame thicknefs keep it ftirring, and kr it boil a few minutes; then pour it into a deep dilb, andfticic pieces of butter in it; or eat it with wine and fqgar, or ale and fugar, or creanrit as you like l)e(t,

lmon4 Puddingf in Slins.

TAKE a pound and a half of Jordafi aknoodsi boil them one minute take oflF the' (kins, ai beat xhem well in a inarbie mortar with a little rofe water to keep them from oiling; then put in a pou of fine bread-crumb99 a pound and a quarter of £d( iugar, a quarter of an ounce of cinnamon, a fmaV outpaee beat ne, half 4 pound of meted butttri the yolks of eight and the whites of four gs, bef ."well with a pint pf fack and lialf a pint of aeaaii (firit boil the cream with 9 little fal&pi) and ftr it through a lawn fieve) boil a quarter of a pound of vermicelli a miiucf in watjrr, ftraiq ic o£f in a fieve, and pnix all the ingredients well togectier have fomc •fcog's'gpts nice aad idean, fill thqm only half f)ll and as you put in thl ingredient pujt iip a )utp citron cut fmali hexp and l;faere, tie bojth end of tte 'put tight, and bipil them gotly a quaiter of sa •hour I then put them in 4 di, ind fend ibem hK 'to table.

You nuiy, for a choge put in half poynd of • currantj; clean wcd sad.pickei

1

PUDDINGS. 391

Tanfey Pudding lolled.

BOIL a quart of cream, and put it over a quarter of a pound of Naples bifcuit s beat up the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs, put a fev? tanfcy leaves with a handful of fpinach in a mortar and bruife them, iqueeze the juice out through a clean rag, put in half a pound of fugar, and a little grated nutmeg, mix all the ingredients well together, put it over the fire, and keep it ilirring till it is thick; then put it away to cool, and when it is cold tie it tight in a cloth, and boil it one hour when it is done take it up, carefully turn it into a difh, and pour melted butter, fweet wine, and fugar mixed over it.

Tanfey Pudding ivith Almonds.

TAKE the crumb of a penny French roll and fltce it very thin, boil a pint of cream and pour on it, and cover it over; take a quarter of a pound of almonds, boil them one minute, take .off the fkins, and beat them in a marble mortar, with two fpoonsful of roic water; beat up fix eggs well, and mix with the eggs a quarter of a pound of fine fugar, a little grated nutmeg, and a glafs of brandy; bruife about a dozen leaves of tanfey with a handful of fpinach, fqueeze the juice through clean rag and put n mix all the ingredients well together with a quarter of a pound of fredi butter melted, put it over a flow fktCy keep it Ilirring till it is thick, and then put it away to cool; when it is cold tie it in a cloth, and boil it one hour; then turn it into a di(h and pour melted butter, fweet wine and fugar mixed over it,

C c 4 yon

-wr" I ppwH



392 PUDDINGS.

You may pot a puflF-pafte round the edge of the dilby pour in the ingredients, and bake. it.

TCanfey Pudding baked.

BOIL a quart of milk with a little lemon-peel and two laurel leaves, flrain it over a quarter of a pound of Naples bifcuit; beat vp the yolks of eight and the whites of four eggs with a fpoonful of role water; put a handful of tanfey leaves to two bandsful of fpinach, bruife them in a mortar, and fquccze the juice through a clean rag, grate in half a nutmeg, put in half a pound of fine fugar, and a quar ter of a pound of butter melted; mix the ingredients altogether, put it over a flow fire, and kcqi it ftirring till it is thick; then take it off, fet it away to cool, and ftir in a glafs of brandy; put a puffpafte round the edge of the diib, pour in the ingredients, put a little candied fweetmeats over it, and bake it three quarters of an hour in a mo(ierate oven. • '

Little Cbeefe Curd Puddings.

TAKE a gallon of milk and turn it with rennet, then drain all the curd from the whey, put the curd into a mortar, and beat it up with halt a pound of frefli butter till the curd and butter are well mixed; then beat up the yolks of fix and the whites of three eggs and firain them to the curd, with two Naples bifcuics and the crumb of a halfpenny roll grated, mix the ingredients well together, fweeten it to your palate, and grate in half a nutmeg; butter your patty-pans, put in the pudding, and bake them in a flack oven; when they are done turn them out into a dilb, cut candied citron and orange-peel in flips about an inch logg, and blanched dmonds in

flips.

TT"

PUDDINGS. 393

flips, and ftick on the tops of th$ puddings as you fancy,, pour -melted butter and fack mixed in the difli, and fprinkle powder fugar over all.

Suet DumpKns.

TAKE a pound of beef-fuet and (fared it fine ut it to a pourfd-tjf flour, a tea-fpoonFul of fait, and a little grated ginger, mix it up with two eggs and milk to a (tiff pafte, put a quarter of a pound of currants clean waflied and picked to half of it, roll them about three inches long, and flatten them with your hand; have a pot or ₯fater boiling, puc them in, and boil them twenty minutes; when they are done take them up, cut a flit in the middle, put in a thin flice of butter, and fend them to table hot

Suet Dumplins a fecond Way.

TAKE a pound of beef-fuet and flired it fine,' put it to a pound of flour, a tea-fpoonful of falc, and a little grated ginger, mix it up with four eggs well beaten, and milk till it is a ftiflr batter; then put them into cloths the fize of a tennis ball or k goofe's egg, and boil them one hour then turn then into a difli, with melted butter in a boat.

Teajt Dumpitns.

MAKE a light dough, as for bread, with flour water, fait, and yeafl:, cover it with a cloth and fee it before the Are for half an hour to nft; have a iauce-pan of water on the fire boiling, make the dough into little round balls as big as a hen's egg, flatten them with your hand, put them into the boiI ing water, and boil them ten minutes; (mind thejr do not ftick to the bottom, as that will make them

heavy

94 PUDDING •

liray y) wlien they arc don put them in a dilh, anl lur melted butter, fugar and a fpoonful of vinegar mixed over them.

If there is a baker near you, the beft way is to fend for as much dough as you want and that irill iave you a great deal of trouble.

Norfolk Dumplins.

BREAK two eggs into half a pint of milk, tod beat them up, then mix it with flour to a ftiff batter, -tod put in a little fait; put a fauce-ppan of water oq the fire, and when it boils drop the batter in with a large fpoon, and boil them quick for five minutes; then carefully take them out with a dice, lay them jm a £eve to drain a minute, put them into a difli, cut a piece of butter in thin flices and ftir amongft lbcm 4nd fend t;heip up a;$ hot;2is you am.

Hard Dumplins.

Mix icKoe fiour and water with a little fak and fceaten ganger into a ftiff pftfte, have fome flour in yoiir hand, axid roll them' out in bills as big a a turkey's egg; have a (auce-pan of water boihogi put them in, amd boil them half an hours or if fou are boiling a piece of beef, boil them with it, which will be better; (you may add a few currants for a change) when they are done put them in a di(h widi " butter in a boat.

Hard Dumplins afecond Way.

RUB a little butter into your flour, with a lictk fait, and mix it into a ftiff paftc with milk, make em in round balls, and boil them as before.

Atfk

PUp?INGS. 395

. 3

I

pple DumpUnt.

MAKE a py&Uie, but npt too rich, pare a many large apples as you wairt, cue them in quartersy and take out the cores i roll a piece of cru(( round, enou for onc large 09 two fimil apples, put in the appli with a little lemOn-peel fhred fine, and with your hand make them up like a bail, with a lijtle flppTi have apot of water boiling, tak a cban ck)th tiip it in the water, and flour it, tie each dumplin by itlelf, put them in the water boiling, and luuitbfinthrice.guters of an hourj thea tak! iem m put hcQ in a ciih,, drew powder fugar oyer pee) wichf)ats or jccs of butter d ppdr fu ill pliteSf,

Jlppk Dumpiins afecwi W

Take half Aozen of the lrgeft apples you can et, pare them and take out the cores with an apple corcr, fill the holes with quince or orange marPlide, or With beateo cinnamon and lemon-peel flitd fine mixed with powder fugar a rub halif a .pound of butter with a poqnd Of ilour, make it into ftiff pafte with cold water, roll a piece out rounder .put in the apple, and cloCb the pafte oyer it tie them jq feparate cloths, and boil them one hours then i:arefuUy turn thpm into a difliy fprinkle powder fugar over them, with pts or Alices pf butter and powder fugar in plates.

CHAPe

V 11

-

C 39 1

CHAP. XVIL

E S.

Proper Rules to be objerved in making and

baking Pies.

WHEN you heat your oven, it muft be rcgo lated according to the pie you intend to bake: for a venifon pafty it muft be well heated, a that requires a great deal of foaking; and raifcd pb muft have a quick oven, and well clofed up, orelie your pie will fall in the fides. Never put any liquor in till it is half baked; then take it out, make a hole in the middle of the lid, and with a funnel put in what gravy you think fit; by this means your ingredients in the pie will eat better, and prevent it from looking foddened; and if the pie is raifed properly ic will not run, for when it runs it always fpoils it. For light puflT-pafte a moderate heated oven, but not too flack, as that will deprive it of the light appearance it fhould have; and a quick oven will catch and burn it, without giving it time to rife: the beft way is, to roll out a bit of pafte and put it into the oven, to try whether it is too hot or not. Iced tarts (hould have a flow oven, or the icing will be brown before the pafte is thoroughly baked. Wbco you put in a venifon pafty, raifed or meat pie, pot a flicct of paper over it, and that will prevent it from catching.

Great care muft be taken of the butter for making pafte, according to the different feafons, in order

to

3. ' 397

to kiatke it light and good: in cold weather it flbould be worked icy to make it pliable; and if fait huu ter, well walhed in frelh water. In hot weather yoa ihould put it in a cold cellar the over-night, in the nx)ming put it in cold fpring water, and handle it as little as poilibie. Make your pafte in hot weather as early as you can in the morning, before the fun has too much power, and keep it ig a cold place till you want to bake it

TAKE a quarter of a peck of fine flour, and rub in a pound of butter till it is fine, make it up in a light pafte with cold water, fliff enough to work it up, but do not work it too much, as that will make it heavy; then roll it out about as thick as a crown piece, put a layer of butter in lumps as big as a OQtmeg all over it, fpriokie a little flour over it, and double it, roll it out again, and double it three or four times, then it will be fit for ufe, either for pies, tarts, or any thing elfe that requires it. You may make a larger or fmaller quantity, by adding or di minifliing the quantity of flour and butter.

Tart Pafie.

TAKE a pound of flour and rub tn three quarters of a poupd of butter very fine, mix it up to a ftifi pafte with a little cold water, work it well, and roll u out thin for the ufe you want it.

Tart Pafie another Way.

MtS a pound of flour, three quarters of a pound of butter, and four ounces of fine fugar well togeer, make it into a ftiff pafte with a little cold

water

9 ' I t EI 5i

ster Work k 1 witli: fMp h&ndi uif dieii iidt il eot thin' fbr ufe. Vmi may pat the yolk of an egg m if you like it

Raijing Pajle.

PUT a pound of butter into a utrt of watery and boil it till th butter ii meitcd take a qaarrcr rf a peck of fine flour make a hde in t lie middle of ity pour in all the butter and as much of the waief as will make it a very, ft iff ifte, york it well, aod mind that it is veryttifF; pftii: it under a piece of jtfannel before th fire for half an hckir to at tficD take what quantity you wane, (and keep the orixr covered to keep it warm) and work it wcU in wlut &ape you chofe to hav ir.

it wjil ferve either for large or final I pies or eiif tard; and by this mctjtod;f ou may make molt t tU by the fame rule according to the quantity tM you have occafion fori a this is fofficitnt forwt good fized pie, mamencs, 6cc.

Andtber raifihg Pajie.

TAKE two pounds of beef, mutton, or Utfib fuet (hred fine, put ic intoa faiKrepan with a little water, cover it dole, put it over a flow fire, and render it, but not too much then (h'ain it throo a fieve into a gallon of cold water, let it ftaiid ftf one hour put it into a faucepan ili4th a quart- water, and boil ic upi take half a pbck of flWi make a round hole in the middle, pour in all thefoi and as much water as will make it into a ftiff p and work it well up; then put it under a piece of flannel before the fire, and proceed as b€fore

I

t' I £ j



kuhbed Pujie.

kUB a pound of butter into two pounds of flour till it is fine, put in the yolks of two eggs, mix ic well up with a little cold water, and work it with youf" hands for a few minutes; then U may ufe i( r tarts or common meat pies.

Dripping Pajie

TAKE two pounds of clean beef-dripping and boil i( up in a faucet pan, ft rain it through a fieve into two gallons of cold water, let it ftand in it for two hours, (if it is cold weather you may work x in the water well with your hands) and make puffpMle with the fame a with butter; if hot weather put it itltb a quarttr of a peck of flour, and make it into a ftifT pafte with a little cold water. Tou may render fuet the fame as for railing cruj.

Crackling Pajie

TAKE a pound of almondsi fcald them in boil H9g water, take off the flcins, wipe them dry with i clean cloth, beat tham id it mortar very fliie with Kttle rofe or orange-Aower Water and the white of atf egg) then rub it throtigh t fiete wioh the back of a fpoon to take out the kimps work it well on a difli' till it is pliable, and roll it out thin for a bottom to put preferred fruit on, with leaves of puflpa(i baked and put over it.

Sbrewjbury Fajle.

RUB half a pound of butter with a pound of 'our, a quarter of a pound of powder fugar, the

yolks

400 PIES.

yolks of three eggs, and a little milk to moiften tt work it up into a ftiff pafte. and roll it out tUn for

tartS9 &c.

•

Cfocant Pafte.

TAKE one pound of flour and two ounces of £ne powder fugaf, make a hole in the middle, and put in two fpoonsful of rofe water, and the yolks of as many eggs as will make it. a flifF pafte, work it up with your hands, put it into a mortar, and beat k well for half an hour; then roll it out thin, tobi little Tweet oil over your mould, lay on the pafte and cut it into flowers, birds, &€• or any ihape you fancy.

This is a thing that few attempt, without bdog taught by fome pcrfon who is a complete mafter of jt i for it is not eafily learned without time and experience.

Gum Pqfie.

STEEP one ounce of gum-dragon in a tea-cupful of cold water all night i the next morning have a pound of double-refined fugar pounded and fifced through a (ilk fieve, rub the gum through a hiir fieve with a fpoon, then mix the gum and fugar to gether with a firong hand, and by working ic will become as white as fnow, then take a little fine flour and make it into a (tiflT pafl:e, roll it out, and cut it into what form you pleafe, to put over preferyed fruits, &c. or work it into moulds, firfl: rubbing tiiem with a feather dipped in fweet oil, turn it ou and put it on Savoy cakes, or any thing that you want to ornament with it and dry it in a cool oveoi or before a fire

Venifn

Vinifon Pajiy.

TAKE a i)eqk and brcaft or fhould?r and breaft cut off the fkin, bone ir, wafh it well out, and cue it in large pieces, notch the edges, and fave the fattefl piece to lay on the top rub two pounds of butter into half a peck of flour,, mix it into a palle with cold water moderately (lifF, lay a thin fheet Over the edge and fides of a deep paftydiOi, buc hone ai: the bottoni, fprinkle fome pepper and Jalc in, and lay in the venifon as fhug as you can, with the fat piece at the top well feafoned with pepper and fait, and iut in a gill of water; roll a piece of palte out about half an inch. thick wet the edge of the difh, lay it on, and make; a round hole at th top; then take the other pafte, roll it out, and put half a . pound of butter in lumps upon it; fprinkle fome flour on, it double it, and roll it oUt two or three times; then with your brulh . wet the other padeand lay it on, work a round place at th top sknd ornament it with leaves cut in pafte with a rofci at the top, with ftrings of pafte twifted, or any device you arc capable of making, put a Iheet of paper over it, and bake it four hours in a well-heated vcn; when it comes out cut a hole in the top, pour in a pint of venifon gravy, and Ihake it about, as is •dire fted in the chapter for fauces.

This is a much better vay than ftewing it firft, or baking it in two crufts, for it will be tenderer and better flavoured.

If your venifon is not fat enough, take the fa.t of

loin of mutton, and fteep it in a little rape vinegar and

icd wine all night, put your venifon in firft, and lajf

the mutton at the top; or you may fteep it in red

ihe only.,

I?, d Miif

402 PIES.

Beef-Steak Pie.

PUT a little rubbed cruft on the edge of the dift, cut your fteak$ thin, beat them with a roUiogrpin, fealon them with pepper and falt lay t1iem in the difli till it is full, and then put in a gill of water; roll ibme puff-pafte out about an inch thick and put over them, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, ornament the top with leaves cut in pafte, and bake ic two hours in a well-heated oven; when it is taken out, if you find there is not gravy enough, pour in a little good gravy, and give it a fhake about. You maf make it ith a raifed pafte ornamented.

Mutton Pie.

TAKE a loin of mutton, cut off the (kin and in- fide fat, cut it into thin chops, and feafon them with pepper and falc Uy a thin ibeet of pafle on the edge of the di(h, and put in the chops with half a pint of water; roll out a piece of puff-paile about three quarters of an inch thick, put it over them, clofe it, ornament the top with leaves, or any way you fancy, and bake it in a moderate oven two hours.

Ox-Cheek Pit.

TAKE an ox-cheek, wafh it well, put it in a

deep earthen pan, cover it with water, and put it in

the oven all night; take it out in the morningi 2nd

cut all the meat and kernels from the head, in the

iame manner as for a halh; take a deep di(h, put a

layer of pafte round the edge and fides, lay in ihe

meat, with the palate boiled tender, ikinned, and

cut in pieces; wa(h an ounce of truffles and oioiek

well, and throw over the meat, with the yolks of

fix hard eggs, two dozen force-meat balls boiMi

Tome fre(h or pfckled mulhrooms, two artkhoke

bottoms cut in four, and afparagus tops boiled, it

they are in feafon 1 feafon it with pepper and fait to

your

.

ymr palate, and about lialf fill the difh ith the gravy ic was baked in s roll out a piece of puffpafte about an inch thick and put over it, clofe it, and ornament ic with leaves, &c. at the top bake it till the cruil is done and fend it up hot%

Chejhire Pvri Pie.

TAKE a loin of pork, fkin it, cut it into thin chops,, and feafon them with grated nutmeg, pepper and fait $ put a thin pafte round the edge of the diOi lay a layer of pork, thtn a layer of pippins, pared, cored and cat in quarters, with a little fugar ftrewed over (hem, then a layer of pork, then of pippina and fugar, and a layer of pork at the top, put feme butter on the pork, fill the difli half full of white wine, put a good puff'-pafte over it ornament it as you fancy, and bake it well.

Druonhire Squab Pk.

CUT the flcin and infide fat off a loin of mutton, and cut it into thin chops % pare and core fome good baking apples and cut them in dices ( peel and (lice fome large Onions; lay a thin pafte over the bottom of the difh, put in a layer of mutton, pepper and fait it, then a layer of apples and onions, another . layer of mutton feafoned, a layer of apples and onions, and fo on till the difh is full pour in a pint of water, put a pufF-pafte pretty thick over it, clofc it, and ornament it at the top -, it will take two houra and a half baking iu a well-heated oven.

Sbrpjhirt Pie.

LAy a (heet of paftc round the edge and fides of a deep dilh, cut two rabbits in pieces, with two pounds of fat pork cut into fmall pieces, feafon both with pepper and fait to your liking, and lay them irttamiixed in the dilh; parboil the livers of the rabbits, and beat them in a mortar with as much fat

D d t bacon

404 p I te s.

bacon, a little parfley and fweet herbs choppei fine, and half: a dozen oyfters, feafoned with pepper and falc, beat them all well, mix them up with the yolk of an egg make it into round baHs and lay them over the meat, .with a few truf&es and morels and artichoke bottoms cut in dice, and cocks-combs if you have any, grate a fmall nutmeg over all, pour in half a pint of red wine and half a pint of water; put a good thick puff-pafte over it, clofe it, ornament the top, and bake it two hours in a WelKheatcd toven.

Ham and Cbrcken Pii.

BOIL a fmail ham about three parts enough to take oflf the rind, and when it is cold cut it into flices, about half an inch thick; lay a thin iheetof pafte at the bottom of a deep di(h, then put in a layer of ham, and fprinkle a little pepptr over it; draw, trufs, and finge one or two chickens, according to the fize of the pie you intend to make, waih it well, feafon the infide with beaten mace, pepper and fait, rub a little fait on the outfide, put the chicken on the ham, with fix yqlks of hard eggs round it, fome truffles and morels well wafhed, a tew frefli mufhrooms firft dewed a little, an artichoke bottom cut in pieces, and a few afparagus tops boiled, if you have any, lay the ham over them, fprinkle a little pepper over the ham, and put in a little good gravy; lay on a good thick pufF-paftc, clofe it, omament it at the top as you fancy, and bake it well iwhen it is taken out put in a pint of

I white cullis as hot as you can, give it a fliakc round,

I and fend it to table hot.

All the above pies may be made with a raifcd

cruft, if you chufc to take the trouble tp raifc thcflJ, or like it bcft.

J

1

P I E S, 4P5,

Sweet Veal or Lami Pie.

TAKE any pare of veal of lamb except thf breaft, and cut it into little p'ieces free from any bone, leafon it with beaten macej cloves, nucmeg, pepper an.d fait; lay a thin Iheet of puff pafte all over the ' bottom and edge of the diih, then put in your mtatt' ftrew on it fome raifins ftoned currants clean waihed and picked, and fugar, put on fome force-meat balls lAade fweet, tnftead of leafonjng in them and in the fammer fome artichoke bottoms boiled and cut in pieces, in the winter fcalded grapcsi two or three Spanifli potatoes boiled and cut in piecea, if yot( have then fome candied citron, orange, and lemon- peel cut in flireds, grate half a nutmeg over it, and put fome butter at the top; lay a moderate thick puff-pafte over it, clofe it ornament the top with ieayes, &c. and bake it two hours in a wellneated oven, but not too hot. Againfl: it is taken out of tbe oven have the following caudle ready: take a pine of mountain wine, beat the yolks of three eggs in it, and itir it well together over the fire till it is thick 5 then take it off, fweeten it with pawder fuar, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, put it in your pie as hoc as you can, clofe it again, and fend it to table hot; or you may put the wine in a faucepan, with fugar enough to fweeten it, and make it boil; beat up the yolks of three eggs with a little of the wine, and pour them backward and forward two or three times out of one fauce-pan into ano ther, then make it hot, fqueezc in the juice of lemon, and pour it into the pie.

Veal Pie.

CUT fome chops ofF a loin of veal, but not too fat, cut the lean off the trhump-end in thin dices, feafon them with beaten mace, nutmeg, pepper, and fait lay a thin pafte round the edge of your diOi, ot 1,11 the meat, with fome hard yolks of eggs,

D d 3 i(brcfw

466 t I E S

force-meat balls, actichoke bottoms, truffles and morels, over the meat, or leave them out, a$yoti think proper put ibme butter at the top, and a little l;ater in it $ la a good pufF-pafte over it, clofek, ocoamcm the top, and bake it well; when it is taken opt put in fome good gravy, and fend it to tabic hot

Lamb Pie.

TAKE a loin of lamb, cut off the (kin and ixt of the kidneyfat, cut it into thin chops, and feafon tliCQEi with pepper and falti lay a thin fheec of pafle round the edge of the difli, put in the meat, with half a pint of water; put pufF-pafte over it, clofe x ornament the top, bake it well, and fend it to tble hoc

Veal or Lamb Pie raifed.

.MAKE a hot parte, as direfted, with butter, raifc it as high as you can, cither round or longj cut fpme veal or lamb from the bones in fmall thin Qices, put in a layer, and feafon it with ptpper, fait, and grated nutmeg; have fome veal fwectbreads blanched and cut in fmall pieces, fome lambs ftones Ikinned, truffles and morels well waflicd, feme frefh mulhrooms ftcwed a little, two artichoke bottoms cut in fmall pieces, force-meat balls boiled, a few afparagus tops' boiled, if in feafon, put in a layer of thciDi and then meat, till your difh is full, feafon it as you put it in, then put on the lid, clofe it, rub it all over with the yolk of an egg, ornament it all rounds and on the top, with leaves, fruit, &c, cut out of paftei put a Ihcet of paper over it, and bake it as direftcd in the beginning of this chapter; when it is dooCj have a pint of white cullis, take off the lid, ikim off the fat, put the cullis in, put on the lid againj aad fend it to table hot. It eats very well cold

PIES. 40

Veal Olive Pie.

CUT fome thin dices oflF a ffllcc of veal, the fame as for veal olives, as many as you think wiiJbfiU your pie, hack them with the back of a knife, with a brulh rub them over with the yolks of .eggs, and fprinkle them with beaten cloves, mace, nutnieg, pepper, and falc, a handful of parlley and fweet herbs, a little fpinach well wafhed, a liule beef fuet, two or three hard eggs, and a few oyfters, all chop ped fine and mixed together; lay a thin pafte round the edge of the dilh, roll them up, and put them in the difh clofe together, put in a few yolks of hard £ggs, fome force-meat balls, trufHes and morels well ivaflicd, a few freft) mufhrooms, Tprinkle them over with the mixture that is left, put fome butter at the top, and a little water in put a good pufF-pafte over', clpfe it, ornament the top, and bake it well; when it is taken out of the oven put in fome good gravy, and fend it up hot.

You may make a raifed pie the fame way as veal orjajpnb pies by putting in the ingredients the fame way.

Calf's Foot Fie.

PUT as many calves feet on the fire in a fauce pan as you think you fhall have occafion for, and vater fufficient to cover them, with two or three blades of mace, and boil them till they are tender -, then take out the feet, and drain off the liquor; lay thin (heet of pufF-pafte at the bottom and round the edge of a deep difli, then pick the flefh off the hones and lay half of it in, ftrcw half a pound of currants clean waflied and picked, and half a pound of raifins ftoned over it, lay On the reft of the meat, im the liquor, and fweeten as much of it as will nearly fill the pie with half a pint of white wine, and pour it into the dilh; put on a lidof good puff D d 4 paftc.

1

4IO PIES.

one that is made with wax and puc on. It will be better to make it over-night, as there is a great deal of work in it, and the pafte will ftand the better.

Torkjhire Cbrijimas Pie.

TAKE a fine large turkey, a goofe, large fowl 9 partridge, and a pigeon, and bone them all nicely j beat half an ounce of mace, half an ounce of nutmegs, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, half an ounce of white pepper ground, and two large fpoonsful of fait, all mixed together; open all the fowls down the back, lay the turkey on the drefler, fcafon it in the infide, lay the goofe breaft downwards in ibc turkey, then feafon the goofe, put in the fowl the fame way, then the partridge, then the pigeon, dofc them together, to make them look like 'a whole turkey, as well as you can; cafe and bone a hare, and cut it in pieces, with fix woodcocks, moor game, or fmall wild fowl all boned; make a bulhcl of fiour ith ten pounds of butter into a pafte, as dircftcd, make the bottom and fides very thick, and raife it as high as you can, put in fome feafoning, then lay in the turkey, &c. breaft uppermoft, lay the hare on one fide, and the woodcocks, moor game, or wild fowl, on the other fide, fprinkle feafoning over all, put four pounds of butter on the top, lay on a thick lid, ornament the fides and top, but firft rub it over with the yolk of an egg, put paper over ir, and bake it in a hot oven for fix hours; let it ftand till it is cold before you cut it. It will keep a good while.

Goofe Pie.

BOIL a fmall neats tonge till it is tender, peel it, and cut off the root and tip-end; bone a large goofe and a large fowl; mix half an ounce of beaten mace with a fpoonful of pepper and one of fait, fcafon the infide of the fowl and goofe, put the fowl in the goofe, and the tongue in the fowl j make the hot

pafte,

PIES. 411

pafte with half a peck of flou as direfled in the beginning of this chapter, raife it high put in the. goofe breaft uppermoft, fprinkle fome fcafoning on it, lay on half a pound of butter, put on the lid, rub It all over with the yolk of an egg, ornamenc the (ides and top, and bake it three hours; if it is to be eat hot, put the bones of the goofe and fowl into a fauce-pan, with a quart of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, two blades of mace, a little pepper and fait, and ftew it till it is above half watted; then drain it off, and one hour before she pie is done take it out, and put the liquor in, and when it is done fend it to table hot. If it is to be eat cold, put no liquor in •, when it is cold, cut it in dices acrofs if you pleafe, put it in a di(h and garnifh it vith parflcy for a fide difh for fupper.

Turkey Pie mth green Truffles.

TAKE a turkey and bone it i make a force meat as follows: take the flefh of a fmall fowl, a little lean veal, a quarter of a pound of fat bacon, and half a pound of beef fuet chopped all fine, a little parfley, fweet herbs, lemon-peel, and fix fhallots ihred fine, feafon it with beaten mace, pepper and fait, mix it all well up with the yolks of two eggs and put in the infide of the turkey; raife a fhcU big enough to hold it, then put in the turkey i pare the lind off a dozen large trufBes, cut them in thin dices, and lay them round and over the turkey, fprinkle fome fea&ming on it, put a little butter on it, put on the lid, rub it all over with the yolk of an egg, ornament it on the fide and top, and bake it three hours; have a pint of good white cuUis ready, and when it is done take off the lid, put in the cullis, give it a ihake round, put on the lid, and fend it to table hot; or it eats very fine cold. If you have no green truces, you may put in hard yolks of eggs, torceI. cneat

412 PIES.

neat balls, truffles and morels mulb.rooins, afparaguStCops &c.

Chicken Pie%

• LAY a thin pafte round the edge of your difli take two chickens, draw and finge them, cut them in pieces, put one at the bottom of the difti, and feafon it with pepper and fait; have two veal fwcccbreads boiled and cut in fiices, a few force-meat balls, truffles and morels, two artichoke bottoms cut in pieces, lay all thefe over the chicken, feafon them with pepper and fait, then lay the other chicken over them feafon it the fame, put a little butter on rhe top, and half a pint of water in; put a good pafF-pafte half an inch thick over it, clofe it, ornament the top, and bake it two hours; when it is taken out put a little good gravy in, and fend it to table hot. You may raife a cruft, and put the ingredients in the fame way bake it the fame tiffie and put in a little gravy.

Duck Pie.

LAY a thin pafte round the rim of your dilh; take two duqks and fcald them clean, cut off the feet, pinions, necks, and heads, with the gizzaids, livers, and hearts, all fcalded and cleaned, and cut in pieces; pick all the fat out of the infide, and ieafon them with pepper and fait infide and out, hf them in your difh, with the giblets all round, fprinkk fome pepper and fait over them, put a little butter at the top, and pgt in half a pint of water; pat a good puff-pafte on, clofe it, ornament the top and bake it two hours; when it is taken out of theovcnj pour in a little good gravy, and fend it to table bor.

Pigeon Pie

LAY a thin Ihcet of pafte round the rim and fides of a deep difb, fprinkle a little pepper and &lc on bottom, and put in a thin bef-fteak; ix

6m

P 1 fi S. 4ij

dt-aw, and finge fix pigeons, wafti thcril clean, cut off the feet, and ftick the legs into the fidesi fearon theinfides with pepper and fair, put a little butter ia the infidc of every one, put them in the di(h bread Upwards, artd the nefcks-ends next the rim of the difli, put the gizzards between them, firinkle Ibme pepper and fait over them, and put in a gill of water 5 lay a Very thin (heet of pafte before it is puft iDvcr them, and with a brulh wet the pafte all ovcr then put a Iheet of )uff-pafte half an inch thick over that, ciofe it rub it over with the yolk of ail eggy ornament the top, ftick the feet in, and bake it nicely; when it is taken out put in fome good gravy, and fend it to tsble hot. You may put in the yolks of fix hard eggs, or leave out the beef fteak if you think proper. '

Pigeon Pie raifed.

MAKE a raifed pafte with a quarter of a peck df flour and one pound of butter, as direfted in the beginning of this chapter, and raife it up high i pick, draw, and finge fix pigeons, wa(h them clean, cut off the feet and pinions, feafon the infides with pepper and fait, and lay them in, with the yolks of fix hard eggs, the pinions and gizzards cut in two over them, fcalbn them with pepper and fait, and put a quarter of a pound of butter on the top •, put on the lid, rub it all over with the yolk of an egg, ornament the fides and top with leaves, &c, and bake it two hours; when it is taken out of the ovepi take off the lid, fill it full of good gravy, put the iid on again, and fend it to table hot.

Giblet Pie.

TAKE two pair of young goofe giblets, fcalded d wa(hed clean, and cut them in pieces the fame s for ftewing or foup; lay a thin pafte round tke rim of your difti, put in your giblets, feafon thfem

wixh

r

414 PIE S

with pepper and fair, put a little butter on thetii and put in a gill of water 1 put a puff-pafte half iq inch thick over them clofe it, rub it over with the yoik.of an egg ornament the top, and bake it tvo hours in a good oven when it is taken out put fume good gravy in, and fend it up hot.

When your giblets begin to get hard put them io a iauce-pan cover them with water, ftew them till they are tender, and let them ftand till they are cold before you put them in the pie. Sooie put a thia beef-fteak at the bottom and fome thin lamb-chopS but in that cafe you may do as you think proper.

Rabbit Pie.

TAKE two young rabbits and cut chem to pieces) lay a thin fheet of pafte round the rim of yourdilbi put fome thin dices of veal at the bottom, feafoa them with pepper and fait, then put in the rabbia feafon them with pepper and fait, put in fome truf Acs and morels well walhed, artichoke bottoms cut in pieccts,. chop a handful of parfley and ftrewovcr, and put in a gill of water; put a good pufif-paftc half an inch thick over them, clofe it, rub it owe with the yolk of an egg, ornament the top wiA leaves cut in pafte, and bake it tWo hours; when it is taken out of the oven put in fome good fCiI gravy, and fend it to table hot.

Hare Pie.

MAKE a hot pafte with half a peck of flour awl butter, as dircded in the beginning of this chaptcTj and raife it up high; make a good veal force mctfi bruife in the liver of the hare, and put in a glafsol red wine, feafon it pretty high, and put it all round the infide of the pie; cafe and bone a large hare, cut it in pieces, fcalon it with pepper, flc, and gratri jiutmeg, put it in as fnug as you can, lay a litti butter on the top, put on the lid, rub it over with

' the

i"

P I E S. 41s

the yolk of an eggi ornament the fides and cop, and bake it three hours; put the bones of the hare into a flew pan, with a pint and a half of gravy, half a pint of red wine, fome pcp()er and lair, and (lew ic for one hour; then (train it off, and one hour before the pie is done, take it out and put in the gravjr; then put it in again, and when it is done fend it to table hot.

Patty Gou de Fou.

MIX' a pound of butter with a quarter of a peck of flour, make half of it into a ftiff pafte with cold water, work it well with your hands, and roll it out; take a tin or copper patty-pan, fprinkle fome flour on it, and lay the pafte on mix the other half with cold water, but not fo ftiff, and puff it; cut fome thin Qices off a leg of veal and lay over the bottom pa(te,feafon them with pepper and fait, cue a chicken into joints and lay on the veal, lay a veal fweecbread cut in flices, two artichoke bottoms cut in pieces, an ox-palate boiled tender and cut in pieces, a dozen fmall force-meat balls, the fame of egg balls, a few truffles and morels wafhed well In warm water, a few frefh muflirooms ftewed a little, and Some afparagus heads boiled, over the chicken, feaidn it with pepper and fait, grate on half a nutmeg, chop two (ballots fine and put over it, then lay thin flices of veal over all •, roll the puff-pafte out and lay on it, clqfe it, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, ornament the top, and bake it in a moderate oven two hours; have a pint of white cuUis ready againft it is taken out of the oven, then flip it out of the patty-pan into the difli, take off the lid, raile up the veal, and pour the cullis in i put the lid on again, and fend it up hot. Take care to leave half an inch round the rim -to clofe in the upper cruft.

Gou

4i6 t? r fi s.

Gou de Vou PV,

MUST be raifcd, and the fame irigrcdicnt$ put in, in the fame manner as the above, only it will take more baking; and put cullis in the fame way.

Beef 'Steak Pttf.

SlRlNKLE fbrrie fiour on a tin or copper pattyJjan, make a thin Iheet of tart-pafte, as dircfted m the firft rrccipt for tarc-paftes, and put on it; take rump (leaks cut very chin and in fmall pieces, feafcn thenn with pepper and fait, and Bll your patty; lay a good puff-pdfte moderately thick oVer it, dofc ii i-ub it over with the yolk of an egg, ornament the top and bake ic one hour and a half in a moderate oven then take it our, flip it into the dilh, fill it with good brown gravy, and fend it to table bou

Sweetbread Pattys

SPRINKLE d little flour on a pattv-pan, layoti d thin flieet of tart-paftc as above for becf-ftcit patty, take fome veal force-meat, and lay a thin fhcet over the paflre, but leave about half an inch from the edge of your pafte to clofc on the toplid have two veal fwcetbreads boiled, cut them in thin nices, and put on the force-meat,' fome Iambs ftoncs Ikinncd and cut in two, a few truffles and morelSi fome frefli muduboms cut fmall, one artichoke bottom cut in fmall pieces, and a few afparagus tops boiled tender, lay them over the fweetb'reads, widi a few force-meat and egg balls, feafon thcmwiA pepper and fair, and grate on a little nutmeg; put a good puff pafte at the top, clofc it, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, ornament the top, and bake it one hour in a moderate ovens then take it our, flip it into a diQi, take off the top, fill it with ivhite cullis or bclhemcl put on the cover, and fend it up hot.

py

1

PIES. 417

Peregcrd Pie.

TAKE three brace of partridges, pick, draw, and (inge them, trufs them like a fowl to boil, dip the breads into hot water, and then lard them with bacon; beat a pound of fat bacon in a mortar, fcald the livers, and bruife them, mix them with the bacon, and put half into the infide of the partridges; chop fome parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-peel fine, and a few ba(il leaves, mix them with fome beaten mace, nutmeg, pepper and fate; raife half a peck of flour made into a pade, as dire&ed in the beginning of this chapter pUt the other half of. the bacon and livers over the bottom, fprinkle half the herbs over it, then lay in the partridges, and fprinkle the reft of the herbs over them; pare half a dozen frefii truflles, and cut them in thin dices, half a pint of frelh muflirooms chopped fine, fix diallots chopped, aod put over them; put little bits of butter here and there between them, and a little fat bacon cue fine, and put a layer of fat bacon over all; put on the lid, rub the pie all over with the yolk of an egg, ' ornament the fides and the, top, and bake it three hours; take fome good gravy that will jelly, boil fix bay leaves in it for a few minutes, then take out the kaves when the pie is taken out of the oven take off thf lid and the bacon, put in the gravy, and as the fat rifes (kim it off, (for by putting in the grav you can fkim the fat off better than otherwife) put on the lid, and fend it to table hot. If you want ic cold, let it ftand withthe lid on; then take off the lid, and put fome favory jelly over the top, or fend it with the lid on only.

Little Mutton Pies.

• • •

RAISE hlf a dozen fmall pies as high as you can, cut the meat off a loin of mutton from the hones, and almoft all. the fat, i:ut it in little pieces, ftafon it with pepper and fait, fill your pies put oh

£ c the

r

418 PISS.

the lids, and bake . them; make a gravy from the bones; when they are taken out of the oroi fill them wiih gravy, then put them in a difh, aod icni them up hot. Fork pies are made in the fame mao 13 er. You may make large ones the iame wy.

Turiot Pie.

GUT, gill, and wafli a middle- (izcturbot, ha boil it, and tuke the flefh from the bones as whokas you can v put a thin pafte round the edge of the di(h, feafon the turbot with beaten ' cloves mace, pepper, and fait, fome parQey and fweet herbs (bred nne, lay it In the di(h, with fix yolks of hard eggs,

fut a pound of butter at the top, and a little of toe iquor it was boiled in; put a good puiF-pafte overit clofe ity rub it over with the yolk of an egg, onu ment the top, and bake it one hour and a half when it is dona fend it up hot to table. It eats vcr) well cold,

Salmm Pie.

TAKE four povmds of the middk part of a 61mon, fcale it, cut the bone out, cut it in thin dices, £cafon them with beaten cloves mace, pepper, and fait; lay a thin pafte all oirer the dtib, put ibmebot tcr over the pafte, then a layer of falmon, -then a little buner, and fo on, till it is full, and pat butter at the top; boil a fine hen lobftcr, pick out the meat, chop it fine with the fpawn, and.fprinkle over k;. then put on a good puflT-pafte, clofe it, rtb it over with the yolk of an egg, ornament xht top, tod bake it two hours in a welMleated oven i fend it to table hot or cokl

SaltFiJhPk.

