The Foods of England | Cookbooks | Diary | Index | Magic Menu |

The Lady's Assistant, 1777

A Foods of England online text. For more see Cookbooks



TITLE: The Lady's Assistant for Regulating and Supplying Her table
AUTHOR: Charlotte Mason
PUBLISHER: J Walker
DATE: 1777
THIS VERSION: This transcript is based on the online version at archive.org, digitized from an edition in the collections at Radcliffe College Library. This is an Optical Character Recognition scan, it has been partly edited, but still contains very significant errors.



THE
LA DY'S ASSISTANT
FOR

Regulating and Supplying her Table,

BEING A COMPLETE SYSTEM OF COOKERY,

C0NTAIKI9

Oae Hundred and Fifty feled Biv'ts of Fake, properly

difpofed for Family Dinkbrs of Five Diflies

to Two Courfes of Eleven and Fifteen i

WITH .VFWARAI OF

Fifty Bml8 of Fahi for Suppiai from Five Difliei to Niaeteeni

- AND

SEV.t:4L deserts:

"

IMCiVDING LfKIWItB,

The fuUedb and choiceft Receipts of various Kinds,

Full Diredlions for preptring tem in the moft approved Manner, from which a continual Change may be made, as wanted in the feveral BrLLS of Fari:

PttblUhed from the Manuscixpt Collictton of

Mrs. CHARLOTTE MASON,

A PnortftBO HovsKXSBvtRAvhohad upwardi of Thirty Years Experience in Famili of the firil Faihion

THE THIRD EDITION.

The moft reiinM underftandinf and the moft exalted fentimenta do not place a woman above the little duties of life.

.Mrs. OairriTn.

LONDON:

, Printed for J. WalteRi at HomerVHead, Cbaring-Crofs.

M.PCC.LXXVII.

INTRODUCT. KOuH

Tq the First Edition.

CT'H'ER E bifving already been a gnat Numhir ef PuUkaliofls concerning the art of Cookery it may perhaps ht thought unnecef-fary to produce another hook on the fubjeSf'etf I truft tbat upon examination this work will appear of -more reed utility tkan may heatfirjl imagined There are many books of receipts, yet I have never met with one that contained any inru£f ions for Regulating a TaUe.-TT grWL inconvenience I experienced on eoenmenang rniftrefs of a famm from the want ef fuch affiftance hai fnce prompted me to attmpt a fet of bills of farCy which I flatter myfdfy will be of great ufjLto ladies in general but particularly to the younger part of my fex, who on their entering into life may not have tbefe advantages which arifefrom inflru£Hon eu well as from practice y and are greatly at a lofs how to conduSt their table with that decmcy and propriety which • are much to bg defired not only in making dinners for company but alfo in a family way. •

It is certain jh at a woman never appears to greater advantage than at the head of a well-regulated table $ which Jhould be always fi fuppliedy that the unexpected viftt of a friend j or even of a firanger Jhould occajion no inconvenience or confufton. If a dinner befmall andfimple the manner ofjerving it will make it appear to great advantage 5 and I think I may venture to fay that with the GJftftance of the bills of fare herein infertedy with the variety that every peffon of but moderate tqfte will be able to introduce, a table may he fo conduSitd as to do credit both to the tajle and management of the miflrefs.

In regard to the JReeeipts-They are feleSfed with great care from tie manufcript of an experienced houfekeeper; they areby no means expenfwej yet I may with certainty affirm they will prove excellent n their kindy if followed with exanefi and attention and I have given lohatever inflruions are neceffary for a fervant in a plain y fo thaty by application if Jhehas any genius j and a good pa ', Jhe mayy upon the wholcy be made capable of any cooks place Vihere a man is tiot required '

IJhaU add nothing more to recommend this publication-I hope that ikt fains I have taken will be found to anfwer the end propofed - how for they may the eytnt of attending to the general plan will hejt itrmn

ADVERTISEMENT

T Q THE

SECOND EDITION.