TAKE half of a fine fait fiOi, trim if, and hty it

in water all night; the next morning wafli ttwell,

put it on the fire in a kettle of water, and boil it oB

it is tender then take it oat aad put it imo a dife,

take

ukt the (kin oflr pick the Meat from the btone and mince it fmall take the crumb of a pennjr French hil cut it in flices, and boil it up with quart of new milk; break the bread very fine with the back of a Ipocn, put in your minced Talt fifh, a pound of melted buttef, a handful of parQey (bred fine, half a nutmeg grated, a litcte beaten pepper, and a large fpoonful of muftird, and mix them altogether; lay a thin puflF-palle all over the difb, put m the ingredients, cover it with a thin puffpafte, bake it one hour, and fend it to table hot.

Sale Pk.

LAY a thin pafte all over the bottom of yout di(h; take two pounds of eels, flcin, gut, and wafh them clean, and boil them till they are tender, pick idl the meat clean from the bones, and mince it fine, mix it with a few crumbs of bread, fonre parfley nd leRK)n'peel fhred fine, an anchovy boned and chop- ped fmall, fonie grated nutmeg, pepper and fait, a quarter of a poufid of butter, and lay it over the pafte; cut the flefh off a pair of large foles, or three pair of fmall ones, clean from the bbnes and Bns, (but take care to fcale and (kin thein) feafon it with nutmeg, pepper, and fait, lay it on the force meat, tad piK on a little butter; put the bOnes of the eels and the fbles into the liquor the eek was boiled in with a little mace and fait, boil it till it is reduced to half a pint and then ftrain it off; let it ftand till It is cold, and then put it in your pre; put a puflp pafte on k, clofe it, ornament the top, bake it two hburs in a moderate oven, and fend it to table hot.

Carp Pie.

TAKE a brace of carp, fcale, gut, and wafli them 'CleaU)'' clean two eels, and boil them till they are tender, pick off all the meat, and mince it fine, with the roe of the carp a hamttul cf bread-crumbs, a

£ e 2 little

r

4 PIES.

litcle parflcy, fweet herbs, and lemon-peel (bred % an anchovy boned and ehopped fine, half a pint of oyfters blanched, and the yolks of three hard eggs chopped fine, feafon it with pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, mix it up with half a pound of butter, and fill che belly of the carp with it; lay a thin pafte over the bottom of the di(b, and put in the carp; (if you have any forcemeat left, make it into balb and put round the carp) put the bones of the eels into the liquor they were boiled in, with a few doves and mace, whole pepper, an onion a bundle of fvea herbs, and an anchovy, boil it till it is reduced to half a pint, (train it off, and put it in the faucpao again, with a gill of white wine, a piece of butter ai big as a hens egig, mixed with a little flour boil it up, let it (land till it is cold, and then put it in die pie; put a good puflT-pafte half an inch thick ovtr It, and bake it two hours; when it is taken out of the oven, if there is not liquor enough fill il up wiik fome filh gravy, and fend ie hot to table

Tencb and Eel Pie.

SCALE, gut, and wa(h a brace of tench, and cut off the fins; (kin, gut, and wafh two fine eels and cut them in pieces two inches long, feafon botb tench and eels with beaten cloves, mace, nutmcgi pepper, and fait, a little patfley and lemon-peel Ihttd fine; lay a thin pafte round the edge of the SH put in (he tencfi, and eels round them, drew the itft of the feafoning that is left over them, put on half t .pound of butter, and half a pint of white wine io it; put a good puff-pafte over it, clofe it, bake it to hours in a moderate oven, and fend it up hot.

Eel Pie.

SKIN and gut as many eels as you want, waft them clean, and cut them in pieces about two inches

long, feafon them with beaten mt PPPi'

lay

PIES. 441

lay a thin pafte round the edge of your difti, put on a little butter, and half fill the dilh with water; put on a flieet of good pufF pafte, clofe it, and bake it You may raife a cruft, and put in the eels the fame way, onlv leave out the water, and when it is baked put in a little fi(h gravy.

Flounder Pie.

TAKE fix or eight large flounders, gut and wa(h them, dry them with a cloth, and cut all the meat from the bones and fins; lay a thin pafte over the bottom of the difli, put fome butter over it, lay on the fifh, and feafon it with beaten mace, pcpptrr and fait •, put the bones in a pint of water, with a little horfe-radifh, parfley, lemon peel, -a cruft of bread, a little fait, and a gill of white wine, boil, it till if is reduced to half a pint, fl-raia it, and when it is cold put it into the pie; put a puflF-pafte over it, bake it one hour and a half, and fend it to table hot

Herring Pie.

TAKE fix large herrings, fcale, gut, and wafh them clean, cut ofF the heads, fins, and tails; lay a thin cruft over the bottom of the di(h, put a little butter on it, lay in your herrings, feafon them with beaten mace, pepper and fait; pare and core fix large apples, cat them in flices, and lay over the herrings •, peel fix large onions, cut them in flices and put over, put a little butter at the top, and put in a ludc water; lay a good pufi-pafte over, clofe it, and bake it one hour and a half

Lobjler Pie.

TAKE three large Ipbfters and boil them, take the meat out of the tails whole, cut each of them in four pieces longways, take out the fpawn and the at of the claws, beat it well in a mortar, with the crumb of a roU rubbed through a fine cullender,

E e 3 feafon

r

4tz P I E S

foafon Ir with raacc, pepper and falc two fpoonifid of vinegar and a Kttle anchovy liquor, mcU hilf 2 ppund of frefh butter and put in, and mix it alt up with the yolks of two eggs j, lay a thin (heet of piftc over the bottom of the dih lay half of the forcemeat on, then lay on the tails, fprinkte a litde pep per and fait on, and put on the remainder of the force-meat, put on a puffpafte, dole ir, and bake it one hour in a moderate oven.

MuJcU Pie.

TAKE half a peck of mufcles, wa(h tKcm fill in a pail of water with a birch-broom, put then into a pail of fpring water and fait for one hour, tbco waflb thero out put them injto . &uce-pan, cover them ckfe, and ftew cheoi till they rq all opea; then ft rain the liquor from themj, take thfinoutef the ibells, pick out the beards, and walh theud s put them into a ftew-pan, with aiS much of the liquor as will cover them, a little beaten mace, a piece of butter mixed with flour, a handful of crumbs of bread) and a glafs of white wine; ftcw them a few minutes, and let them ftand till they are cold; liyt thin (heet of pafte over the bottom of the dift. pot in the mufcles, p)t on a thin puff-pafte clofe iti and bake it half an hour. Yqu may msike an oyta or cockk pie the fgme w.

Fijh Pafties the Italian W(.

TAKE 81 (urter of a peck of flour, and make ii into pafte with fweet oil work ic well with yotf hands, and roll it out; take a large flice of falinon fcale ir, cut it from the bone, and dip it in fweet oils chop an onion, a clove of garlick, and lome pariky fine, mix them with a little bettea noace, pepper aad falt rew it over the falmon) lay it in the pafle, and make it up in the fliape of a flice of iaimoo bQW

flieat of wrior)g paper aad put Q9 V asd hake it

oae

PIES. 425

ne hour. It cats bcft cold, and will keep for a moDch. Any kind of fi(h may be trcawd in the fame manner.

Mince-meat.

TAKE fouitten pounds of good bccf-fuet, pick it clean from the fkins, and chop it very fine, four pounds of the bcft tender double tripe, take oiit the far, wipe it dry with a cloth, and chop it fine pare and core as many HoUand pippins or pearmain apples as will weigh four ix)undS) and chop them fine, then chop thefe three artkles well together $ have iburteeA pounds of currants well waflied and picked, and dry them well in a cloch, four pounds c jar raifins ftoeed and chopped fine, three piunds and a half of moi(l fugar well bruifed with a roHing-pin balf an oucce of ginger, the fame of mace'a quarter- of an owkW of cloves, tke fame of cinnamon aod nutmeg, dry them well, pound them fine, and life them through a fine fieve, the peeling of four lemens chopped very fine, half a pound of caadied ctrren, the fame quantity of candied orange and le.flion-peel cue in chin flips, then with your hads mix all the ingredients together for a quarier of n i0ur, fKen put in a pint of French brandy, the fame of anountaip wime, and half a pint of good crab vef juice, mix it all well; have a dry cold earthen pan, well glazed in the infide, put the mince-meat down clofe, put a Ihcet of paper over it, tie another over the pan, put it in a cool, dry place, and it will keep fix months. It will keep good to the Eaft or Weft Indies, if you put it down very clofe into twoquart gallipots, and add a little more brandy, render Tome mutton-fuet and put over, tie it over with a bladder, and leather over that; when you want to ufe it ftir it well up from the bottom, as all the goodnefs fettles there i and when you have kept it fomc time put a little more brandy and verjuice to iw

E c + By

424

E S.

By the fame rules you may make more or kfi, a you pleafe.

Make a good pufF-pafte roll the bottoms out thin flour your patty-pans well, lay on the pafte, and according to their fize put in the mince-meat; put a puff-pafte rolled thin over them, clofe it u light as you can, and never ufe any water to wet the pafte when you clofe it. If you make it in a diih, lay a thin pufF-pade over the bottom, put in the mince-meat, put on the lid and bake it m rather a flack oven.

Lent Mince Pie.

BOIL flx eggs hard, chop them fine, pare and core twelve large pippins, and chop them fine, a pound of raiiins of the fun ftoned and chopped fine, a pound of currants waihed and picked clean and rubbed -well in a cloth, a quarter of a pound of nioift fugar bruifed, an ounce each of candied citioo, lemon, and orange peel cut fine, a quarter of an ounce of cloves and mace beat fine, a little grated ginger and nutmeg, mix all well together with a gill of brandy and one of fack; lay a thin (heet of pQff pafte at the bottom of the diih, put in the mincemear fqueeze in the juiee of a Seville orange, put a thin pufF-pailc over, and bake it one hour. You may make it into fmall pies in patty-pans to tuni out the fame way as the other.

Florendine of VeaL

TAKE two veal kidnies, fat and all, and jmincc them very fine, chop a little parfley, fweet herbs, and lemon-peel very 6ne, four or five yolks of hard eggs chopped fine, feafoned with beaten cloves, mace nutmeg, and fait, a handful of bread-crumbs, two pippins pared and chopped fine, one ounce of can died lemon- peel cut Imall, a little fack and orangeflower water, beat up four eggs well, and mbt the ingredients well together lay a puff-paftc round the

PIES. 425

edge of the difli, and a very thin iheet at the boc-torn i cover it with another Ihcrt of puflF-pafte, ornament the top as you fancy, bake it in a flack oven, fprinkle powder fugar at the top and fend it to table hot.

Cbeefe Curd Florendine.

TAKE a pound of almonds, put them in boiling yRzxxr take o£P the (kins, and beat them in a mortar, with a little rofe water to keep them from oiling; break two pounds of cheefe curd well with your hands, put it to the almonds, and beat them well together, wa(h and pick half a pound of currants clean and put in; (lew a little, fpinach, fqueeze it dry between two plates, chop it fine, and fweeten it to your palate, grace in half a nJtmeg, and mix it "well together; lay a thin pu(F-pafte at the bottom of the diih, and a thick one round the rim, and put in the ingredients -, roll out fomc puflT-pafte, and cut ic out in flips as thick as a goofe's quill, put it acrofs and acrois, to make it look like checquers, fprinkle a little powder fugar over it, and. bake it half an hour

Florendine of Apples and Oranges.

TAKE fix fine Seville oranges, cut them in two, fqueeze out the juice, (train it through a fieve, and fave it covered over, take out the pulp, and iay them in water twenty-four hours, fliift them three or four limes, and boil them in three or four different waters till they are tender 5 then drain them from the water, put the juice, with two pounds of lump fugar, into a ftew-pan, put them in, and boil them to a fyrup, but take care they do not ftick to the pan, then put them away in gallipots for ufe; when you ufe them, pare and core twelve pippins, quarter them, put them into a ftew-pan, with a little water and fugar, boil them till they are foft, and beat them with a fpoon when they are cold flice tvo oranges

into

426 PIE S.

into them; ky a pufT-pafte round ti edge of the di(h put them in, ftring them at the cop z% the above, and bake them half an hour.

Tort de Moy.

LAY a thick flieet of pufF-pafte round the rim of your dilh, then put in a layer of Naples bifcuir, then a layer of butter and bccf-marrow cut in dices, then, a layer of all forts of candied fwectmcats cut m thin dices, and fo on till the difli is full; then boil a quart of cream, or milk with a ftick of 'cinnamon, and fwecten it to your palate; when it is cold, beat vp four eggs, and mix well with it, and a fpoonful of orange-flower water; take out the cinnamon, pour h over the remainder in the dilh, and bake it half an hour in a moderate oven, but not too flack •

Artichoke Fie.

BREAK twelve afrtichokes from the ftalks, waft and boil them, pull off all the leaves and chokes from the bottoms; lay a puff-pafte over the bottom of your difh, and a quarter of a pound of &efti buN ter on it, i!hen lay a row of artichokes, mix a quarter of an ounce of beaten' mace wiih a fponful of pepper and fait, drew half of it over them, then lay the red on, drew more feafoning on, put a quarter of a pound of butter at the top, bqil half an ounce of truffles and morels in a gill of water, pour the water into the pie, cut the truffles and morels very fmall and fprinkle over it, put in the yolks of twelve hard eggs with a knife, take the pulp off the bottom of the leaves, make it into round balls, and put them in, pour in a gill of white wine, cover your pie with a thin puff-pade, and bake it; when die crud is done the pie is enough.

Potatoe Pie.

BOIL three pounds of middlcfized potateea, and peel them puc a thin pafte over the ixitieni of your

di ib

PIES. 427

tiQl put feme butter on that, cut your potatoeMa flicea and lay ioj chop fix hard eggs' and ftrew over thm, grate a nutineg over alU Iprinkle on a fpoon ful of fait, a tea-fpoonful of pepper, and put ja half a pint of white wine; ay on a thin pufivpafte clofe itj and bake it half an hour.

' Onion Pie.

PARE'a pound of potatoes, flice them thin, peel about a pound of large onions, and flice them, pare tlie fame quantity of apples, core and flice them likewife, boil fix egg$ hard, take off the Qiells, and cut them in flices; lay a thin (heet of pufF-pafte aver the bottom of the dilh, put on a quarter of a pound of fr(k butter, mix a quarter of an ounce of beaten mace, a teafpoonfgl of pepper, and three of fak, ftrew fome over the butter then lay in a layer of potatoes, a layer of onions, a layer of ap plf9 and one of eggs, ftrew fome feafoning on, and fo on till all the ingredients arc in; ftrew the re mainder ot the feafoning on the top, put on a quar ter of a pound of butter, and pour irt half a pint qf white wine I put a thin puff-pafte over it, and bake i( one hour and a half.

Skirret Pie.

TAKE two or three pounds, of flcirret-roots, wafh cbem clean, and boil them till they are tender, peel and tlice them; lay a thin pafte round the rim and (ides of your difl), put in the flcirrets to half a pint of cream or new milk, beat up one egg well witlva litde nutmeg, beaten mace, and fait, and pour in as much as the difli will hold; put on a thin pufF- pafte, and bake ic half an hour. You may put in fix yolks of hard eggs if you like it.

Savory Egg Pie.

• BOIL twelre egg$ hard, and chop them fi ne, a pound of beefuet or marrow ihrcd fine, the fame

quantity

42S PIE S.

quanthy of Currants well wafhed and picked, &aibn them with a (te nutnneg and cinnamon beat fine, mix all together with two or three fpoonsful of cream, a little fack, and a fpoonful of rofe water; lay a thin pafte over the difh, put in the ingredients, put a thin pufF-pafte over ir, and bake ic half an hour; when it is done, fiir in hlf a pound of frelh butter, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon

Sweet Egg PV.

BOIL twelve eggs hdrd, take off the (hells, and cut them in thin dices •, lay a thin puff-cruft over the difli, put in your eggs, with a quarter of a pound of frelh butter in littJe bits- amongft them, throw half a pound of currants well wa(hed and picked over the eggs; then beat up four eggs well with half a pint of white wine, grate in half a nutmeg, make it pretty fweet with fine fugar, and pour it over all; put a thin pufF-paftc over it, clofe ir, and bake it half an hour, or till the cruft is done.

Green Coddling Pie.

TAKE two dozen fine green coddlings, lay fome vine or cabbage leaves at the bottom of 9 (lew- pan, put in the coddlings, and cover them with fpring water, lay leaves over them, put them on the fire, and coddle them till the fkins will peel ofi, but mind they do not break j throw them into cold water, peel off the fkins, cut them in quarters, and take out the cores; lay fome vine leaves at the bottom of the ftew-pan, put in the coddlings, cover them with fpring water, then with leaves, and fee them at a diftance from the fire till they arc quite hot; then put them away all night in a cold place, and the next morning they will be as green as grafs; take them out of the liquor, lay a thin pafte round the edge of the di(b, put.tiiem in, chop fome lenwJnpeel -very fine, and fprinklc over thcjn, put half a

pound

P"

PIES. 429

pound of moUt fugar on them, put a little of the liquor in lay a thin puff-pafte over and bake it in a moderate oven -, when it is taken out cut off the id cut it in three -corner pieces, and lay it round the pie, with one corner at the outfide; boil a pint of cream with a laurel leaf, a little lemon-peel, a bit of cinnamon, and fweeten it with lump iugar to your palate; beat up the yolks of four eggs with a little cream, drain the hot cream to it, andtkeep it fiirring over a flow fire till it is thick, but do not let it boil, as that will curdle it, take it off, and keep it (lirring till it is nearly cold; then put it over the pic, and when the pie is quite cold feqd it to table jippe Pie.

. PARE, quarter, and core as many large apples as you will want; lay a thin pafte round the edge of the difb, put a little fugar at the bottom, and lay in your apples, chop fome lemon-peel fine and ftrew over them, put in fome quince marmalade in little bits on, then more fugar, put a little water in the di(h, put a pufF-pafte over, dole it, and bake- it nicely; when it is taken out cut off the lid, bruifc the apples well, ftir in a piece of butter, and fend it to table hot; or you may fend it without the butter. If you chufe it cold, make a cream the fame as for greeo coddling pie, and treat it in the fame manner.

Goofeberry Pie.

LAY a thin paftc round the rim of your difli, put a little fugar at the bottom, pick your gOf)reberries, and if it is rainy weather, or they arc dufty, walh them, and lay them in, put fugar over them, put a little water in the difh, put a nice puff pfte over them, and bake them in a moderate oven; let the pie be cold before you fend it to table;

•or

430 P I B

or if yoa like it jtou may crm it the fame tt a green coddling pie.

Currant and Rajberry Pie.

LAY a tbn pafte round the rkn of your di(h put a licde fugar at the bottom pick your raA)crricS Und half fill the di(h, pick the currants and lay ofct the rafberriesj and fugar over them put a fpoooful of water in the di(h put a thin puff-pafte lid evtri clofe it and bake it nicely; when the pie is cold fend it to table. Currant and cherry pie is madt the fame way.

MirtUa Cherry Pie.

LAY a thin pafte round the rim of your dilh, put a little fugar at the bottom, pick the (talks off the cherries, lay them in, with fugar over tkm, put a little water in vthe difli, put on a thin poffpafte ik, and bake it when it is ccdd fend it t uble.

All forts of plumbs, damfons, and cranberry pic% are made the fame way. You may ice all thefe fruit pies in the following manner: beat up the white of n 8S froth, then with a pafte brulh rub it over the crown of the pie, and lift fine powder fugar over it, and jufl: before you put it into the cnrea fprinkle a little water over it, or it will catch and burn. You may leave the iceing alon according as the company likes it.

PETTIT PATTIES.

Force-meat Patties.

AKE a very light veal force-meat, take littfe

tin patty-pans, about the fize of a tea-ciS

not fo deep, make a rich puffpafte, roll (Nit

thje bottom; thiot butter the patty-pan, roll a piece

of

J

mmmm

'N

Pits. 4

4 forcemeat roand like a botl, ptn it in, roll fame more puff-pafte for covers, put them on, rob them over with the yolk of an egg, and bake thtm of fine goW colour; put five or fcven tn a diih out of the tin, and fend them up hot; or they will fervefor garnifii round large made dilhes.

Chicken urkey or Veal Pattks.,

ROLL out fome puff-pafte,. butter your patty pans, and lay it in them cut fome lUle crumb of bread in round pieces, lay it in, put a pafte over them, rub theni over with an egg, and bake thco) % in the mean tioie mince the white part of a chkkeo fowl, turkey or veal, vwy Bne, put it into a ftewpan, with a littld veal broth, a little lenion-pcel fhred fene grated nutmeg, pepper and fait, a little cream, and a little butter mixed with ftour, put it into a ftcw-pan, put it over the fire, and keep it ftirring till it is thick and fmooth; flip the parties into the di(h, take off the lid take out the bread, fill them with the mince; put the lid on again, and ktid them to table hot.

Fijb Patties.

TAKE about a pound of any kind of freih fi(b, boil it and pick the mea from the bones, beat it well in a mortar, with half a pound of bread-crumbs, fome parfley and lemon-peel fhred fine, feafon ic with beaten mace, pepper and fait; put in a quartet oF a pound of freih butter, mix it up with the yolk of an egg, butter your patty-pans, lay in a thin Iheet of pufiT-pafte, roll fome of the force-meat round, and put in, put a coverof pufiF-pafte over thcm rub them over with the yolk of an egg, and bake them of a gold colour.

Oyjier Patties .

BOIL a large filver eel, pick the meat from the bones, and beat it in a mortar, with a little cloves and tiiace, and a little mountain wine to moiften it;

blanch

43 ' P I E S.

blanch fix large oyftcrs, and wrap a little force-meat round them, put them in the pafte as above aod bake them. You may make them thus: put a piece of crumb of bread between the pafte, as fr chickea, &c. patties, fcald two dozen large oyfters, wafli them clean, and chop them, but not too fmall, put them into a itew-pan, with a little of the liquor, a glafs of mountain, (bme grated nutmeg, a piece of butter mixed with flour, put it over the fire, aod keep it ftirring till it is thick; when the patties are taken out of the oven, take out the breadj put in the oyfters, and fend them up hot s or for garailb . round fifli, &c.

Oyjier Loaves.

. THE proper oyfter loaves are made by the bifcuit-baker; but if you cannot get them, take fix fmall French rolls rafped, cut a hole in the tops, and pick out the crumbs, but mind you do not break the cruftj and put the loaves or rolls before the,ixt to crifp •, take as many oyfters as you think you will want, fcald them and ftrain the liquor from them, walh and beard them, put them into a ftew-pan, drain the liquor from the fettlings to them, put in a gill of mountain wine, a little cream, a piece of butter mixed with flour,a little nutmeg, put them over the fire, and keep them ftirring till it is thick; then put them, fauce and all, into the loaves, and fend them to table hot for a fide diih.

Lobfter Patties.

BOIL a fine large lobfter, pick out all the meat, mince it very fmall, bruife the fpawn fine, fcafon it with beaten mace, pepper and fait, mix it up with a little butter, and the yolk of an egg, put it into pufT-pafte, as the other patties and bake them.

Friii

Fried Patties.

kOLL out fotue good puflT-pdfle, about as big as b crowii piece, ahd put either a little veal forcemeat, or fi(h into it, turn it over, and clofe it like an apple puff; have a pan of boiling hot hogs-lard, fry them quick, and of a fine brown; put them on a fieve before the fire to drain and fend them round made difhes, fi(h, &c

TARTS, TARTLETS, anU PUFFS

IN the beginning of thiii (chapter you hivc proper directions for makirig all forts of pafte; and as it is neceflary that paltry of all kinds (hould be in one chapter, it will not tie improper to end it with fmall paftry. When you ufe prcferved fruit for tares, the beft method will be to put them into glafs patty-pans, and cut a cover out of crocant pafte in any Ihape you pleafej bake it on a tin by itfelf and )uc it Over the fruit in the glafs, for the oven fpoils prcfcrvc, except rafberfy jam. When you make Dottled fruit into tarts, fuch as goofcberrics, damfons, and cranberries, put them into chainy or earthenware patty-pans, fweeten them with iugar, put a thin pufT-pafte over them, and ice them.. If yoil tnake them in tin patty pans to turn out, fprinkle ibme flour on the patty-pans, lay a thin tart pafte in then put in the fruit and fugar and a thin cruft ac the top, ice tHem, and bake them in a flow oven; and as fbon as they afe done flip them Out of the patty-pans, or loofen them for if you let them ftand to be cold you will not get them out without break% them to pieces i for apple tarts, you muft pare, quarter, and core the apples, if they are late cut th quarters in two, and put them in with a little lemons pel chopped fine, and a little marmalade of quinces

F f with

434

B S.

I

with fugar over them i or you may put the apples into a fauce-pan with a little water and a little lemon- peelj and boil them till they are tender; take out the lemon peel', brqife them fine, and fwceten them with fugar 5 when they are cold put them into the patty-pans and make them the fame as bottled fruit, and ice them; you may make green goofcberry, 6r all forts of ripe fruk, into tarts, fuch as curranoi cherries of all forts, plums, damfons, white bullacc apricotSj &c. the fame as bottled fruit.

Orange or Lemon Tarts.

TAKE fix large oranges or lemons, rub them nveU with fait, put them in water for two days, with a handful of fait in it j then change ti)em into frciii water every day (without fait) for a fortnight, then )ut them into a laucepgn yf water, and boil them or two or three hours till they are tender, cut them into half quarters, and- then three corner- wys, as thin as poffible$ par, quarter, and core fix pippins, put them into a iauce-pan with a pint of water, boil them till they are ''tender, break thjcm fmooth with a fpoon, and put the liquor and pippins to your oranges or lemons with a pound of fine fugar, and bolt all together for a quarter of an hour, if for an orange tart, fqueeze in the juice. %£ an orange; if for lemon, the juice of lemon; put it into gallipots, and when cpld tie paper over thcm When "you make the tarts, let your china, or other patty-pns be fmall aud (hallow, fill them nearly full, and put a thin puffpafte over them, ice thcfD and bake chem. in a flow oven till the pafte is dooe

Green Apricot Tarts.

TAICE your green apricots, put fodie vine or cabbjige leaves at the bottom of a prelerviog-pao put thenri in, and coyer them with fpring watery put vine or cabbage leaves at the top, put i boatxl or

trenchor

Fwam

i"



E

S

4$$

trencher on that, to Jiffep thsfx yndcr water, and fcald them till they arc; yellow j thacc them Qut, put them into cold watr a minute, find tk them out pf the wattr; then put Vine or cabbage les' at the bottom of your prcferving-pah, put then'in, and cover thm with cold fprin Watef; pijf viije or ca()bage leaves over them, put them at a goQ diftance from the fire, and let them fimmer up, Ijn?. not to boil i put them aw all night in the pan and liquor, and the next morning they will be green; take tbem oit, put rbcai nio ancthef pan, wick at much of the Uqoras will moifteil them, fweeeen tfaem with fine fuarto vetir patate, give them a l)oil till the fur is melted, and'hen they are cold make them into fapis, in chlha earthenware, or tin pattypans, with what (oFt ofpaftier you plealb, ige them, and bake them k a'flow oven tiU the paife s

done;

I.?. • • .••• ."'

GATHER, the almonds oflF the itroe: before thejrbegin to ftiell, ndjub o(F the; down with a coarfir flptti) hav0 ft parif qf ipjing water ready to piiltf)ien in, as fafl: as they ace done; then put them into % (killer, cover them ith fpring wa(er and put them over the fire at a greiat dkllance rill it fimtners; hange.thevttcer twice, and let theui lmain in till .the laft, till they begin to be tender; then take; them' put, and put them; in a clean cloth, with another over them, and gently prefs them, to make theni dry then oake a fyrap with double-refined Ibgar, put them IB, nd fimmer them a few minutes repeat it the nfxc day; then put tfiem into a (tone jar,' and cover theip very clofc, for if flie leaft air gets to them they will turn blacky ihen you ufe them, put them into paay-paae, an put either pu(r or rt:pa(e ov€)f tbffi I v:'9P4 IwKe Jiem in a mode



Ff

JRJmharh

43

PIES.

Rhubarb Tarts.

' Take the (lalks off the rhubarb that gtows in the garden peel the Ikin off, and cut them the fize of a goofeberry, put them into china or earthen- Wate patty-pans with fugar over them, and put on a pafte either puff or tart, ice them and bake them the fame as green goofeberries and they will cat like them.

Angelica Tarts.

, TAKE (bme gplden pippins or non panels, pare and core themj take the (talks of angelica, peel and cut them into fmall pieces, an equal quantity of apples and angelica; put the apples into a (lew-pan, with water enough to cover them, with fome lemonpeel and fine fugar, boil them gently till they ait of a thin fyrup; then (train the fyrup from the ap pies to the angelica, put it over the fire, let it boil gently for ten minutes.; then put it away to cool; take any fort of patty-pans, and lay a thin puff-pa(te at the bottom, put on a thin layer of the apples, and then of angelica, till it is full, fill them with fyrup, ftring them acrofs with palte, the fame as urdets, and bake them in a (low oven

Icing for Tarts.

BEAT . up the white of an egg to a high froth, with a pafte-bru(h put it on the top of the tarts,:nd fift on them fine powder fugar; befoi'e you put them in the oven fprinkle a little water over them Or thus: beat up the white of an egg to a high froth, and put in two ounces of fine pqwder fugar with a woodea fpoon beat it well for a quarter of an hour, then with a knife lay it very thin over the tarts

Apple Tartlets.

PARE quarter, •d core fix pippins, put them VAto a fauce-pan with a litdc wacr and lemon-peel,

and

PIES, 437

and boil them gently till they are tender i then beat them up well with a fpoon till they are fmooth, fweeten them with fine lugar, take out the lemon peel, and put in a tea-fpoonful of rofe water fprinkle a little flour on your fmall tin pattypanSf lay in a thin (hcet of puff-pafle, and then put in yogr apples; roll out a thin llieet of pufF-paftet cut it in as fine llrings as you can and ftring them acrofs and acrofs in what jhape you pleafe; rub a little ivhite of egg on, fift a little powder fugar over and bake them in a flow oven of a nice light colour; then Dip them out into the difli.

Rajierry Tartlets.

SPRINKLE a little flour over the patty-pans, Hy a thin flieet of pufT-pafte at the bottom, then put in fome rafberry jam firing them the fame as the apple tartlets, fife fugar over them, and bake chem in a Aow oven.

ApricQt Tartlets

TAKE a dozen ripe apricots, take out the ftones put them into a fauce-pan with a little water and coddle them till they are tender then beat them up with a fpoon till they are fmooth, and fweeten them with fine fugar; fprinkle a little flour on your pattypans lay a thin fheet of puff-pafte at the bottom put in the apricots, and ftring them as before. When ypu chufe to put cream on them, you wil have no occafion to ftring them, only lay a thin puff pafte over the pattypans, put in the fruit, and notch the edges all round with a knife, and bake them; when they are done put a fpoQnful of pream over them made the fame as lor coddling pies

Apple Fujfs.

PARE, quarter, and core fix large apples, put them into a fauce-pan with a little wa(er and lemoa

458 PI E S.

Ael oovir thm clofe, %M ftcw them gently iiR tktj dre tendor; tsike out thi lemon-ptel and with afpDon beat them fmooch, fweeien them with fugar, did put in a tea-fpoonfiil of rofb water, make a liice puSpafte, roll it out thin to any fmal) Dze you pleafe, put in a liitdi of the apple turn the pifte ovcf and cl6fc them with a knife j cut them either t?hrce-coifner ways or fquare or in -any (hapc you pleiib; ice thcm and bake them in a moderate oveo dn tin or iron plates.

RaJ&erry Pufs.

MAKE a nice puff-paftc, roll it out in fmall fizcs about as big as a crotn piece put in a fpoonful of ra(berry jam, twrn the pafte ovef, cut them in What ape you pteate ice them and bake them in a mo derate oven on tin or iron plates,

Jfricot Pttffs.

TAKE a dozen ripe apricots, take out the ftoncr, put thern into a fauce-pan ith a little water, fiew them till they are tender then ma(h thecti with a jooni rub them through a fieyc and fweeten tbcm, yritnTugari make a nice pufFpafte, roll it out in pieces about as big as a crown piece, put a little ipricot on, turn the pafte over, clofe them and tot them in. what ihape you plefe,- ice them, and bak ihem in a moderate oven on tin or iron plates.; You may make any kind of ripe plvim puff in tbe fame manntn

CurdPuffu

TAKE tio qtiafts of hew milk, ahd put a litdl teitttcif to Xy and whth It iS broken pbr it oti i Bfcvi; to drain, tbifi fub the cOrd through a hair fieV, ahd put to it a quarter of a pound of frcfli butter, about half a pound of fifte bread-crilrftbs, half a nutmeg grated, the rhid of a lenlbn gratlsd, a fpdonil of iiile WiM) fweettn i to ytim pstatei lAid m A

J

PI R - 439

wtil together; butter focrie (tnall tea-Cups, put in your ingredients, and bake them half an hour irlien they are done tiirn them out into a d)(h.

Sugar Pt.

TAKE the whites of ten eggs, and beat thertt well with a whiik till they rife to a high froth, thefi put them into a marble mprtart and add as mucli double-refined fugar powdered as will make it ijiick, rub it round the mortar for half an hour, and put in a few carraway-fireds; tatee a fceet of wafers, and lay it on as broad as a fixpence, and as high as you can, put them into a moderate oven for feven or eight minutes, then they will look as white as fnow,

. Chocolate Puffs.

TAKE' half a pound of double-refined fugar, beat and fift it fine, fcrapfe into it one ounce of cho colate very fine, and mix thm together i bdat Up the white of an egg to a Very high ffoth, theft put in your chocolate and fugar, and beat it till it is as ftiff as a paftej then ftrew fugar on fomc writingpaper, drop them on about the fize of a fixpence, and bake them in a very flow; oven •, when they arc done take them c the paper and put them in plates

Almond Pufs,

BLANCH and (kin two ounces of almonds, and beat them fine in a mortar with orange-flower wa ter; take the whites of three eggs, and beat them to .a hish froth, then put in fome powder fugar finely fifted, mix vour almonds with the fugar and eggSy and then add more fugar till it is as thick as a bafte; (lirew fbme ftgar on a (heet of writing-paper, lay it on in fmall cakes, and bake it ip a cool aven

Lemon Puffs.

'iKt a pound of double-refined lugar, fift it through a fine fieve, put it into a bowl, with the

f t 4 jiiice

44P PANCAKESLand FRITTJERS.

juice of two lemons ftrained through a fieve, and beat theip weU together then beat up the white of egg to ycry high froth put it into the lerooiv juige and fugar, bef all well fqr half an hour, grate in the rind of two lemons, beat qp three eggs and put in, and mix it well up; fprinkle fome fugar oti writing-paper, drop on the mixture in fmall drop nd bake them a fe7 minutes in a moderate oren.

m

CHAP. XVIII.

PANCAKES ANft FRITTERS.

•

WHN ypM mke pancakes and fritters, always tn'm them one hour or wo before you fry them, by tht means the lumps in the flour will diiTdlve, only mind to ftir your batter well Up before you ufe it and befure your frying-pns are very clcaa and fmooth, otherife your pancakes will ftick and break For fritters, be fure your fat is very fwcet and clean, or elfe it will give them a difagreeable ftrong tafte; and never fry them till they are nearly wanting, for by frying theq tpo fopn;hey ge Qa( nd infipij(

MIX a large fpoonful of flour to half a pint of cream, break in tiyo eggs, and beat them well till 11 is fmoctli; pu iri twQ ounces of ponder ftigar 9 little beaten cinnamon, and nutmeg 3 put a Uttl hogslard or butter into your frying-panj make it hot, put in a large fp40i!)ful of batter, move the pai round till it covers this bottom and is even all over fry pne fie btrown, thn tpi3 it over and fry tb

otheif

PANCAKES AND FRITTERS. 44,1

pther fide; put them on a dilh before the fire over one another, till the whole is done, fend them c table hot, with beaten cinnamon and fugar in a fmaU plate or faucer.

Fine Pancakes.

MIX half a pint of cream witti a large fpoonftil of 'flour, put in half a pint of fack, the yolks of eighteen eggs beat fine, a tea-fpoonful of fait, half a pound of powder fugar, a little beaten cinnamon and nutmeg, mix all well together till it is fmcfOthf and fry them with freih butter as above.

Fin? Pancakes afecQnd Way.

IX a pint of crem wi(h flour to a thin batter, put in half a pound of frefl) butter melted nd alnioft cold, eight eggs well bear, half a nutmeg grated, a little faltj, mix them well up, aqd fry them as befo.

4 third Way

BEAT fix new laid eggs well, with half a piqc of cream a quarter of a pound of fugar, half a nutmeg grated, as much flour as will make them of a proper thiknefs, and fry thexp as above.

Milk Pancakes.

MIX a pint of milk with as much flour as will make it a thin batter, put in a glafs of brandy, a little nutqicgy ginger, and fait, break in four eggs, beat them well together till they are fmooth, and fry them as before diredbedi and fprinkle fugar over ' them,

Coimmm Pncaes.

IX a qqart of milk wiih as much flour as will Qiake it into a thin batter, break in fix eggs put in 4 yttl falt and a fpoonful of bietcQ ginger, mix all

442 MNCAKES ANb jPRITTERS,

well together, fry them as before direded tud fprinkle fugar over thiitn.

A ire of Paper Pancakes.

MIX a pine of cream wkh three fpoonsful of fific flourt three of fack and: one of oraiige Bower water, a little, powder fugar, half a nutmeg grated, half a pound of freih butter melted almod cold, .and mix all well together,; put a piece of buaer in the pan as big as a walnuc, let them run in die pan as thin as poffible, and fry them of a light brown oa

both fides.



ice Pancakes.

TAK£ thre fpoonsful of flour of rice, put it ioto a fauce-pan with a quart of cream, put it over a flov fire, and keep it ftirring till it is thick andfmoodii fiir in half a pound of frefli butter and half a nutmeg graced, then pour it into an earthen pan to cool when it is coid flif in three or four fpoonsful of flour, half a pourYd of fine fiigar a Ikcle fair, and nine eggs beat well, ftif all well together, and fty them with hogs- lard or frdh butter of a nice brown on both fides,- the fame way as the- firft pan cakes. If you have no cream, ufc new milk onlr and put in four fpOOnsfu) of the rice inftead of chree.

anfey Pantdkes.

P3T four fpoonsful of flour into an earthen paO and mix it with half a pine of cream to, a fmooih batter, beat four eggs well and put in, with two ounces of powder fugar, and beat all cll together for a quarter of an hour; then put in two fpoonsful of the utcc of fpinach and one of tanfe, a little grated nutmeg, mix 'll weH together aild frythent ith freQi butter garnifh them with Seville oranges Cut in quarters and drew powder fugar over them.

Psnk

PANCAKES AB l"RlTtERS, 44 j

Pink-ctflottred Pancdkes. '

TAKE a large red beet-root and" bbif ft tender take oflf all the fkins, beat it weH in a mortar, and add four eggs beat vei, two largfe fpdonsfal of fiour and three or flour fpoonsful of crtam, fweeten it iivith fine fugar to your pa)at;ej grate in half a itot meg, put in a glafs of brandy, fry them with frelh butter, and garntfli them with prcfcrved fweetmeats fT fprigs of myrtle.

Jppk Pritters,

TAKE iiK large apples, pare, quarter, and take

out the cores, put them in a deep difli, pour over

them a glafs of brandy, fomt lemon-pf el Ihred fine,

ind grate half a nuteg over themi mix a gill of

cream with two eggs and flour into a fttfi-batter,

put it to the apples, with two ounces of powder

fugar and mix them well together; hav a. large

pan of hogslard boiling hot, and as qUick as you

can put tbem in and fry them cfifp of a nice gold

colour I take them out, and put thm dn a fieve be ibte the fire to drain •, then heap thefn Up high in

a diifa fprinkle powder fugar ovr thetn, and gar

niA them with Seville orange ut in hilf- quarters,

pr fweet meats.

jippte Fritters a fecond Jtay

PARE fix large apples, and with a corer take out the cores, and cut them in .flices as thick as a half crown piece; mix half a pint of cream and two eggs with flour into a ftiff batter, put in a glafs of brandy, a little lemon-peerfhrdd fine, two ounces of ponAkt fUgar, mix it well up, and then put ih the i!ppt% % have a pan of hogslafd boiling hot, put ih every flice fingly as faft as ytiu tan, And fry them uickdf a flne gold colour on both fides; then take them out, put them oH a fieve to drain, fikD ui Aem into a diih, aiid gniih them with

prefervcd

444 PANCAKES an FRITTERS.

pefered or dried fweecmeatSt or Seville oran cot ia half-quarters.

Fme Fritters.

' TAKE about hdf a pound of the fineft ftour, dry k well before the firCt and mix it into a ftiff batter wltli new milk or cream, beat up fix eggs wet! firain them through a fieve to the batter, grate in a Uttle nutmeg, beaten mace, and fait, wiih a glafs of fack or brandy, and beat them well together; pare, core, and chop fix pippins fine, and put them in; have a pan of hogs-lard boiling, and with a oon drop them in as quick as you can, fry them of a light brown, put them on a fieve to drain be fore th fire; then dilh them, gamilh a$ beforei and ftrew fine fugar overthem.

Fritters Royal.

PUT a quart of new milk into a fauce-pan and inake it boil, then put in a pint of fack, or mountain wine, boil it up again, and let it ftand five or fix minutes; then ftrain the whey from the curd, put the curd into a mortar, and beat it well with fix eggs •, then beat it with a wifk, put in a little beaten cinnamon and nutmeg, fweeten it to your palate with fine fugar, and make it into a thick batter with fioor; have 4 pan of hogslard boiling hot, and with a fpoon drop them in, in drops as big as a large outnrteg, fry them quick of a light brown, put them 00 a fifive to drain then diih them, and garoilh ai before

Hajiy Fritters

MIX half a pint of mild ale with flour into a batter moderately ftifiF, put in fome currants clean waflied and picked, or fome apples pared, cored, and chopped fine, and beat it up quick; the meaa time put half a popnd of butter into a ftew-pan, ipaHc it hot, and with a fpooo drop in th frirtera

as

PANCAKES AN FRltTEH. 44J

as quick as you can, but take care they do not ftkk rogctber then with an egg-flice turn them $ when they are of a fine brown put them into a difli fire fome powder fug;ar over them, and garniih with a Seville orange cut in half-quarters.

Curd Fritters.

TAKE half a pint of cheefe curd, and as muck flour, beat them well together, with ten eggs beat atid (trained fweeten them with fugar, put in a little beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, and a litde faffron, and fiir all well together; have a pan of hogs-lard boiling hot, and with a fpoon drop them in as quick as you can, fry them of a light biown put them on a Jieve before the fire to drain a mo ment, then put them in a . di(h and gamifh widi Seville orange cut in quarters.

Skirret Fritters.

BOll- fome (kirrct-roots till they are very tender take off the outfide and beat a pint of the pulp very fine, rub it through a fieve, and mix it wtcli a large fpoonful of Hour and four eggs beat wdl fweeten it with powder fugar, and put in a Trttte grated nutmeg and ginger, and mix it into a thick batter; (if a large fpoonful of flour is not fufficient put in more) have a pan lof hogslafd boiling hot drop them in with a fpoon, and fry them quick and brown; put them on a fieve before the fire to drain a minute, put them in a diih, and gamifh with Seville orange cut in quarters, or dried fweetmeacs

White Fritters.

•

TAKE two ounces of tbe flour of rice, and fift it through a very fine lawn fieve put it into a faucepan, with milk enough to wet it, and when it is well incorporated put in a pint of milk, put the whole over a ftove or flow fire, and take care to

keep

446 PANCAKES amp FRITTERS.

keep it moving; pdt in powder fugar to fweecen it, iod fomc candled leftion-peel (hred very fine, keep it over the fire till it is as thick as palle flour a peal, put It on, and with a rolling-pin fprcad ic abroad about quaner of an inch thick, and when it is quite cold cut it into foiall pieces; put half a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, nake it hgc, and with a little floor rol ypur fritters with your hand fry them of a light brown, then put them into a di(h, and pour a fpoon ful of orange flower-water over them fprinkle fococ powder-fug4r over al), and fend them to table hoL

Syringed Fritters,

FUT pit of water into a ftewpan, vicli'a piece of butter as big as an egg -, grate in the riod of a lemon a preCerved lemon peel rapped, a km orange flowers crifped and rubbed fiae-, put all over the fire, and when it boils fliir in fome flour, wbidi continue to do till it is as thick as batter; then take it off the fif t take fin ounce of fweee almonds ini, four bitter ones, blanch and bet them fine in a mor tar, rub two Naples bifcuits through a fine cuUender, and beat two eggs $ mix all well together, and put in eggs till your barter it thin enough tp fyringe; then fill yiur fyringe, have a pm of Hogs lard boiU ing hot, fyringe in your fritters as uick aa yqu caOi in any form you pleafe; have a flce rady to tak them out in a moment, hy them on a ficve to draia, then put them in a di(h, and firew powdrfugai over them: or you may butter a (beet of paper j ringe your fritters on it in the form of a true-lover's knot, or any other fhape; then turn the paper upfide down over the pan of boiling hogs lard or butter, fo that they may drop off the paper inio it; fry ftem of light brQwn, lay them W a fieve to drijiy dilb them nd fprinkle powdei fugar over chmxu

NCAKEfi AND FRITTERS. 44r

. Vine Leaf Fritters.

TAKE ft doeen of the fmalleft viae leaves yon cao get, cut off the ftalks, put them in a deep di(h, pour in a glafe of brandy and grace the rind of a lemon over them, and about two ounces of powder fugar; mix a. gill of cream with two eggs and flour CO a ftiff batter, and mix with them; have a pan of boiling hogs lard, minding that the leaves have plenty of batter on both fides; put them in, and fry them quick on both fides of a light brown, lay them on a fieve to drain, then put them in a dilb fprinkle powder fugar over them, and glaze tbem with a hot iron

Clary Tritters.

MAK a good ftiiF batter with half a pint of new milk, four eggs, and flout grate in a little lemon peel and fomc nutmeg, put in two ounces of lewder fiigr, and a fmall glafs of brandy then take a dozen Clry kaves, cut away thj: (talks, pitf them into batter, faking c that they have plenty of it on both fides; have a pan of boiling hogs lard, put them io one by QQe, apd fry them quick on both fidcs of a liht brown then take them Qut lay them on a fieve to drain a moment, put them in a di(h„ ftreW powder fugar over them, and glase them with a hot iron. Note. You may drefs Comfrey or Mulbcry leaves the fame way.

J0tatae Fritters. BOIL about a pound and a half of potatoes, peel and bruife them fine, rub them through a fieve, mix them with a large fdonful of flour, a fpoohful of cream, three eggs well beat, a little lemon peel flired fine, a little nutmeg, arid powder-fugar enough to iweeten them to your pallet, a glafs of mountain, and one of brandy ) mix all well together; have a paa pf boiling hogs lard, and with a fpoon drop

them

448 lANCAKES aid FRlttfekS.

them in as faft as you can; fry chem on both (ides of 9 light brown lay them on a fieve to drain, then put rhem on a difli and fprinkle powder-fugar over iJiein.

Note. You mud fnd with aU kind of fritters beaten cinnamon and powder fugat in. faucecs the iaoie as for pancakes.

Apple Fraze.

PARE fijt large apples, take outthecores cut them in flices and fry them on both fide Ivith butter ptlt them on a fieve to drain, mix half a pint of milk and two eggs with flour to a batter not to6 iliF, put in a little lemon peel (hred fine a litdc beaten cinnamon, put fome butter .into a frying pan, and make ic hot; put in half the batter, and lay the apples on it, let it fry a little to fet it, then put the other batter over, fry it on one fidc then turn it and fry the other fide brown; put it into a difh, ftrew powder- fugar over it, and fquee over it alfo the juice of a Seville orange

Almond Fra%e

' ' TAKE a pound of Jordan almonds boil them b water a minute, drain them off, and put them into cold water; take off the fkins, put theai into a inortar, and beat them to a fine pafte; put in a litdo cream to prevent their oiling beat Up the yolks of ten eggs, the whites of four weUt ith a pint of cream, and ilrain them through a fieve to the a monds; put in quarter of a pound of fugar, as much grated bread, a little rofe- water; mix them all well together put a quarter of a pound of firtih butter into a ilew pan', make it hot, pour in the ihifit and keep ftirring it till it is of a good thickoels, then turn it into a difh, and drew powdcr-fugtr over it

U0€9n

CHEESECAKES ANiy CUSTARDS. 449.

Bac(m Ffaxe. •

CUT z dozen thin rafhcrs of bacon, put them into a f rytng-pan, and fry them on both fides, but not toatnuch; have ready t piht of pancake batter, and put it in; fry it gently tiil one fide is done, then tofs' or turn it, as you would u pancake, to do the other Ifde then:put it into a difh.

Jb..rihkMftMMiMaMHiHHHHMiBBB'HMhirtMMiih.

CHAP. XIX.



CHEESECAKES and CUSTARDS;

WHENyounakeyour chtefecakes, makeihem as near the time you want to bake them' as you can, particularly almond or lemon cheefe cakcs as they will get oily by (landing long, and acquire a dtikgixeable appearaoce; take care that your pans are well tinned, for cuftards in particular, and always wet the bottoms with water before yooput the milk, &c into them, as it will prevent their fticking or burning to the bottoms •, and thefe article's fliouW always besf baked in a moderate oven for stqufok oven will fcorch them, and a very flack oven wiH make them look dingy, flat, and heavy; in thi cafe- there is nopreeife rules to be laid down, but mult be Itarned by care and experience.

Fine Cheefecakes.

TAKE a pint of fwcet cream, warm ir, and put

it to fire quarts of milk warm from the cow; then

pin runnet to it ftir it about, and when broke ftrain

• the whey from the curd through a fine fievc or cloth,

putit into a mortar, and beat it till it is as fine as b4U

G g tcrj

ifSo CHEESECAKES AND CUSTARDS.

ter; have half a pound of altponds blanched and beat fine, and half a pound of macaroons beat fine if you have no macaroons get Naples bifcuics; beat the yolks of nine eggs very well, and ftrain diem through a fieve; half a nutmeg grated, a fpoonfol of orange or rofe water, half a pound of powder fugar; mix all well together alfo mix well in a pound of melted frefli butter, with half a pound of currants clean wafhed and picked; let it ftand oil it is cold and then make a nice puflF pafte, as dirf dcd in the beginning of the chaper for pics. Flour fome middling-fized patcie-pans, roll out the pafie and put it on, crnnp it round the edge with a knife, and then put in your fiuff, with a little candied dtroq cut in dices at the top, and bake them.

Or you may roll out a piece of puff pafte, about as thick as a crown piece, and quita round; put fome ftuff en, and raife up the edge of the pafte round it, or make it into what ifaape you pleafe: put a flourifh of pafte over it in ftrings, butter a tin or iron plate, and put them on to bake. You may de two perfumed plumbs, difiblved in orange cm rofe water, if you like it; or you may make a leis quantity, according to the above receipt.

Common Cbeefecakes.

TAKE a quart of new milk, and juft warm it; put a fpoonful .of runnet into it, and fet it near the fire till it is broke; then ftrain it through a fieve, put the curd into a pan, and beat it well with a fpoon; melt a quarter of a pound of butter, pitia the fame quantity of moift fugar a little grated nutmeg, two Naples bifcuits grated fine, the yolks of 'our eggs beat well, and the whites of two, a fpooaful of rofe- water, a glaft of fiick, quarter of a poupd of currants plumped, and mix ail well togr? ther. Make your pafte as the before receipt, aiid treat tlem the fame.

Cipro

1

GHEESECAKES ANj) CUSTARDS. 451

Citron Cbeefe cakes.

TAKE a pint of curds, and beat them well in a' mortar till they zxt fine; blanch and beat a quarter of a pound of almonds with orange flower-water; beat Bie yolks of four eggs well, two Naples bifcuits grated, fweeten it with powder fiigar, fhrcd fome green citron very fine, mix all well together, ind bake them in tea cups, or with puff paftc in patty-pans, with a little candied citron cut in flips and put on the tops.

Lemon Cheefecakes.

CUT the peel of two large lemons very thin, boil it in plenty of water till it is very tender, pound it well in a mortar with half a pint of curd, a quarter of a pound of powder fugar, the yolks of fix eggs beat Well, and half a pound of frelh butter melted; briaf and mix all well together; fprinkle a little flour on K)ur patty-pans,, put a fliect of puff pafl:e on, and crimp the edges with a knife; then fill them rather more Than half with the Huff j .and put a little candied lemon peel cut in thin flices at the top, and bake them.

, Orange cheefecakes are made the fame way, only?ail the orange peel in three different waters, to take ff the bitternefs, and put candied orange peel on he tops.

Lemon Cheefecakes a fecond Uay .,

GRATE the rind of two large lemons, and fquceze be juice of one into a (lew-pan; put in half a pound i double-refined iugar, twelve yolks of eggs beat nc, melt half a pound of Utih butter in three or lur fpoonsful of cream, ftir all well together, fet it per the fire, and continue fl:irring it till it grows lick; then take it off, and let it cool; when cold,. rinkle a little flour on the patty-pans, puton a thin lect of puffpafl:e, crimp the edges round with a

G g 2 knife.

452 CHEESECAKES AND CUSTARDS knife, (ill them little more than half full, and bake them in a moderate oven.

Almond Cbeeecakes.

TAKE half a pound of Jordan almonds, bcul them in water one minute, uke off the (kins and throw them into cold water wa(h thcnvout and drj them in a cloth, beat them very fine in a marble mortar, with a little orange flower-water to keep tbcm from oiling; beat up the yolks of fix es, the whites of two, and (train them through a ucve to the almonds -, put in half a pound of poer fugar, little beaten mace and cinnamon, melt half a poood of frefli butter, and put it in with th rind hslf a lemon grafted $ mx all well together; fprinkk a little Hour on the ptty-pans, put on a thio ibeet of pufi pafte, crimp it all round with a knife, fiU tbcm rather more than half full, blanch a few almonds and cut them in thin flips and lay on v bake thera in % moderate oven.

Plain CBeefecakes.

TAKE two quarts of milk from the cow, pot in fome runnet, and fet it near the firo till it brws; then (train the whey from the curd through a fieve; pttt it into a marble morurand beat it well, mdc&tif t pound of fre(h butter and put in with two (poonsitfl of rofe-water, beat it well together; then beat up the yolks of fix eggs, the whites of three, ftrain them through a fieve to the curds, fweeten it with fine fugar, grate in a little nutmeg, flour your patty-pans, put a thin puiP pafte over them, crimp them rotiwi with a knife, and more than half fill them with tbei (tuff; or roll out puff pafte round, put ibme fti on, pull up the edges all round, lay them on tin ot iron plates, and bake theqi in a moderate ovro.

Skt

CHEESECAKES and CUSTARDS. 453

Rice Cbeefecakes.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of rice, wafli and pick it clean, boil it in two quarts of water till it is tender, ftrain it through a fieve, and let it drain; put it into a ftewpan with half a pint of cream, half a pound of fre(h butter, and half a pound of fugat, a fpoonful of orange flower water, a little lenno'n peel (hred fine, mix it all well together with fix eggs well beaten, and a glafs of brandy put it over the fire, and ftir it till it is thick; then take it ofithe fire, and let it go cold; in the mean time flour your patty-pans, put fome pufi pafte on them, crimp chem roud the edge with a knife, and when your ttoS is cold, fill them nearly full, and bake them in a Qow oven

Maids of Honour.

TAKE half a pint of fweet eurds, beat them well in a marble mortar till they are as fmooth as butter, put in half a pint of cream, the yolks of four eggs, the whites of two, well beaten and ftraiAed throu a fieve; a quarter of k pound of frefli butter melted, a little grated lemon peel and nutmeg, one ounce of candied citron (hred very fine, a gfs of brandy, and a fpoonful of orange flower-water; fweeten it to your palate with powder fugar; mix the ingredients all well together, have your pattypans very fmall, fprinkle on a little flour, put a thin puff pafte over them, more than half fill them, and bake them in a moderate oven.

Fine Gujiardx.

TAKE a pint of cream, and boil it with a few coriander feeds, a little lemon peel, a laurel leaf, and a bit of cinnamon; fweeten it with fine fugar to your palate, beat up five eggs very well, and, when the cream is nearly cold, pour the eggs add cream backward and forward between two velTels tiU they

G g J ae

454- CHEESECAKES and CUSTARDS.

are well mixt, then ftrain them through a finefievC put them into a cup and bake them

Plain Cuftards.

TAKE a quart of new milk, and boil it with a little coriander feeds, a little lemon peel, two laurel leaves, and fweecen it with fine fugar to your palate; beat up eight eggs very well, and when the milk is nearly cold, pour the milk and eggs backward and forward between two veflcls till they are well mutt, then drain them through a (ieve, put them into cups and bake them: you may put in a fpoonful of roTe water when you mix the milk and eggs together; and if you have not an oveii, make ufe of a ftew-pan of boiling water; put the cups in, and let the water come about half way up, boll them gently till they are fer, then take them out, and brown them on the tops with a hot (hovel or iron.

Almond Cujiards.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of almonds, blanch and beat them fine in a mortar, keep putting in a little cream to prevent their oiling; put a pint of cream into a ftew-pan, the yolks of four eggs well beat, a fpoonful of rofe-water, a little fack, grated nutmeg, and fugar to fweeten it to your palate put it over a ftove, and ftir it one way till it is thick; then put in the almonds, and ftir them well in the cream s then pour it into cups, and brown the tops with a hot (hovel or iron.

Orange Cujiards.

PARE the rind o(F a Seville orange as thin as ycu can, boil it in plenty of water till it is very tender, beat it in a marble mortar till very fine; put in a fpoonful of brandy, a quarter of a pound of powder fugar, the yolks of four tggs; beat all well together for ten minutes; then, by degrees, pour in a pint of boiling cream, flirring it all the time, and even till

It

BLANCMANGE, &c. 451

it IS cold; then fqueczc in the juice of t Seville orange, taking care that none ot the feeds get in; then put it into cups; let them be put into a ftewpan of boiling water, (landing about half way up, and remain there till fet; then take them out, and ftick candied orange peel, cut in flips, on the top.

Note. You may make Lemon Cuftards the fame way; only ftick candied lemon peel on the tops, inftead of orange.

C xx A P. JLX.

Blanc'mange, Creams, and Flummery.

Blancmange.

TAKE a calf's foot, cut it in fmall pieces, put it into a fauce-pan with a quart of water, one ounce of ifinglafs, a little lemon peel, and a ftick of cinnamon; boil it gently, and fkim it well, till it is of a very ftrong jelly; which you may know by putting a little in a ipoon to get cold; then ftrain it off, put jc into a ftew-pan with a few coriander feeds, and two or three laurel leaves; blanch and beat an ounce of fweet almonds, and two bitter ones (not two ounces), very fine, put them in, fweeten it with lugar to your palate, and let it boil up; then put in a pine of good thick cream, and boil it again; ftrain it into a bowl, and let it ftand till it is half cold, then pour it off from the fettlingsinto another bowl; let your mold& be ready, fill them, let them ftand to be cold; heii they are thoroughly cold, raife them with your fingers from the fides, dip the bottom of the mold in

Gg 4 warm

456 BLANCMANGE, ecir.

warm water, and turn them out iMo a di(h: garmfli with jellies of diiFerent colours:; or curraat jcUy i or Seville orange cut in qurtersi or flowers, or aoy thing you fancy.

Blancmangt, n fecondWay.

PUT a quart of fweet cream into a ftew-pan, with two ounces of ifinglafs a ftick of cionaruofu a little lemon peel, a few coriander feeds, two or three laurel leaves, fweeten it wich fugar to your palate, boil it gently till the ifinglafs is difiblved, in the mean time blanch one ounce of fweet almonds, and two bitter ones, beat them fine in a mortar, and put them in; ftir it well about, then ftrain it through a fine fieve into a bowl, let ic ftand till it is half cold, then pour it from the fettlings into another bowl - Let your moulds be ready, and proceed as bcCoie directed.

Blancmange a third Way.

PUT a quart of new milk into a (lew-pan, with xwo ounces of ifinglafs, a flick of cinnamon, a bctle lemon peel, a few coriander feeds, two or three laa rel leavers, fweeten it to your palate, cut fix bitter almonds in flices and put in, boil it gentljr till the iGnglafs is difiblved, then ftrain it through a fine fieve into a bowl, and proceed as before

When you want to colour yourBlanc'mangt green, juft when it is done, put in a little fpmach juice, but take care that ic does not boil after it is put in for in that cafe it will curdle, and be fpoiled. If you wi(h to have it red, bruife.a little cochineal and put . in; if yellow, a little (fifron if violet colour, a lit tic fyrup of violets; and by this means you may have five different colour in thedifli, tht is, plain wl.ite, green, yellow, redj and violet. Let your meld for the white be deeper than the reft put it in

B L A N C • M A N G Ei &c. 457

the middle of che difli, and the others round it: gar nilh as directed in-tbe fir ft receipt.

Steeple Cream.

PUT two ounces of ivory, cut ver? fine, and fix ounces of hartfhorn, into a ftooe bottle fill it up with fair water to the neck; put in a little gum arable and gum dragon, then tie the mouth of the bottle clofe, and fet-it in a pot of water with hay at the bootom, and let it fimnier for fix hours; then rakte it ottt, and let it ftand an hour before you open it, for fear it fi)Ould fly in your face; ftrain it through a Btrc fieve into a pan that it may cool; when ic is cold, obfervc that k is of a very ftrong jelly; if it IS not, put it into a ftew-pan, with two ounces of ifinlafs, let it fimmer till the ifinglafs is diflTolved; then take haif a pound of fweet almonds, blanch and beat them fine in a nKrtar, and as you beat them, put in a little cream, to prevent their oiling, and afterwards mix them with a pint of thijpk cream, ftrain them through a fine fieve into a ftew-pan, and put in a pint of jelly •, fweeten it to your palate with fine powder fugar, fet it over the fire till it is fcalding hot, taking care that it does not boil; then take it off, and put a little amber into it, ftrain it through a fieve into a bowl, and let it ftand a few minutes; have your fteeple moWs ready, pour it in, Ipt it ftand till quite cold, and carefully turn it out into a difli. Garnifti with currant jelly, fweetmeats, or any thing you fancy.

Lemon Cream.

PUT the rind of two lemons very thin, the juice ef three, with a pint of fpring water; beat the whites of fix eggs very fine, and mix with the lemon and water fweeten it with fine fugar to your tafte; put it over a flow fire, ftir it till it thickens, and take oure that it does not boil ftrain it through a fine

lawn

4s8 BLANCMANGE, ice'.

lawn (ieve; beat up the yolks of fix eggs, and mix i₯ich it in a ftew-pan, put it over a flow fire til) it thickens, then pour it into a bowl, and continue llirring it till it is nearly cold; afterwards put it ioto cups or glafTes Lemon Cream, a fecond Way.

PEEL off the rind of two lemons very thio, boil then) in plenty of water till they are quite tender, and beat them fine in a mortar; in the mean time cut two calf's feet very fmall, and put them into a fauce-pan with two quarts of water, one ounce of ifinglals, a ftick of cinnamon, and fome lemon peel; boil it gently till it is reduced to a quart, ftrain it of, ikim off the fat very clean, put it into a ftew-paa with the beaten lemon peel, fweeten it with fugar to your tafte, and let it boil up; beat up the yolks of fix eggs very fine, put them in, ftir them well for i minute or two, then drain it through afinefiere; fqueeze in the juice of two lemons, ftirring it a fer minutes, then pour it into your molds: when thef are thoroughly cold, turn them out into a difh, vA garnifh as you fancy.

You may make Orange Cream in the fame manner, only boil the peel in three or four diercat waters to take out the bitternefs.

Orange Cream, a fecoudWay.

TAKE a fine clear Seville orange, pare the rind

off very thifl, fqbeeze the juice of four oranges, put

them into a ftewpan, with half a pint of water and

half a pound of fine powder fugar; beat the whitc$

of five eggs, and mix into it; fet them on a flow

fire, ftir it one way till it gets thick and white, theft

ftrain it through a gauze fieve, and ftir it till it i

cold; beat the yolks of five eggs very "fine, mit all

wgether in a ftew..pan, put it over a flow fire, ftinrii

it till it nearly boikj pour it into a bowl, andcooti nue

BLANCMANGE, &c. 459

nue ftirring it till it is nearly cold; then put it into your cups or glafies.

Rbenijh Cream.

• CUT two calf's feet very fmall, put them into a fauce-pan with two quaris of water, a (lick of cin namon, and a little lemon peel boil them gently till reduced to lefs than a quart, ftrain it off, and ikim it to be free from fat; put it into a (lew-pan, with a little lemon peel, two laurel leaves, a few coriander feeds, and a little faflfron fweeten it with fine fugar to your palate, and let it boil up; beat the yolks of eight eggs very fine, take the cream off the

. fire and (lir in the eggs well; put it over the fire a moment, taking care that it does not boil; drain it

. through a ficve, put in a gill of Rheni(h wine, (lir it till it is half cold, then put it into molds; when it is cold, turn it out into a di(h, and garnifh as you fancy.

Jelly of Cream.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of hartfhorn, put it into a fauce-pan with three pints of water, a (lick of cinnamon, and a little lemon peel; boil it gently till it becomes a difF jelly, which you may know by

. putting fome into a fpoon to cool; drain it through a fine (ieve into a dew-pan put to it half a pint of cream, fweeten it to your tade, and give it a gentle

% boil i take it oiF the fire, put in two' fpoonsful of rofe-watcr, two of fack, and dir it a few minutes; then put it into your molds, and when cold turn them carefully into i, difh. Garnifh with jelly, fweetineats, or what ypu plcafe.



Piiacbio Cream.

BREAK half a pound of PiRachio nuts, take out the kernels, beat them fine in a mortar, with a fpoonful of brandy, and a little cream; rub them

through



4o BLANC'MAN0E &c.

thrcMigk a fievt to take out the flctns; put thein into a ftew-pan with a pint of fweet cream, a Jittle pewder fugar, and the yolks of four eggs beat fine; ftir all well together, put it over a (low fire till it is near boiling, (but mind it does not boil, as that will fpoil it) then put it into a foup-plate, or fmall deep di(h; when cold, ftick fomc kernels, cut length ways, all over it, and fend it to table.

Pijlscbio Crtam a fecond Way.

TAKE two ounces of ifinglafs, boil it in a pint of water, wit4i a little lemon peel, and a fmall (lick of cmnamon, till thoroughly diflblved i ftrain it throogh a fine fieve into a ftew-pan, fweeten it with fine fugar, put in a pint of cream; break half a pound of Piftachio nots, beat them fine in a mortar with a lit tie cream, rub them through a fieve, put them into a (tew pan, bdil it getitly, then pour it ifito a bowl, and let it remain till half cold; afterwards put it into what moulds you pleafe, or deep cups when quite cold, turn it out into a di(h, and garnilh to your fancy.

Hartjhorn Cream.

PUT four ounces of kartlhorn (havings into three pints of water, bdil it till reduced to nearly half a plot, and run it through a jdly bag; put it into a ilew-pan with a pint of cream, quarter of a pound of fugar, and juft give it a boil up; then put it into fmall moulds, cups, or glaflcs; when cold, dip them in warm water, and turn them on the di(h. Blanch a few almonds, cut them in flips, and ftick them in your cream: garnifh with flowers.

Almond Cream.

TAKF a quart of cream, boil it with a ftick of

cinnamon, a little lemon peel, two or three laurel

leaves, fweeten it to your tafte; blanch half a pound

of almonds, beat them fine in a mortar with a little

cream.

BLANCMANGE, &c. 461

cream, mix them with the cream, ainl give it a boil; then ftrain it through a fievQ-, beat up the yolks of nioe eggs very fine, mix them, well with the cream; puit it over a (low fire, and ftir it one way till ic is thick, obferving that it does not boil i then pour jc into a bowl, put in a fpoonful of rofe or orange flower water, and ftir it till nearly cold; then put it into cups, or glafle. .

Ratijia Creams

BOIL a quart of cream with fix laurel leaves, a ftipk of cinnamon, and a little lemon peel; put in a little ratifia i when boiled, firain it through a fieve into another ilewpan beat up the yelks of eighceggs well with a little cold cream, mix them with the hot cream, fweeten it to your.palate.with powder fpgar, put it over a flow fire (lirring it one way till it IS thick, and when near boiling, pour it into doep china di(hes, or fmall bafons, to get cold for ufe.

Barley Cream.

BOIL an ounce of pearl barley in milk and water till it is tender; then ftrain the liquor from it, and put it into a ftew-pan with a quart of good cream, and beil it five minutes; fweeten it with fugar to your palate; beat up fix eggs well, take the creamoff the fire, mix in the eggs by degrees, fet it over the Bre again, ftir it one way till ic is thick, then take it off, put in two fpoonsful of orange flower- water, and pour it into bafons; when cold, ferve ic up.

Goojberry Cream.

TAKE two quart) of goofterries, put them intf a fauce-pan, juft cover them with water, fcald them till they are tender, then rub them through a fieve with a fpoon to a quart of pulp; have fix eggs well beaten, make your pulp hot, and put in one ounea of frelh butter; fweeten it to your tafte, ftir in.youp

8g

I

t

I

462 BLANCMANGE, &c

eggs, put it over a gentle fire til) they are thick, but you muft take care they do not boil; then ftir in a gill of the juioe of fpinach, and when it is almoft cold, ftir in a fpoonful of. orange flower-water, or fack; pour it into bafons, and when cold ferve it up.

Lute Cream.

BOIL a quart of new milk with a ftick of cinnamon, a little lemon peel, and two or three laurel leaves; fweeten it to your tafte; ftrain it through a Geve into another (tew-pan, beat up the yolks of eight eggs, the whites of two, with a little milk, very fine; ftir the eggs into the milk, put it over a flow Bre, and ftir it one way till it is thick; pour it into a bowl, put two fpoon5;fLil of rofe cr orange flower water into it, and ftir it till it is cold; then put it into glafies or cups

Wbipt Cream.

TAKE a quart of cream, put it into a broad pan, with half a pint of fack, half a pound of fine powder fugar,; beat up the whites of four eggs to a high froth, and put in, with fome lemon peel cut thin; you may perfume it, if you pleafe, with a little mufk or ambergreafe tied in a bag, and fteeped in the cream; whip it up well with a Whiflc, and, as the froth rifes, put it into cups, glafles, or fmall ba fons; or you may put it over fine fruit tarts.

Clouted Cream.

TAKE four quarts of milk from the cow, in the evening, put it into a broad earthen pan, and let it ftand till the next day, then put the diOi over a very flow fire, and another difli over it to keep out the duft; make it nearly hot, to fct the cream; put ic away to get cold, then take the cream off into a bowl, and beat it well with afpoon. It is account cd

BLANCMANGE, &c. 463

ed vety fine in the Weft of England for tea and coffee, or to put over fruit pies and tarts.

ince Cream

TAKE as much cream as you think you will want, boil it with a little cinnamoa and lemon peel, make it very fweet with fugar, ftrain it off, and let it get cold; put your quinces into boiling water, boil them quick, uncovered, till they are tender; pare and beat them very fine, rub them through a fieve, then put them into a mortar, and mix the cream well with them. Put it into fmall bafons or glaffes, and ferve it up.

Citron Cream.

TAKE a quart of cream and put it into a ftewpan, with one ounce of ifinglafs, a ftick of cinnamon, two laurel leaves, a little lemon peel; fweeten it to yourtafte with fine fugar, boil it gently till the ifinglafs is diflblved, then ftrain it off; put it into a deep china di(h, or fmall bafons; cut fome green citron in very thin fmall dices, wa(h it in rofe water to raife the green colour, and when your cream is nearly cold, put in the citron, fo that it may fall into the middle, and be covered with the cream at top but not fall to the bottom. When cold, feVve it up to table

Rajberry Cream.

TAKE a quart of very ripe rafbcrries, or rafberry jam, rub them through a hair fieve to take out the feeds, mix it with a quart of good cream, fweeten it to your tafte with fine powder fugar, and put in a fpoonful of rofe-water; then put it into a deep pan, and with a chocolate mill raife a froth; as the froth rifes take it off, and put it on a fieve tp drain; if you have not a chocolate mill, put it into a broad pan, and whilk it with a whifk till the froth rifes; as ic rifes take it off, and lay it on a fieve as before: when you have got as much froth as you want, put what

cream

n

464 BLANCMANGE, &c.

cream remains into a deep china dt(h or bow),, and ivich a rpoon put your froth upon lE aa high as you can, and flick a light flower in the middle; or pull the pips off fome flowers, and put here and cheic over it.

Snow and Cream.

TAKE a quart of new milk, and boil it with a ftick oi cinnamon, a little lemon peel, two or three laurel leaves, fweeten it with fugar to your tafte, bctf up the whites of four eggs, the yolks of fix, very fne, mix the milk and eggs well togerher, and ftr all through a Bne fleve into a flew-pan; put it over a flow Are, and fl:ir rt one way tifl it is thick, then pur it into a deep dilh to get cold -, when cold, beat tlie whites of fix eggs to a high froth, put fome milk and water into a hroed ftew-pan, and when it boils, take the froth oflF the eggs and put in on the milk and water, boil it up once, then wieii a flicf take it carefully ofl, and lay it on your cuftard.

Ice Cream.

TAKE a dozen ripe apricots, pare them vcrythia and (lone them, fcald and put them into a meitar, and beat theni fine % put to them fix ounces of dou ble-refined fugar, a pint of fcalding cream, and rub it through a fieve with the back of a fpoon then put it into a tin with a clofe cover, and ict it in a tub of ice broken fmall, with four handsful of falc mixt among the ice 5 when you fee your cream get thick round the edges of your tin, ftir it well, and put it in again till it becomes quite thick; when the cream is aU froze up, take it out of the tin, and put it into the mould you intend to turn it out of: miod that you put a piece of paper on each end, between the lids and the ice cream, put on the top lid, and have another tub of ice ready, as before, put the tnould in the middle, with the ice under and over it;

Ice

let Hand four hourj, and do not turn it out before fffa wane it; then dip the mould into cold fpring water uke off the luls and paper and turn it into a pljite You may do any fore of fruit the fame

Harfh&rn Plummery

TAK half a pound of harcfhorn (havings put them into a fauoe-pan with three pints of water, boji it gently till reduced to a pint, ftrain it into abafon and.fe( it by to cool; boil,a pint of thick cream, and let it get cold; put your jelly on, and make it blood warm put the crcjfim to it with a gill of white wine, two fpoonful of orange flower- water, fweetcn % with fine fur, and beat it till well mixt; dip your mpuldsorcgps in old water, (hen put in your Burn mery; when it is cold, trn it out into a difli, and mix a little cream white wine, and fugar togctherj and pour into your difh. Cut a few blanched almonqs in long flips, and Hick in the tops of th jQummery.

Hartjhorn Flummery afecond Way

TAKE four ounces of hartfhorn ihavingi, put them into a faucepa.n with two quarts of fpring water, let it fimmer over the fire till reduced to a pint; or put it into a jug, and fet it in, the oven with houfhold bread; ftrain it through a fieve into a (lew-pan, blanch and bet half a pound of fweet almonds with I little orange flower- water, mix a little of your jelly in, and fine fugar enough to fweeten it, then drain it through a fieve to the other jelly, mix it well together, and when it is blood warm put it into moulds or half-pint bafons; when it is cold, dip the moulds or bafons in warm water, and turn them into a difli. Mix fome white wine and fugar together, and pour into the di(h You may ftick almonds in if you pleafc

Hh Oatmal

46 BiANC'MANGE; &c;

' Outmeal Flummery. i

GET fomc Oatmeal (Scotch is the bcft), and put it into 4 broad deep pan, cover it with water, ftiric eiJ together, and let it ftand twelve hours; pour that water off as clear as you can, put on more.wiI ter, and let it ftand twelve more; then pour the wa I te off clear, and drain the oatnrieal through a coaHe

hair (ieve, put it into a fauce-pan, fet it overaflov

fire, and ftir it' with a (lick till it boils, and becomes

very thick; then pour it into foup-plates, arid wbea

cold, turn it out into plates, and eat it with whu

f you pleafc- either wine and fugar, ale and fugar,

or cyder and fugar,; fo me like it made hot with milk, and put a piece of butter in the middle, like a hafty-pudding. Take care you have plenty rf .water to your oatmeal, and' when you clear off tk

If lad water but one, put on as much frefli as will

I moiftcn it well: fomc let it ftand forty-eight hourt,

fome three day, fiiifting the water every twcl hours;' but this you will do according as you tike it for fweetnefs or tartnefs. Grits once cut, is better than oatmeal. Obferve to ftir it up well when yott putinfrclh water.

French Flummery. TAKE a quart of cream, and one ounce of i&' glafs beat fiae, put it iiito the cream, and boil it gently for a quarter of an hour, ftirring it all thctitnej then take it off, fweetcn it with fine powder fogafi put in a fpoonful of rofe arid one of orange flowerwater, ftrain it through a fieve, and ftir it tillh cold, then put it into a mould or bafon i when coU turn- it on a di(h, and garni(h with currant t% put ffiewed pears round it.

Hedge-'Hog. • TAKE two pounds of fwcct almonds, put thcii,iftto boiling water, take off the Ikins, favc about foi?

B L A N G J M A N G: fe; ttci. 467.

cMlnces Mfhole put the reft in a mortar and beat them, with a little canary and orange flower- water' to keep them from oiling; then beat up the yolks of twelve eggs, the whites of fix, put them in and beat them well; put in a pint of cream, fweeten with poWder-fugar to your palate, then put it into a ftewpaiii put in half a pound of frclh butter melted, fet it over a ftove, and ftir it till it is ftifFenAugh to be made into the (hape of a hcdge-hog then put it Into & di(b, and cut the rcft'of the almonds in lon flips, and ftick in, to'-rtprcfent the briftks of a: hedge hog. Boil a pitpf cremv fweeten it with fgar,. beat up th'e yolks of four eggs, . the whites, of two, mix them with the crcfjam, fet if over the fire, and Ilir it one way till it is thick, then pour itrdunc the hedge-hog; let it ftand till it is cold. GarnifK he dlih with currant jelly ahdfcrve it up; or put a rich .calf's Joot jelly, made clear aad good, inftead

or tne crcim, oct.

' • '

Eggs and Bacon in Flummery.

TAKE a quart of new milk and put it into a ftewpan, wuh two ounces of ifinglafsjobil it gently till the ifinglafs is diflblved, fweeten it with fugar, and ftrain it through a fieve; colour a quarter of a pine red with cochineal; hae la tin mould about four iofrbs. long, two broad, andonedeepi .pu a little ctf-iJHe Vfcd ae the bottom, and let it be cold,- then )Ut on fome white, then red, and treble the thicknefs oF vhite at the top, always.iobfervingLto let one be cold before you put on the other, and that only blood Varm; then take five tea-cups and fill them half folf lih white flummery and let all ftand till the next ihorning: turn them out and cut that of the tin Ihoulds in thin flicks, and lay in your difh; then turn %bem out of the cups, and put over the other, cut i •hole out of the tops, and lay in half a preferVed apr !•• cot, to make it appear like thefolk of an egg; Gar

H h 2 nib

4S JELLIE9 AND SYItABUBS.

nifli the dilh with curriuic jclly calPs foot jdly, flowers, 6 you fancy,

Fmry Butter.

TAKE the yolks of two ban) eggs, and beat then fine in a marble iDoc;;ar, with a large fpooofol of oran flower-water, and one of fine powder-funri beat it xill it is a fine pafte, then mix it pp wiu as fpucb freih butter out of the churn, and force through a ftrainer fuU of fmall holes iQto a plate, or fawi difli as an ornament for fupper.

Orange Butter

TAKE and beat the yolks of ten e;s very wdi put them into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of Rhenilh, fix ounces of powder-fugar, and the juice of three China oranges, fet them over a gende fire, and ftir them one way till thick; when you take it off, ftir is a piece of butter as big as a walnut, then put it ifii a difl), and when cold ferve it up.

X: H A P. XXI,



JELLIES and SYLLABUBSL

Bartjham Jelfy.