TH S approve Receptiba of the ffarmer

ei this Work ha$ induced the Editor to revife and Gorce the Taiks aod the fiveral Receipts infcrted ia the firft Edition, and, with the moft minute Care and Feuna, to add to die prefent Publication, a fuU JeSf and realfy f€ful ColleAion c£ Receipts and Amendments, which makes The Ladys Assistant, hf Mm. MAsw, STA m ccmpleti Book of Cookery

UTotti ta this Edition

HE tmtinmd qidck Sak of the lafi correSed Edition of ibis PuUication claim tie Editors Jincenfi jtcknowiedgemeHts and afeertains tho Mmtof the Book.

[BILLS OF FARE - Omitted]

DireSlions bow to cboofe Beef,

THE flefli of Ox Beef, if young, will have a fine open fmooth grain, of a bright red, and very tender; the fuet very white: if it is yellow, it is not good.- Cow Beef, the grain is clofer, the fat whiter, but the lean not fo bright a red.- Bull Beef, is of a ftill clofer grain; the fat is flcinny and hard, the lean of d deep red, and it has a much ftronger fcent than any other beef.

Different Pieces of an Ox.

Fore garter.

SHIN, clod, fticking-piccc, leg of mutton-piece, fore-rib, middle-rib, chuck, blade- bone, marrowbones brifket.

Hind garter.

LEG, fmatl round, or moufe buttock, the round, or middle buttock, thick flank, Chin flank, veiny piece, haunch-bone, rump, and furloin.

The Head

Tongue, Palate,

SKIRT, heart, fweetbreads, kidneys, fillet, liver, and the

6 tripe,

126 THE LAliY'd ASISTANt.

tripe, which is diftinguiflied by the names of the double, tJaSi roll, and the reed-tripe; and the feet.

General DireSidnsfdr Boiling; 'ici

AS neatnefs is a thoft material requfite in a kitchen, bib par ticularly careful to keep all the utenfils perfedlly clean, the pots and faucepans well tinned, or lined with iilver i let all meat boil gently, and always ufe foft water, if to be had; put thd meat into the veflel while the witer is cold, unlefs it is not fait enough (if beef or pork) then put it intohot,or boiling water; be Aire always to let the vefTel be large enough, that the meat may be well covered with water; cover thq pot, to prevent the foot droppfng into it, nd fo clofe that the fthokci Xxoxk the iire does not get under the edge! of the cover; when it boils, never negle£ to take oiF the fcum, as that not being attended to, fpoils the look of the meat - fome (hake a fmall handful of flour upon the water, which takes up all the fcum - and others pour a little cold water in, when the pot boils, to ih4ke the fcum rife.

General Diraions for Roafting.

AS foon as the tneat is put to the Ere, pour over it fome. warm water, which throw away; this is very neceflary to thofe Who are nice in the drefling their meat, it being a good deal handled in the fpitting; (hake fome flour over it, baice it with butter, and do not put it too near the fire: this, with frequently bafting it, a brifk fire, and allowing time enough, are the only means of roafling in perfection: when the fleam draws to the fire, the meat is near done: flour and bafle it juft before it Is fent to table, that it may have a nice froth: always allow a longer time for the meat to roafl in frofly weather: take particular care to have the fpit clean, as nothing is more difagreeable than a fpit mark; and rememberj when the meat is half doncf, to remove the dripping-pan and fpit a little from the fire, and &xt it: if it is a good fire before the meat is laid down, once ftirring it will in general roaft a joint of meat. 'Never fait the meat before it is put to the fire, it draws out the gravy too much: if it is to be kept fome time before it is drefied, as indeea mutton and beef are not good frefh killed, be fure to dry it well with a cloth, and hang it vrhet it will have a thorough; air; look at it every day, and wipe off all the damp; it wilt keep a long time; fome pepper it a little.

c . Boiled

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 127

Boiled Beef.

BEEF muft be boiled according to the different pieces: a toand, or a haunch-bone, ought not to be thoroughly boiled as they make good bubble and fqueak, if under done, or the infide of a round will make a good pie; a middling iized round will take three hours: briiket and inferior pieces ought to be very 'well boiled. For fauce- cabbage, favoys, any fort of greens, carrots, or turnips.

To boil a Rump of Beef relied.