TAK half a pound of hartifaom fliaviogs, ptf them into a fauce-pan with three quarts of vif fjcr, a lemon peel, and a (lick of cinnamon, i)oil K

gently till it is a ftrong jelly, which you may koov y. taking a little out in a fpoon, and let it cool; die ftrain it through a fine firve into a clean ftcw-fM

put in a pint of RbfUiifli wine fwcctcn it widb lpf'

fugir

J

JELLIED AMD SYLLABUBS. 46

foga to yoiif palate fquese tht fuite of four lemons, or two lemons and two Seville oranges, ftraiit the juice to keep out the feeds, and put in with a little fafFron, boil it up, beat Jtp the whites of eight tggs to a' high froth, misc them weH in (hejelly; ilnd bot) it up for five nnrinuies thdh cake it off the fir cover it over, and let it ftand five minutes; have ready a fwanfkin jeHy-bag hung in a frame, pot a bowl under, and pour your jeHy in gently, and as it runs pour it in again till it is as bright as you want it; when it is clear and bright, with a clean filver ijpooD fill your glafies. Always be fure to put your iugar and lemon in, to make it palatable, before you put your eggs ini for by putting fugar and lemon m afterwards you will prevent its being clear

CaiTs Feet "Jelly.

TAKE two calPs feer, and take out the large bone,, cut them in fmall pieces, put them into a fauce-pan with three quarts of water, a little lemon peel, a ftick of cinnamon, and boil them gently tilt It is reduced to a quart; be careful in trying with %. fpoon that it is ftrong enough 1 drain it off, and let it fettle for half an hour, then ikim it very clean, and pour it from the fettlings into a ftew-pan 1 put in half a pint of mountain or Lifbon wine, fweeten it to your tafte with loaf-fugar, fqueezc four lemons, or two lemons and two Seville oranges, ftrain the juice to keep out the feeds, and put in with a lemokipeel, and a very little faffron, boil it up a few mi nutes, then beat up the whites of eight eggs to a high froth, and mix them well together with the jelly, then boil it up for five minutes % have your bag ready with a bpwl under it, pour your jelly gently in that it may run pretty faft through at the firft, and as ic runs pour it in aain for feveral times, till it is aa clear as you would have it j when k is all run off, nith a filver Ipoon fill your glafies

H h 3 Not€

47 JELLIES AND SYLLABUBS.

Note. You may mike any larger quantity by ob ferving the fiune rules.

Jelfy for Moulds &c.

AS this jelly requires to be a great deal ftronger than for glades, it will of courfe be neceflary to have ftronger things to make it with. You muft take two calf's feet, and one neat's foot, take out the largs bonesi and cut them in fmall pieces; if you do not like the neat's foot, ufe two ounces of iQnglafsiniis fiead; put it into a large faucepan or pot with a gal Ion of water, a lemon-peel cut thin, and a (tick of cinnamon; boil it gently till it is reduced to three pints or lefs, as it boils fkim it well, try it with t fpoon as before direded, and if you find it ftron; enough, ftrain it off, and let it fettle half an hour, thn Ikim the top, and pour it from the fettlings jntoa ftcw-pan, put in half a pint of white wine, fwcetci) It with loaf-fugar,- fqueeze fix lemons, ftraining lie juice to keep out the feeds, and put in with alittfe lemon-peel; if you want it quite clear and bright, lont put in any fafFron; if you want it an amber colour, put in a little fafFron; if a very high colour, -bruife a little cochineal and put in; boil it upforteo minuted; beat the whites of ten eggs up to a high froch, mix them with the jelly well together, aw boil it up for ten minutes, ihen take it off thcfini covr it, and let it ftand for five minutes j havcyour bag ready with a bowl under, pour your jelly in gently, and as it runs through pour it into the bag again, till it is as bright as you want it; when it is all run through, fill your moulds, and let it (land till it is coW, then loofen the fides with your fingers, dip the mould into warrti water, and turn it out on your dih. Garnifti with broken jelly, or flowcrSi or as your fancy leads you.

JELLIES AND SYLLABUBS; 471

Savory yelfy.

CUT fix thin rafiiers of lean ham, and put at th bottom of afoup-pot; cut the (hank-end of a knuckle of veal with a pound of lean veal, in flices put them in with half a pint of water, fix blades of mace % few clpves, a carrot cut in flices cover the pot clofe, fct it over a flow fire and fweat it gently for fifteen minutes, then pour in a gallon of boiling water, and as it boils up fkim it well; put in a fpoon ful of fait, and ftew it gently for fix hours, then try with a fpoon whether it is a ftrong jelly, if it is not, ftew it till it is fo; drain it off into a pan, and let it fettle i then flcim the fat clean ofiT, pour it clear from the fettlings into a ftew-pan, and put in a gill of elder or common vinegar j beat up the whites of twelve eggs tp a high froth, and mix with the jelly well together. If you want it a high colour, bruifc a little cochineal and put in, boil it up till the eg become a fine white froth at the top, then take it oflT the fire, cover it up, and let it ftand ten minutes: have your bag ready, and pour it in gendy, and as ic runs put it into the bag again, till it is quite clear; when ail is run through, it will be fit to fill your moulds, &c. &c.

Orange Jelly

' TAKE half a pound of hartfliorn (havings, or four eunces of ifinglafs, )ut it into two quarts of fpring water, and boil it gently till it is a ftrong jeN y; take the juice of three Seville oranges, three lemons, and fis China oranges, the rind of one Se- ville orange, and one lemon pared very thin; put them to your jelly, fwceten with loaf-fugar to your tafte, beat up the whites of eight eggs to a froth, and mix them well in, and boil it for ten minutes; thenf run it through a jelly bag till it is very clear; put it into your moulds, and let it ftand till it is thoroughly cold, then dip your mouldi in warm water and turn . Hh 4 them

474 JELLIfeS ANj SYLLABUBS.

them out into a china difh, or fiat glals. Gamiik wiih flowers.

Ribband Jelfy.

TAKE four calf's feet, take out the great boiies Cut them fmall put them into a pot with fix quartt of water, four ounces of iQnglais, a little lemon peel, a (tick of cinnamon; boil it gently for fix hours, (kim it well, and try a little in a moon to fee if it be ilrong enough, if it is, flrain it off into a clean pan, and let it fettle one hour, then if there is any fat at the top (kim it off, and pour it from the lettlings into a flew-pan put in a pint of white wine, the juiccof fix lemons, and fweeten it with fugar to your uftci beat up the whites of ten eggs, (tir them well in, and boil it up gently for ten minutes; then take it off the fire, and let it ftand five minutes; have your bag ready, and run it through till it is as clear as you would have it •, then colour fome of it red with cochineal green with fpinach juice, yellow with faf fron, blue with the fyrup of violets, white with thick cream, and fome of its own colour; then put your jelly into high glaffes. Run every colour a quarter of an inch thick; one colour muft be thoroughly cold before you put on the other, and that you put on muft be but bloodwarm, for fear it mixtogethcr Or you may take a tin mould fix inches long, one broad, and one deep, fill it in the fame manner, and when cold turn it out, cm it with a thin knife in flices,, and lay it on a di(b. Garnifh as yoa fancy i or cut it out in fliapes, to garnifh other jclliea.

Green Mellon in elty

MAKE a pint of blanc'mange, and colour it of a light green with the juice of fpinach, put it into a melon mouki, and when it is cold turn it out; hare a deep mould with a little jelly at the bottom quite cold, put your nieWaini fid:in fome jelly bloods

JEtLlfiS AND SYLLABftifii 47 j

warm lee it be cold, then fill op your mould with niore blood-warm jelly, let it (land all night, and the tiext morning turn it into a di(h, and garniOi it with fwectmeats, flowers, or an thing you fancy.

Fruif in Jelly:

HAVE a plaia mould, either long 01 round, about three inches deep-, have fome mould jelly made as directed in this chapter, and put fome at the bottom of the mould about a quarter of an inch thick, let it be cold, then put in ripe peaches, grapes, or any fort of ripe fruit or prefervcd fruit, or China oranges cut in quarters, or in aF)y Aape you fancy; put in a little jelly olood-warm, and let it ftand till it is cold to fallen your fruit in its place, otherwife it will rife up; then fill up your mould with blood-warm jelly, let it (land till it is thoroughly cold, then turn it into a dilh, and garniih it to your fancy.

Thefe jellies look extremely well in a difh, if you mind that you put in your fruit neatly, to (hew it to advantage, andyour jelly very clear, as a little experience will teach you.

GoU Fijh in Jelly.

FILL two or three fmall fi(h-moulds with very ftrong blanc'mange, when cold turn them out, and gild the fifh with leaf-gold, let them ftand for one hour, that the gold may dry on s have a mould, put a little mould jelly at the bottom, when it is cold lay the gold filh in back downwards, put in fome jelly blood- warm toiaften them to their places; when it is cold fill the moulds up with blood-warm jelly, and )tt thorn ftand all night; the next day turn them out into a difti, and garnifh with Sowers, or any thing you fancy

Hen's

474 JfilXIES AND SYLLABUBS;

Herts Nejlin Jelly.

IF you have got egg-moulds fill them with blanch mange, and when cld turn them outj but if;ou have no moulds break holes in the thick ends of fix or feven eggs, and pour out the yolks and whites clean as you can, fet them on one end in fait, and witha funnel fill them with (Vrong blanc'mange; when thej are cold, very carefully break the fhelis and take them off the blanc'mange, put a little jdly at the bottom of a round mould, or China bowl, lay the eggs on it, and put inui little jelly to fix them to their places; when cold put in more jelly bloodwarm, till it is even with the eggs; then lay fome Yermicelli over and round them, to make it look like a neft % when it is cold, fill the mould or china bowl quite full, fet it afide all night, the next day turn it out into a dtfli, and garnifh with fweetmeats, fiowerSi or any thing you fancy.

Red Currant Jelly.

GATHER your currants when they are full ripe,

on a dry day, and to every gallon of red put a quart

t white, put them into a prc.fcrving-pan, cover them

clofe, and fet them over a flow fire, Itirring them, to

prevent their -burning at the bottom, till the juice ii

out; or put them into an earthen-pan, tie a paper

over them, and fet them in a warm oven for one

lour; then put them into a flannel bag, and when

the juice is all run out, to every pint put a pound

of loaf-fugar broke into fmall pieces, put it over a

gentle fire, and ftir it till the fugar is meked or it

will burn at the bottom; flcim it well, and boil it

gently half an hour; while it is hoc put ir into your

gallipots or glafles; when it is cold put brandy pa

pers over it, and tie another paper over that; Put

them in a cool dry place.

BUck

JELLIES-AND SYLUUBKBS. 475

Black Currant Jelly.

GATHER your currants as before, and ftripthem 6flFtbeilalks, put them in an Earthen-pan, and to every ten quarts put in a quart of fpring water; tre a paper over them, and fet them in the oven for to hours, then fqueeze out the juice through a fine cloth, and to every, pint of juice put a pound of loaff rTtr broke to pieces, ftir it and boil it gently for half an hour, fkim it well all the time- While it is hot put it into gallipots; put brandy-papers over it, and tie another paper over that, and keep it in a cool dry place.

Turkey in Jelly.

TAKE a nice ben-turkey, bone it, and cut off the pinions; make a forcemeat with the fiefh of a fowl; tome lean veal, beef marrow, beef fuet, fwect herbs, bread crumbs, &c. fill your turkey, and trufs it as for boiling, put it into a fauce-pan, cover it with vea broth, ahd put in a bundle of fweet herbs, a little cloves, mace, and all-fpicc; boil it gently till ic is tender, then take it out, and let it be cold; put it on the difh on which you intend to fend ic to table have ready a good favory jelly, made as direfted in the beginning of this chapter, and pour over it bloodwarm. Garnifli with flowers and curled parfley, and ftick a fprig of myrtle in the orcafl; or colour fome jelly red and yellow, and ornament the breaft with it 10 your fancy.

Chicken in Jelly.

' TREAT a cbicken the fame as a turkey; have an joval mould; put in fome favory jelly a quarter of an nch thick; ivhen it is cold put the chicken in, breaft downwards, put in a little jelly blood-warni, to M tenit, and when it is cold 11 your mouldwith bloodwarm jelly letttftandali night, and the next day

turn

476 JELLIES Ant SYLtABtJfeg.

turn it into a dVh Oarnifli k with dices of letnooi er Seville 6range Note. You may put partridges or any find birds, into favory jelly, but you need not booe them.

Loijer or Cfaxfijb in Jefy.

BOIL two fmall iobilters, or about a dozen cny fi(h, put a little favory jelly at the bottom of your mould, and when it is cold put in your iobllersor crayfiih, backs downward; put in a little bloodwarnfi jelly to faften ihem to their places, and when cold 611 your moulds with. blood-warm jelly, let them iland all night, and the next day turn them into i diih. Garntih wirh dices of notched lemon or Stvilk orange.

fTJbipf Syllabubs.

TAKE a quart of good fweet cream put it into i broad earthen-pan, with a gill of fack, the juice of a lemon or Seville orange, and the rind of a lcmo9 cut thin; make it pretty fweet with fine powder-fugafi whip it with a whidc, and as the froth ri(es take icoffi and put it on a fieve to drain for l)lf an hours then half-fill your glafles with fome red, and fome white wine, and with a fpoon put on your fyllabub as high as you can: or you may half-fill your glafles with different coloured jelly. Never make it long before you want to iend it to table.

Solid Syllabubs.

TO a (uaft of rich cream f)ut in a pint of mountain wine, the juice of two lemons, the rind of one grated fweeten it with powder-fugar to your tafte, whipic welly take off" the froth as it rifes, lay it on a hair fieve, and put it in a cool place .till next day; theft

fill your glafles better than hlf-f uU with the ttrif

with

•

"

JELLIES AMD SYLLABUBS; 477

iPith a fpooQ put on the froth as high as you can.-- It will keep (cYcral days, and look clear at the bottooi.

TAKE three pines of good thick cream, put iot an earthenpanj with half a pint ofRhenifh half a pint of fack, the juice of to large Seville oranges, the rind of three lemons grated, and a pound of doute-refined ffigar pounded aod fifted, pit in a Spoonful of orange pwer-water, bet it well toge ther with a whilk for half an hour, then with a fpoon Xakt off the froth, and lay it on a fieve to drain, and then fill your glafles. This will keep a week.

The bed way to whip fyliabubs, is to have a fine large chocolate mill, whkh you muft keep on pur pofe, and a arge deep bowl or pan to mill them in 1 it is both quicker done, gnd the froth ftronger. For the .duo that is left at the bottani have ready fome calves feet jelly, made thus; cut two calves feet into fmall pieces, put them into a fauce-pan, with two quarts of water, and a little lemon peel, bcnl it gently till re:duced to a pint and a hif, then drain it ofF„ nd let it ftand half aa hour to fettle; im it well, pour it into a ftew-pan from the fettlings beat up the whites of fix eggs and put in, boil it gently for ten minutes, then run it through a flannel bag, and plx ijt with the cler that you favcd from the fyliabubs; fweeten it to your tafte, give it a boil, then pour it into your moulds, and when cold turn it into A difli. Garniih with flowers.

Syllabub under the Cow.

PUT a bottle of either red or white wine, ale or (Cyder, into a China bowl, fweeten it with fugar, and grate in fome nutnieg, then hold it under the cow, ud milk into it -till it has a fine froth at the top;

ftrevr

478 JELLIES and SYLLABUBS.

ftrew over it a handful of currants, tican wafhed and picked, and plumped before the fire, • .

You may make this fyllabub at home, only have new milk., Make it as hot as' milk from the cow, and' out of a tea-pot, or any fucli things our u ifl, boIdiDg your hand very high.

Lemon Syllabubs.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of loaffugar in ooc piece, and rub it on the rind of two lemons till yon have got all the efience out of them, then put the fugar into a pint of cream and a gill of mountain wine, fqueeze in the juice of both the lemons, and lee it ftand for two hours, then whip it with a whiflc, or mill it with a cbocholate mjll, ar as the froth riles take it off, and plic it on a flevtf to driuh; let it ftand all night, then put the clear Into the glafles, and with a fpoon put on the froth a6 high as you ciii. '

. .n'rifle.

TAKE a quart of thick cream, and put Tnto it t jgiU of white wine; tlie juic6 of a lemon or Sevilte orange, grate in the rind of a lemon, fwcetcn icwiih powder-fugar, whip it with a whifk, or mill it with a chocolate mill, and as the froth rifes take it oflv and put it oh a hair ficve to drn; put a quarter of a pound of macaroon cakes, and ratafia drops, into a deep difli, juft wet them with fweet wine j boil a pint of milk or cream,fweeten it with fugar, beat Upthe yolks (tf four eggs and mix with it, put it over a flow fire, and fiir it till it is thick, then put it on the cakes and when cold put the froth on as high as you can, and ftrew it over with nonpareils of diflrcrent colours: (thefc •are bought at the confectioners). Garni(h it with Howers, or currant jelly, fwee(mct% &c.

1 I

S I C K. 47,

Floating IJland.

TAKE a drep difh, according to the fize and quantity you would make; but a pretty deep glafs is The beft, which fet on a China di(h. Fim, take a quart of the thickcft cream you can get, make it pretty iweec with fine fugar, pour in a gill of fack, grate ill the yellow rind ofa lemon, and mill the cream till it is of a thick froth, then carefully pour the thin from the froth into your dilh or glafs; take a French roll or as many as you want cut it as thin as you can, put a layer, of that on the cream as lightly as poffible theq a layer of currant jelly, after that . a very tbia Jayer of rpll, then hartfliorn jelly, and then Frencb roll, and over that whip the froth you faved off thp cream, very well milled up, and put on the top a high-aa you can heap it; and as for the rim of the dilh, fet it round with fruit, or fweetmeats, accordiog to your fancy.

This looks very pretty in the middle of a tabl fvith candles round it You may make it of as many different colours as you fancy, according to what jeLJies, jams, or fweetmeats you have; or at the bottoo o( your di(h you may put the thickeft cream you'caii gei but that as you fancy.

''ii'mmmmmmmmmmmm

CHAP. XXII.

Diredions for thofe that attend the Sick;

Mutton Brotb.

TAKE a pound ofa loin of mutton, take off the fat, put to it jone quart of water, let t boil aid Ikim it well; then put in a good piece of pppfih

crwA

40;5 I C K.

crufl: of bread, aR4 W Itrge blae of mace, cover It clofe, and let it boil flowly an hpur; donotfliriti but pour the broth clear off. Seafon it with a little falt and tbe muoo will be fit to eat. If you boil lurnips, do not boil thai in the broth, but by thrmfclvi:$ in aoocher fauqe-paii.

To boil a Scrag of Veal.

SET on the fcrag in a clean fauce-pan: to etch pound of veal put a quart of water, flcim it very clean, then put in a good piece of uppcr-crud, a blade of mace to each pounds and a little parfley tied with thread. Cover it clofe; then let it boil very fofdy two hours, and both broth and meat will be fit to at.

Beef or Mutton Broths for very weak People who

take hut littje Noitrfl)ment.

TAKE a pound of beef or muttoni or both together: to a pound put two quart$ of watery firft flcia the meat and take off the fat, then cut it into little pieces, and boil it till it connes tp a quarter of a pint, ficafon it with a very little corn of lalt, ikim off aB he fat Give a fpoonful of this broth at a time to veiy weak people; or half a fpoonful my do: to iboie a tea- fpoonful at a time; and to others a tea cupful. There is greater nourifhmcnt from this than any thing clfe.

Beef Drinks nvbicb is ordered for weak People.

TAKE a pound of lean beef 5 then take off all the fat and (kin, cut it into pieces, put it into a ealloo of water, with the under-cruft of a penny loaf, and a very little falc; let it boil till it comes to two quarts then ftrain it off, and it is a very hearty drink.

Beef Tea.

TAKE a pound of lean beef, and cut it very fine, pour a pint ot boiling watei; over it, and put it on

the

w

WVi

S I C K.. it

the fire to raife the fcunl; fkicil it clean ftfain it off 9nd let it fettle; pour it clear from the fettlingS ar.(t then ic is fie for ufc.

TAKE two pounds of young pork then take 06 the fkin and fat, boil it in a gallon of dter with turnip, and a very little corn of fait, let it boil till it comes-to two quarts, ftYain it off, and let it ftand till cold. Take off the fat then leaving the fettlings at the bottom of the pan, and drink half a pine in the morning fading, an hour before breakfaff, and poon if the llomach will bear it.

To boil a Chicken.

LET your fauce-pan be very clean and nice; when the water boils put in your chicken, which muff bf very nicely pickt and clean and laid in cold water a quarter of an hour before it is boiled, then take ic out of the water boilings and lay it in a pewter difh Save all the liquQr that runs from it in the difh, cue up your chicken all in joints in the di(h, then bruifc the liver very fine, add a little boiled parQey chop- pcd fine a very little falc, and a little grated nutmeg i mix it all well together with two fpoonsful of the liquor of the fowl, and pour it into the di(h with the reft of the liquor in the di(h; if there is not liquor enough, take two or three fpoonsful of the liquor ic was boiled in, clap another dilh over it. . Then fet ic over a chafing di(h of hot coals five or fix minutes, and carry it to table hot with the cover on. This is better than butter, and lighter for the ftomach, though fome chgfc it only with the liquor, and no parfley, nor liver, and that is according to difiTerenC palates: it is for a very weak perfon.. Take oflF th ikin of the chicken before you fet it on the chafingdilhr If you road it, make nothing but bread fauce.

4 S - I •, C T K

and that is lighter than aoy fauce you can make Ion weak ftomach. Thus yoii may drefs a rabbity only bruifebota little piece of the liver,

?. . T!q boil Pigeons.

I-ET your pigeons be clean waflied, drawn, aod 'jkinned, boil them in milk and water for ten mijDutes, and pour over them fauce made thus -takc the liver par-boiled, and bruife it fine, with as much jparfley boiled and chopped.fine. Melt fome butter, nix a little with the liver and parfley firfl:, then mix all together and pour over the pigeons.

To boil a Partridge 9 or any other Wild Fowl.

. WHEN your water boils put in your partridge, Jet it boil ten minutes; then take it up into a pewter place, aqd cut it in two, laying the infide next die plate, and have ready fome bread fauce made thus: take the crumb of a halfpenny roll, or thereabouts, and boil it In half a pint of water, with a blade of 4nace; let it boil two or three minutes, pour away moft of the water,, then beat it up with a little piece of nice butter, a little fait, and pour it over the partridge; clap a cover over it,' then fct it over a chafing-difb of coals four or five minutes, and (end it away hot, covered clofe.

Thus you may drefs any fort of wild fowl, only boilingitmore or lefs according to the bigns. Duck take off the Ocins before you poxir the bread-fauce over them j and if you roaft them, lay brcad-fauce under the. It is lighter than gravy for weak fto machs.

To boil a Plaice or Flounder.

LET your water boil, throw fome fait in, then put

in your fifh; boil it till you think it is enough, mi

take it out of the water in a llice.toratxu Tab:

wo fpoonsful of the liquor, with a little ialt, a little

grated

I C? Ki 48

geaced nytmeg thea beat Up the yolk of an egg verf ell with the liquoTj and ftir in the egg, beat it wdl together I with a knife carefully (lice away all the yttle bone9 round the fi(h pour the fauce over it $ then (et it birer a chafing-dilh of coals for a aiiautcj Hnd fend it hot away. Or in the room of this fauce, 9dd melted butter in a cup.

90 mince VeaU or Chicken for tbejick Qr vmk

People.

MINCE a chicken, or Tome veal, very fine; take off the ikin, jufl: boil as much water as will moiflien ic, and no niore, with a very little fait; grate a very little nutrpeg, then throw a very little flour over it nd when the water boils put in the meat; keep ihaking it over the fire a minute, then,have ready: tvo or three thin fippets, roaftid nice and brown laid in the plate and pour the mihce-meat over it.

To pull a Chicken for tbejick.,

YOU mud take as mgch cold chicken a$ you think troper; take 00 the fkin and pi)Il the meat into little bits as thick as a quill; then ta)ce phe bones, boil them wifh a little fait till they are good, drain it then take a fpoonfyl of the licjupp, a fpoonful of imilk, a little bif of butter as big as a large walnut roUf ifcd inour, alktle chopped parQey, as much as will lie on a fixpence, and a little fait, if wanted; this will be enough for half a fmall chicken; put all to'jrher ito the fauce-pan, then Hfep (hakingic till it la tliifks and pttr it ioto a hot plate.

Chicken Broth.

YOU muft fake ar old cock, or large fowl, flajf it then pick off all the fat, and break it all to pieces with a rolling-pin,;pjut it into two quarts of water, ith gpod cjTMd of bread, and a bkde of mae; Milt -bQn fgfply, till it i$ as good as you )ould hvA ' - - li 2 ' ' it.

484 SI C IC

it. If you do it as it fliould be done, it will takft five or fix hours in doing. Pour it off, then put t quart more of boiling wacer and cover it clofe; let it boil foftty till it is good, and ftrain it off. Seaioa with a very little fait. When you boil a chickeO) (ave the liquor; and when the meat is eat, take the bones, then break them and put to the liquor yod boiled the chicken in, with a blade of mace, and a crufl of bread, let it boil till it is good, and ftraia it off.

Chicken Water

TAKE a cock, or large fowl, flay it, then brutfc k with a hammer, and put it into a gallon of water, with a cruft of bread. Let it boil half awajr, and ftrain it off.



White Caudle.

YOU mud take two quarts of water, mix in four fpoonsful of oatmeal, a blade or tw of mace, a piece of lemon peel, let it borl, and keep ftirring it often I let it boil about a quarter of an hour and take care it does not boil over then ftrain it through 4 coarfe fieve. When you ufe it fweeten it to your palate. Grate in a little nutmeg, and what wine is proper; and if it is not fit for a fick perfon, fqueczc in the juice of a lemon.

Brown Caudlei

BOII the gruel as above, with fix Qoonsfulcf oatmeal, and ftrain it, then add a quart of good ale, not bitter, boil it, then fweeten it to your palate, and add half a pint of white wine. When you do bot put in white wine, let it be half ale.



JFater GrueL • '

•

YOU muft take a pint of water, and a large Ipoooful of oatmealj then ftir it togethcfi and let it boil

up

Qp three or four times, ftirring it often; do not et it boil over then ftrain it through a fieve, fait it to your palate, put in a good piece of frefli butter orew it with a fpoon till the butter is all melted, then (c will be fine and fmooth, and very good. Some love a little pepper in it.

Panada.

•

YOU mud take a quart of water in a nice clean . lauce-pan, a blade of mace, a large piece of crumb ef bread, let it boil two minutes then take out the bread and bruife it in a bafon very fine, mix as much water as will make it as thick as you would have it, the reft pour away, and fweeten it to your palate; put in a piece of butter as big as a walnut; do not put iany wine, it fpoils it: you may grate in a little nutmeg. This is hearty and good diet for fick people..

To boil Sago.

PUT % large fpoonful of fago into three quarters Df a pint of water, ftir it and boil it foftly till it is as thick as you would have it, then put in wine and fugar with a little nutmeg to your palate.

To boil Salop

IT is a hard (tone ground to powder, and gene Mly fold foV one hilling an ounce. Take a large tea-fpoonful of the powder and put it into a pint of boiling water, keep ftirring it till it is like a fine jelly, then put wine and fugar to your palate, and ieoion if it wil agree.

ffinglafs Jelly.

TAKE a quart of water, one ounce of ifinglafs, half an ounce of cloves boil them to a pint, then ftrain it upon pound of loaf-fugar, and when cold (Weeten your tea with it. You may make the jelly a$

I i 3 ab6ve

4 ff I'" C' KP

above, arid leave out the cloves; fweten to your palate, and add a little wine. All other jellies you have in another chapter.

The PeSloral Drink.

TAK a gallon of water, and half a pound ti pearl-barley, boil it with a quarter of a pound of figs fplit, a pennyworth of liquorice diced to pieces, a quarter of a pound of raifins-of-the-ftm Hdiittl; boil all together till half is wafted, then ftraioit'oSt This is ordered in the oieafleSj and fevcral other d orders, for a drink.

!ButteredWater9 or what the Gefmans call Eggfoupf who are very fond of it for Supper.

TAKE a pint of water, beat up the yolk of at egg with the water, put in a piece of butter as bi as a fmall walnut, two or three knobs of fugar aii4 keep ftirring it all the time it is on the fire; when it begins to boil, brew it between the fauce-pan and a mug till it is fmooth, and has a great frothy then it is fit to drink. This is ordered in a coldj or whdt gg will agree with the ftolnach.

Seed Water.

TAKE a fpoonful of coriander feed, half a fpoooful of earraway feed, bruifed and boiled in a piorof water, then ftrain it, and bruife it with the yolk oC An egg; mix it with fack and double-refiaed fugaxi according to your palate.

Bread Soupy for the Sick A '

TAKE a quart of water, fet it on the drt in i clean fauce-pan, and as much dry cruft of bread cut to pieces as the top of a penny -loaf,, (the drier the better) a bit of butter as big as a walnut i let it boil then beat it with a fpoon and keep boiling it till tbi bread and water is well mixed i then cafoa it wkh

•

DO!

Hrry Uttle falti and it is a pretty thing for a weak ftonsach.

, . Artificial AJfes Milk.

TAKE two ounce? of pearl barley, two fpoonsful of hartfhorn (havings, one ounce of Eringo root, tone ounce of China root, one ounce of prefervcd;inger, eighteen fnails bruifed with the fhells, to bi aled in three quarts of water till it comes to thre pints i then boil a pint of new milk, ndi it wftlk the reft and put in two ounces ef baliam of Tolu. -Take half a pint in the morning, and half a pint ac night.

Cows Milk next to AJfes Milk, done tbus

Take a quan of milk, fet k in a pan over-nighV the next morning take off all the cream and boil it, and fet it in the pan again till night; then Tkini it Ugain, boil it, fet it in the pah again, and the next morning (ktm it. Warm it blood-warm, and drinit ic as you do afles milk s it is very near as good % and fvich fome confumptive people it is bettqf . A good Drink.

OtL a quart of milk and a quart of water with the top-cruft of a penny-loaf, and one blade of mac, ja quarter of an hour very foftly, then pour it off; and when you drink it let it be warm

Barley Water.

PUT t quarter of a pound of pearl-barley int two qtiarts of water, let it boil, (kim it very clean boil half away, and ftrain it off. • Sweeten to yoijf palate, but not too fweet, and put in two fpoonsful of white wine. Drink it luke-warm

Sage Tea.

TAKE a little fage, a little balm, put it into % phn dice a lemon, peel- and all, a few knobs of fuga4

I i 4 one

n

f

48 .-$ X C K.

on glafs of white wine; pour on thefe two or tbre0 quarts of boiling water; cover it, and drink when thirftyr When you think it ftrong enough of the brbs take them out otherwife it will make it bintr,

for a Child.

A little fage, balm, rue, mint, and penoyrojrals ()Our boiling Mater on, and fwoeten to your palate.- Syrup of cloves, &c. and black cherry-water, joo liave in the Chapter of Preferves

Liqutfrfor a Obild that has the Thrub,

TAlC E half a pint of fpHng water, a knob of double-refined fugar, a very little bit of alum; beat )t wrll together with the yolk of an egg; then beat n a large fpoonful of the juice f fage, tie a rag to the end of (he ftick, dip it in thi$ Jiqqor and oncQ clean the mouth. Give the child pvernigbt ope drop of laudanum, and the next dy proper hyiic yaibing the niouth often with the liquor

To boil Comfriy RooU.

TAKE a pound of comfrey roots, ftrape them clean, cut them ioto little pieces, and put them into three pint of wpter, let them boil till there is about a pine then drain it, at)d when it is cold put itipW 9 laqce-pan if there is any fettling at the bottom throw it away % m% it with fugar to your Patei half pint of mountain wine, and the juice of a lemon; let it boil, then pour it into a clean earthenpot, and fet it by for ufe. Some boil it iq nrilk i and it is very good where it; wjll agree aid is reckoned very fi;reat (lrei)gthenert

7he Knuckle rbb.

TAKE twelve (hank-ends of legs rf mutioB;

break them well, and foke (hem in cold fpring wa ter for an hour then take a fmall brolh and fceur

$hem cjjw with warpfi water aqd faltj then pgttbefll

id

$ B A . S T O K £ S. 49

in two quarts of fpring water, and let them fimmcr till reduced to one quart i when they have been oa one hour, put in one ounce of hartfliorn Ibaviogs and the bottom of a halfpenny-roll; be careful to take the fcum off as it rifes; when done, ftraiaic off, and if any fat remains, take it olF with a kntfi hen cold. Drink a quarter of a pint warns whe you go to bed and one hour before you rife. It is a certain reilorative at the beginning of a decline, or when any weaknefs is the complaint.

N. B. If it is made right, it is the colour of calf i foot jeljy, and is ftrong enough to bear a (poon up right.- -From the College of Phyficians, London

A Medicine for a DjorJer in the BnoeUn

TAKE an ounce of beeffuet, half a pint of mill and half a pint of water, mix them together wich % table fpoQoful of wheat flour, put it over the Qro ten minutes, and keep it ftirring all the time ao4 take a coee-cup fpU two or thre times a-day.

wmmmmmmmmmm .1

CHAP. XXIII, Dhedions for Seafaring Meit

Catchup to keep twinty Tears.

TAKE a gallon of rong ftale beer, one pound of anchovies waflied from the pickle, a pound of Ihaljots peeled an ounce of mace, half an ounc9 C cloveSi a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper three or four large races of ginger, two quaru of the

large (puihroom isps rubbed xi piccei cover aU

thia

'49 E A - ST 'a R E .

•

W cloft, attd let it fimmer tifl it h half wafted, tW ftrain it through a Sanfiel bag; let it ftand till it is Kjtttte cold, then bottle it. Yoii may carry it to the Indies. A fpoonful of thrs td a pound of frelh butter melted, makes a fine fi(h fauce; or in th roorA 6f gravy-fauce. The ftrotiMr and ftaler the btcr is, .the better the catchup will be.

Fijb Sauce to keep the whole Tear.

YOU muft take twenty-four anchovies, chop ehenr, bones and all, put to them vtn (hailots cot fmall, a handful of fcraped horfe-raddifli, a quarter of ah OHMe of TKisXs quart of white wine, a pint of water, one lemon cut into Htces half a pint of anchovy liquor, a pint of red wine, twelve cloves, twelve pepper-corns; boil them together till it comes to a uart, ftrain it off, cover it clofe, and keep it jn a dry cold place. Two fpoonsful will be fufficiefit Ibr a pound of butter.

It IS a pretty fauce either for boiled fowl, veal &c, or in the room of gravy, lowering it with hot water, and thickening it with a piece of butter rolled in flour.

7i Pot Dripping, to fry Fijh Meat

Fritteh'&c.

TAKE fix pounds of good beef dripping, boil it in fof c ater, ftrain it into a pan, let it Itand tifl cold; then taice off the hard fat, and fcrape off the gravy which flicks to the infide:.tbus do eight times. When it is cold and hard vkt it off dean from the water, put it into a large fauce-pan with fix bay leaves tirtlve cloves, half a pound of fait, and a quartef of a pound of whole pepper: let the fat be all mdticd, and juft hot; let it ftand till it is hot enough td ftrain through a fieve into the pot, and ftand till it is quite cold, then cover it up. Thus you may di what quantity you pleafe. Th beft way to kteji any

any fort of dripping, is, to turn the'pot pwAJ down, and then no rats can get at it. If it will keep MlOflpboard, it will make as fine pufF pafte cruft as an

butter can do or cruft for puddingi &c:

•

To pickle Mupfoomifor the Sea.

WASH them clean with a piece of flannel in falc jftnd water, put them into a fauCe-pan and throw c little fait over them let them boil up thee times 'v heif own liquor, then throw them into a fieve to drain, and fpread them on a clean cloth, let them lie till cold, then put them in wideifiouthed bottles; ut in with them a good deal of whole mace, a lillle nutmeg diced, and a tew cloves; boil the fugar.vife gar (of your own makiag) with a good deal of whol9 pepper fome races of ginger and two or three haf leaves; let it boil a few minutes, then ftrain it; wheit it is cold pour it on and fill the bottle with mutton it fried •, cork them, tie a bladder, theo a leather over them; keep it down clofe, and in as tool h place as poflible. As to all other pickles, you havtt them in the Chapter of Pickles.;

, TAKE half a peck of fine large thick mufhfdoftis, tath them clean from grit and dirt wuth a flannet rags fcrape out the infidei cut out all the worms put them into a kettle over the fire,withouc any wi ter, two large onions (luck with cloves, a large handi ful of fait, a quarter of ianf ounce of mate, two tea nsful of beaten pepper; let them ftmmer ciM the liquor id boiled aWay, take gteat care they di tM burn then lay them on fievea to dry in the fun; of HI tin plates, and fet them in a fiack vh ill iighC €0 dry, till they will beat to powder pfefsrthe powv der down hard in a pot, and keep it fdr Uffr • Yoil itoay put what (uaotity you pieftfe for tht £iuce

49 S E A S T O II E S.

TV keep Mujhrooms without Pickle.

TAKE large muihrooms, peel chem fcrape out Ae infide9 put them into a fauce-pan, throw a fiide iaic over them, and kt them boil in chdr own liquor theo throw them into a Geve to dram; then lay them li tin plates, and fee them in a cool oven. Repeat it often till they are perfedtly dry: Put them inco a dean ftone jar, tie them down tight, and keep them is a dry place. They eat delicioudy, and look a Htll as truffles.



To keep Artichoke Bottoms dry,

BOIL them juft fo as you can pull off the leaves sad the choice cut them from the (talks, lay them on tin plates, fet them in a very cool oven, and rc peat k till they are quite dry then put them hi a pa per bag, tie them clofe, and hang them up in a dry place. Keep them in a dry place; and when you vk them, lay them in warm water till they are ten dr. Shift the water two or three times. They are fine in almpft all iauces, cut to little pieces, and pus in juft before your fauce is enough.

To fry Artichoke Bottoms.

LAY them in water as above, then have ready feme butter hot in the pan, flour the bottoms, ana ry them. Lay them in yourdiJb, and pour mehed butter over them

7a ragOQ:4rticboke Bottoms

TAKE twelve bottoms, foften them in warm wa frr 4S in the foregoing receipt Take half a pint of watery a piece of the ftrong foup as big as a fmall walnut, half a fpoonful of the catchup five or &c of the dried mulhrooms, a tea fpoonful of the ntnifli. foom powder; fet it on the fire (hake all together, and lee it boil foftly two or three ipioutes; lt the lift water you put to thq bottoms boil, take them

out

SEAS TORES. 4

out hot lay them in your dilh, 'pour the (auceovcT them, and fend them to table hoc.

To drefs Fffh.

AS to drying filh - firft wafli it very cleaOf 4mi dry it well, and flour it; take Ibme of the beef drip' ping, make it boil in the ftew-pan, then throw ia your fifli, and fry it of a fine light-brown; lay it oa the bottom of a Geve or coarle cloth to drain, tod xnake fauce according to your fancy.

TobakeFiJb.

BUTTER the pan, lay in the 6h throw a little fait oirer it, and flour; put a very little water in the difli, an onion, and a bundle of fweet herbs % ftick (bme little bits of butter, or the fine dripping, on the fiflu Let it be baked of a fine light-brown. When enough, Uy it on a difli before the fire, and fkim oflF all tht fat in the pan; ftrain the liquor, and mix it up either with the fifli fauce, or ftrong foup, or the catchup

A Gravy Soup.

ONLY boil foft water, and put as much the ftrong foup to it as will make it to your palate. Let ic boil, and if it wants fait, you muft leafon it. The receipts for the Ibups you have in the Chapter for Soups;

Peas Soup.

GET a quart of peas, boil them in two gallons of water till they are tender then have ready a piece of (alt pork or beef, which has been laid in water the night before, put it into the pot, with two larg onknfl peeled, a bundle of fweet herbs, celery if yoa have it, half a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper $ €t it boil till the meat is enough, then take it up, and if the Ibup is not enough, let it boil till the foup ii good % then flrain it, fet it on again to boil, ana ju in a good deal ( dry mint Keep the meat hot; " When

94 E A S T O Jl E S.

3yben tbe foup i$ ready, put in the meat agab for % few minutes, and let ic boil; then ferve it away. l you add a piece of tbe portable foup it will be very good. The onion foup you iiave in the Lent Chapter.

Fori Pudding, or Bief.

' .MAKE a good cruft with the drippings or mgttorw j, if you have ir (hred fiae. Mkc a thick cruft; - take a piece of fait pork or beef which has bcea twenty-four hours in foft water, feafon it with a little peppcK, put it into the cruft, roll it up clofc, tic it in a cloth and boil it. If abodt four or five pounds, boil it five hours.

And when you kill mutton, make a pudding the feme way only cut the fteaks thin, feafon them .with pepper and fait, and boil it three hours tf large, or two hours if fmall, and io according to thr fize.

. Appl pudding make with the fame cruft; only pare the apples, core them, and fill your pudding; if large, it will take five hours boiling. When it is ien9ugh lay it in the difh, cut a hole in the top, and Hir in butter and fugar, lay the piece on again, and Tend it to table.

' A prune pudding eats fine, made thefame way only when the cruft is ready, fill it with prunes,, and fweeten it according, to your fancy $ clofc ic up, and ji ic two hours

A Rice Pudding.

I TAKE what rice you think proper, tie it loofe tp a clothj and boll it an hour y tfien take it up and 2nite it, grace a good deal of nutmeg in ftr in a good piece of butter, and fweeten to your palace j tie ic up clpfe, boil it an hour more, then take it un and turn it into your difii. Melt butter, iiyitli 9 Iktie fugar, and a little whit wine forfauc.

S E A . S T O R E S. 495

A Suet Pudding.

GET a pound of fuct Ihred fine, a pound of flour, a pound of currants picked clean, half a pound of raifins (toned, two tea-fpoonsful, of beaten ginger, and a fpoonful of tinfture of faffron $ mix ail together with fait water very chick i then either boil or bake it.

A Liver Pudding boiled.

QET the liver of a (heep, when you kill one, and cut it as thin as you can, and chop it, mix it with as much fuet (bred fine, half as many crumbs of bread, or bifcuit grated, feafon it with fome fweec herbs (hred fine, a little nu:meg grated, a little bea ten pepper, and an anchovy (hred fine; mix all together, with a little fait, or the anchovy liquor, with a piece of butter; fill the cruft, and clofe it. Boil it three hours.

Oatmeal Pudding.

GET a pint of oatmeal once cut, a pound of fuet fhred fine, a pound of currants, and half a pound of raifins ftoned mix all together, with a little fair, tie it in a cloth, leaving room for the fwelling.

Tb bake an Oatmeal Pudding.

BOIL a quart of water, feafon it with a little fait; htrn the water boils, ftir in the oatmeal till it is fo thick you cannot eafily ftir your fpoon, then take it oflT the fire, ftir in two fpoonsful of brandy, or a gill of mountain, and fweeten it to your palate; grate in a little nutmeg and ftir in half a pound of currants clean wa(hed and picked then butter a pan, pour it in, and bake it half an hour.

A Rice Pudding boiled.

BOIL a pound of rice juft till it is tender, then take it up, untie it ftir in a good piece of butter, a

little

n

496 S E A - S T O R E S.

little fait, and a good deal of beaten pepper; then tie it up tight again, boil it an hourlooger, and it will eat fine. All other puddings you have in the Chap ter of Puddings.

A Harrico of French Beans

TAKE a pint of the feeds of French beans, which are ready dried for fowing, wa(h them clean,' and put thicm into a two quart iauce-pan, fill it with wa ter, and let it boil two hours: if the wterwaftei away too much, you muft put in more borfing water to keep them boiling. In the mean time, take almoft iialf a pound of nice fre(h butter, put it into a clean ijbew-pan, and when it is all melted, and done making a noife, have ready a pint bafbn heaped up with onions peeled and fliced thin, throw tkem imo the pan and fry them of a fine brown, ftirring them about that they may be all alike; then'pour oflF the clear water from the beans into a bafon, and throw the beans all into the ftew-pan; ftir all together, and throw in a large (ea-fpoonful of beaten pepper, two jeaped full of fait, and ftir it all together for two or three minutes. You may make this difh of what thickncfs you think proper, (either to eat with a fpoon, or otherways) with the liquor you poured oflf the beans. For a change, you may make it thia enough for foup; when it is of the prpppr thickoeis you like it, take it off the fire, and ftir in a large fpooofui of vinegar, and the yolks of two eggs, beat. The eggs may be left out if difiiked Dilh it % and fend it to table.

A Fowl Pie.

FIRST make thick rich cruft, over the dilh with the pafte, then take fome very fine bacbn, or cold boiled ham, (lice it and lay a layer all over s feafoQ it with a.Iiulc pepper, then put in the fowl after it is picked cleaned, and finged i ftiake a very little pep

1

S E A • S T OR E S 497

per and fait into the belly, put in a little water, cover ic with harai feafoned with a little beaten pepper; puc on the lid, and bake it two hours. When it comes out of the oven, take half a pint of water, boil itj ahd add to it as much of the (Irong foup as will make the gravy quite rlch pour it boiling-hot into the pie and lay on the lid again. Send it to table hot. Or lay a piece of beef or pork in fdft watertwentyfouf Hours, (lice ic in the room of che.hamg and it will eac fine, '

A Cbejhire P$rk Tie for Sea.,

TAKE fome fait pork that has been boiled ciftrit into thin dices, an equal quantity of poMtoc pared and Qkred thin; makp g good cmft, cover the 4i( lay a layer of meat fc;afoned with a little pepper, and ' a layer of potatoes, then a layer of meat, and a layer of (otfftoes, and fo oa till your pie is full % feafon ic ' with pepper; -when it is full, lay fome butter on thetop, and fill your difh above half-ixill of foft stater, clofe your pie up, and baki it in a gentle oven

Sea Venifon.

WHEN youkilJ alhcep, keep ftin'ing the bIboS all the time till it is'cold or at leaft as cold as it win be, that it may not con'geal; then Cut up the fheep, take one fide, cut the leg like ti haunch, cut off the Ihoulder and thigh, the neck and breaft in two, ileep them all in the blood as long as the weather will permit vou, then take but the haunch, and hang it out of the fun as long as you can to be fweet $:and rbatt it as you do a haimchof venifoh It will eat very fine, efpecially if the heat will give you leave to keep it long. Take off all the fuet before you lay it in the blood; take the other joints and lay them in a large pan, piur over them a quart of red wine, and a quart of rape vinegar lay the fat fide of the meat downwards in the pan (on a hollow tray is beft)

Kk and

498 S E A . S T O R E S.

and poor the wine and vinegar over ic let it lie twelve hours; then take the neck, breaft and loin out of the pickle, let the Ihoulder lie a week, if the beat vrill let you; rub it with bay-falt, falt-petre, and coarfe fugar, of each a quarter of an ounce, one handful of common fait, and let it lie a week or ten days bone the neck, breaft, and loin, feafon them with pepper and falrto your palate, and make a pafiy as you do of venifon. Boil the bones for gravy to fill the pie when it comes out of the oven i and the ihoulder boil frefh out of the pickle with a peaspudding.

•And when you cut up the Iheep, take the heart, liver, and lights, boil them a quarter of an hoar, then cut them fmall, and chop them very fine i feaion them with four large blades of mace twelve cloves, and a large nutmeg, all beat to powder; chop a pound of fuet fine, half a pound of fugar, two pounds of currants clean waihedj half a pint of red wine; mix all well together and make a pie. Bake it an hour. It is very rich.

Dumplings, noben you have nobite Bread.

TAKE the crumb of a twopenny-loaf grated fine, as much beef-fuet fiired as fine as pofiible, a litde fait, half a fmall nutmeg grated a large fpoonful of fiigaii beat two eggs with two fpoonsful of fait, mix all well together and roll them up as big as a turkey's egg; let the water boil, and throw them in. Half anhour will boil them.. For fauce, melt bot cer with a little fait; lay the dumplings in a difli, pour the fauce over them, and ftrew fugar all over the difh.

Thefe are very pretty, either at land or fea. You muft obferve to rub your hands with flour when you make them up.

The portable foup to carry abroad you have in the Chapter for Soups;

Clmdcr.

PRESERVING. 499

Cbouder.

TAKE a bclly-piccc of plickled pork, (lice ofFthe

fat parts, and lay them at the bottom of a kettle;

flrev over it onions, and fuch fweet herbs as yois

can procure. Take a middling large cod bone, and

flice it as for crimping; put pepper, fait, and all fpice on, and flour it a little; make a layer with

part of the dices, upon that a flight layer of pork

and on that a layer of bifcuit, and fo on, purfuing

the like rule until the kettle is filled within about

four inches; cover it with a nice pafte, pour 'in

about a pint of water, put on the cover of the ket

tie, and let the top be fupplied with live wood em

bers, and keep it over a flow fire about four hours.

When you take It up, lay it in the difli, pour in a

glafs of hot Madeira wine, and a very little India

pepper; if you have oyfters or truffles, and morels,

it will be till better; thicken it wich butter mixed

with flour. Take care to flcim the flew before you

put the fauce in, then lay on the cruft, and fend it to

table reverfe, as in the kettle. Cover it clofe wich

the pafte, which fliould be brown.

C H A?• XXIV.

PRESERVING.

Rules to be obferved in Frefervtng

WHEN you make your fyrups for prcfeivcs, always pound your fugar, and let it diflTolvc • in the fyrup before you put it on the fire, as it will occaflon the fcum to rife, and bake your fyrup of a

?Kk 2 better

5po P RE SERVING.

better colour. You mud be careful not to boil any kin;i of jellies or fyrups too high, as that will make them dark and cloudy; be fure not to keep green fweetmeats longer in the firft fyrup than direded, or they will lofe their colour. The fame care is required for oranges and lemons, when you preferve fruit with their flones fuch as cherries, damfons. Sec. render mutton fuet and put oyer them, tie a bladder over the top, and thick paper over that, to keep out the air; for if the air gets to them it will turn them four, which you may know by the fyrup's fretting and riOng above the fuet. Wet or dry fweetmeats (hould be kept in a dry cool place, as a hot place will deprive them of their virtue, and a damp place will turn them mouldy; be fure to let the fyrup be above the fruit, and cut writing paper in the fhape of your pot or glafs, notch it all round the edge, dip it into brandy, lay it clofe on the top of your fweetmeats, then tie a thick paper over that, as you cannot be too careful in tying them down clofe to keep out the air, as you will find yourfelf in a great fault if you leave the pots open, or tie them down carelefsly.

Oranges.

TAKE the largefl: and cleareft Seville oranges, cut a hole out of the ftalk-end as big as a fix-pence, fcoop out all the pulp very clean, tie them fingly in muflin, and lay them two days in fpring water, change the water twice a. day, and boil them in the muflin till they are tender 5 be pareful fo keep them covered with: water.; weigh the oranges before you fcoop them, to every pound add two pounds of double-refined fugar pounded and a pint of fpring water, boil the lugar and water with the orange, juice- to a fyrup, fkim tc well, and let it ftand till it is cold; take the oranges out of the muflin and put them in, put them over a (low fire, and boil them till they are clear, and put them by

till

PRESERVING. 501



till they are cold; then pare and core fomc green pippins, boil them in water till it is flrong of the pippins, do noc ftir then but put them down gently with the back of a fpoon, and drain the liquor through a jelly-bag till it is clear-, put to every pint of liquor a pound of double-refined fugar pounded, and the juice of a lemon drained as clear as you can, boil it to a ftrong jelly, drain the oranges out of their fyrup, and put them in glafs or white (tone Jars of the fize of the orange, and pour the jelly over them; cover them with brandy-papcrs and tie them xloArn, as directed.

Lemons.

TAKE the fineft and clearcft lemons you can get, and pare them very thin; then cut a round hole ac the top, the (ize of a (hilling, and take out the pulp and (kins; rub them with laic, and lay them in fpring water as you do them, which prevents their turning black; let them he irt five or Hx days, then boil them in frefh falc and water Bfteen minutes; have ready made, a thin fyrup of a quart of tater and a pound of loaf fugar, boil them in it fivi iffifnures for five, or (ix days, and then put them in i large jar; let them (land fix or eight weeks, which will make them Ipok clear and plump; then take them out of that fyrupj or they will mould. Make a fyrup with fine powder-fugar; put as much fpring water to it as will dilTolve it, boil and (kim it well, then put in your lemons, and boil them gently till they are clear; put them into a jar with brandy-paper over them, and tie them down as direAed. Or you may preferve them the fame as oranges

Goofeberries.

TAKE the largeft preferving goofeberries, and pick ofF the black eye, but not the (talk j then fet tbem over th,e fire in a pot of fpring water to fcald.

Kit 3 cover

502 P R E S E R V I N G

cover them very clofe, but do not boil or break them, and when they are tender take them up and put them in cold water; to every pound of goofeberries take a pound and a half of double-refined fugar, a pint and a half of fpring water, and clarify it; and when our fyrup i$ cold put the goofeberries fmgle into your preferving-pan, put the fyrup to them and fet them on a gentle fire, let them boil, but not too faft, for fear they fhould break; when they have boiled, and you perceive that the fugar has entered them take them off, cover them with white paper, and fet them by till the next day; then take them out of the fyrup, and boil the fyrup till it begins to be ropy, Ikim it, and put it to theni.

Again, then fet them over a gentle fire and let it fimmer gently till you perceive the fyrup will rope; then take them off, and fet them by till they are cold cover them with paper; then boil fome goofeberries in fair water, and when the liquor is ilrong enough drain it through a cloth, let it fland to fettle, pour it from the fettlings, and to every pint add a pound of luble-refined fugar pounded, then boil it to a jy4nd put the goofeberries in glafles; when they are cold cover them with the jelly; the next day cover them with brandy-paper, and tie them down as dire£ted

You may prefervc red goofeberries. thus: put a pound of loaf fugar into a preferving-pan, with as much fpring water as will diflblve it, il it and (kim it well i then put in a quart of rough red goofebcr ries, and let them boil a little, fet them by till the next day, then boil then till they look clear and the fyrup thick,; then put them into pots or glalTcs, tie brandy-paper, &c. over them

!. Jafitrrki

PRESERVING. 503

Rajberries.

GATHER your rafbcrries on a dry day, before they turn too red, with the ftalks on about an inch long, (it is bed: to cut them oflF with a large pair of fciflars) and lay them fingly on a di(h; beat and jGfc their weight of double-refined fugar and (hew it over them; to every quart of red rafberries take a quart of red currant juice, after it is run through a bag, and put to it its weight in double-refined fugar, boil and Ikim it well, but mind to keep it (lirring till thei fugar is melted; then put in your raberries and give them a fcald, then take them off and let them ftarid for two hours; then let them on again, and make them a little hotter: proceed in this manner two or three times, till they look clear, but mind they do not boil, as that will make the ftalks come off them'; vrhen they are nearly cold put them into jelly glaflest ' ivith the (talks downwards

You may preferve white rafberries the famie way, ' only ufe white currant jelly inftead of redj and put brandy-papers, &c over them.

TAKE fon)e of the largeft red currants you can get, not over ripe, and with a fmall knife (tone them; tie fix bunches together with a thread on a piece of thin fplit deal, about three or four inches long; weigh the currants, and put in their weight of dou bid-refined fugar into a preferving-pan with a little fpring water, boil it till the fugar fiies, then put the currants in, and juft give them a boil up, cover them with white paper and fet them by till the next day; then dry them in a cool ftove, or put them into glailes, and boil up the fyrup with a little red currant juice, put brandy-pa:per, &c, over them,

K k 4 Wbit

Red Currants. '

5P4 PRESERVING.

Wkite Currants.

-STONE and tie your currants io bunches as above direded, put them into the prcferving-paji, with their weight in double-refined uigar beat and fifted through a fieve, let them (land all night; then take fome green codlings, pare, cpre, and boil them prefs them down with the back of a fpooD, but do not ftir them when the water is ftrong of the apple, add to it the juice of a lemon and ftrain it through a jelly-bag till it runs clear; to every pine of your juice add a pound of double-refined fugar, and boil it to a ftrong jelly; thenput it to your currants, and boil them gently till they look clear, cover them in the preferving-pan with white paper till they are almoft cold; then put a bunch of currants into every glafs, and fill them up with jelly when cold put brandy-papers over them, &c.

Green CodBngs.

GATHER as many as you want when they are about the fize of a walnut, ith a little of the ftalk leaf or two on them, put a handful of vine leaves bottom of a pan, then put in feme fpring then a layer of codlings then of leaves, till the pan is full, with vine leaves at the top, cover it clofe that no fteam can get out, and fet it over a flov fire, look at them oflen as foon as you think the fkins will come off take them out, and with a knife take off the ikins; then put them in the fame water again with the vine leaves, which muft be quite cold, or ic will crack them, put in a little roach alum, and fet them over a flow fire till they are green, which will be in about three or four hours then take them out and lay them on a fieve to drain; make a good ftrong fyrup, and give them a gentle boil once a day for three days s then put them ictQ gallipois, with brandypapers over them, 6cc.

f.

PRESERVING. 505

Golden Pippins.

TAKE the rind of an orange and boil it very tender, lay it in cold water for three days; take two dozrn of golden pippins, pare, core, and quarter them, and boil them to a ftrong jelly in fpring water, and run it through a jelly bag till it is clear; take the fame quantity of pippins, pare them and take out the cores, put three pounds of loaf fugar into s preferving-pan, with a pint and a half of fpring water, when it boils fkim it well, and put in your pippins with the orange rind cut in long thin flips; let them boil faft, till the fugar is thick and will aU mod candy; then put in a pint and a half of pippin jelly, and hoil it fad till the jelly is clear; then fquecze in the juice of a lemon, give it a boil, and puj, rhem in pots or glafles, with the orange-peel; tie brandy-papers over, &c. You may ufe lempnpcel inftead of orange, but then you muft only boil ic, not foak it.

Grapes.

TAKE fome fine grapes, not over ripe, or white, cut very clofe, and pick off all thi ones, put them in a jar, with a quarter of of fugar candy, and fill the jar with commoi tie them down clofc with a bladder, and ki in a cold dry place. You may prefeive mor rics the fame way.

Walnuts white. TAKE your walnuts before they are hi infidc, pare them till the white appears, ai as you pare rhem throw them into fait and ' prevent their turning black, and let then your fugar is ready; take three pounds of 1( lUtitinio your prcfcrving- pan, fet it overs re, and put as much water as will jutt wi gar, and let it boil j then have ready ttn o:

I

5o6 PRESERVING.

whites of eggs ftrained and beat up to a frodi, eorer ypyr fugar with the froth as it boils aoAlkiai it; tbeo boil it and ikim it till it is as clear as cryftal; thea throw in your walnuts, juft give them a boil till they are tender; then take them out, and lay tbem in a dtfh to cool i when cold put them in your pivferring-pots, and when the fugar is as warm as milk pour it over them, and when quite cold tie then ' down.

Walnuts green.

TAKE and wipe them very clean, and lay tbem in ftrong fait and water twenty-four hours, then take them out and wipe them very clean with a dry cloth j have ready a ftcw-pan of fpring water boiling, throw them in, let them boil a minute, and ake them out, Jay them on a coarfe cloth, and boil your fugar k .?bovc i then juft give your walnuts a fcald in the 'fugar, take them up, and lay thcrn to cool % put them in your prefer ving- pots, pour your fyrup on Old tie them down.

• Walnuts black. E as many as you want of the fmaller fort, them in falc and water for nine days, changwater every day, and put fome cabbageit the top, with a board upon them to keep luts under water j then put them in a Geve,:hem Hand in the air tiU they begin to wa then put them into an earthen jug, pour dfaier over them, and kt them ftand till the '; then take them out, and put tbem on t drain; ftick i clove in eaeh end of your Kut, n into a llew-pan of boiling water, and boil "e minutes then take ihem up, make a thin . id fcald them in it three or four times a day, walnuts are black and bright; then make a rup, with fojpc ginger cut in CUccs and a few eloTC

• •

PRESERVI NT G. 507

cloves in it, boil it up and Ikixn it well) put in your walnuts, boil them iive or fix minutes, then put them into your jars, tie them over with brandy-papei

Green-Gage Plums.

T:E the fincft green-gage plums juft before they are ripe; put vine-leaves '-at the bottom of a prelerving-pan, then a layer of plums, then vineleaves till the pan is nearly full, then fill it with fpring . water, fee them over a flow fire, and when they are hot and the fkin begin to break take them offj and take the Ikins off carefully, lay them on a fieve as you do them, then lay them in the fame water in the fame manner you did at fir ft, and cover them very clofe, fo that no fteam can get out; hang them at a great diftance from the fire till they are green, which will take five or fix hours at leaft$ ihen . take them up very carefully, lay them on a hair ' fieve to drain; make a good iyrup, and give them a gentle boil twice a day tor two days, take them out and put them ima fine clear fyrup, tie brandy-paper over them, &c.

Damfons.

TAKE two quarts of damfons and cut, them in pieces, put them in a pan over the fire, with as much water as will cover them; when they are boikd and the liquor pretty ftrong ftrain it through a fine ficve wipe four quarts of damfons very dry with a cloth, add to every pound of damfons a pound df fing'cr refined fugar, put the third part or your fugar into thejiquor, fet it over the fire, and when it fimmcrs put in the damfons, let. them have one good boil; then take thrm off for half an hour covered up elofe, then fet them on again, aaid let them fimmci' on the fire after turning them; then take them out and put them in a bafon, ftrew all the fugar over them that was left, and pourhe hot liquor over

them.

' 5o P ft E S R V IK G.

tbem cover them Up, and let them ftand till the next day; then give them a gentle boil up, then put them .in gallipots when cold, put mutton-fuet over tbetn, and tie a bladder and paper ove; all.

Damfons for arts.

PUT a layer of coarlc fugar t the bottom of as earthen pan, then a layer of dam Tons, then fugar, till the pan is full tie them over with brown paper, put them in a warm oven for two hours, then take them out, and to every quart of damfons uke a pound of good moift fugar, juft wet it with fpring water in a prefcrvingpan, boil it up and ikim it well; then put in your damfons, d boil tbem up very gently for ten minutes, fkim them vrell, then put tbem into jars, and when cold put mutton iuet hot over them; tie a bladder and coarfe paper over aU aqd keep them in a cool dry place.

Morella Cherries.

GATHER your cherries on a fine day when they are full ripe, take off'the ftalks, and prick them with a pin; weigh your cherries, and to every pound add a pound and a half of double-refined fugar pounded and fifted, drew about one-third of ydur fugar over the cherries, and let them lay all night; diffolve the reft of your fugar in a pint of currant juice, fet it over a flow fire, and put in the cherries, ith the fugar and juice that runs from them, and give them a gentle fcald; then take them our, put ihem into youc pots, boil your fyrup till it is thick, and pour it over them, tie them down with brapdy papers, xr put mutton fuet over them, and tie a t)ladder and paper over all.

Strawberries.

GATHER your ftrawberries on a fine day, the largeftand iinefl: fcarlet ones, with their italks oa

before



P RE S E R'V I N g: 50

before they are too ripe, lay them feparately on 'a difii

and weigh them i beat and lift double their weight

of double refined-fugar, and ftrew over them; then

take a few ripe fcarlec ftrawberries, crufh them and

put them into a jar, with their weight of double-

refined fuear beat fine, cover them clofe, and let

them (land in a deep pot of boiling water til thef

arc foft, and the fy rup is come out of them; then

ftrain them through a muflin rag into a preferving pan, boil and ikim it well, and when it is cold put

in your whole ftrawberries and fct them over the fire

till they are milk warm-, then take them off, anci'

kt them Hand till they are quite cold $ then fet them

on again, and make them a little hotter, and do fo

feveral times, till they look clear, but do not let.

them boil, for that will bring off their ftalks j when •

they are cold pot them iri jelly glafles with the ftalks

downward?; then fill up your glafles with the fyrup,

put brandy-papers over them, and tie writing paper

over all.

, Pine Apples. .

TAKE the fmall pine-apples before they are ripe, make a llrong fait and water, and lay them in for five days; then put a handful of vine leaves in the '' bottom of a Jarge fauce-pan, and put in your pinic apples; fill your pan with vine leaves, and then pour on the fait and water they were foaked in ' cover them up vfery clofe, fct them over a flow fire, and let them ftand till they are of a fine light green; make a thin fyrtip of a quart of fpring water and a pound of double-refined fugar, when it is almoft cold put it into a deep jar, and put in the pine apples . with their tops on, let them fliand a week, but take care they are well covered with the fyrup when they have flood a week, boil your fyrup again, and pour ic carefully into your jar, for fear you fliould break:fae tops of your pine-apple$ oflj let iheqi ftand eight

Sio . PRESERVING.

or ten weeks, and duriog that time give the fynip two or three boilings to keep it from moulding; kt ypur fyrup (land till it is nearly cold before you put it in; and when your pine-apples look quite full aod green take them out of the fyrup, and make a thick fyrup of three pounds of doublereiined fugar viik as much water as will difiblve it, boil and (kim ii well, and put a few dices of white ginger into tr, and when it is nearly cold put your pihe-apples in clean jars, and pour the fyrup over them, tie them down clofe with a bladder, and they will keep fevtral years

Barberries.

VHEN you intend to prcferve barberries for tarts proceed in the following manner: take and pick the female bunches from the ftralks, weigh them, aod put them in a jar with their weight in loaf fugv, and fct them in a kettle of boiling water till the fagar is melted and the berries quite foft, let them ftand all night, and the next day put them into a preferving-pan, and boil them fifteen minutes, then put, them into gallipoc;, and.tie theiti down clofe.

If they are to be prefer ved in bunches piooced thus: gather the fined female barberries and pick out the largeft bunches, and then pick the reft from the ftalks, put them in as much fpring water as will make fyrup for your bunches as near as you can guelis, boil them till they arc very foft, theo fbaift them through a fieve, and to every pint of juice put a pound and a half of loaf fugar pounded, boil and ikim it well, and to every pint of fyrup put half a pound of berries in bunches, boil them very gcndr till they look fine and clear; then put them carcfuUf into gallipots or glaffes, and tie them down whk brandy-paper, &c

'

- - - 9y "Vtp wm m

PRESERVING. 511

TAKE and pare them very thin and round, and preferve them whole, or cue in quarters, which you pleaie, put them into a (lew-pan, fill it with hard water, and lay your parings over the quincps to keep them down; cover your ftew-pan dole, that ndfteam can get out, and fet them over a Qow fire till . they are foFt and of a Bne pink colour; then let theta A-and till they are cold; make a good fyrup of dou bie-refined fugar pounded, wetted with fpring water enough to melt it, and fufficient to cover the quinces boil and fkim it well, then put in your quinces, let them boil gently ten minutes, then take them off and let them Hand two or three hours; then boil them till the fyrup is thick and the quinces look clear, then put them into deep gallipots and tic diem over, with brandy-paper, &c.

Teaches.

m

TAKE the finefl: and largeft you can get, not oyet ripe'rub off the lint with a cloth, and run them down the feam with a pin fkin-deep, put them in a jar, and cover them wi(h French brandy, tie a blad der over them, and let them (land a week; iriake ilrong fyrup, boil and fkim it well; take the peaches out of the brandy, put them in and boil them till; they look clear then take them out, mix the iyrup ' virith the brandy, and when it is cold pour it over' your peaches; tie them down clofe with a bladder, and a leather over it.

You may put peaches into a deep jar or glaft, cover them with French brandy -, and a fpoonful of the brandy with a flice of the peach is very fine ' in ' punch.

A pine apple is very fine cut in flices, and covered with fine old rum, to be ufed in the faoe manner, and will keep gogd a long time.

512. PRESERVING.

Apricots.

GATHER your apricots before they arc too ripe, put them into a ftew-paii, and cover thcni with fprif water; coddle them till the (kins will come off, thro take them our, and with a penknife take off the Ikins, take out the ftones, and lay them on a coarfc cloth make a ftrong fyrup with double-refined fugar with as much water as will wee it, boil and iVrni it well, then put in your apricots, and boil them grntly till they are clear; then put theai into gallipots and tie brandy-paper over, &c.

Cucumbers.

: TAXE two Hundred of the fined and clearcft fmair cucumbers for pickling, put them into ftroDg fait and water for four hours; then waih'them out, and put them into a fieve to drain,; put them into a jar and pour boiling hot vinegar over them, cover them clofe, and let them ftand till the next day; then .pour the vinegar from them and make it boil, whilie.it boils pour it over the cucumbers cover than clofe, and repeat it till rhey are as greea aa grals; then let them ftand, ti)j they are cold; make a fyrup of thre pints of Spring water and two pounds of loaf fugar, ftrain them from the vinegar, put them it and give them a gentle boil; let them (land to that fyrup a week, then make a ftrong fyrup with double-refined fugar, with as mueh fpring water as will wet it, put in fone flices of white ginger, bcnl and (kim it well, ftrain the cucumbers from the firft fyrup, and put into the ftrong fyrup, give them a geptle boil, then put them into gallipots, and whea cold tie brandy papers over tipm, &c.

Rajberry Jam.

TAKE your rafberrics and bruife them, put them into a ftcw-pan, and fet them over a (low fire, Itir

them



P R E S E R V I N a 513

them often till they arc boiled up, then rub them through a cullender, then add their weight in loaf fugar pounded, boil them very gently for half an hour, but mind to ftir them often, for fear of their burning; then put them into gallipots, and tie them down with brandy-paper, &c

apricot yam

TAKE as many fufl ripe apricots as you want, pare and cut them thin, take out (he ftones, and infuie theii in an earthen pan till they are dry and tender; to every pound and a half of apricots put a pound of double-refined fugar with thrive fpoonsful of fpring water boil your fugar to a candy height then put in ygiur apricots bruifed fine, (lir them over a flow fire tilj they are clear and thick; mind they mud only iimmer, not boil; then put them into your glafles put brandy-paper over, &c

Strawberry yam.

TAKE fome of the fineft fcarlet ftrawberries ga-i thered when they arc full ripe, pick them from the Italks, put fome juice of.ftrawberrics to them beat and fife their weight in doublerefined fugar, and llrew it over them; put them into a preferving-paq, fct them over a flow fire, boil them twenty minute?, and Ikim them; then put them in glaflcs, when cold put brandy-paper on them, &c.

Black Currant yam.

GATHER your currajits when they are full ripe on a dry day, pick them from the ftalks, then bruife them well in a bowl, arid to every pound of currants put a pound, of 'doiyt)le-refined fugar beaten and fifted; put them Into a preferving. pan boil rhejn half an hour„ flcim and keep them ftirring all the time, then put them into pots; when cold put brandy.papcr over, and tic white paper over all.

LI CHAP.

t 5H

CHAP. XXV.

SYRUPS AND CONSERVES.

Syrup of jfinces

TAKE your quinces and grate tbefti, pafs their pulp through a coarfe cloth to cxtrad the juice, fet the juice before the fun or fire, to fettk, and by that means clarify it to every four ounces of juice take a pound of fugar boiled into a fyrup whh fpring water; if the putting in the juice of the quinces fhould check the boiling of the fyrup too much, give the fyrup fome boiling till it becomes pearled, then take it off the fire, and when coU put it into bottles and cork them tight.

Syrup of Rofes

INFUSE three pounds of damaik rofe leaves io i gallon of warm water in a wdll glazed earthen pot with a narrow mouth, for eight hours, which ftop & clofe that none of the virtue may exhale; when tbef have infufed To long, heat the water again, fqueea them our, and put in three pounds more of role leaves to infufe for eight hours more, prefs them out very hard; then to every quart of this infufion add four pounds of fint fugar, and boil it to a fyrapi when it is cold, bottle it and cork them tight.

Syrup of Citron.

PARE and flice your citrons thin, lay tbem la t China bowl with layers of fine fugar; the next day pour off the liquor into a glafs, and clarify it oitri gentle fire.

SYRUPS AND CONSERVES. 515

Syrup of Clave Gilliflowers.

CLIP your gilliflowers, fprinkle them with fair irater, put them into an earthen pot, ftop them very dofe, fct them in a kettle of boiling water, and lee them boil for two hours; then drain out the juice, put a pound and a half of fine fugarto a pint of juicei put it into a preferving-pan, fee it on the fire, keep it ftirring till the fugar is all melted, (do not let it boil) then fet it by to cool, and bottle it

Syrup of Peach Blojfoms.

INFUSE peach bloffoms in hot water, as much as will handfomely cover them, let them (land in balnao, or fand, twenty four hours, covered clofe, then ftrain out the flowers from the liquor, and put in frefh flowers, let them ftand to infufe as before, then ftrain them out, and to the liquor put frefh peach bloffoms, a third time, and if you pleafe a fourth time; then to every pound of your infufion add two pounds of double-refined fugar, and fet it in fand or balnao i this makes a fyrup which will keep for ufe.

Conferve of Red Rofes or any other Flowers.

TAKE rofe buds, or any other flowers and pick them, cut off the white part from the red, and put the red flowers and fift them through a fieve to take out the feeds, then weigh them, and to every pound of flowers take two pounds and a half of loaf fugar; beat the flowers very fine in a marble mortar, then .by degrees put the fugar to them, and beat it very well till it is well incorporated together, then put it into gallipots, tie it over with paper, over that a leather, and it will keep feven years.

Conferve of Hips.

GATHER your hips before they grow foft, cut iS the heads and llalks, flit them in halves, take

L 1 2 out

5i6 SYRUPS AND CONSERVES,

out all the feeds and white that is on them very clean, then put them into an earthen pan, and ftir them every day, or they will grow mouldy, let them ftand tillthey are fofc enough to rub through acoarfc hair lieve, as the pulp comes through take it oflf the fieve; (they are a dry berry, and will require pains to rub them through) then add its weight in fioe fugar, mix them well together without boiling, and keep it in deep gallipots for ufe.

Conerue of OrangePeeL

GRATE the rind of your Seville oranges as chin as you can, weigh it, and add to every pound of orange rind three pounds of loaf fugar; pound ik orange rind well in a marble mortar, and mix the fugar by degrees with them, beat all well togcthcrj then put it into gallipots, and tie it down with pi per, and keep it for ufe.

Lemon peel may be done the fame way.

CHAP. XXVI.

DRYING AND CANDYING.

To dry Cherries

TO four pound of cherries put one pound of loaf fugar, and put as much water as will wci them, when it is melted make it boil; flonc youf cherries, put them in, and make them boil, fti two or three tknes, take them oflF, and let thcffl (land in the fyrup two or three days •, then take tbcfl

out of the fyrup, and boU it up, pour it over fl

cbcrno

DRYING AND CANDYING. 517

cherries but do not boil the cherries any more; let them ftand three or four days longer; then take them out, lay them on a fieve to dry, and lay them in the fun, or in a Qow oven to dry; when dry lay a (heet of white paper at the bottom of a fmall box, then a row of cherries, then paper, till they are all in, and paper over them

. Cherries with their Leaves and Stalks green.

TAKE your cherries with a little ftalk and a leaf or two on, firft dip the ftalks and leaves in the belt vinegar boiling hot, ftick the fprigs upright in a fieve till they are dry; in the mean time make a ftrong fyrup with double refined fugar, and dip the cherries, leaves, ftalks and all into the fyrup, and juft et them fcald; take them out and lay them on a fieve, and boil the (yrup to a candy height j then dip the cherries, leaves, ftalks and all in; then ftick the branches in fieves and dry them in a flow ovcn or before the fire j they look very pretty by candlelight in a defert.

To dry Cherries a third Way.

TAKE eight pounds of cherries, one pound of fine powder fugar, ftone the cherries over a deep bafon or glafs, and lay them one by one in rows, and ftrew a little fugar over, thus do till your bafon or glafs is full to the top, and let them ftand till the next day; then put them into a preferving-pan, fee them over the fire, and let them boil faft for a quarter o( an hour or more; then pour them into your bafon again, and let them ftand two or three days, then take them out of the fyrup and lay them one by one on hair fieves, and fet them in the fun, or put them in the oven till they arc dry, turning them every day on dry fieves; put them in boxes with vvbite paper between.

L 1 3 . T9

5i8 DRYING and CANDYING.

To dry Cherries a fourth Way.

TAKE twelve pounds of morella cherries, ftonc them and puc them into your preferving-pan, with three pounds of double-refined fugar pounded, and a quart of water; then fet them on the fire till they are fcalding hot, take them off a little while, then fet them on the fire again, and boil them till they are tender; then fprinkle them over with half a pound of fine powder fugar, and (kim them ckan, put them altogether in a China bowl, let them ftami m the fyrup two or three days, take them out one by one, and lay them with the holes downwards on a wicker fieve, then fet them into a ftovc to dry, and as they dry turn them on clean .fievesj when they are dry enough lay a (heet of white paper at the bottom of a prefcrving-pan, then put all the cherries in with another (heet of white paper on the top, cover them clofe with a cloth, and fet theni.ovcr a cool fire till they fweat; take them off the fire, then let them ftand till they are coldj then put them la boxes with white paper

To dry Peaches.

T AK E the cleared and ripeft peaches, pare them into fair water; take their weight in double-refiaed fugar, of one half make a very thin fyrup, then put in your peaches, and boil them till they look clear; then fplit and ftone them, boil them till they arc very tender, and put them on a fieve to drain; take

I the other half of the fugar and boil it almoft to a

candy, then put in your peaches, and let them lay i all night; then lay them in a glafs and fet them is

j a (love till they are dry; if they are fugared too

I much, wipe them with a wet cloth a little, then pot

I them in boxes between white paper.

DRYING AND CANDYING. 519

To dry Plums.

TAKE the large pear-plums, fair and clear co- loured, weigh them, and flit them up the fides, ut chem into a broad ftew-pan and fill it full of fp'ring 'water, fct them over a very flow fire, (take care that the flcins do not come off) when they are tender take them up, and to every pound of plums put a pound of powdered fugar, drew a litrle at the bottom of a large bowl, then lay your plums in one by one, and ftrew the reft of the fugar over them, and fet them into your ftove all night; the next day with a good warm fire, heat them, and fet them into your ftove again, and let them ftand two days more, turning them every day; then take them out of the fyrup, and lay them on glafs plates, and dry them in your flove or oven; when dry put them between clean white paper in boxes.

Note. Green-gage plums, or any other fort, may be dried the fame way.

To dry Damfons.

TAKE the fineft damfons you can get, make a thin fyrup, boil and flcim it well, then put in your damfons firft, take out the ftones, and give them a boil, and let them ftand in the fyrup till next day; then make a rich fyrup with double-refined fugar and as much water as will wet it, and boil it to a candy height; then take your damfons out of the ' other fyrup, and put them in, give them a fimmer and put them away till the next day; then put them one by one on a fieve, and dry them in a cool oven or ftove, or before the fire; (mind and turn them twice every day) when dried put them in a box with white paper between and keep them in a cool dry place.

L 1 4 To

520 DRYING AND CANDYING.

Tq dry Plums green.

TAKE and dip the ilalks and leaves in boiling vinegar, and put them on a fieve to dry; have a ftrong fyrup ready, and give them a fcald in it, and very carefully with a pin take off the (kin, boil yoor fyrup to a candy height; then dip in your plums, then take them out, and hang them by the ftalks to dry on ny thing you conveniently can, and dry them in a cool oven, and they will look finely tranfparent, with a clear drop at the end.

To dry Apricots.

TAKE fomc fine ripe apricots, pare them vc thin, and ftone them, put them into a prcfcrvingpan, and to every pound of apricots pound a pound of double-refined fugar, drew fome amongft them, and lay the reil over them; let them (land twentyfour hours, turn them three or four times in the fyrup; then boil them pretty quick till they are clear, then put them away in the fyrup till they are cold; when cold put them on glalTes, and dry them in a cool oven or Itove, turn them often j when they are dry put them in a box between white paper.

Lemon and Orange Peel candied.

TAKE your lemons or oranges and cut them lengthway, and take out all the pulp and infide fkins, put the peels into a ftrong fait and hard water for fix days, then boil them in fpring water till they are tender, take them out and lay them on i fieve to drain; make a thin fyrup with a pound of loaf fugar to a quart of water, and boil them in it for half an hour, or till they look clear; make a thick fyrup of double-refined fugar, with as much water as will wet it, put in your peels, and boil them over a flow fire till you fee the fyrup candy about the paor and the peels i then take them out and fprinklc

fine

i

"1

DRYING AND CANDYING. 521

fine powder fugar over them, lay them on a (ievc and dry them in a cool oven, or before the fire.

Melon Citron candied.

QUARTER your melon and take out all the inilde, then put it into a thin fyrup, as much as will cover the coat let it boil in the fyrup till it is tender all through; then put it away in the fyrup for two or three days, (but mind the fyrup covers them) that the fyrup may penetrate through them; thea take them out, and boil your fyrup to a candy height, then dip in your quarters, and lay them on a fieve to dry in a (low oven or before the fire.