CUT a very large handful of fweet herbs very fmall, mix with them fome common fait and pepper, a fmall quantity of faltpetre; rub the beef all over with thefe ingredients, let it lie four days. but not longer, put it into a pot with a large quantitj of water, and put in with it four onions cut in quarters, a bunch of carrots, four bay-leaves, a large bunch of fweet herbs, a handful of pariley, five or iix cloves, fome whole pepper, and a little fait; boil it well, and as the fcum rifes take it off: do not put any of the roots into the difli with it, only ftrew feme freh parfley. This is a very good way of dreiSng it; the herbs it is rubbed with give it a good flavour.

Roaft Beef

A PIECE of ten pounds.will take about an hour and a half of twepty pounds, three hours, if thick; two hours and a hal if thin: put a piece of buttered paper on the outfide, it prevents the Ikin from ihrinking. For fauce - fallad, pickles, potatoes, broccoli, cucumbers raw or ftewed, celery raw or ftewed, French beans, colliflower.

To ftew Beef

TAKE a pound and a half of the fat part of the brifket, with four pounds of ftewing Beef, cut into pieces; put thefe into a ftew-pan, with a little fait, fome pepper, a bunch of fweet herbs, an onion fiuck with cloves, two or three pieces of carrot, two quarts of water, and half a pint of good fmall beer: let it ftew four hours, then take fome turnips and carrots cut into pieces, a fmall leek, two or three heads of celery cut fmall, a piece of bread toafled hard; let thefe ftew all together one hour more, then pour all into a tureen, and ferve it up.

• Fid bcf and cabbage.

iaS THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

T$ftew a Rump of Beef.

. TAKE a rump, and roaft it till it is half done, then put it into a large pot with three pints of water, one pint of fmall )eer, one pint of red wine, fome fait, three dr four fpoonfuls of vinegar, two fpoonfuls of ketchup, beaten mace, a bunch of fweet herbs, an onion ftuck with flovesj a little cbjran pepper; let it ftew very gently till it is very tender, it will take about two hours; when it is enough, take it up and lay it in a deep difh: fcum the fat off very carefully, and ftrainthe gravy; put in a few pickled mufhrooms, truffles, niorIIs, and oyfters if agreeable; it is very good without: thicken the gravy, and pour over the beef.

Forcemeat-balls fried are a good addition, laid roimd th beef.

oftew Beef Gohbets.

Take a piece of beef, not too leaii, or too fat, cut it into pieces, the fize of a large egg put them into a ftfew-pan, and juft cover them with water; let them ftew an hour, fcum them very clean, then put in fome fait, and fome whole pepper cloves, and mace tied in a bit of liiuHin, fome celery and car rots, turnips pared and cut into flices, a bunch of fweet herbs, aqd a large cruft of bread, a little red wine according to the quantity that is wanted; cover them clofe, and let them ftew till they are tender;, take out the fplces and the bread, and have a French roll ready fried and cut into four, iput into them when they are fent to table.

A Leg of Beef Jlewed or baked,

CUT it into pieces, put to it a bunch of fweet herbs, two large onions, fix or eight, cloves, a carrot or two, a turnip a head df celery, fome black pepper, a quart of beer, and water enough to cover the meat; fet this into an oven with the bread, or ftew it in an earthen vclTel fix or fevcn hours; take out the meat, fcum the liquor; put to it celery ready boiled and cut into pieces, carrot cut to pieces and boiled, and turnips in balls, a little chyan. Or thicken fome of the liquor with flowet, boil it up a few minutes, (a little red wine, not much) pick out the finews, and as much of the meat as is wanted, put it into the fauce ferve it in a deep diih.

Be'ef A-la-mode, TAKE fome of the round of beef, the veiny piecc or fmall, 1 round.

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 129

roufldt' (what is generally called the moufe buttock) cut it five, or fix inches thick, cut fome pieces of fat bacon into long bits; take an equal quantity of beaten mace, pepper, and nutmeg, with double the quantity of fait, if wanted; mix them together dip the bacon into fome vinegar, (garlick vinegar, if agre able) then into the' fpice, lard the b(f with a larding-pin, very thick and even, put the meat into a pot juft big enough to hold it, with a gill of vinegar, two large onions, a bunclk of fweet herbs, half a pint of red wine, foitie lemon-peel: cover it doWn very clofe and put a wet cloth round the edge of the pot to prevent the fteam evaporating; when it is half done turn it, ind cover it up again, do it over a ftove or a very (low fire: it will take five hours and a half before it is done.