• Angelica candied.

TAKE it in April, cut it in lengths, and boil it in water till it is tender, then put it on a fieve to drain, then peel it and dry it in a clean cloth, and to every pound of ftalks take a pound of doublerefined fugar finely pounded, put your ftalks into an earthen pan, and ftrew the fugar over them cover them clofe, and let them ftand for two days; then put it into a prefervihg-pan, and boil it till it is clear then put it into a cullender to drain, ftrew it pretty thick over with fine powder fugar, lay it on plates, and dry it in a cool oven.

Cajfia candied.

TAKE as much of the powder of caflla as will lay on two (hillings, with a little mufk and ambergreafe,. and pound them well together; then take a quarter of a pound of fine fugar, with as much water as will wet it, and boil it to a candy height; then put in your powder, and mix it well together; butter fome pewter faucers and pour it in, and when it is cold it will turn out.

Orange

522 DRYING AMD CANDYING.

Orange Marmalade.

TAKE two of the fincft Seville oranges yoo can get, and cut them in two, take out all the pulp and juice into a pan, and pick out all the (kins and feeds, boil the rinds in hard water till they are very tender, and change the water three times while they are boil ing; then pound them in a mortar, and put in tbe uice and pulp, put them in a prderving-pan, widi double their weight of loaf fugar, fet them over a flow fire, and boil them gently for forty minutes i then put them into gallipots, and when cold tie them down with brandy-papers, &c.

Apricot Marmalade.

TAKE the apricots that are not fpecked, or not good enough for preferves, or over ripe, will anfwcr this purpofe, take out the (tones, and boil them in i good fyrup till they will maih, then beat them in x marble mortar to a pafte; put half their weight is loaf fugar, with as much water into a prcferviog pan, boil and fkim it till it looks clear, then put io the apricot pafte, mix it well together, give it a boil op, then put it into gallipots; when cold put braodjpaper over it

Ked ince Marmalade.

TAKE ripe quinces, pare and quarter them, take €tit the cores, put them into an earthen pan, and cover them with fpring water, put the parings on the &p, tie a piece of coarfe paper over them, put them into the oven after your other things are baked, and kt them (land in all night; the next day take them out, take out the parings, maih them well, and rub them through a coarfe fieve; then take their weight in loaf fugar, put it into a prefer ving-pan, with as much (pring water as will wet it, boil and

ikim it wel) then put in your quinces and boil

diem

DRYING AND CANDYING. 523

them gently three quarters of an hour, tiiind and fiir them all the time, or they will ftick to the bottom and burn; then put it into gallipots, and when it is cold tie it down with brandy-paper, &c.

JVbite Since Marmalade.

TAKE the whiteft quinces, pare and core them as fail as you can, and cut them in dices, take out the cores, arid to every pound of quinces take three quarters of a pound of double-refined fugar pounded, throw half the fugar over the raw quinces, fct it over a (low fire till the fugar is melted and the quinces tender 5 then put in the reft of the fugar, and boil it up pretty quick, and keep it ftirring often when it is clear put it into gallipots, and when it is cold put brandy-paper over itj and keep it in a cool dry place.

Rajberry Pajie.

TAKE a quart of fine ripe rafberries and ma(h them, fqueeze the juice out of one half and put to the other half, boil them gently for a quarter of an hour, then rub them through a coarfe fieve with the back of a fpoon, then put them into a preferving pan, with a pint of red currant juice, and boil them well; then put a pound and a half of fine fugar into another pan, with as much water as will diflblve it, and boil it to a fugar again, then put in your raf berries and juice, give them a fcald, then put them on a glafs or plates, put them into a ftove to dry and turn them often.

Currant Pajle.

YOU may make either red or white currant pafte in the following manner: ftrip your currants from the ftalks, boil a few, and (train the juice to the reft) boil them well, and rub them through a hair fieve with the back of a fpoon put them into a preferving-

pan.

524 DRYING and CANDYING

pan, boil them a quarter of an hour and to a pint of juice put a pound and a half of double-refined fugar pounded and fifted, boil it till the fugaris melted, then pour it on plates, cut it in what fonn you pleafe, and dry it in the fame manner as tbe above pafie.

Goofeberry PaJIe.

TAKE your red goofeberries when they are foil grown and turned, but not ripe, cut them in halves, and pick out all the feeds; have ready a pint of red currant juice, and boil your goofeberries in it till they are tender, then rub them through a fieve put a pound and a half of double-refined fusar into i preferving-pan, with as much fpring water as will diilblve it, and boil it to a fugar again; them mix all together, and make it fcalding hot, but do.notlecit boil, pour it on plates or glafles, and dry it as before ' direfted.

Orange Chips.

TAKE fome of the fineft Seville oranges and pare them aflant, about a quarter of an inch broad, and keep the parings as whole as you can, as they will have a prettier efFeft; when you have pared all you want, put them into fait and fpring water for a day or two, then boil them in a large quantity of fpring water till they are tender, then drain them on a fieve; make a thin fyrup of a pound of fine fugar and a quart of warer, boil them a few at a time, to keep them from breaking, till they look clear, then put them into a fyrup made of fine fugar and as much water as will diflblve it, and boil it to a caody height; then take them up and lay them on a fieve, and grate double-refined fugar over them, and dry them in a ftove or before the fire.

JprM

CAKES.' 52

Apricot Chips.

TAKE your apricots, pare them, and cut them very thin into chips; take three quarters f their nveight in fogar finely fcarced, then put the fugar and apricots into a pewter difli, fet them upon coals, and when the fugar is diflblved turn them upon the edge of a dilh out of the lyrup, and fet them by till the next day; thcn warm them again in the fyrup, but do not let them boil, and keep them turning till they have drank up all the fyrup; then lay them on a plate, and dry them in a (love

Ginger Tablet.

MELT a pound of fine loaf fugar, with a bit of butter over the fire, and put in an ounce of pounded ginger, keep it flirring till it begins to rife into a froth; rub fome pewter plates with a little oil and pour it in; when it is cold flip it out, put it into a China difh and garnifli it with flowers.

CHAP. XXVII. A K E S.

Proper Rules to be obferved in making Cakes.

BEFORE you intend to finifli your cake, be fure to have all your ingredients ready prepared to your hand, and never beat up your eggs till the laft thing, and never leave them to go about any thing elfe till they are finiflied, as the eggs by (landing pnmixed will require frefli beating, which will occaiion your cake to be heavy. When you intend to

put

526 CAKES.

put butter in your cakes be fure to beat it with your hand to a fine cream before you mix ic with fugar, or elfe it will require double the beatiog and will not anfwer your purpofe half fo well: all cakes made with rice, feeds, or plums, are bed baked ia wooden hoops, for when they are baked in tins or pans the outfide of your cake will be burned, aod will be fo much confined, that the heat cannot peoetrate into the middle of your cake, and prevac it from rifing; the beft method is, to put a rouod tin in the middle of your large cakes, and then 70a will have it thoroughly baked.

All kinds of cakes fhould be baked in a welliieated oven, heated according to the fize of your cake

Icing for Cakes.

TAKE the whites of twelve eggs, and a pound of double-refined fugar pounded and fifted through a fine fieve, mix them together in a deep eanbeo pan, and beat it well for three hours with a ftrong wooden fpoon till it looks white and thick, then with a thin pafte knife fpread it all over the top and fides of your cake, and ornarncnt it with fwect nonpareils, or fruit pafte, or fugar images, and put ic in a cool oven to harden for one hour, or fet it ac a diftance from the fire, and keep .turning it till ic is hard. You may perfume the icing with any fori of perfume you pleale.

A rich Cake.

TAKE four pounds of flour dried and fificd

feven pounds of currants clean wafhcd, picked, and

rubbed well, fix pounds of the beft frelh butter, two

.pounds of Jordan almonds blanched and beat fine io

•a mortar, with orange-flower water and ickj then

take four poiinds of eggs, put half the whites af

three

i

nv

CAKES. 527

thrtt pounds of double refined fugar beaten and iifced, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, the fame of cinnamon and niace three large nutmegs, and a little ginger all beaten fine and fifted, half a pint of fack, half a pint of good French brandy, fome candied citron, orange, and lemon peel to your liking, and cut in flips, work your butter to a cream with your hands before any of your ingredients are put in, then put in your fugar, and mix them well together i before you put in your eggs let them be well beaten and ftrained through a fieve, then w6rk in your almonds then put in the eggs, and beat all well together, till they look white and thick, thea put in your fack, brandy, and fpiccs, Ihake your flour in by degrees, and when your oven is ready put .in your currants and fweetmeats, and work it well up, put it into your hoop, and bake it four hours la a quick oven. You muft keep beating it with your hand all the while you are mixing it ', and when your currants are waihed and cleaned put them before the fire to plump, fo that they may go warm into the cake. You may bake this quantity in two hoops if you pleafe, and when it is cold ice it.

Pum Cake.

TAKE a pound and a half of fine flour well dried and fifted, the fame quantity of freih butter, three quarters of a pound of currants well waflied, pickeii, and rubbed, ftone and Qice half a pound of raifins, one pound and a quarter of fine fugar beat and iifted, and fourteen es, (leave out half the whites) (bred the peel of a large lemon very fine, two ounces of candied citron, the fame of lemon-peel, the fame of orange-peel, a tea-fpoonful of beaten cloves and mace, half a nutmeg grated, a gill of brandy, and four fpoonsful of orange- flour water; firfl: work the butter with your hand to a cream, then

beat

5a8 C A K E .

beat your fugar well in, beat your eggs for half ao hour, then mix them with your butter and fogai, and by degrees put in your flour and fpices, and beac the whole with your hand for one hour and a half; when your oven is ready, mix in lightly your braady, fruity and fweetmeats-, then put it in your Hoop,aod bake it two hours and a half in a quick oven; when it is cold ice it.

•

A Found Cake.

TAKE a poiind of frcfh butter, beat it in an earthen pan with your hand one way till it is like a fine, thick cream; then have ready twelve eggs, bui half the whites, beat them vell, and beat them with the butter; then beat in a pound of fine flour, a pound of fine powder fugar, and a few cairawaj feeds, beat them well together for one hour wita yourhand; butter a'pan, put it in, andbakeitooc hour in quick oven.

Seed Cake

TAKE half a peck of flour, a pound and a half of frelh butter, put the butter into a faucepao, with a pint of new milk, and fet it on the fire; cake a pound of fugar pounded, half an ounce of allfpice pounded, and mix them with the flourj when the butter is melted pour the milk and butter in the middle of the flour, and work it up like pafe; pour in with the milk and butter half a pint of good ale ycaft, fet it before the fire to rife before icgocs the oven; put in two ounces of carr a way-feeds, p it in a hoop, and bake it in a quick oven.

White Plum Cakes.

TAKE two pounds of fine flour dried and fiftdi

one pound of line fugar pounded and lifted, a pouo

of frcfli butter, a quarter of an ounce of mace aflo

one nutmeg beaten i fixteen eggs two pounds anda

ball

C A K E 3. 530

half of currants clean wafhed, picked, and rubbed tialf a pound of fweec almonds blanched, half a pound of candied lemon, half a pint of brandy, and. three fpoonsful of orange flower-water; beat your butter to a cream, put in your fugar, beat the whites of your eggs half an hour, and mix them with your fugar and butter; then beat your yolks half an hour, and mix them with the re(l, which will take two hours beating, put in your flour a little before your oven is ready, and jufl before you put it into your hoop mix together lightly your currants and all your other ingredients, and bake it two hours in a quick oven.

Butier Caki.

TAKE a di(h of butter and beat it with your hahdft till it is like cream, two pounds of fine fugar beat and (ifted, three pounds of flour well dried, and mix the butter with twenty-four eggs leave out half the whites, and then beat all together for one hour; juft as you are going to put it into the oven, put in a quarter of an ounce of mace and a nutmeg beaten, a little fack and brandy and feeds or currants, as you pleafe.

Rice Cakes.

TAKE the yolks of fixteen eggs and beat them half an hour with a whifk put to them three quar ters of a pound of loaf fugar beat and lifted flne, and beat it well into the eggs; then put in half a pound of the flour of rice a Jittle orange flower-water and brandy, and the rinds of two lemons grated; then beat feven whites with 4 whifk for an hour, and beat all together for a quarter of an hour, then put them in fmall hoops, and bake them half an hour in a quick oven.

Mm . Cream

"

53Q C A K B S

Cream Cakes.

TAKE and beat the whites of nine eggs to a ftii froth, then ftir it gently with a (poon, left the froth ihould fall J to every white of an egg grate the rind of two lemons, fhake foftly in a fpoonful of doublerefined fugar beat and fifted fine; put a wet beet of paper on a tin, and with a fpoon drop the froth in littTe lumps on it at a fmall diftance from each other; &ft a quantity of fine pounded fugar over them, let them in the oven after bread is drawn, and mike che oven clofe up, and when the froth rifes they arc baked enough; as foon as they are coloured take them out, and lay two bottoms together, lay them on a fieve, and put them to dry in a cool oven. If you chufc, you may, before you clofe the hotionw together to dry, lay rafberry jam, or any' kind; of fweetmeats betMvecn them.

A fine Seed or Saffron Cake.

TAKE a quarter of a peck of fine flour, a pound and a half of frcfh butter, three ounces of carrawaffeeds, fix eggs beat well, a quarter of an ounaof cloves and mace beat together very fine, a little cinnamon, a pound of powder fugar, a fpoonful of rofewater, a pennyworth of tindturc of fafFron, a pint and. a half of yeaft, and a quart of new milk, mix it all together lightly with your hands thus: firft boil your milk and butter, then fkim off the butter, and mix with your flour and a little of the milk, ftir the ycafl into the refl, and flrain it, mix it with the flour, put in your feeds and fpice, rofe- water, faffron, fugar, and eggs, beat it all well up witk your hands lightly, and bake it in a hoop or patt well buttered j it will take an hour and a half w quick ovcn You may leave the feeds out if you choqfe it;

CAKES. 55r

Nuns Cake.

TAKE four pounds of fine flour and three pounds of double-refined fiigar beacen and fifced, mix them together, and dry them before the fire till you prepare the other ingredhrnts; take four pounds of buftef) be4t it with your hand till ic is as fine as cream; then bt thirty-five ieggs, leave out fixfieen whites, ftrB your eggs through a fieve to take ouc the tre9dles and beai ihem and the butter together till all pjpears like butter; tiien put in four large fpooosiul of rofe or orange-flower water, and beat ic again; then take your flour and fugar, with fix ounces of carr a way-feeds, and drew them in by degrees beating it up ali the time, and for two hours together, and put in a little tintSture of faflron to colour iti; butter your hoop, put it in, and bake it three hours in a nK)derate oven.

Pepper Cakes.

TAKE a gill of fack and a quarter of an ounce of whole white pepper, put it in and boil it together for a quarter of an hour, then ftrain out the pepper, and put in as much double-refined fugar as will make it like a pafte, then drop it, in what fliape you pleafe, on a tin plate, and let it dry itfeif.

Portugal Cakes.

MIX into a pound of fine flour a pound of loaf fugar pounded and fifced, then rub it into a pound of fweet frefh butter till it is thick, like grated bread, then put to it two fpoonsful of rofe- watery two of fack, ten eggs well whipt with a whifk, then mix into it eight ounces of currants, and mix all well together-, butter your fmall tin pans, fill them but half full, and bake them.

If they are made without currants they will keep half a year, add a pound of almonds blanched and

M m 2 beat

532 CAKE S.

beat With rofe-water as above, and leave out die fiour Thefe are another and better fort.

A. pretty Cake.

TAKE and dry five pounds of flour well, otie pound of fugar, half an ounce of mace, as much nutmeg beat very fine, and mix the fugar and fpkc in the flour, take twenty-two eggs, leave out fix of the whites, beat them well, atid put a pint of ale yeafl and the eggs into the flour; take two pounds and a halt of frefh butter, a pint and a half of cream, fet the cream and butter over the Are till the butter is melted, let it ftand till it is blood warm before you put it into the flour, fet it an hour bjr the fire to rife, then put in feven pounds of currants waflied, picked, rubbed, and plumped in half a pint of brandy,, and three quarters of a pound of candied peels cut fine; mix it welL up, putitio hoop, and bake it three hours in a well-heated oven.

Little fine Cakes.

TAKE and beat one pound of butter to a creaffli a pound and a quarter of flour, a pound of fioc fugar beat and fifted, a pound of currants clean walhed and picked, fix eggs, two whites leftom, and beat them fine; mix the flour, fugar, and gs by degrees into the butter, beat it all well with both hands. Ekher make it into little cakes, or bake it in t)ne

Sbrewjbury Cakes.

TAKE two pounds of flour, a pound of fugar finely fearced, and mix them together; (take out a quarter of a pound to roll them in) take four ' beat fine, four fpoonsful of cream and two fpoonsful of rofe-water, beat them well together, and mtf them with the flour into a pafle; roll them intothifl cakes, and bake them in a quick oven

J

CAKES. 533

Maudling Cakes.

TAKE a quarter of a peck of flour well dried before the fire, add two pounds of muctonfut tried and (trained clear oF and when it is a little cool mix it well with the flour, fbme fait and a vtxy little all.fpice beat fine; take half a pint of good yeafl:,. and put in half a pint of water, ftir it well together, ftrain it, and mix up your flour into a pafle of a moderate ftifiihers, (you mud: add as much cold water, as will make the pafte of a right order) and make it into caks about the thickaefs, and bignefs of an oat cake; have ready fome currants clean walhed and picked, ftrew fonne in the middle of your cakes between your dough, fo that none can be feeii till the cake is broke. You may leave the currants out if you do not chufe them.

hittte Plum Cakes.

TAKE two pounds of fine flour dried in the oven or before a great fire, and half a pound of fugar finely powdered, four yolks of eggs, tw6 whites, half a pound of butter waflied with rofe -water, fix fpoohsful of cream warmed, a pound and a half of currants unwaflied, but picked and rubbed very dean with a cloth, and mix all well together; then make them up into cakes, and bake them in a pretty hot oven, ana let them flrand half an hour till they are coloured on both fides $ then take down the oven lid and let them (land to foak. You mud rub the butter into the flour very well, then the eggs and cream, and then the currants.

Carraivay Cakes.

TAKE two pounds of fine flour and two pounds of coarfe loaf fugar well dried and fifted, (after the flour and fugar is fifced and weighed mix them together and put them in the bowl you intend to mix

M m J them

534 CAKES

them in) beat two pounds of freih butter till it u like cream, beat etl eighteen eggs, leave out eight whites, beat al) well tbgeth fdr ohe hduf, and put in four ounces of candied peel etft fide, Qx ounces of carraway-corhfits two fpoon&ful of rofe-water, a gM of fack, and by degrees mix in the difKfrent iogr dients as you beat it, nd keep cbnftamly beating it with your hand till your oven is ready, then put it irito your hoops (you tniift have three doubles of cap paper buttered in your hoops) and (ift fome fine fdgar over (heili; bake them one hour and a half in a moderate oven.

Sugar Cakes.

TAKE a pound and a half of fine flouTi ooe pound of cold butter, half a pouiid of fugar worl all thefe well together into a pafle, then coU it vidi the palms of your hands into round balls, and cut them with a thin knife into tliin cakes, fprinkle a lifttle fltur on a fheet of paper, and put them ooi prick them with a fork and bake them.

Almond Cakes.

TAKE a pound of Jordan almonds, blanch tbeio and beat them fine in a mortar,- wch a little oraog flower water to keep them from oiling, then take a pound and a quarter of fine fugar, boil it to a caody height, and then put in your aknonds; take two fiK lemons, grate ofiT the rind very thin, and put ss much juice as to make it of a quick tafte then poc it into your glafies, and fet it into your Hove, flimng them often, that they do not candy; when it is I Jjittle dried make it in little cakes on glais to dry.

XJxbridge Cakes.

TAKE a pound of fine flour, fcven pounds of currants, half a nutmeg, and four pounds of butl rub your butiei cold yery yell amongft the flour,

m

CAKES. 531

triix your currants well in the floUr, butter, and fea fbninfi;, and knead it with fo much good new yeaft as will make it into a pretty higji pafte; after it is kneaded well together let it ftand an hour to rife, and put about half a pound of pafte into a cake.

Bride Cake.

TAKE four pounds of fine flour Well dried, four pounds of frelh butrer, two pounds of loaf fugar, a quarter of an ounce of mace, the fame of nutmegs well beat and lifted, and to every pound of flour put eight eggs, four pouitds of currants well waihed and picked, and dry them before the fire till they are plump, blanch a pound of Jordan almonds, and cut them lengthways very thin, a pound of can died citron, the fame of candied orange, and the fame of candied lemon-peel, cut in thin flips, and half a pint of brandy; fird work your butter to a fine cream with your hand, then beat in your fugar a quarter of an hour, and beat the whites of your eggs to a fl:rong froth, and mix them with your fugar and butter i beat your yolks for half an hour with one hand, and mix them well with the reft; riien by degrees put in your flour, ihace, and nutmeg, and keep beating it till your oven is ready; put in the brandy, currants, and almonds Kghtly; tie three flieets of paper round the bottom of your hoop to keep it from running out, and rub it well with butter, then put in your cake, and lay your fweetmeats in three layers, with fome cake between every layer; as foon as it is rifen and coloured cover it with paper before your oven is clofed up, and bake it three hours. You may ice it or not, as you chufe, diregions being given for icing in the beginning of this chapter.

M m 4 T ruffian

53 CAKES.

Trujian Cakes.

DRY half a pound of fine flour well, a poood of fine fugar beaten and flftcd, fcven eggs, and bcu the whites and yolks feparately, the peels of two lemons grated fine, and the juice of one and a half, and a pound of alnoonds beat fine with rofe-wateri as fooQ as the whites are beat to a frotb pvt in the volks nd every thing elfe, except the flour, and beat them together for half an hour; beat in the 0our ju(t before you pt it into the oven.

Apricet Cakes.

TAKE a pound of nice ripe apricots, fcald wd peel them, take out the ftones, then beat them in a niortar to pulp boil half a pound of double-refiocd fugar with a fpoonful of water and fkim it well, then put in the pulp of your apricots, and fimmer them a quarter of an hour over a flow fire, (lirring them foftly all the time; then put it into fhallow flat glafles, and when cold turn them out on glafs platrsi put them in a Itove, apd turn them once a day till they arc dry.

ittce Cakes.

TAKE a pint of fyrup of quinces and two quarts of raiberries picked, bruifed, and rubl$ed through a coaric fieve, boil and clarify them together over a gentle fire, and as often as the fcum rifes fkim it off; then add a pound and a half of fugar beat and fifted, and as much more boiled to a candy height, and pour it in hot; boil all up together, then take it off ihe fire, keep it ftirring till it is nearly cold; then fpread it on plates, and cut it out in cakes of what ihfipe you like, -nd dry them in a ftovct

CAKES. sij

Orange Cakes.

TAKE fix fine Seville oranges with clear rinds and quarter them, boil them in two or three waters ttU they are tender and the bitternefs gone oflT, fkioi them, and lay them on a napkin to dry; take all the ikins and feeds out of the pulp with a knife, beac the peels fine in a mortar, put them to the pulpt weigh them and put rather more than their weight of double-refiqed fugar into a prefcrving-pan, with as much water as will diflblve it, boil it till it comes to fugar again, and then by degrees put in your orange-peels and pulps, ftir them well before you fee them on the fire, boil it very gently till it looks clear and thick, and then put them into (hallow fiat bottomed glafies, fet them in a ftove, and keep them in a confliant and moderate heat, and when they are candied at the top turn them out upon glafles.

Bath Cakes.

RUB a pound of frefh butter into a pound of flour, with a fpoonful of good yeaft warm, fome cream, and make it into a light pafte, tovtt ic over with a cloth, and iti ic before the fire to rife; when it is rifen, take four ounces of carra way-comfits, work part of them in, and llrew the reft on the tops make them into a round cake the fize of a French roll, and bake them on plates. They eat well hot for foreakfaft, or for tea in the afternoon.

Black Caps.

TAKE twelve large pippins, cut them in halves; take out the cores, place them on a tin plate as clofe a3 they can lay, with the Bat fide downwards; beac the white of an egg to a froth, rub ii over them, ihred fome lemon-peel very fine and ftrew over $bm fife doMble-rtfined fvigar over them, and bake

them

538 CAKES.

them half an hour; put them on a diib and fend them to table hoc.

Green Caps.

TAKE twelve large green codlings, green them?rt the fame thanner as for prefervlng; beat up tht vhite of an egg to a froth and rub over them, Cft fonne double-refined fugar over them; firft put them on a tin plate, put them in the oven till they look bright, and fparkte like froft; then take them out ind put thetn into the dilh you intend to fend them to tabfe on; pour a fine cuftard robnd them, ftic ftnall lowers on every apple, and ferve them up for i corner di(h at dinner or fupper.

Ginget'bread Cakes,

HUB one pound of butter into three pounds of flour, one pound of fugar, two dunces of ginger beat fine and fifted, anct a large nutmeg graced; then take a poudd of treacle, a gill of erean), nuke thi9m warm together, and make up the thread ftiffi foil it out, and make il into thin cakes, or cot it immd with a tea-cup or ghfs, or itiake it into nuts, 6r anjf form or (hape you pleafe, put it on OTca places and bake it in a flack oven.

Macaroon Cakes.

BLANCH a pound of fweet almonds and beat them fine in a mortar, with a little rofe- water to kcrp them from oiling; put to them a pocmd of doublet refined fugar beat and fifted i then beat the whitest Pg gg to a high froth and put them in, and beat them well together, and drop them on wafer-paper; lift fine fugar ovrHhem, and balc them in a lUck

l4m

C A K E S. 539

Lemon Btfctdts.

BEAT the yolks of ten eggs and the whites of five well together ythh four fpoonsful of orange flower water till they are of a high froth, then ut in a pound of double-refined fugar beat aad lifced, beat it one way for three quarters of an hour;, put in half a pound of Sour, and grate in the rind of two lemons, and put in the pulp of a fniall one, beat them well; butter your tin moulds and put it in life a litde fine fugar over them and put them in a quick oven, but do not flop the mouth up at firft for fear they ihould fcorch.

French Bifcults.

HAVE a pair of clean fcates, in one fcale put three new-laid eggs, in the other as nilicii dried flour, an equal weight with the eggs and baic ready as much powder fugar firft beat up the whites of tbe eggs well with whiik till they are of a fine frothy then whip in half an ounce of candied lemon-pecl cut thin and fine, then by degrees whip in the flour and fugar, then put in the yolks, and with a fpoon temper it well together; then flia7e your bifcuits on fine white paper with -a fpoon, and fift powder fugar over them bake them in a moderate oven, giving them a fine colour on the topi thn with a fine knife cut them off from the paper and put thetn in dry boxes for u(e.

Drop Bifduits

BEAT the yolks of ten and the whites of fia eggs well with a fpoonful of rofe- water for half ar hour, then put in three quarters of a pound of dou- ble-refincd fugar, whilk them well for half an liouii n)ore, and then add one ounce of carrawayieefd Vruiftd a litde, nd fix ounces of fine flour; itrhiflc

54, CAKES.

in yonr flour gently drop them on wafer-paper, and bake them m a moderate oven

Common Bifcuits.

TAKE eight eggs and beat them for half an hour, pm in a pound or fine fugar beat and fifted, with the rind of a femon grated, whiik it one hour, or till ic looks Itght; then whifk in a pound of flour and i Sctle rofe- water, fugar them over, and bake them ia tins or in papen

Sponge Bifcuits

BEAT the yolks of twelve eggs for half an hour, Aen put in a pound and a half of fine fugar beat and fifted whifk it wdl till you fee it rife in bubbles, en beat the whites to a flrong froth, and whKk them well with your fugar and yolks; beat in a pound of flour, with the rind of two lemons grated, butter your tin moulds, put them in, and fift fine powder fugar over them; put them in a hot oven, btic do not flop the mouth of it at firfl; they will take half an hour baking,

Spanijh Bifcuits.

BEAT the yolks of eight eggs for half an hoar, then beat in eight fpoonaful of fine fugar, beat the whites to a flrong froth, then beat them well with your yolks and fugar for half an hour; put in four fpoonsful of fine touv and a little lemon-pect grated i bake them on papers in a moderate oven.

Liht Wigs.

TAKE a pound and a half of flour, mix in it a pint of warm milk and a gill of ale yeafl cover it vp and fet it before the fire half an hour i take half a pound of fugar the fame of butter, work it ail into a pafte, and make it into wigs with as litde flour

as

HOGS PUDDINGS, &ۥ 541

ms poffible, and a few carraway-feeds; put them oa ovenplatcs, and bake them in a quick oven

Buns.

TAKE two pounds of fine flour, a pint of good ale yeaft, put a little fack in the yeali, and three eggs well beat, knead all thefe together, with a little warm milk, a little nutmeg, and a little fait, lay it before the fire till it rifes very light 5 then knead in a pound of frelh butter, and a pound of carraway comfits make them in what (hape you pleafe, put them on buttered paper, and bake them in a quick oven 4

CHAP. XXVIII.

HOGS PUDDINGS, SAUSAGES, &c.

Almond Hogs Puddings.

TAKE two pounds of beef-fuet or marrow fiired very fmall, a pound and a half of almonds blanched and beat very fine with rofe-water, one pound of grated bread, a pound and a quarter of fine fugar, a little fait, half an ounce of mace, nutmeg, and cinnamon together, twelve yolks of eggs, four whites, a pint of fack,. a pint and a half of thick cream, fome rofc or orange- flower water; boil the cream, tie the faffron in a bag, and dip it in the cream to colour it; firft beat your eggs very well, then ftir in your almonds, then the (pice, the fait, and fuet, and mix all your ingredients together; fill your guts but half full, put fome bits of citron in the guts as you fill them, tie them up, and boil them a quarter of an hour

Another

44 HOGS PUDDINGS, &c.

Another Way.

TAKE a pound of beef-marrow chopped fine, half a pound of fweet almonds blanched, and beat fine with a litdei orange fiower or rofc water; half i ppqnd of white bread grated 6qe, half a pound 4 f:urrants (rlean waihed and picked, a quarpr of a pound of fine fggar, a quarter of t ouncp of mna, isutmcg, and cinnamon together, of each an t quantity, apd blf a pint of Tack % ipix all wcllqigather with half a pint of good cream and the yolks of four eggs % fill your guts half full, tie theoi if, and boil them a quarter of an hour, and prick thfp as they boil, to keep the guts from breaking. Yoa may leave out the currant! fur a change, but tbco you muil add a quarter of a pound more of fugar.

A third Way.

HALF a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of fugar, a quarter of a pound of currants, the €rttdb pf a halfpenny roll grated fine, fix large pippins pared and chopped fin a giU of fack, or two fpooDSful of rofe- water, fix bitter almonds blanched aod IbieaC fine, the yolks of two eggs and one white aeat fine; mix all together, fill the guts better than kilf iuU and boil them a quarter of an hour.

Hogs PudSngs ivith Currants.

TAKE three pounds of grated bread to four pounds of beef fuet finely fhred, two pounds of car raiits clean picked and wafhed, cloves, mace, and cinnamon, of each a quarter of an ounce finely beaten, a little fait, a pound and a half of fogi pint of fack, a quart of cream, a little rofe- water, tweqty eggs well beaten, but half the whites $ mi all thefe well together, fill the guts half full, boil them a little and prick them as they boil, to keep the guts from breaking i take them op upon clean

cloths,

HOGS PUDDINGS, &c 541

cloths, then lay them on your dilh; or when you ule them boil them a few minutes, or eat them cold.

Black Puddings.

WHEN you kiU your hog, get a peck of grets boil them half an hour a water then drain them, and put them in a clean tub or large pan; lave two quarts of the bloody and keep ftirring it tiH the bloo4 is quite cold, then mix it with your gretSy and ftir them well together; ieaibn ic vrith a large fpoonful of falc, a quarter of aa ounce pf cloves, mace, and nutmeg together, an equal quantity of each, dry it, beat it well, and mix ic in; take a little winter favory, fweet marjoram, and thyme, pennyroyal ftripped of the (talks, and chopped very fine, juft enough to feafon them, and to give them a flavour, but no' more. The next day cake the leaf of the hog, and cut it into dice; fcrapc and waih the guts very clean, then tie one end, and begin to fill them; mix in the fat as you fill them; (be fure to put in a good deal of fat) fill the fkins three parts full, tie the other end, and make you puddings what length you pleafe; prick them with a pin, put them in a kettle of boiling water, and boi) them very foftly an hour; then take them out and ay chem on clean draw.

In Scotland they make a pudding with the blood ef a goofe: chop oflf the head and fave the bloody ftir it till it is cold, then mix it with grets, fprcc, ialt, and fweet herbs, according to their fancy, and ibme beef-fuet chopped; take the fkin off the neck, then pull out the wind-pipe and fat, fill the (kin, tic it at .both ends; fo make a pie of the giblets, and lay the pudding in the middle •, or you may leave the guts out if you pleafe.

Savohys

544 HOGS PUDDINGS, &:c.

Savoloys.

TAKE fix pounds of young pork, free it front lKne and (kin, and fait it, with one ounce of fait petre and a pound of commofa falc, for two daysi chop it very fine, put in three tea-fpoonsful of p€p- per, twelve fage leaves chopped fine, and a pound of grated bread; mix it well and fill the guts, and bake them half an hour in a (lack oven and eai them either hot or cold.

Fine Souages.

YOU muft take fix pounds of good pork, fitc from lkin,-gri(lle8, and fat, cut it fmall, and beat jt in a mortar till it is very fine; then (bred fix pounds of beef-fuet very fine and free from ikioi ihred it as fine as poflible; take a good deal of fage, wa(h it very clean, pick ofiT the leaves aod ihrcd it very fine; fpread your meat- on a cleio drcficr or table, then fiiake the fage all over, aboitf three large fpoonsful, (bred the thin rind of a mid- dling lemon very fine and throw over, with as manf fweet herbs, when (bred fine, as will fill a largi fpoon; grate two nutmegs over, throw over twotea fpoonsful of pepper, a large fpoonful of falti diCD throw over the fuer, and mix it all well togetben put it down clo(e in a pot; when you ufe them, roll them up with as much egg as will make them roll fmooth; make them the (ize of a fau(age, and 67 them in butter or good dripping; be fure it be bot before you put them in, and keep roUinc tbetn about; when they are thorough hot, and 01 a fiflo light brown, they are enough. You may chop this meat very fine, if you do not like it beat. Veal eats well done thus, or veal and pork together. Yott may clean fome guts and fill themi

Cmmt

HOGS PUDDINGS, &c. 545

Common Saufages.

TAKE three pounds of nice pork, fat and lean together, without Ikin or griftles, chop it as fine as poflible, feafon it with a tea-fpoonful of beaten pep per and two of fait, fome fage (bred fine, about three tca-fpoonsful, and mix it well together j have the guts very nicely cleaned, and fill them, or pu( them down in a por, fo roll them of what fize you pleafe, and fry ihcm. Beef makes very good fai fdges.

Oxford Saufages.

TAKE a pound of lean veal, a pound 6f young pork, fat and lean, free from flcin and griftle, a pound of beef fuet, chopped all fine together; put in half a pound of grated bread, half the peel of a Icnrjon llired fine, a nutmeg grated, fix fage leaves vrafhed and chopped very fine, a tea-fpoonful of pepper, and two of fait, fome thyme, favory, and marjoram ihred fine; mix it all well together and put it clofe down in a pan -, when you ufe it, roll it out the fize of a common faufage, and fry them in freCh butter of a fine brown, or broil them over a clear fire and fend them to table as hot as pofilble.

Bologna Saufages

TAKE a pound of bacon, fat and lean together a pound of beef a pound of veal, a pound of pork a pound of beef- fuet, cut them fmall, and chop them fine, take a fmall handful of fage, pick off the leaves, chop it fine with a few fweet herbs, feafon it pretty high with pepper and fait. You muft have a large gut, and fill it, then fet on a faucepan of water, when it boils put it in, ahd prick the gut for fear of burfting •, boil it foftly at) hour, then lay it on clean ftraw to dry.

N n Andouilks

546 P O T T I N G.

Andouilks or. Calves Chitterlings

TAKE Tome of the larged: calves guts, cleanfe them cue them in pieces proportionable to the length of the puddings you defign to make, and tie one end to thei'e pieces; then take fome bacon, with a calves udder and chaldron blanched, and cut it into dice or dices, put them into a (lew-pan, and feafon with fine fpice pounded a bay leaf, fomelalt, pepper, and fhallot cut frnall, and about half a pint of cream; tofs it up, take off the pan, and thicken your mixture with tour or five yolks of eggs, and fome crumbs of bread; then fill up your chitteriings with the ftufiing, keep it warm, tie the other eod with packthread, blanch and boil them like hogs chitterlings, let them grow cold in their own fiquof before you fervc them up; then boil them over a moderate fire, and fervc them up pretty hot. Tbcfc fort of andouilles or puddings muft be made io fummer, when hogs are leldom killed.

CHAP. XXIX.

POTTING.

Proper Rules to be obferved in Potting.

WHEN you intend to bake your meat, he before y5u fend it to the oven befurt to feafon it properly, and cover it with butter, tic i over with ftrotig paper, and bake it gently and well till it is tender. As foon as it comes from thcovcot drain all the butter and gravy frotn the meat, vA

arMf

POTTING 547

carefully pick out all the griftles and flcins, for if they are left in, when you cut the meat they will Ipoil the beauty of it, and the gravy would foon turn it four. Be fure to beat your feafoning very fine, and fift it through a fieve before you put it to your meat, and put it in by degrees as you beat the meat; and when you put your meat into pots prefs it well down, and never pour your clarified butter over your meat till it is quite cold. When you clarify buttei put it in a deep di(b, and fee it before the fire to melt and when it is melted drain it from the fettlings at the bottom, and if anyfcum rifes (kirn it off, or put it into a clean ftew-pan and melt it gently, kirn it, and pour it from the fettlings; (as it is the whey that is at the bottom, confequently it will turn your potted meats, birds, &c. four, and foon make them mould and (link) if you want to turn it whole out of your pots, butter them well before you put in the meat, and when you want to turn them out, put the pot a few minutes in hot water and then it will flip out.

Venifon

TAKE a piece of neck of venifon, or a (houlder, fat and lean together, take out the bones, lay it in a deep difh, and fprinkle it over with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, cover it over with butter, tie brown paper over it, and bake it till it is tender, when it comes out of the oven take it out of the liquor hot, lay it on a coarfe cloth to drain, take off all the (kin and griftles, beat it well in a marble mortar, fat and lean together, (kim off the butter of the gravy, and put in; feafon it with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait; when it is well beat put it down clofe in your pots; when cold pour clarified butter over it, and tie it down with paper.

N n a Bcf.

58

POTTING,

B?ef.

TAKE a piece of lean beef, about twelve poundsi and rub it well with one ounce of falc-petrc aod brown fugar, let it lay for twenty-four hours, ihcn wa(h it clean, and wipe it dry with a cloth, cut it in pieces, and put it into an earthen pan, juft covaic with water, feafon it with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, put a pound of frclh butter on the top, tie it over with coarfe paper, and bake it four hours-, when it comes out of the oven, take it out of the gravy, and lay it on a coaife cloth to drain; then pick out all the fmews and fkinSj and beat it well in a marble mortar, clarify a pound of frefh butter, and as you beat the beef, by degrees put in the butter, feafon it with beaten mace, doves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait to your palate; when it is well beat put it down hard in your pots, and pour clarified butter over it.

Beef like Venifon.

TAKE any quantity of the lean part of a buttock of beef you want, and to Civcry eight pounds of beef take four ounces of falt-pctre, four ounces of petrc-falt, a pint of white fait, and one ounce of fal prunella, beat all the falts well, mix them together, rub the (alts into the beef, and let it lie four days i turn it once a day then put it into an earthen pan, cover it with pump water and a little of its own brine, then bake it in an oven, with houfcoW bread, till it is as tender as a chicken; when it is taken out of the oven, take it out of the gravy to drain, take out all the finews and (kitis, and pound It in a marble mortar-, feafon it with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, clarify a pound of frcjth butter, and as you beat it mi)e the buner and fpices in; when it is well beat prefs it down clofe into your pots, and when it is cold cover it one inck

thick

POTTING. 549

tHick with clarifycd butter, and when the butter is cold lie it over with white paper, and it wiH keep a long while.

Tongues •

TAKE a neats tongue, rub it with a pound of cotnnf)on falt ono ounce of falt-petrej one of fal prunella, and half a pound of coarfe fugar mixed together; turn and rub it every day for one week; then take it out of the pickle, cut off the root, va(h it clean, and boil it till it is tender; then peel ic; then take your tongue and feafon it with beaten mace, cloves, nutaieg, pepper, and fait; then pus it in a pan, and melt butter enough to cover it U over, tie coarfe paper over it, and bake it one hour then take it out, let it (land to cool, then rub a little iVeih fpice on it, and when it is quite cold put it in a long potting-pot; when the butter is cold yoa balced it in, take it clean from the gravy and fct it in an earthen pan before the fire, and when it is melted pour it over the tongue; and when it is cold, clarify butter enough, and pour over it till it is one inch above the tongue

s

Tongue and Fowl.

TAKE and boil a pickled tongue, peel it, and cue off the root; take a large fowl and bone it, a goofe and bone it, a turkey and bone it; beat a quarter of an ounce of mace, the fame of cloves, one large nuitmeg, a fpoonful of pepper, mixed with a little fait, feafon the infide of the fowl well, and the tongue, put the rongue into the fowl; then feafon the goofe, and fill the goofe with the fowl and tongue, then fcrve the turkey the fame, and it will look nearly like whole; lay it in a pan that will juft hold it, and melt frefli butter enough to cover it fend it to the oven, and bake it two hours; when i(f is taken out of thtoven, take it out of the butter,

N n 3 and

I

550 POTTING.

and lay it on a coarfe cloth to drain till it is cold; and when the butter is cold, take it dean off the gravy, and lay it in a dirti before the fire to' melt; put your turkey, &c. into a pot, and pour the butter over it; when it is cold clarify fome norc better, and let it be one inch thick above the meat, and it will keep a long time; when you cut it cut it crofsays down through the middle, and it will look beautiful •, garnifli it with parfley, and it makes a pretty corner di(h for dinner, or fide difh for fappcr. You may leave out the turkey if you pleafe.

Hare.

HANG a hare up for four or five days, then cafe It, and cut it in quarters; put it in a pot, feafonit, with beaten cloves, mace, pepper, and fair, put 1 pound of butter over it, and bake it four hours in a gentle oven; when it is taken out of the oven pick it from the bones, and pound it well in a mortar with the butter that it was baked in, fkimmed clean off the gravy; fcaon it with beaten clovc5, mace, pepper, and fait to your palate, beat it till it is fine and fmooth, then put it down co€ into your potting-pots, and cover it over with clarified buttcrj tie it over with white paper.

Goofe.

PICK, draw, and bone a fine goofe, finge it, fca fon the infide with beaten mace, cloves, pepper, and fait, and fill it with force-meat, put it into a pan, and fprinkle fome of the feafoning over it; mck frefh butter enough to cover ir, tie it over with brown paper, and bake it for one hour and a half; when it is taken out of the oven take it out of the butter, and lay it on a coarfe cloth to drain till it is cold, and take the butter ckan off the gravy; wbca it is cold put it in a dlQi before (he fire to metr, pc

POTTING, 551

tlie goofe in a pot, pour the butter over itj and when it is cold clarify fonie frelh butter, and put it half an inch chick above the goofc.

Turkey.

PICK dra, and bone a fine turkey, bone a fowlj feafon the infide of the fowl and turkey wici beaten cloves, mace, nutmegs pepper, and fait, put the fowl into the turkey put it into a pan, and lea Ton it well with the above fcafoning, melt butter enough to cover ir, tic a paper, over, and bake it cwo hours; when it is taken out of thejffven take ic out of the butter, and lay ic on a coarfe cloth to drain till it is cold -, when the butter is cold, take it clean off the gravy, put it in a difti before, the fire to melt, put the turkey into a pan, pour the butter over it, and when it is cold clarify more butter, and put over ic half an inch chick.

Note. You may put a goofe and turkey together, bone them, lay ihem fiat open, and feafon them as above, and put the turkey in the goofe; then roll them up as collared beef very tight, and as fliort as you can, and bind it very fad with ftrong tape, bake it in a long pan, with plenty of butter, till ic is tender; then take it out of the hot liquor, and fee it by till next day; then unbind it, place ic in a pot, and pour clarified buccer over ic

Chickens or Pigeons.

PICK, draw, and cue off their legs, wipe them dry with a cloth, but do not wafli them, feafon chem, infide and our, with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, put them in a pan, and cover them with butter, bake them one hour; when they are taken out of the oven take them out of the butter, put them in potting-pots, pour the butter- clear trom the gravy and pour on them; when they are

N n 4 cold

552 POTTING.

cold chrify more frefb butter and put over, thca and tie them over with white paper.

Moor Game or Pbeafants.

PICK and draw your game, wipe them clean viih a cloth, iinge them, fealon them infide and put wdl with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and falc, break the breafl bones down as flat as you can, hf them in an earthen pan, cover them with butter, and bake them one hour; when they are taken out of the . oven, take them out of the gravy and butter, laj them on a coarfe cloth to drain till they are cok), then put them into pots breaft upwards, and cover them half an inch thick above the breads with chrtfied butter I when they are cold tic white paper over them.

Woodcocks or Snipes.

PICK your woodcocks or fnipes, draw out the trails, run their bills through their thighs, put (heir legs though each other, and put their feet upon their breads; fcafon them with beaten mace, pepper, aod lalt; put them into a deep pan, cover them with frefli butter, tie a paper over them, and bake them half an hour; when they arc taken out of the oven, take them out of the butter, put them in pots, and pour the butter from the fcttlings upon themj when they are cold, clarify more butter and poof over them; about half an inch above the brcatoj and tie white paper over them.

WbeaUars Larks &c.

PICK and draw them, finge them, fcafon tbcm infide and out with beaten clove, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, put them into a pan, cover ihem with butter, and bake them twenty minutes; oJ put them into a ftew-pan, cover them with butter, cover them clofe, and ftcw tfaem over a flow fire for

iwentjf

POTTING. 553

twenty ipiaiites) tei rake thcai out of the buttei;, put tbecn into ppc and ppur the butter from the fettlings over tbem; when they Sire cold cLarif more hMttr and ppr over thenou

Marble VeaL

TAKE a pickled tonpjue, and boil it till it is vecjr tender, peel it, cut it if thin flices, anj poup4 well in z, mortar, with a pound of frefh bgter and a Httl!e beaten mace, till it is lika paft; (Ijew if pounds of lean veaj, and beat it the fame way - thqa put fome veal into a large potting-pot, then fptpis tongue in lumps over the veal, (but dp not lay ihp tongue in any form but in lumps) fill your i nearly full with veal, prefs it very hard down, and pour clarified butter oyer it j and when you frnd ic to table cut ic acrofs in thin (lices, put it into a dib and garni (h it with curltd parfley. Mind nd keep it in a cool dry place, tied clofe with papr.

Savory Veal Cake.

TAKE fix pounds of lean veal, and flew it till It is very tender, pick the meat from the (kins, an4 beat it well in a mortar, with half a. pound of frefli butter, feafon it with beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg pepper, and fait-, butter a potting-pot, ancj prefs % down clofe in it, let it (land till next day, then pu;; the pot in hot water a few minutes, and it. will come out; then put it into a difli; work fome butter well with your hands in cold ipring water, put it over the cake, and ornament it with leaves and flowers, as your fancy leads you, and put a bird modelled x butter, or any thing you pleale at the. top.

Salmon.

TAKE a piece of fre(h falmon, fcale it, and wipe it clean with a cloth; let your piece or pieces be cut fo as it will lie neatly in your pot, feafon it with

cloves

554 P O T T I N G.

.cloves, ihtce, Jamaica pepper and black pepper beat fine mixed with falr a litile fal prunella bniifcd fine and rub the bone with it; feafon it with a little fpice, poor clarified butter over it till it is covered, and bake it well; when it is taken out of the oveO take it out carefully, and put it on a coarfc cloth to drain; when cold leafon it well, and lay it in the pots, and cover it with clarified butter.

Or this way: fcale and clean your ialmon, cot it down the back, dry it well with a cloth, and cut it as near the fliape of your pot as you can; take two nutmegs and one ounce of cloves and mace beaten, half an ounce of white pepper, and one of faltj then take out all the bones, and cut the jowl belovr the fins, and cut off the tail, feafon the fcaly fide firft, lay that at the bottom of your pot, then nib the feafoning on the other fide, cover it with a diib, and let it (land all night; put it in double, the fcaly fide top and bottom, before you put it in the poti

put fome butter at the bottom, and when it is io

put butter at the top, cover the pot with a ftiff

coarfe palle, and bake it three hours, if a large fifli;

if a fmall one, two hours; and when it is taken out

,of the oven, lee it Hand half an hour, then uncover

I it, and raife it up at one end, tha the gravy may

run out; then put a board or trencher, with a weight upon it, to prefs out the gravy j when the butter is cold take it off clear from the gravy, add fome more to ir, and put it in a pan before the fire; when it is melted pour it over the falmon, and whca it is cold tie paper over it, and keep it in a cool dry place. As to the feafoning, it muft be regulated according to your palate, more or lefsi and be furc that no ravy, or whey of the butter is put into your pots, as that will prevent its keeping long good. Note, In this manner you may pot carp, tcncbi

I or trout, and many oilier forts of filh

Piki



POTTING. 555

Pike.

TAKE and fcale it clean, cut off the head, fplit it and take out the chine bone; then drew all over the infide with bay fait and pepper roll it up round, and lay it in a pot, cover it with butter, and bake it an hour; then take it out and lay it on a coarfe:loth to drain; when it is cold put it into the pot, and cover it with clarified butter. You may ufe a little beaten cloves and mace, with the bay fait and pepper, if you like it.

Chars.

, THESE filh are peculiar to the lakes in Weftmoreland, and much admired, and are potted thu5: flcin, gut, and walh them clean, cut off the beads, ns, and tails, fcour them well with fait, and wipe them dry with a cloth; turn them round in round pottiog-pots, or lay them lengthways in a long potting-pot; firft feafon them with beaten cloves, mace, pepper, and fait, cover them with butter, and bake them half an hour in a quick oven; then take them out, and lay them on a coarfe cloth to drain; when they are cold feafon them afrelh, and lay them in your pots; then take the butter they were baked' in clean from the gravy of the fifh, put it in a difh before the fire to melt, and hen it is melted pour the clear butter over the filh, and when they are cold put a little more clarified butter half an inch thick over them, and tie them over with paper.

Lampreys.

SKIN them, citanfe them with fair, and wipe them dry with a cloth; feafon them with beaten mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, lay them in a pan, cq,ix them with clarified butter, and bake them one hourj when they are baked, order them (Jie fame as the chars.

Eels.

I

556 POTTING.

Eeb.

TAKE the largeft eels yoa cin U & got, and wa(h them cltan, fcour them with kit, and d them with a cloth i cut tliem in picsctis about four inches loog, feaibn them with beaten cloves, mace, ntMiBf g, pepper, falt and a little fal prunella beat igioej lay them in a pan, cover them with clarified buuer, and bake them half an hour in a quick o?co; (if a flow oven longer, but that mufl: be detercniixd according to the fize of your eels) when they arc baked, take them out of the butter with a fork, and lay them on a coarfe cloch to drain; when they arc cold, feafon them again with the fame feafoning, only leave out the fal prunella, lay chem in your poo dofe; then take the butter clean off the gravy tiiey were baked in, and fet it in a difh before the fire; when it i& melted pour the clear butter over the eels; and when it is cold, clarify a little moce bttet and put over it; then tie them down with paper. You ma bone the eeis if you chufe it but then do not put m any fal prunella.

Lobjiers.

TAKE a fine live lobfter, or two middUng-fized ones, put a fkewer in the vent to prevent any water getting in and boil it for three quarters- of an hour; when It is done,, pick all the meat out- of the bodf, cjaws, aiKi tail, (be fure to put in the fpawn if 70U have any) and beat it to a pafte in a oaarble niorcir; melt a quarter of a pound of good frefli butter and put in it, feafon it with beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and flit to your palate; when it is beat fine put it down as clofc as you can in your pots ', clarify fome butler and put over it a quarter of an inch thick; wten- is is cold tie- it over with paper. Of you nna? pai the nieat in as whole- as you

can i take it out of the tailj daws, and body, Uy

it

POTTING SS7

it as cloTe as jeu can togecher, leafon it with beaten cloves mace, nutmeg, pepper and lalt, and pour clan6ed butter over it.

Note. You may pot crabs, or any other krgc fticll-fi(h in the fame manner. •



LITTLE COLD DISHES.

Salamungundj .

TAKE two pickled herrings and bone them, a handful of parfley picked and waflied clean, the bread of a rOaded chicken or fowl, and the legs feparate, (take off the (kin of tlie chicken or fowl) four eggs boiled hard, chop all feparate very fine; that is the herrings by themfclves, the whites and yolks of eggs, the breafl: and legs of the chicken or ibwl, and the parfley by themfelvcs •, fcrape or chop fome boiled lean ham very fine, or fonie Dutch or hung beef, turn a fmall China difli bottom uppermoft in another China dilh, juA to fie it, then take a tca-fpoon and lay every thing feparate in (hapes; that is, a fhape of parfley, then of herrings, then of eggs, and fo on till you have covered your dilh, and all your ingredients are ufcd j garnifli the edge of your difh with curled parfley or flowers; or in. winter chop a few capers and anchovies fine, and garnifli it with them.

Or in this manner: if you want it for a middle difl), take a round difl), and turn a fmall China bafun upflde down in it, then with a tea-fpoon lay your diflerent things in ftiapes on it; pur a fprig of, myrtle, or a bunch of flowers in the middle, and garnifli as before.

You may ufe cold veal, beef, mutton, or pork boiled, beet-root, apples, onions, cellery, or any thing you fancy chopped fine the more different

colours

5s8 POTTING.

colours you have the better it looks, as it is more fancy than otherwife which mud dircft you. Ic is impoflible for me to direft fo minutely as I could wifh.

Dutch or Hung Beef,

BOIL a piece of Dutch orhung beef, and when it is cold fcrape it fine or grate it with a gracer, put it in a fmall difh heaped up as high as you cu, adid garnifh it with curled parfley or flowers.

Dutch or Hung Beef on Tops and Bottom.

TOPS and bottoms are a kind of bifcuic bought at the bifcdit-bakers: Take and boil a piece of Dutch or hung beef, and fcrape or grate it, fplit the tops and bottoms in two, and butter tbem heap the beef on them, and pile them up in a difh as high as you can -, flick curled parfley in them, afld garnifli the edge of the dilh with curled parfley of flowers. It is a pretty corner dilh for fupper.

Dutch or Britijh Herrings,

TAKE and wafh them, peel the Ikins off and pick the flcfli from the bones; peel them in fmall long pieces, lay them in a difh, and garnifli with curleci parfley.

Ham.

TAKE a piece of lean boiled ham, and fcrape or grate it, heap it up high in a fmall difh, and ffXnifb it with curled parfley

CHAP.

559

rl

' CHAP. XXX.

CARVING.



To cut up a Turkey

RAISE the leg, open the joint, but be fure not to take oflT the leg; lace down both fides of the breaft, and open the pinion of the bread, but do not take it off, raifc the merry. thouglit between the breaft-bone and the top, raifc the brawn, and turn it outward on both fides, (but be careful not to cut it off nor break it) divide the wing pinions from chc joint next the body, and ftick each pinion where the brawn was turned out, cut off the flilrp end of the pinion, and the middle piece will fit the place exaftly.

A buftard, capon, or pheafant, is cut up in the fame manner.

To rear a Goofe.

CUT off both legs in the maimer of (houlders of lamb, take off the belly- piece clofe to the extremity of the bread, lace the gopfe down both fides of the bread, about half an inch from the flarp bone divide the pinions and the flefh fird laced with your knife, which mud be raifed from the bone, and taken off with the. pinion ftom the body; then cut off the merry-thought, and cue another (lice from the bread-bone quite through; ladly, turn up the carcafe, cutting it afunder, the back above the loin bones.

z COLLARING fiar yoo can get and two pounds of . common fiilt, all mixed well cogeUter trn it every day, and rob ic with the brine for a fortnight; then take it out of the pickle, wa(h ic wel, ad wipe ic dry wkb a cloth; take a quarter of an ounce of cloves, the fame of mace, twelve corns of al-fpice, one nutmeg, and beat them fine, mix them with a fpoonfM ef pepper, a large hand£u) of parfley and all forts of fweet herbs chopped fine, and a little lemon-pcd; fprinkle them a)l over the beef, and roll it upas tight as you can j put a coarfe cloth round it, tie it round tight with beggars tape, land boil it in a large copper of water J if large, fix hours; if fmall, five? then take it out, and fre(h tit each end with packthread, put it in a prefs, (if you have no prci's puc K between two boards, with a Urgp weight apon ic, till it is cold) then take it oujt of the binding, cut ic acrofs in thin dices, put it in a dilb d gariiHh ith curled parfley.

Brtaji kf VeaU

TAKE a fine large breaft of veal, bdne it, vA take off the outfide &in, beat it wefl with t rdHing- j pin, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and Ibtjy over it a quarter of an ounce of beaten cloves and mace, half a nutmeg, a little pepper and fair, bm fweet herbs and parfley ihred fine, and a little lemonpeel; then roll it- up tight, wrap it in a clean clorli, bind it round with beggats tapr, and boil it two hours and a half in plenty of water; (obfcrve tto your watr boils before yu jut t in) ' done take it our, tie it at each end afreih with pclcthread, and prefs it in the fiime manner as the beef; when it is cold take it out of the cloth, andputic In a pickle made as follows: to a pint of ialt m' water pot half a piat of good vinegar; wbeflfw lfe it take k out and cut ic acrofs lay it inKbH and garnifli ic with parfley.

C O L L A R I N?• 6j

Galkntine of a Breaji of Veal.

TAKE a fine large bread of veal, bone it, and take oflf the outfide fkinj beat it well whh a rolling- pin, rub it over with the ydk of an egg, feafoo it with pepper, fait, beaten cloves and mace; then make aumlcts of different colours thus: take the yolks of twenty-four eggs in three feparate parcels beat them well,, colour one green with the juice of fpinacb, another with cochineal boiled in a little brandy, and the other plain; rub three foup plates with a little fwcet oil, and put them in feparatelys have a broad ftewpart with fomc water boiling, fufficient to come up to the edge of the plate, put in the plates, cover them over with three plates, and let them boil gently till the aumlets are done; then take them out, turn them out of the plates, cut them acrofs in flips, and lay them on the veal, firft gren; then red, then yellow, till you have covered the veal; then roll it up tight, put a cloth tight round it, bind it well with a fillet, and boil it in plenty of water for two hours and a half; then take it up, tie the ends clofe with packthread, and prefs it the fame as collared beef; when it is cold untie it, cut it in fliers acrofs, lay it in a di(b, and garnilh with curled parfley.

Venifon.

TAKE a bread and neck of venifon together bone it, and take off the (kin and fmews, cut it into three fquare collars, and lard it with fat bacon ieafon it with beaten mace; cloves, nutmeg; pepper fait, and fweet herbs chopped fine; roll up your collars tight, tie them clofe with coarfe tape, piK them into deep pots, fprinklc fome of the leafoning over them with frefh butter and fome bay-leaves, And over all fomc beef-fuet fhred fine; then put a coarfe pafte over your pots, and bake them four or

O o a five

564 COLLARING.

five hours; then take them out of the oven, and let them (land a little; take out your venifon, and let it drain well from the gravy, add more butter to the fat, and fet it over a gentle fire to clarify; then take it off, let it ftand a little, and Ikim it well; have pots ready to hold each collar, put them in, drew a little of the fame feafoning over them, and cover the venifon with your clarified butter and fat, but befurtit is one inch above the venifon; when it is thoroughly cold tie it down with double paper, and lay a clean tile on the top; when you want to ufe a pot, pot it a minute or two in boiling water, and ii will turnout whole; put it in a dilh, and (lick it round with bayleaves, with a fprig of myrtle at the top,

Calfs Head.

TAKE a calPs head with the Ikin on, and fcald the hair ofF, rip it down the face, and take the fkia and meat clean off the bones, fteep it in warm milk till it is white; then lay it flat, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and ftrew over it beaten cloves, mace, pepper, fait, fwect herbs and a handful of parfley chopped fine, two fcore of oyftcrs blanched and chopped fine, half a pound of beef-marrow chopped fmall, and lay them all in the inlide of the fkin -, cut off the ears, cut them open, and Jay them flat on the thin part -, roll it up tight, (but begin at the thin end firft) bind it hard with a fillet, wrap it in a clean cloth, and boil it gently for four hours j when it is done tie it tight at each end, and prefs it the fame as beef 5 when cold put it in a pickle, the fame as a breaft of veal, and when you ufe it cut it acrofs, put the dices in a diih, and garniOi with curled parfley.

KILL a fine young roafting pig, fcald off the bair and draw out the intrails, wafh it clean, and with 1

Iharp

COLLARING. sS

fharp knife rip it dowji the belly, and take out all the bones, rub it over with the yolks of eggs, and feafon it with beaten cloves, mace, pepper, fait, and a few fage-leaves chopped fine; make aumlets the fame as for a breaft of veal in gallcntine, put them on in the fame manner, roll it up tight, put it in a cloth, bind it with a fillet and boil it two hours in plenty of foft water; put into the water half a pint of vinegar, a bundle of fweet herbs, a handful of fait, and when the water, &c. boilsputitin; when it is done take it out, and tie it afrefli at each end with packthread; when it is cold put it into an earthen pan, with the liquor it was boiled in; when you want to life it take it out, cut it acrofs in thin (lices, put it in a difh, and garnifli with curled parfley.

Salmon.

TAKE a fide of falmon, cut ofi about a pound of the tail, w"a(h your large piece very well, dry it with a cloth, and rub it over with yolks of eggs; theii make a force-meat with the remains of the tail you cut off, with about a fcore of oyilers parboiled, the meat of a lobfter, the yolks of four eggs boiled hard, fix anchovies, a handful of fweet herbs and parfley chopped fine; feafon all thefe with beaten cloves, mace, pepper and fait, put in a handful of grated bread, mix it up with the yolks of fix eggs into a pafte, lay it over the falmon, roll it up tight, roll a cloth round it, and bind it with broad tape; then boil it in water, falt and vinegar, a bunch of fweet hcbs, fliced ginger, and nutmeg -, let it boil gently for two hours; when it is done take it up, tie both ends afrelh with packthread, put it into your foufingpan, and whn the liquor is cold put it to your falmon, and keep it covered till you want to ufe it; then take it out, cut it in flices, put it into a difli; and garniftiwith parfley.

O o 3 Eels.

566 SALTING AND SOUSING.

Eels.

TAKE as many of the Jargcft eels you can get as you want fkin chem, but do not open the bellLes, flic them down the back, cut off the beads, and cue out the bones take out the guts, wipe the eels dcy with a cloth, rub the infide over with the yolks of eggs, and drew over thetn beaten cloves, mace, nut meg, pepper and fair, all forts of fweet herbs and plenty of parfley (bred fine, begin at the tail-eod, and roll theoi up tight, roll a cloth round theno, and tie it tight at each end; have a faucepan of water boiling, with half a pint of vinegar, one ounce of alU fpice, and a bundle of fweet herbs i boil them according to the fize of your eels till they are tender; then take them out, and when the liquor is cold put them into an earthen pan, and pour the liquor over them; when you want to ufe them take them out, put them in difh, either whole or cut in flicesj and gamifc with parfley.

CHAP. XXXIL

SALTING AND SOUSING.

Pork Hams

AFTER your hog is killed cut the leg and part of the hind-loin together cut it handfomc for a ham; then rub it well with common fait, and jet it lay on a board twenty- four hours; then fot every ham take four ounces of bay-falt, two duoca of falt-petrc, two ounces of fal prunellay beat them

fine

SALTING ANP SOUSING. 67

fine, and mix theiu with half a poutfid of coarfe fogar and two. pounds of common fait; rub the hama well with it and lay them in a falcing-pan, or hollow tray, and turn and rub them with the brine every day for a fortnight 1 then take thern our, and wipe them dry with a cloth, and fmoke them with a faw-duft fire, with three or four handsful of juniper berries in it, till they are thoroughly dry j then hang them in a cold dry place, but be fure you do not let them touch againft a wall, nor againft one another In this manner you may cure neats tongues, and either fmoke them, or boil them out of the pickle.

Beef Hams.

TAKE the leg of a fat but fmall Scotch or Welch ox, and cut it ham fafhion; take four ounces of bay-falt, two ounces of falt-petre, and two ounces of fal prunella, beat them fine, and mix them with half a pound of coarfe ftigar, two pounds of common fait, and a handful of juniper berries bruifcd; (this quantity, for about fifteen pounds weight, and fo on accordingly) rub it well with the ingredients, and turn it every day for a month; then take it our, and rub it with bran or faw-duft, dry it the fame as pork hams, and then hatig it in a coal dry place; you may cut a piece off to boil, cr cot it in rafliers, as you want to ufe it, either as Dutch beef, or like ham, with poached eggs, or boil it altogether, by obferving the direAions given for boiling hams.

Fieal Hams.

TAKE a leg and part of a loin of veal together, and cut it like a ham; take four ounces of bay-falt, two ounces of falt-petre, two ounces of fal prunellaj and a handful of juniper berries, all bruiled fine; mix them with half a pound of coarfe fugar and a pound of common fait; rub the ham well, and lay

4 it

568 SALTING and SOUSING.

it ii a hollow tray, with the back-Hde downwards turn it, and rub it well with the pickle every day for a fortnight; then dry it the fame as pork hams. Yoii may boil it, or parboil and roaft it, which yod plcafe. This pickle will be fine to cure pork in.

Mutton Hams.

TAKE a hind quarter of fat mutton, cut it like ham, and cure it the fame as a veal ham; then boil K, cut it out in rafters as you warrt it, and juft warm theni through on a gridiron. A leg of mmcon may be pickled in the lame manner., .

Tongues.

TAKE two fine neats tongues, cut ofi the roots, and cut a nick in the under-fide, wafli them clean, and dry them with a cloth i then rub them with common fait, and lay rhem on a board all night the next day take two ounces of bayfalt, two ounces of fak-petre, one of fal prunella, and a handful of juniper berries, all bruifed fine; mix them with a quarter of a pound of coarfe fugar and one pound of common fait; rub them well with the ingjdients, put them in a long pan and turn and rub them with the pickle every day for a fortnight; then either dry them, or dreis them out of the pickle.

Dutch Beef.

TAKE the lean part of a fine buttock of beef, rub it well wich coarfe fugar, and let it lay in a pan or tray two or three hours, turning and rubbing it two or three times j then take half a pound of bay. fait, two ounces of falt-petre, two of fal prunella, a handful of juniper berries bruifed fine, and a pound of common fait; rub it well with them, and turn and rub it with the pickle for a fortnight j then roll it tight in a coarfe cloth, put it in a chcefe-prcfs a day and night, apd then hang it to dry in a wide cnimney whea

yQtt



'

SALTING AND SOUSING. 569

you boil ic put it in a cloth, and it will eat as fine as Dutch beef.

TorkjJnre Hung Beef.

TAKE a buttock or ribs of beef, (cut the buttock in two) take half a pound of bay fait, four ounces of falt-petre, four ounces of fal prunella, and two handstul of juniper berries all bruifed fine; mix th(ni with a pound of coarfe fugar and three pounds of common fait, (this will ferve for twenty pounds •weight) rub the beef well with the ingredients, lay it in a hollow tray or pan, and turn and rub it every day for a fortnight with the pickle then take it out, dry it with a cloth, and hang it up to the kitchen cieling, or in a chimney where there is not too grea.t a fire, to dry; then boil it as you want it, or cut it in rafhers, and broil it. You may, before you broU jr, dip it in warm water, and it will eat ine.

Bacon.

IN making of bacon, different parts of England have different methods, as for inftance, Hampfliire, Wiltlhire, and Berkfhire, &c. &c, they always finge their hogs, and never cut the hams o(F, only cut off -the chine and fpare-ribs; in Yorkftiire and the Northern counties they fcald all the hogs, becauic they cut off the hams, fpare-ribs, and chine, and then afterwards fait them thus: rub them well with common fait, and lay it on a board, for the firft brine to run away, for twenty-four hours; then tak'e for every fide of forty or fifty pounds a pound of bay-fak, a pound of falt-petre, two ounces of fal prunella bruifed fine, and mixed with four pounds of common fait; rub your pork well with the fair, and put'it in your faking pans at full length; turn nd ftib it with the brine every day for a fortnight '• hen take it out, llrew it all over with bran- or faw

570 SALTING AKo aOUSINa

duft and hasg it ii a wood fmoke till it is dry thea hang it in a cool, dry place, but take care it doa not touch the wall, as that will make it fweat and Ipoil it.

WefipbaUa Bacan.

TAKE the fide of a fine hog, and make the following pickle: take a gallon of pump water, tw6 pounds of bay-falty the lame of white fah, a pound of petre-falt, a quarter of a pound of falt-petrc, a pound of coarfe fugar, and one ounce of focho tied in a rag; boil thefe all well together for half an hour, and let it ftand tiH it is cold; then put in the pork) and let it lay in the piekle for a fortnight; then cake out the pork, rub it over with faw-duft and dry it the fame as hams.

Note. You may make Weftphalia hams the (ame way; or you may piekle tongues in the &me pickfe, only mind to put them in pump water for fix or eight hours, wafh them well out, and dry them with a cloth before you put them in the pickle.

Pickled Pork.

AS many people have various ways in pickltiig pork, it is almoft impoffible to give dirediona for pickling it fome people love ic pickled with pkifl lalt, legs efpecially; others in this nianoer: have a tub, and lay a layer of falc at the bottom; thea mix one-third of falc petre beaten with two-tbirdt of white fait i cut your pork in pieces rub it wcH with the fait, and lay ic clofe in the tub, with a layer of fall between every layer of pork till the tub if full; than have a cover, juft large enough to fit the iofide of the tub, put it on, and lay a gieac weight at I he cop, and as the fak melts it will keep ic cfefej when you want to ufe it take a piece ouc and mind to put the cover on again, and it will keef good a

long lime

Sbam

iWV

SALTING AND SOUSING. 571

Sham Brawn.

TAKE the bcUy-piccc and head of a young porker rub it well with falt-petre kt it lay thtee or four days, and iva(h it clean; boil the head take ofiF all he meat, and cut it in jieces.; have four neacs feet boiled tender take out the bones, cue the fleih in thin dices, mix it with the head, lay it in the belly-piece, roll it up tight, bind it round with a (beet of tin, and boil ic four hours; take it up, and fet ic on one end, put a trencher on it within the tin, and a large weight upon the trencher, and let it (land all night; in the morning take it our, and bind it with a fillet, put it in fpring water and fait, and it will be fit for ufe: when you ufe it, cut it in dices like brawn, and garnidi it with parfley. Obfcrve to change the pickle every four or five days, and it will keep a long time.

A Hurkey foufed in Imitation of Sturgeon .

YOU muft take a fine large turkey, drefs it very clean, dry and bone it, and then tie ic up as you do fiurgeon; put it into the pot you boil it in one quart of white wine, one quart of water, one quart of fiood vinegar, and a very large handful of fait; let It boil ikim it well, and then put in the turkey; when it is enough take it out, tie ic tighter, and let the liquor boil a little longer; (and if you think the pickle wants more vinegar or fait, add it) when it is cold, pour it upon the turkey, and it will keep fome months, covering it clofe from the air, and keeping it in a dr, cool place. Eat it with oil, vine gar, and fugar, jud: as you like it. Some admire it more than fturgeoa. It looks pretty covered with fennel for a fide didi.

Tigs

572 SALTING and SOUSING.

Pigs Feet and Earsfoufed.

AFTER you Have cleaned your pigs feet and cars, boil them cilt they are tender; then boil as much I'pring water, with fait and iqoegar in it, as will cover them; when both are cold, put the feet and ears iri a pan, and pour the pickle over them; and when you ufe them, take thern out, fplit them in two, aitd lay them in a di(b; chop fome green pariley and fhallot fine, mix it with oil and vinegar, and a fpoontul of muftard, and pour over them-, QT put them into a batter, and fry them, with butter and muftard in a boat

J Mackrel Soufed.

' PUT fome fpring water into a fifli-kettle, with a handful of fait, half a pint of vinegar, and a few bay-leaves, and make it boil; then put in your mackrel, (oblirv? they arc covered with the liquor) and boil them twenty minutes very gently, then take them out, put them in a long pan, and pour the liquor over them; and when they are cold, put fhcm in a difli, with fome of the liquor, and gar nilh. with green. fenneU

CHAR

m

I 573 '

CHAP. XXXIII.

P I C K L I K G.

•• r

• m t

Proper Rules to be ohferved'in Pickling.

AS pickles are a very necflfary artirle in all families, it is reouifite that every houfe keeper fhould malce her own, and not be obliged to buy them at (hops, where they are often badly prepared, by- putting in pernicious ingredients t( pleafe the eye. Stone jars, well glazed, are beft for all kinds of pjckles to be kept in they arc, to be fure, cxpenfive at firft, but, with care, they will lad many years, and in the end, be found cheaper than earthen veffels; ay it has, by experience, been founds that fait and vinegar will penetrate tllrough common earthen veffels., and leave the pickks lry, efpcciall jr when put in. hot. -When you take out any pickles never put your hands in, but mAkc ufe of a woodeil fpoon kept for that purpofe, otherwife your pickles will fpoil foon; aitd always take care that they are covered with vinegar, and tie them down dole alter you take any out; by this method, . and obferving the different receipts, you can never err. As yincr gar is the grand menftruum for all kinds of pickles, ic will be proper to give directions for making it.

White Wine Vinegar.

AS this vinegar, by the name, is thought to be made from, white wine only,, it is proper to give dir regions for making it: when you brew in the m(ntb of March or April, take as much fweet wort.o jh€ firft running as will ferve you the year, boil it without hops for half an hour, and then put it in a

cooler y

574 PICKLING.

cooler; put Ibme good yraft upon ic, and work it well i when it is done workings break the yeaft into it, and put it into a caflc, but mind to fill the calk, and (et it in a place where the fun has full power on it; put DO bung in the bunghole but pur a tile over it at night, and when it rains; (but when it is fine take the tile off) let it (land till it is quite (bur, which will be in the beginning of September; then draw it off from the fettlings into another calk, let it (land tilt it is fine, then draw it of for ufe.

If you have any white wine that is tart put it in a caik, and treat it in the fame manner; or cyder may be done the fame way i a caflc of ale turned four makes ale vinegar in the fame manner; but none of thefe are fit for pickles to keep long, except the firil white wine vinegar.

Sugar Vinegar.

IN the month of March or April make this?ioc' gar as follows: to erery galkn of fpring water yoii ufe add a pound of coarfe Lifbon fugar boil it, and keepfkimming it, as lortg as the fcum will rife; then pour it into a cooler, and when it is aa cold as beer to work, toad a large piece of bread, and nib it oyer with good yeaft, and let it work till it has done working; then beat the yeaO: into it. put it in a traflc, and let it in a piaee where the rays o the fua have full power on it; put a tile over the bunghok when it rains and every night, but rn the daytime, when it is fine waether, take it off; and when you find it is four enough, which will be in the month tf Augufti (but if it is not four enough let it Aand till it is) then draw it off, put it into a clean caft Md thmw in a handful or ifmglafs; let it ftasd

till it is fine, then draw it of for ufe

EUkr



P I; C.K L I N G. S7$

- EJer Vinegar.

TAKE two pounds of the pips of clder-flowcrSt and put them in a. Hone jao with two gallons o£ white wine vinegar-, let thc.m ftcep, and. ftir theiq every day for a fortnight; then ftrain the vinegar from the flowers,prefs them clofe, and let ic ftand to fetde; then pour it from the fctrlings and put a piece of filtering paper in a funnel, and filter ic through then put it In pint bottles, cork ix clofc and keep it for ufe.

tarragon Vinegar.

PICK the leaves off the ftalks of green tarragon, juft before it goes intq bloom, artd put a pound weight to every gallon of white wine vinegar, and treat it in the fame manner as elder vinegar.

Wainuts Green

TAKE the largeft and cleareft walnuts you can get, pare them a$ thin as you can; have a tub of Ipring watel- (landing by you, and throw them in as yoU pare them j put into the water a poimd of bayfak let them lay in 'the water iwcnty-fbur hours. and then take them out; then put them into a ftbne jar, and between every layer of walnuts lay a layer of vine-leaves, and at the bottom -and top fill it up ivith cold vinegar, and let them ftand all night) then pour that vinegar from them into a copper with a pound of bay-falt, fet it on the fire, let it boil, then pour it hot on your nuts, tie them' oveir ivith a woollen doth, and let tlHsm nd h week) fcen pour that pickle ftway, rub your ntits clcaA with a piece of flannel, then put them again into your jir with, Vine-kavefr as above, and boil frcfh vinegar J put into your pot, to every gallon of vinegar, a Amnieg (Iked, cut four large racs of ginger, at %uatttr Mf ftfl dunce of mace the lame of cloves, a 3 quarter

576 PICKLING.

quarter of an ounce of whole black pqper, and the fame of Ordingal pepper; then pour your vine gar boiling hot on your walnuts, and cover tbetn with a woolen cloth; let them ftand three or four days, fo do two or three times; when coldj put in half a pint of muftand-feed, a large flick of horfe raddifl) diced, tie them down clofe with a bladder, and then wirh a leather: they will be (it to eac in a fortnight; take a large onion, (tick the cloves in it, and lay it in the middle of the pot If you pickle them for keeping, do not boil your vinegar; but then they will not be fit to eat under fix months; and the next year you may boil the pickle this way. 7hcy will keep two or three years good and firm.

Walnuts White.

TAKE the largeft nuts you can get, juft before the fhell begins to turn, pare them very thin till the white appears, and throw them into fpring water .with a handful of fajt as- you pare them; let them ftand in- that water fix hours, lay on them a thin board to keep them under the water; then fet a (lew-pan on a charcoal fire, with clean water take your nuts out of the other water, and put them into the flew'pan; let them fimmer, but not boil, four or five minutes; then have ready by you a pan of fpring water, with a handful of white fait in it, and fiir it with your hand till the fait is melted; then take your nuts out of the ftew-pan with a wooden ladle, and put them into the cold water and fait; let them ftand a ijyarter of an hour, and lay the board on them as before (if they are not kept OLinder the liquor they will, turn black) then lay than pn a cloth, and cover them with another to dry; then carefully wipe them with a (oft cloth, put them into your jar or glafs, with fome blades of mace, jand nutmeg fliced thin; mix the fpice between yoK

nuts,



P I 'C K LI N G S77

nuts, and pour diftillcd vinegar over them i firft let your glafs be full of nuts, pour mutton fat over them, and tic a bladder and then a leather over them

• Walnuts Black.

YOU muft take large- full grown nuts, at their full growth, before the.y are hard, lay them in fait and water, and let them lay two days; then (hifc them into freQi water and let them lay two days longer; then fhift them again, and let them lay three days; then take them out of the water, and put them into your pick)ing-jar •, when the jar ia half full, put in a large onion ftuck with cloves; to a hundred of walnuts put in half a pint of mullardfeed a quarter of an ounce of mace, half an ounce of black pepper, half an ounce of allfpice, fix bay. Jeaves, and a flick of horfe-radi(h j then fill your jar, aind pour boiling vinegar over them, cover them with a plate, and when they are cold tie therh down with a bladder and leather, and they will be fie to cat in two or three months. The next year, if any remain, boil upour vinegar again, and (kim it when cold, pour it over your walnuts This is by much the beft pickle for ufe, therefore you may add more vinegar to it, what quantity you plcafe If you pickle a great many walnuts, and eat them faft, make your pickle for a hundred or two, the reft keep in a ftroog brine of fait and water, boiled till it will bear an egg; and as your pots empty fill them up with thofe in the fait and water. Take care they are covered wjth pickle.