N. B. Truffles and morells may be added to it.

Another Way.

CUT fome of the round of beef into pieces, lard and fry them,' put to them fome beef broth, a bunch of fweet herbs, an onion, a few pepper-corns and cloves; ftew this gently tiR tender, covered clofe fcum off the fat add a few freih muflxrooms.

N. B. Water may be ufed inftead of broth.

Rump of Beef A-lamode.

BONE it, lard it with bacon, make a ftuffing with breadcrumbs, parlley and fweet herbs chopped, a little cfchalot, nutmeg, pepper, fait, lemon-peel grated, fuet chopped, and yolk f SS y Auif the part where the bone came out, and here and there irf the leafl; fkewer it and bind it with a tape: bake or ftew it with a pint of red wine and a quart of water; take out the rtiear, fcum thefiuce, thicken it with a little. flower; add morells, pickled muihrooms, or lemon-juice. It eats very well cold, or may be cut into flices and fried, tofled up in fome of the fauce, (thickened with flower) with oyftcrs and catchup.

A-U-mode de Portugal, TACE a fmall rump of beef, fry the thin part of it broWn in butter; make a ftuffing with fome onions, boiled chefnuts, an anchovy, fome chyan pepper, fait, and nutmeg; fluff the thick part of the rump, and ftew it in fome ftrong beef-pravy tilt it is tender, then take it up; keep it hot, ftrain off the gravy, put to it fome browning, (for made diflies) fome pickled CuCunibcr's, capers chopped, and a little lemon-juice; give it a bail, cut the fried meat in two, lay it on each fide the ftcw, and pour the gravy over it.

Beuf A-la-dauhe.

TAKE a round, a rump, or a veiny piece of beef, lard It with bacon, half roaft it, or fry it brown; put it into a ftewpan or a pot that will juft hold it, fome gravy, an onion ftuck with cloves, half a pint of white Wine, a gill of vinegar, a bunch of fweet •herbs, pepper, cloves, mace, and fait;. cover it down very clofe, let it but juft fimmer till it is tender; take two ox- palates, two fwctt-breads, truffles, morells, artichokebottoms, ftew them all together in fome gravy, and pour over the beef; have ready fome forced- meat balls fried, make fome long, others round, dip fome fippcts into batter, fry and cut them three-corner ways, and fiick them into the meat, lay the balls round the di(h.

A-la-royale.

BONE a rump, furloin, or brifket, and cut fome holes in it at a little diftance from each other; fill the holes, one with cfaopt oyfters, another with fat bacon, and the other with chopt parfley; dip each of thefe, before the beef is ftifFed, into a feafoning made with fait, pepper, beateit mace, nutmeg, grated lemon-peel, fweet marjoram, and. thyme; put a piece of butter into a frying-pan, and when it has done hifling, put in the beef, make it of a fine brown, then put it into fome broth made of the bones, with a bay-leaf, a pint of red wine, two lanchovies, and a quarter of a pint of fmall beer; cover it clofe, and let it ftew till it is tender, then take out the beef, fcum oflF the fat, ftfain the gravy; add two ox-palates ftewed tender and cutinto pieces, fome pickled gerkins, truffles, morells, and a little mufliroom powder; let all thefe boil together, thicken the fauce with a bit of butter rolled in flower, put in the beef to warm, pour the fauce over it, and ferveit up.

Tremblant.

CUT a fmall rump of beef very neatly, fo as to lay flat in the difli, let it hang according as the weather will permit, bind it about with a fillet, put it into a pot with water enough,to cover it, about a pint of Madeira, an onion ftuck with cloves, a piece of lemon- peel, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome whole pepper; let it flew gently for as long a time as it will hang together; take out the beef, fcum the fauce very clean, firft drained; ftfaifled • have fome carrots, firft half-boiled and cut in flips an inch long, then ftewed in about a pint of cullis, with fmall onions or efchalot minced, chopped parfley, and a little taragon; add to this as much of the liquor the beef was ftewed in as will make fauce enough, more wine if neceflkry, and a little juice of lemon; wipe the meat, take ofF the tape, pour the fauce over it when it has boiled up a minute or two. If it is dcfigned for a lide-diih, cut the meat to a proportionable fize,

Ecarlate.