In the fame manacr you may pickle a fmaller quantity, but if youcan get rape vinegar, ufe that inftead of fait and water, treat them thus: put your nuts into the jar you intend to pickle them in, throw in a good handful of fait, and fill the pot with rape

P p Vinegar,



578 PICKLING.

vinegar cover ic clofe and let them Hand a fditniit; then pour them out of the por whipe ic clean, a&d jufl: rub the nuts with a coarfe cloth; then put tliem in the jar with the pickle as above. If you have the beft fugar vinegar of your ow makiog, you need not boil it the firft year, but pour ic oa ccdd; and the next Vear if any remain, boil ic tip agao fkim it, put fre(h fpice to it, tod it will do iin.

GerJdns.

TAKE five hundred gerkihs-, and have ready % large earthen pan of fpring Water atid fait; to ev gallon of water put two pounds of iUt, mi!z it wtH together, and throw in your gerkihs; wafli them out in two hours, putthenfi to drain, tec diein be drai'neid very dry, and put them in a jar; in dx mean time get a bell mettle pot, with a galloa of the beft white Wine vinegar, half an ounce of doves and nace, ohe ounce of alUfpice, one ounce of muilard-leedy a ftick of horfe-radifli cut in flices, fix bay-leave$ a little diH, two or three faces 0f 'ginger cut in pieces, a nutmeg cut in pieces, and a handful of falt boil it up ' in the pot alncber, and put it Over the gerkins cover them cl6fe down, and let them (land twenty-four hours; then par thetn' in your pot, and (immer them over the ftbfc till they are green; (be (Careful not to let them boil, ' if you do ybu ViU Ijpoil them) Ihcn put them in your jar, and cover them dofe doWn riU cheyaie cold; then tie them over wifh a bladd, afnd leather over that, and put them in a cold, dry place. Mind always to keep your pickles tied down clofe. Or this way, after they have been 84 hours in the vine.gar, pour the vinegar off from them, and make ic boil; then pour it over the gerktns, cover then . clofe, and repeat it every day till they are grees; then tie them down with a bladder and le!it6cr,'iiKl

keep

jP r C K L I N G. 579

keep them In a cool dry place. By ihis method they will keep goqd for three or four years.

Large Cucumbers in Slices.

TAKE the large cucumbers before they arc too ripe, and flice them the thickncfs of a crown-piece in a pewter difli; to every dozen of cucumbers flice two large onions thin, and fo on till you have filled your dilh, with a handful of fait between every row; then cover them with another pewter diflb, and let them (tand twenty-four hours; then put them into a cullendar, and let them drain very well i put them in a jar, cover them over with white wine vinegar, and let them Hand four hours pour the vinegar from them into a copper fauce-pani and -boil it with a little fait; put to the cucumbers:a little mace, a little whole pepper, a large race of ginger flicedthen pour the boiling uiriegaron thetn and cover them clofe; when they are cold tie them down, and they will be fit to eat in two or three day



4paragus.

TAKE the largeft afparagus you can get, cut qff the white endd, and wa(h the green ends in fpring

' water; then put them in another clean water, Ud let them lay two or three hours in it; then have a large broad fiew-pan full of fpring water, with ' a

large handful of fait, fet it on the fire, and when it boils piit in the grafs, not tied up, but loofej aAd not too many at a dnie, for fear you fhould breilc the heads; juft fcald them, and no more; take tl&a out with a broad fKimmer, and lay them on a cloth to cool. Then for your pickle take a gallon or more, according to your quantity Of nfparAgU, of white wine vinegar, and one ounce of bayrfalt faoil it and put your afparagus in yogt jari to .a.gtUpn

P p 2 of

f

580 I C K L I N G.

of pickle put two nutmegs, a quarter of an ounce of maccv the fame of whole white pepper, and pour the pickle hot over them; cover them with a Hnca cloth, three or four times double, let them ftand a week, and boil the pickle; let them ftand a week 'longer, boil the pickle again and pour it on hot as before; when they are cold, cover them • clofc wuh a bladder ao.d leather.

Peaches. v

TAKE your peaches when they arc at their full growth, juft before they turn to ripen; (be furc they are not bruifed) then take fpring water, as much as you think will cover them,, make it fak enough tobear an egg, with ay and common fall, -an equal quantity of each -, then put in your peaches, rand lay a ihin board over them, to keep them under . ihe water; let them ftand three days, then take 1 them out, wipe them very carefully with a fine foft rdoth,. and lay them in. your glafs or jar; then take as much white wine vinegar as will lill your glais Qr jar to every gallon put one pint of the beft wellmade muftard, two or three heads of garltck, a Vgood deal of ginger &icc4 half an uii;pf cloves, mape, and nutmeg - ipiii your pickle well together, tand pour it over your peaches; tie. them cloife with £a.bia(lder and. (either; they will b fit to eat in two r. ngiihihs. You may, .with a Qoe pnjcnife, cut them ' acrofa take out the ftoies, $jl hem with muf; it9r(jfred, garlicky horfe-radifi), and ginger, and tie jthe(n . .together. Tou may pick nectarines and I 0p(ri6Q(sthe fame way.

!' 'r;RadiJh,Pods.

MAKE a ftig pickle with cold Tpring water iirJid bayfalt, ftr6ilg enough to bear an egg theo r Alt.yeur podsin Uy a thin boird on .them to keq

;. than

PICKLING. 581

llieai under water and let them ftand ten days then drain them in a (leve, and lay them on a cloth to dry; then take. white wine vinegar, as much as you think will cover them, boil it, and put your pods in a jar, with ginger, mace, cloves, and Jamaica pepper; pour your vinegar boiling hot on them, cover them with a coarfe cloch, three or four times double, thac the fteam may come through a little and let them ftand two days. Repeat ihis two or three times; when it is cold, put in .a pine of muftard-fccd, fome horfe-radifli; and cover thcn clofe.

French Beans.

ft

FICKLE your beans in the fame manner as the gerkins.?

Cauliflowers.

TAKE the largefl: and clofeft cauliflowers you can get, pull them in fprigs, put them in an earthe di(h, and fprinkle fait over them; let them ftan twenty-four hours, to draw out the water; then put them in ajar, and pour fait and water boiling over them; cover them clofe, and let them ftand till the next day; then take them out an9 lay them on a coarfe cloth to drain; put them into glafs jrs, and put in a nutmeg diced, and two or three blades of mace in eachjar; cover them with diftilled vinegar, and tie them down with a bladder, and over thac leather. They will be fit for ufe in a month.

Beet'-Root.

SET a pot of fpring water on the fire, when it boils put in your beets, and let them boil till they are tender; take them out, and with a knife take off all the outfide; cut them in pieces according to your fancy, put them in ajar, cover them with cold vinegar, and tie them down clofe s when you ufe the

P p 3 bectt



h PICKLING.

beet, take it out of the pickle, and cut it into wYm ihapes you like; put it in a little difh, with fonie of the pickle over it. You may ufe it for faliads or garni (h.

ffJbite Plums.

TAKE the large white plums, and if they have ftalks let them remain on, and pickle them as you do your peaches.

Onions.

,TAKE your onions when they are dry enough to lay up for winter, (the fmaller they are the better they look) put them into a pot, and cover them with fpring water with a handful of white fait, and let hem boil up i then drain them off, take three coats off, lay them on a cloth, and let two people take hold of it, one at each end, and rub them backward and forward till they are very dry; then put them in your bottles, with fome blades of mace and cloves, a nutmeg cut in pieces, with fome doubletiftilled white wine vinegar; boil it up with a litde fait, let it ftand till it is cold, and put it over the onions; cork them clofe and tie a bladder and lea ther over them.

Lemons.

TAKE twelve lemons, and fcrape them with a "piece of broken glafsj then cut them acrofs in two four parts downright, but not quite through, fi that thev will hang together; put in as much fait as they will hold, rub them well, and ftrew thedi over with fait let them lay in an earthen di(h three days, and turn them every dayi flit an ounce of ginger very thin, and falted for three days twelve cloves of garlick parboiled and falted three days, .a fmall handful of muftard-feeds bruifed and fearced through a hair ficve, and fome red India pepper; take your lemons out of the fait, fqueeze them very gently, put them into ajar with the fpicc and ingre dientSy

PICKLING. 583

dients, and cover them with the beft white wine vinegar; flop them up very clofe, and in a month's tioae they will be fie to eat.

Mujhrooms White. TAKE fmall buttons, cue oiF the ftalks, rub off the ikins with flannel dipped in fait, and throw them into milk and water; drain them out, and put them into a (lew-pan, with a handful of fait Qvtx them; cover them clofe and put them over a gentle (love for five minutes to draw out all the water; then put diem on a coarfe cloth to drain till they are cold.

7( make Pickkfor Mujhrooms.

TAKE a gallon of the beft vinegar, and put t into a cold ftill; to every gallon of vinegar put half a pound of bay-falt, a quarter of a pound of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, and a nutmeg ciic into quarters; keep the top of the ftill covered witli a white cloth, and as the cloth dries put on a wee one; but do not let the fire be too large left you burn the bottom of the ftill dra it as long as you tafte acid, and no longer. When you fill your bot ties .puc ipn your muihooms; lere ai)d there put in a few blades of mace, and a flice of nutmeg; chen fill the bottle with pickle; melt fome mutton fat, ftraii it, and pour over it; it will keep theip better than oiK

You muft put your nutmegs over the fire in a little vinegar, and give it a boil while it is hot; you may dice it as you pleafe when it is cold it will not cut for it will crack to pieces.

Mufirooms Brown. AFTER you have cleaned them with a flannd and fait as above, throw them into milk and water, then lay them on a cloth to drain, when drained, put them into a jar; boil white wine vinegar enough to cover them, with fpices in it, as before diredtcd, pour it over them boiling hot; when they are cold tje them down, or put them in botdesiand cork them tight.

F p 4 Codlings



584 PICKLING.

Codlings.

GATHER your codlings when they arc. the fize of a large double walnut; take a pan and put vineleaves chick at the bottom, put in your codlings, and cover them well with vine-leaves and fpring water; put them over a Qow fire till you can ped the (kins off; take them carefully up in a hair fieve, and peel them very carefully with a penknife; put them into the fame water again, with the vineleaves as before; cover them clofe, and fet thtm at a diftancc from the fire till they are of a fine green; drain them in a cullender till they are cold; put them in jars with fome mace, and a clove or two of garlick; cover them with diftilled vinegar; pour fome mutton fat over them and tie them down With a bladder and leather very tight.

Fennel.

SET fpring water on the fire with a handful of fait; when it boils tie your fennel in bunches, put them into the water; juft give them a fcald, and lay them on a cloth to dry; when cold, put them in a glafs, with a little mace or nutmeg, fill it with cold vinegar, lay a bit of green fennel on the top, and tie over it a bladder and leather.

Grapes.

GET grapes at the full growth, but not ripe, cut them in fmall bunches fit for garnifhing, put them in a ftone jar, wjth vine-leaves between every layer of grapes; then take as much fpring water as you think will cover them, put in a pound of bay-falt and as much white fait as will make it bear an egg dry your bay-falt and pound it, it will melt the fooner, put it into a bell metal or copper pot, boil . it, and fkim it very well, and as it boils take the black icum of but not the white fcums when it has

boiled

PICKLING. 585

boiled a quarter of an hour, lee it ftand to cool and (ectle; when it is cold, pour the clear liquor on the grapes, lay vine-leaves on the top, tie them down clofe with a linen cloth, cover them with a di(h, and let them ftand twenty-four hours; then take them out, lay them on a cloth, cover them over with another, and dry them between the cloths -, then take two quarts of vinegar, one quart of fpring water, and one pound of coarfe fugar; let ic boil a little while, fkim it as it boils very clean, and 1ft it ftand till it is quite cold; dry your jar with a cloth, put frelh vine-leaves at the bottom and between every bunch of grapes, and on the top; then pour the clear off the pickle on the grapes, fill your jar, that the pickle may be above the grapes; tie a thin piece of boafd in a piece of flannel, Jay it on the top of the jar to keep the grapes under the pickle, and tie them down with a bladder and leather; take them out with a wooden fpoon, but be fure to make pickle enough to cover them,

ft

Barberries.

TAKE white wine vinegar-, to every quart of vinegar put in half a pound of fix-penny fugar j thenpick the worft oi your barberries and put into this liquor, and the beft into glafles; then boil your pickle with the worft of the barberries, and flcim it very clean i boil it till it looks of a fine colour i then let it ftand till it is cold before you ftrain it then ftrain it through a cloth, wringing it to get all the colour jou can from the barberries, and let it ftand to cool and fettle; then pour it clear into the glafles in a little of the pickle; boil a little fennel; when cold put a little bit at the top of the pot or glafsj and cover it clofe with a bladder and leather. To every half-pound of fugar put a quarter of a pound of white fait.

Red

586 PICKLING.

Red currants are pickled in the fame manner.

You may pickle barberries thus: pick them clean from leaves and fpotted ones, and put them into jars I mix fpring water and fait pretty (Iropg and put over, and when you fee the fcum rile change: the £ilt and water, and they will keep a long time.

Re J Cabbage.

SLICE the cabbage very Bne crofs-ways pit it on an earthen difhj fprinkle a handful of fait ovtr it cover it with another diib, and lee it ftaod cwentyfour hours; then put it in a cullender cd drain, and lay it in your jar $ take white wine vinegar enough to cover ir a little cloves, mace, and all-fpice i put them in whole, with one pennyworth of cochineal bruifed fine; boil it up and put it over the cabbage hot or cold, which you like beft cover tt clofe with a cloth till it is cok, and then cie k OTCr with leather.

Golden Pippins.

TAKE the fined pippins you can get, firec from ipoLs and bruiies, put them into a prefer ying- pan of cold fpring water, fet them on a charcoal fire, and kt:ep them turning with a wooden fpoon till they will peel, but do not Jet them boil i when they are enough peel them, and put tliem into the water again, with a quarter of a pint o the bed vinegar, and a quarter of an ounce of allum; cover tbem very clofe with a pbwter di(b, and fet them on the charcoal fire sain, (a flow fire not to boil) let them fland, turning them now and then till they look green; then take them out, and lay them on ajcloch to cool I when cold, make your pickle as for the peaches, only inftead of made muftard, this muft be mudard-feed whole, cover them clofe, and keep them for ufe,

'Naertixm

s

PICKLING. 587

Nafiertium Berries and Limes, You pick them off the lime trees in fummer.

Take naftcrtium berries, gathered as foon as the bioITom is off, or the limes, puc them in cold fpring water and fait, and change the WAter for three days fucccffivcly; make a pickle of white wine vinegar, inace, nutmeg, (lice fix ilzallots, fix blades of garlick, fome pepper corns, fait, and horfe radifh cut in dices; make your pickle very ftrong, drain your berries very dry, and put them in bottles, mix your pickle well up together, Tbut you muft not boil it) put It over the berries or limes, and tie them down trlofe.

Xoung Suckers 9 or young Artichokes before the

Leaves are bard

TAKE young fuckers, pare them very nicely, (all the hard ends of the leaves and ftalks) and juft fcald them in fait and water; when they are cold,

)ut them into little glafs bottles with two or three arge blades of mace, and a nutmeg Diced thin; BU them cither with diftilled vinegar, or the fugar vinegar of your own making, with half fpring water.

Artichoke Bottoms.

BOIL artichokes till you can pull the leaves off then take off the chokes, and cut them from the ftalk; (take great care you do not let the knife touch the top) throw them into fait and water for aa hour; then take them out, and lay them on a cloth to drain J then put them into large widemouthed glaffes, put a little nmce and fliced nutmeg between theii; fill them either with diftilled vinegar, or fugar vinegar and fpring water, cover them with mutton fat fried, and tie them down with a bladder aiid 4eather

Samphire

588 PICKLING.

Samphire.

TAKE the famphire that is green, lay it in % clean pan, throw two or three handsful of fait over it, and then cover it with fpring water; let it lay twenty-four hours; then put it into a clean brafs fauce-pan throw in a handful of fait, and cover it with good vinegar; cover the pan clofe, fet it over a very flow fire, and let it (land till it is juft green and crifp; then take it off in a moment, (for if it (lands till it is foft it is fpoiled) put it in your pickling-pot and cover it clofe; when it is cold w it down with a bladder and leather, and keep it for life. You may keep it all the year in a very ftroag brine of fait and water, and throw it into vinegir juft before you ufe ir.

Mock Ginger.

TAKE the largeft cauliflowers you can get, cut off all the flower from the (lalks, peel them and throw them into ftrong fpring water and fak for three days; then drain them in a fieve pretty dry, and put them in a jar; boil white wine vinegar with cloves, mace, long pepper, and all-fpicc, each half an ounce, forty blades of garlick, a (lick of horle radi(h cut in (lices, a quarter of an ounce of Cayan pepper, a quarter of a pound of yellow turmeric and two ounces of bay-fait; pour it boiling over the ftalks, and cover it down clofe till the next day; then boil it again, and repeat it twice more; and when it is cold tie it down clofe.

Melon Mangoes.

TAKE as manyigreen melons as you want, flit them two thirds up the middle, and with a fpoon take all the feeds out; put them in ftrong fpring water and fait for twenty-four hours, and then dnia them in a fieves mix half a pound of white muf

tard

P 1 C K L. I Sf G. 59

tard, two ounces of long pepper, the fame of alU fpice, half an ounce of cloves and mace, a good quantity of garlick and horfe-radiih cut in dices, and a quarter of an ounce of Cayan pepper; fill the feed-holes full of this mixture, put a fmall (kcwer through the end, tic it round Vvith packthread clofe to the fkewer, and pQt them in ajar; boil up vinegar with fome of the mixture in it, and pour it over the melons; cover them down clofe, and let them ftand till next day; then green them in the fame manner as you do getkins ybu may pickle larg cuCumbers the fame way; tie them down clofe when cold, and keep them for ufe.

Elder SboofJ in Imitation of Bamboo.

TAKE the largeft and oldeft (hoots of elder -which put out in the middle of May; the middle ftalks are moft tender and biggeft, the fmall ones are not worth pickling; peel off the outward peel or (kin, and lay them in a ilrong brine of fait and water for one night j then dry them in a cloth, piege by piece. In the mean time make your pickle of half white wine and half beer vinegar; to each quart of pickle you muft put an ounce of white or red

' pepper n ounce of ginger diced, a little mace and a few corns of Jamaica pepper-, when the fpice has boiled in the pickle pour it hot on the (hoots,

. ftpp them clofe immediately, and fet the jar two hours before the Bre, turning it often. It is as good a way of greening pickles, as frequent boiling. You may boil the pickle two or three times, and pour it on boiling hot, ju(t as jm p'eafe. If you make the pickle of the fugar vrocgar, there muft be one half fpring water

•

Indian

590 PICKLING.

Indian Pickle or Ticca Liilo.

TAKE a pound of race-ginger d lay it in wa ler one oight; then fcrape ic, cue it iq thin flices uc CO ic Tome fait, and Ice itnd i.the iun to dry; Aake cwo ounces of long ppper, and prepare it as the ginger, a pound of garlick.cuc in chin dices an lalced, and .let ic ftand three days; ctien walh ic well, ialc ic again, and let it ftand.tbrce dy longer the v(a(b ic well, drain it, andpuc it in the fun to dry; taHe a quarter of a pound of inuftai:d(eeds brpifcd,,and half a .quarter of an ounce oif turmeric put thefe ingredients, when preped, into Igrge flone or glafs jar, with a gallon of good white wine vinegar, (tir it very often for a fortnight, and tic it up . clpfe.

In this pickle you may put white cabbage cut in quarters, and put it in a brine of (alt and water for tfar days; then boil frei falc and water and juft put in the . cabbage to fcald; prefs out the water, and put it in the fun to dry, in the fame manner you muft do cauliflowers, cucumbers melons, apples, French beans, .plums, or any fort of fruit; but take care they are well dried before you put them into this pickk. You need 4icvcr empty the jar, but as the pickles are, in ieafon; puc them in, and fupply thepi with vinegar as often as there is occaHonl

.It you would have jour pickle look green, leave .out the turmeric, colour them .as ufiial, nd put them into this pickle cold.

In the above you may pickle walnuts in a jar by themfelves: put the walnuts in wichouc any pre pacation, tied clofe down, and kept fome time.

Red Currants.

TO every quart of white wine vinegar put half

a pound of Lifbon fugar, and a quarter of a pound

of white falc % then pick out the worft of your currants

P r C K L I N G- 591

iants and put into this liquor, and put the beft in bunches into glafes then boil the pickle with the -vorft currants in it fkim it very clean, and let k Jboil till it till it looks of a fine colour, then let ft -itand till it is cold; then ftrain it through a coarfe NclOth wring it through to get out all the colour df ihe currants, and let it (land to fettle; then pour the clear off the fctlings, and fill up your gkflTds with it tie them over with a bladder and leather, and keep them in a cold dry place.

Ox Palates.

TAKE as many ox palates as you want, and wal

them clean with fait and water; put them in a pot,

cover them with water, put in feme fait, and as the

fcum rifes fkim it off clean -, then put in half an

ounce of cloves and mace, a. little all-fpice and

whole pepper, ftew them gently till they are tender,

(which will be in four or five hours) take them out,

and take the two fkins clean off-, cut them of whac

. fize and fhape you pleafe, and let them ftand till

they are cold; in the mean time make a pickle of

half white wine and half vinegar boiled together,

with fome frefh fpices in it; when bqth the pickle

and palates are cold, lay a layer of palates in a jar,

and put in fome bay- leaves with a little frefh fpice

' between every layer, and pour the pickle over theni;

tie them down clofe, and keep them for ufe.

Thefe are very ufcful to put into made difhes if all forts, only wafh them out of the pickle in warm water. You may make a little fide-difh with white or brown fauce, or butter and muflard, with a fpooaful of white wine in it.

Cods Combu

PUT your combs into fcalding water, take the

2fkins off; then put them into a flew-pan, cover them

•with white wine vinegar, put in fome cloves and

3 mace

59i PICKLING.

jnace a' Utile all-fpice and whole pepper, a fiew hxf leaves a little bay falt and (lew them for half afl hwti then put them in a jar; and when they are -iorld, render a little mutton fuet and put over them, to keep out the arr, and tie them down with a bladder and leather. When you want to ufe them, lay them in warm water for an hour before; and yoa may put them in made-diAieSj or make a Htde diih of themj with white or brown cullis.

Purpe Cabbage.

TAKE two cauliSowers, two red cabbages, half a peck of kidney-beans, fix fticks, with fix cloves of garlick on each (lick wafli them all well, and give them a boil up; then drain them on a fievc, lay them leaf by leaf on a large table, and fait them with bay-falt; then lay them to dry in the fun, or in a flow oven, until they are as dry as a cork; and make the following pickle: take a gallon of the btft vinegar, with one quart of water, a handful of fait, one ounce of whole pepper, and boil it altogether for a quarter of an hour; then let it ftand till it is cold; then take a quarter of a pound of ginger cut in pieces, fait ifj and let it ftand a week; take half a pound of muftard-feed, wa(h it, and lay it to dry; when very dry bruife half of it, mix the whole and brtrrfed with fome all-fpice, whole pepper, the prepared ginger, and an ounce of powder of turmeric j then have a jar, and lay a row of cabbage, then cauliflowers, .and then beans, put the garlick in the middle, and fprinklc between every layer your mixture; then pour your pickle over all, and tic it down with a bladder and leather.

Salmon.

TAKE your falmon, fcale and gut it, and wafc

it very clean have a kettle of fpring water boilingf

with

P, I C; K L IN O; 593

ivUh a handful offal t -a Ihcle allfpice, cloves ami mace; put in the BfH," and boil ic three quarters of in hour, if fmall;'!iflarge, one hour j cftcn take thef&lmon our, and ietit ftand till t is cold; ftrain tlie liquor through ficve 5 when it is cold put your falnnon very clofc in a tub or pan, and pour the liquor over it; when you want td ufe it put it into di1h with a little of the pickle hd garnllh it with green fennel.

Sturgeon.

TAKE your fturgeon and cut it in handfome pieces, wafh it well, and tie it up with bafs; make a pickle of half fpring water afid half vinegar, make it pretty iak, with fonne cloves, mace, and all-fpice in it; make it boil, then put in your fturgeon, and boil ic till it is tender; then take ic up, and let it Hand till ic is cold; ftrain the liquor through a feve;then put the fturgeon into a pan' or tub a clofe as you can, pour the liquor over it, arid cover it clofe;. when you ufe it put ic in a difh, with a lit tle of the liquor, and gamifh it with green fennel or parfley.

Mackrel, called Caveach. •

CUT your mackrel into round pieces, and divide one into five or fix pieces; to (ix large mackrel you may take one ounce of beaten pepper, three large nutmegs, a little mace, and a handful of fait; mix your fait and beaten fpice together; then make two or three holes in each piece and thruft the feafoning into the holes with your finger; rub each piece all over with the feafoning, fry them brown in . fweec oil, and let them ftand till they are cold; put them into ajar, cover them with vinegar pour fweet oil over them. They will keep, well covered g long time, and are delicious.

CLq Mock

14 PIC K L I N G,

Mock Anchovies,

T O a peck of fprau, two pounds of coaumn ialts a quarter of a pound of baylalc, one poood of laU-petrf, two ounces of fal prunella and a Kttle bole armeoiac pound all in a oiorur % put them into a ftonc pot, a row of (prats, a layer of your compound, and fo on to the top ainernately i pitfs chem hard down, and cover them clofe let thera ftand fix months, and they will be fit for ufe.

Obferve chat your fprats are very frefli, and do not wafli or wipe them, but firft take chem as they coin out of the water

Smelts.

TAKE a hundred of fine fmelts, half an ounce of pepper, half an ounce of nutmeg, a quarter of an ounce of mace, half an ounce of fait petre, and a quarter of a pound of common fait •, beat all very nne i walh and clean the fmelts, gut them, then Isy them in rows in a jar, and between every layer df fmelcs ftrew the feafoning, with four or five bay leaves, then boil red wine and pour over them, cover them with a plate, and when they are cold tie them down cloie. They exceed aochovies

Ojifters

OPEN one hundred of the fineft and largeft rxk oyfters you can get into a pan, with all their liquor with them, but mind you do not cut them in opening, as that will fpoil their beauty; waffa them deaa out of the liquor one by one, put the liquor into a ftew-pan, and give it a boil % then ftrain it through a fieve, and let it ftand half an hour to fettle; ttn pour it from the fettlings into a ftew-pan and put m half a pint of white wine, half a pint of vinegar, a little fait, half an ounce of cloves and mace, a Uttle all-fpice and whole pepper a nutmeg cut in

3 thifl

PICK L IN Cr, S9S tMri flices, and a dozen bajr-leavesi boll it up five tninucesi then put in your oyfters, and give tbent a boil up for a minute or two i put them into fmall jars, and when they are coid put a Htile fweet oil c the top, and tie them down with a bladder and leiu iher; keep them in a cool, dry place, and wheo you ufe them untie them, fkimof the oil, put them in a diOi with a little of the liquor, and garnifli them with green parQey. If you want oyftcr fauce take them out, and put them into good anchory fauce, with a fpoonful of the pickle for fi(h, or for poultry, waQi them in warm water, and put them into a white fauce

Csckles or Mufiks.

TAKE half a peck of cockles or mufcles, and wafh them well then put them into a fauce-puit cover them clofe, and fet them over a (tow fire till they are all opened; drain the liquor from them,

J lick them all out of the Ibells, (mind and take the ponge or crab out of the mufcles) and wafh them clean in warm vinegar llrain about half the liquor from the feitlings, and treat them in the fame manner as oyfters

Walnut Keubuf4

TAKE half a bulbel of green walnuts, before the flicll is formed and grind ihem in a crab-mill, or beat them in a marble mortar then fqueefe out the juices through a coarfc cloth, and wring the cloth well tS get all the juice outt and t gallon of juice put a quart of red wine, a of 4 pound of anchovies, the fame of bay-f ounce of all-fpice, two pf long and black half an ounce of cloves aod mace, a little nd horfe-raddifli cut in fliccs % boU all togei nduced to balf tbc quantity pour it into Q.q a

596 P I C K L I N G.

when it is cold bottle it, cork it tight, and it wiU he fit for ufe in three months. If you have any pickle left in the jar after your walnuts arc ufed, to every gallon of pickie put in two heads of garlicki i quart of red wine and an ounce each of doves, snace, long, black, and Jamaica pepper and boil them altogether till it is educed to half the quantity; pour it into a pan, and the next day bottle it for ufe, and cork it tight.

Mujhroom Ketchup

TAKE a bulhel of the large flaps of mufiirooms gathered dry, and bruife them with your hands; put fome at the bottom of an earthen pan, drew feme fait over them, then mufiirooms, then fait, tiU you have done put in half an ounce of beaten cloves and mace, the fame of all-fpice, and let them (land five or fix days ftir them up evpry day; then tic a

Saper over them and bake them for four hours in a ow oven; when fo done, drain them through a cioth to act all the liquor out and let the liquor (land to Icttle then pour it clear from the fetdings; to every gallon of liquor, add a quart of red winr, and if not fait enough, a little fait, a race of ginger cut fmalli half an ounce of cl6ves and mace, and boil it till about one-third is reduced; then drain ic through a firve into a pan; the next day pour it from the fettlings, and bottle jt for ufe-, but mind to cork it tight

Mujhroom Powder.

TAKE the larged and thicked button mufcroomf you can get, cutoff the root-end, and peel thcmj do not wafl) them, but whipe them clean with a cloth; fpread them on pewter difiies and put them j in a flow oven to dry; let the liquor dry up in the mufiirooms, as it will make the powder much llroDger •, and when they are dry enough to powdrff

beat.

TO KEEP VEGETABLES, &g. 59

beat them in a mortar, fife them through a fieve, with a little Cayan pepper and pounded mace; put the powder in fnrall bottles, cork them tight, and keep it tot ufc.

CHAP. XXXIV.

To keep Garden Vegetables and Fruits.

To keep French Beans all the Tear.

GATHER the fineft young French beans free from fpots, on a very fine day 5 have a large Done jar with a wide mouth, clean and dry, lay a layer of falc at the bottom, then a layer of beans, then faU, then beans, and fo on till the jar is full; cover the with fait, put a coarfe cloth over, them and. a board on that, and then a weight to keep out all; (he air; let them in a dry cellar, and when you take any 6uc cover the reft clofe again; wa(h them you took out very clean, and let them lay in foft water for tweritffour hours, (hifting the water often; and when you boil them do not put any falc in the water, but mind to boil them in plenty of water; the beft way of dreflTmg them is; boil a white heart cabbage with about a pine of them, then chop the cabbage, and put bqtji into a fauce-pan, with, a piece of .butter as biga3 an egg mixed with flour, a quarter of a pint of gry and a little pepper; let them ftew for ten minutes; then di(h them up for a fide-difh, and garniili with fried fippets.

598 TO KEEP VEGETABLES, &c

Q keep Green Peas till Cbrtftmas.

AS footi as yoo have gathered as many fine young peas on a dry day as you want, fhdll riiem, throw them into boiling water, with Ibme fait in i let them boil five or fix minutes, and throw them into a cuU lendar to drain; then lay a cloth four or five times double on a table, fpread them on, and dry them very well i have your bottles, clean and dry, ready, fill them, and cover them with mutton fat rendered; when it is a little cool fill the necks almoft to the top, cork them, tie a bladder over them, and fee them in a cool, dry place; when you tife them make your water bollj put in a litde fair, fugar, and a piece of butter boil them till they are enough; then drain them in a cuUendar; then put them into a lauce-pan, with a good piece of frem buuerj keep fhaking them round all the time, till the butter is melted i then put them in a difh, and fend them to table i garnifli them with a Iktle green mint boiled and chopped fine, if you have any.

Aficoni Way to keep Green Peas.

GATH£R your peas on a fine dry day neither very young nor old, fliell them, and two peifoos lay hold at. each end of a cloth, (hake them badcwards and forwards a few minutes; haveready ibme quart bottles, fill them, and cork them tight; have a pipkin of rofin melted, into which dip the nccki of the bottles, and fet them in a cool, dry place.

To keep Red Goofeberries.

PICK them when fall ripe; to each quart of goofeberries put a quarter of a pound of Lifbon fugar, and to each quarter of a pound of fugar pot a quarter of a pint of water, (jet it boil) then put in your goofeberries, and let them boil 'feftly two or three minutes $ then pour them into little ftone jan;

. whca

TO KEEP VEGETABLES, &c. 599

mhctk cold, cover them up, and keep them for ufe. They make fine pies with little trouble. You mty jrefs them through a cullender, to a quart of pulp iut half a pound of fine Lifbon fugar, keep it ftirring over the fire till both be well mixed and boiled and pour it into a flone jar; when cold, cover it with white paper, and it makes very pretty tarts or

To keep Walnuts all the Tear

TAKE a large jar, a layer of fea-fand at the bottom, tlien a layer of walnuts, then fand, then the nuts, and fo on till the jar is full, but be fure they do not totich each other in any of the layers; when you would ufe them, lay therh in warnr water for an hour, Ihift the water as it cools, then rub them drV, arid ihey ill peel weM and eat fwcet. ' Lemons will keep thus covered better than any other way.

AnMkif Way to ketp Limons.

TAKE the fineft and largeft lemons that are quite found and good, anduke a fine packthread, about a quarter of a yiMtl long, and run it through the hard nib at the end of the lemon; then tie the ftrtitg together stt the ends, hang it on a little hook in an airy, dry place, and fo do as noMny as you pleafe but he fure they do not touch one another, nor any thing die, but hang them as high as you can

You may keep all fores of winter pears, by tying a ftriog to the ftalka and wrap the pears in. clean paper

To keep Grapes.



BEFORE your grapes are to ripe cut them from the vines, with a good piece of the (talks to them, tie a ftring to the ftalks, and hang them,up to the f ieling of a cool dry room, where there is plenty of

Qi,q 4 air I

6oo TO KEEP VEGETABLES, Sec,

iir; miiid they do not touch one another, nor any thing elfir, but Wvc room for the 'air to pafs be twctn them,. or thtry will get mouldy and rot.' The ronteniac graphs arc the bcft'for this purpofe, ao4 ill keep till the end of January.

ffo dry Artichoke Bottoms.

GATHER your artich kcs before they arc too full grown, add ter them frpm tfaedalks to draw out all (he firings tbtn boil them in plenty of wa.ilv till the leaves will come off cafily by plucking, tal;e them pp, and pluck off ai the leaves lay the botxoms on lias, and dry them in a cool oven, or before the fire, and keep lurning them two or three times a dy till they are dry, (which you may know, t)y hcidi'ng them up againft the light) and no damp about tbem; 4ben put them into paper bags, and hang them inia very dry place.

To Rottk reen Goofeberries.

GATHER your goofcberries on a fine dry day, before they are full grown, ptck ihem, and two perfons lay hold at each end of a large cloth, and 0)ake tbem gently backwards ariti forwards a minute or twos then have )our. wide mouth bottles, very clean and dry, ready, fill the bottles, and put the cork Oightly in thtm put them in a cool oven all night; the next moining take them our, and when they are cold cork them tight, put them in a cool, dry place for a fortnight upright, then lay the bottles upon thtir fides, and they will keep all the ftif

You may, after yc u hive put them in bottles, put th cork fl:ghtly in, and put them up to the neck ia water, and coddle them till yoi percicve they begin to break; then take tcoi our ant treat them the fame as if baked



TO KEEP VEGETABLES, &c, 6oi

To Bottle green Currants.

GATHER your, currants while, they arc green and almoft full grown while the fon i% hot upon them, pick them from te ((alks, and put them into narrow-mouthed bottles; cork them clofe and fee them in dry fand and they will keep all tBe wintei

To Bottle Dambns' wh'te Bulace Gf.;

GATHER them on a clear dry day, before they are over ripe, pick thcftalks off,' and put them into wide mouthed bottles put the cork loofely in, and put them in a cool oven all niht; the next mornJng- take them out, jmd when they are. cold cork them tight, fet them in a cool dry place upright ibr a fortnight;:thoi lay the bottles upon their fideii nd they will keep the year round,

• Td Bottle Cranb&ries.

GATHER your cranberries on a fine dry day, and put them into dry bottles; cork them tight, anci put them upright iti a cool dry place and they will ' Jceep for two years.

ACat

i 6oz

A

CATALOGUE

o t

JP16H, Game, Poultrv Froit, and GaiDEN Veceta.bi,es in Seaiba every Moodi ift the Year.

JANUARY,

CO D icaC0, thotnback, faknon, IbleSt kmprtys, perch, carp, tench flounders prawos, Jobfters, crabs, ffarimps, cockicsy mufclest cySUg% finelcs, and whitings. .

Gme and Foukry.

HARES, pheafants, partridges wild ducks, wid ons, pintails, dun birds, teal, capons, pullets, fowls, chickens, turkeys, fquab ptgeons, tame rabbits, woodcocks, fnipesi larlut blackbirdsj and woodpigeons.

Fruit.

PORTUGAL grapes, the Kentifti ruflct, golden French kirton, Dutch pippins, nonpareils, pearmains ruHeitog apples, and all forts of winter pears.

Roots and Vegetables.

MANY forts of cabbages, favoys, fprouts, and gens; parfnips, carrots, turneps, potatoes, cellery, endive, cabbage lettuces, leeks, onions, borle-radilht fmall falltds under glafies, fweet herbs, and parfley; tgttti and while broccoli, beet- roots, beet-leaves and lops, afparagus, forced, and cucumbers in the hot bed French beans and peas in the hot houfe.

FE.

A CATALOGUE, &c 6o

f:ebruary.

Fijb.

COD, fcate, thomback, falmon, fturgeon, folef, flounders whitingi fmelts, crahSt obfters prawn% lluimps, oyftcrs, eels, Crawfiiby kinprejs ctrp, tench, and perch.

Game and Iotdtry.

HARES, partridges till the 14th, turkeys, capons pullets with eggs, fowls, chickens, tame rabbits woodcocks, fnipcs, all forts of wild fowl, which begin to decline in this monch

Fruit. NEARLY the fame as the laflr month

Roots and Fegetabks. THE fame as laft moMb

MARCH.

FiJb.

COD and codlings, turbot, falmon, fcate thornback, fmeltSi fblcs, crab, iobfters, prawns, flounders, plaice, oyfters, perch. carp, tench, eels, gudgeons mullets and fometimes mackrel comes in.

Poultry.

TURKEYS, pullets, fowls, chickens, ducklings, tame rabbits, pigeons, galanies, orguinea fowl.

Fruit.

PINE apples, the golden ducket Dorfet plppi&s, rennetings, loves peannain, nonpareils, John apples, the latter boncfaretieo, and doilcbloffMn pears.

• Roots

o) A CATALOGUE, &c.

Roofs nd'Vegeijtalles.

CARROTS, parfneps, turncps, potatoes, beetroots, leeks, onions, gieo and white broccoli, broccoiripFOuy ';browo ahd green cole, qibbage fpronts, greens, Ipinach, fpall JilUds, parley, foi:rel, chcrvil' corn failed, green fenoei, fweec herbs of aH forts, cabbage lettuces, forced muihrooms, afparagus forced, cucuoibersjn hoc beds, French beans and peas in hot houits, and young radifhes and onions,

. ft .

A P R I L:

t

Fijb. .

SALMON, turbot, nnackrel, fcate, thornback, red and grey mullets gurnets, pipers, foles, lobftcrs, oyfters, prawns, crawBfh, fmelts, carp, tench, perch, chub, pike, gudgeons, eels, and plaice,

PoiHtry.

PULLETS, fowls, chickens, ducklings, pigeons, tame rabbits, and ibmetimes young leverets, galanies, or Guinea fowls

Fruits.

A few apples and pears, pine apples, hot houlc grapes (Irawberries, cherries, apricots for tarts, and green goofeberries.

Roots . and Vegetables

CARROTS, potatoes, hgrfe-radifb, ohioris, leeks, cellery, broccoli fprouts cabbage plants, cabbage lettuces, afparagus, fpinacli, parfley, thyme, all forts of fmall falads, young radi(hes and onions, cucumbers iti the hot beds, French beans and peas in the hot houfti, green fennel, forrei chervil, and if the weather is fine, all forts of fwcet herbs begins to

grow. -

MAY

A ' C A T A;L O.O U E, .&c, 60

M A y.

TURBOT, falmon, foles, fmclts, trout, wHitingf tnackrel, herrings eels, plaice flounders, crabs, lobiters, prawns, mrimps, and crawfifii.

' Poultry.

PULLETS,' fowls, chickens, Guinea fowls, greeo eefe, ducklings, pigeons, tame rabbits, leverets and (bmctimes turkey poults.

Fruit.

STRAWBERRIES, green apricots, cherries, goofebcrries, and currant