TAKE a brifket, or the.thick part of the thin flank, rub it over well with fome falt-petre beat fmall, then take half a pound of coarfe fugar, a pound, of common falt two ounces of bayfalt, mix it all together and rub it well on the beefj turn it every day, and let it lie twelve days or a fortilight.

It eats very good cold with a weight laid upon it, and then cut mto flices.

Rump au RagouL

,?VT M " '"' " h 5 pour over it a little boilmg water, about a pint of fmall been; add a carrot or two, an onion ftuck with cloves, fome whole peppfalt, a piece of lemon-peel, a bunchnjf fweet herbs j let thefe-feljn hour then add fome good gravy; when the meat is tndet take it out ' . ftram the fauce, thicken it with a little flower; add a little celery

ready boiled, a little catchup; put in the meat, juft fimmer it up. Ur the celery may be omitted, and the Ragout enriched by adding muOirooms.frefh or pickled, artichoke-bottoms boiled and quartered, and hard yolks o eggs.

N. B. A piece of flank, or any piece that can be cut free" trom bone, will do mftead of the rump.

Round of Beef forced.

RUB It with fome common fait, a little bay.falt, falt-petre and coarfe fugar; let it lie a full week or more, according to the fize, turning it every day; wafli and dry it, lard it a little and make holes, which fill with bread crumbs, marrow, or fuet' parfley, grated lemon-peel, fweet herbs, pepper, fait, nutmeg! yolk of egg, made into a fluffing; bake it with a Me water boiled ' "" "" "" " '''''''''• "'y It is a handfome fideboard-dlfh cold for a large company.

U is the mfide of the fuo-ioirt; it muft be carefully cut &om' K 2 the the bone; make a feafomng whl a few crumbs of bread, a linle pepper and fat fbcne lefnoit-peel, thyme, parfley fliFed fmalt, with (bme nutmeg giated; ftrew this al) oyer it, and then put fbme flices of fat bon etic very thtn over the feafcmng $ roll it up very tight, flcewer it with fmal) ikewers, and roaft it; Ibafte it with red wine and butter, put fome good gravy into the diflr.

To broil Beif Steaks.

THE beft fteaks are cut from the middle of the rump; let them be cut half an inch thick, then beat them with a rollingpin, feaibn them with pepper and fait; let the fire be very clear and briik, the gridiron very clean; fet the di(h before the fire upon a chafingdtfli to keep hot; turn the fteaks often witft a pair of fmal) tongs made on purpofe. When they are enough, lay them in the di£h and rub a bit of butter over them.

N. B. Be fure do not feafon them tiH they are put upon the gridiron.

ef Stiaks fried.

TAKE fomefteaks cut out of the middle of the rump, fry them in butter; when they are done put a little finall beer into the pan if not bitter, the gravy which runs from the fteaks, a little nutmeg, an efchalot, fome walntit catchup, a piece of butterroUed in fiower, fliake it round the pan tilt it boils, and pour it over the fteaks; fome ftewed oyfters may be added, or pickled muibrooms.

Another way.

PEPPER and fait fome rump-fteaks, ftew them with fome water, aglafsof Madeira,a bun of fweet herbs, an anchovy or two, an onion, a piece of lemonpeel, two or three cloves % cover them clofe; when tender take them out;. flower them pretty well, fry them, pour olF the fat, ftrain the liquor that they were ftewed in, put it to the fteaks, with catchup or mufli room powder and liquor, oyfters and their liquor, lemon juice; .

flmmr this up; garnilh with pickles.

Beef Steaks fiewed.

CUT three pounds of fteaks from the leg of mutton-piece of Beef, beat them, put diem into a ftew-pan with a pint of water; the fame of fmall beer, if not bitter, if it is, put lefs beer and more water, fix cloves, a large onion, a bunch of fweet herb?, a carrot, a turnip pPP) anfl fait; ftew this very gently (dole covered) four or five hours, but take care the meat does not go to rags by doing (oo faft; take up th meat, ftrain the knee over it; have turnips cut into bas, and carrots cut into any ihape and boiled, whi(;h lay on the neat. It is a very good and cheap difh

Beef Steaks rolled.

TAKE fome Beef fteaks, what quantity is wanted, beat then with a cleaver to nuike them tender; make fome force-meat with a pound of veal beat£ae in a mortar, the iefli of a fowl, half a pound of cold ham of gammcxi of bacon, fat and lean, the icidaeylat of a loin of veal, and a fweetbread, .all cut very fmall; fome truffles and morells ftewed and then cut fmall, two efchalots, fome parfley, a little thyme, fome lemon-peel, the yolks of four eggs, a nutmeg &;rated, and half a pint of cream; mix thefe all together, and ftir them over a flow fire for ten minutes; put them upon the fteaks and roll them up, then ikewer them tight, put em into the frying-pan and fry them of a nice brown; then take them from the fat, and put them into a ftew-pan with a pint of good drawn gravy, a fpoonful of red wine, two of catchup, a few pickled muibrooms, and let them ftew for a quarter of ah hour; take up the fteaks, cut them in two, lay the cut fide uppermoft, Garniflx with Icmon Beef Olives.

CUT fteaks from the rump or infide of the furloin half an inch thick, about fix inches long, . and four or five broad, beat them a little, rub them over with yolk of egg, ftrew on bread crumbs, parfley chopped, lemon-peel ftired, pepper and fait, chopped fuet or marrow, grated nutmeg; roll them p tight, flewer them, fry or brown them in a Dutch oven; ftew them in fome Beef broth or gravy until tender, thicken the gravy with a little flower; add catchup, a little lemon juice. To enrich them, add pickled muflirooms, hard yolks of eggs, and forced-meat bails.

Beef Coll&ps ftemed.

CUT the Collops as Scotch Collops, they arc good from the thick flank, but more fo from the middle of the rump; beat them with a rolling pin, put them into a ftew-pan with a little water, a glafs of white wine, two efchaloCs ftired, a little grated lemon-peel, a little dried marjoram rubbed to pieces, fome fait and pepper (remember to have fome fat cut to the Collops fet them over a quick fire until the pan is full of gravy turn them, and they will be done in ten minutes; fome milfhroom pickle may. be added if it is liked; they are eat with pickles. The infide of a furloin of beef after it is roafted may be done the fame way.

Beef bajhed.

BOIL a little beer and water, with an cfchalot, two qr three cloves, and a bit of lemon peel; ftrain it, cut the beef thin, and flower it; add pepper, fait, a litde catchup, and garlic vinegar; fimmer thefe together, fliaking the pan round, then put in the meat; make it quite hot, but do not let it boil, add what gravy may have run from the meat, Garnifh with pickles and toafted bread.

Tle Butch way of falling Beef

TAKp a lean piece of 3eef and rub it well with brown fugar (fome pour treacle over it) let it lie at leaft two days, turning it very often, then wipe it and fait it with common fait and falt-pctre, beat the falt-petre fine, rub it well in, and turn it every day for fourteen or fifteen days, then roll it very tight in a coarfe cloth, and prefs it down with a large weight; hang it to dry in a chimney, but turn it the bottom upwards every day; tlien boil it in pump -water: it will cut into ihivers like Dutch Beef.

Hung'Beef.

THE proper piece is that called the navel-piece: it mu be hung up in a cellar until it is a little damp, but not long enough to change; take it down and wafli it very well in browi fugar and water, dry it with a cloth, cut it into two or three pieces; take half a pound of brown fugar, two pounds of bayfalt dried and pounded fmall, fix ounces of falt-petre dried and beat fine, rub it well into the Beef, then ftrew common fait all over it, as much as will make it fait enough, let it lie together ten days, changing the pieces the bottom to the top; hang it where it may have the warmth of the fire, but not too near; when it is drefTed, boil it In hay and pump-- water until tender: it will keep two or three months, if when mouldy it is dipt ii boiling water.

Beef hamSn

TAKE a fat leg of Beef, rub it well with falt-petre and fait prunella beat fine; then take an ounce of bay-falt well dried, an ounce of falt-petre beat fine, a pound of coarfe fugar, and a pound of common fait; rub this pickle well in every day for a month, then roll it in bran or faw-duft, and hang it in wood-fmoke, or burn horfe-litter under it for ten days or a fortnight j hang It in a dry place near the chimney for a week; it will then keep very well covered over with bran. Any other piece of Beef may be done in the fame pickle.

7o collar Beef.

Take a thin flank of Bcf take ofFthe fl:in, beat it, and rub It over with a little cochineal, half a pound of brown fugar, one ounce of falt-petre beat fine, and five ounces of common fait, rub it well in, and let it lie ten days, turning it every day; then take it from the pickle and put it into warm water for four or five hours, dry it well with a cloth, ftrew over it a good deal of fcalded parfley chopt, a little thyme, fome green fweet mar-' joram, and a little fage feafoned with pepper, fait, and nutmeg; cut the lean piece from the fat, and ftrew over it a few of the herbs, then put on the fat part, and then the reft of the feafoning, roll it tight, bind it with a coarfe tape; boil it until it is tender, and hang it up j the next day fcum the liquor it was ))oiled in, put in half the quantity of vinegar with black pepper andTalt, keep it in the pickle

Another,

TAKE the flat ribs of Beef, bone it, and beat it until it is quite foft; take half a pound of brown fugar, an ounce of falt-petre beat fine, half an ounce of fait prunella, a quarter of a pound of common falt rub it well all over the rncat, let it lie for twelve or fourteen days (according to the fiz) turn it every day, then foak it in warm water nine or ten hours, lay it upon a table, and cut it acrpfs each way about the fize of a finger, but do not cut the outfide; (kin the places that are cut fill one with chopt parfley, another with bread grated fmall, another with fat pork cut fmall, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and fait until they are full, then roll it up and bind it tight with coarfe broad tape, tie it up clofe in a cloth and boil it four or five hours very flowly; when it is done, hang it up by the ftring to keep it in fhape; the next day fcum the liquor, add to it half the quantity of very ftale ale, if it is to be had, if not, of very ftale ftnall beer, fome mace, long pepper, and fait, put in the Beef, and keep it for ufe. Cut a piece off each end when it is fent to table. If it is to be kept, make a frefli pickle every week.

Beuf a la Vinegrette.

CUT a flice of Beef from the round three Inches thick, with very little fat; ftew it in water and a glafs of white wine, lemoned with fait, pepper, cloves, a bunch af fweet herbs, and a bay'-Ieaf 3 lt it boil till the liquor is almoft confumtdt and when it is cold ferve it up; what liquor remains, firajn it ofF and mix it with a little vinegar.

To po$ Bef.

TAKE two pounds of lean beef, cut it into flices, and lay them upon a plate, feafon them with fait and faltpetre and a little cochineal; turn and feaTon them on the other fide, then ' let them lie one upon another all night, put them intp a pan i add to them half a pint of fmaJl beer, a little vinegar, as nmck water as will cover them; let there be In the pickle m blacc and Jamaica pepper, cover them very cloie and bake tbeip; wbea they are baked, take the flices out of the pickle while they ar hot, let them lie till cold, then beat them in a mortv a4d to them a pound of fre(h butter while they are beating; alfo ibme fait, pepper, and nutmeg; when they are well beat, put then into the pot, and when the bread is drawn put it into the ovea until it is hot through; when it is cold cover it over iithcla rified butter, and it will keep a month or two.

Another way.

RUB the leg of mutton piece of Beef, or part of it, with a little falt-petre, let it lie twenty- four hours; wafli and dry it, cut it into pieces, put it into a pan with a little water at the bottom, fome butter laid in lumps at the top; tie over it a thick piece of paper, bake it till tender take it out while hot, free from gravy, pick out all the (inews and fat, beat it in a mortar with pepper, fait, a few pounded cloves; add in the beating the butter which cakes upon the gravy, and what more is necefiary to inake it mellow; it muft be beat fine and be well feafoned put it down in pots, fet it for five minutes into a flack oven pour over clarified butter.

To pot cold Beef.

CUT it fmall, add to it fome melted butter, two anchovies boned and wafhed, a little Jamaica pepper beat fine; put theoi into a marble mortar and beat them well together till the meajt is yellow J then put it into pots and cover it with clarified butter.

Ox-Cbeek.

DRESS it in the lame manner as the leg of beef i take care to make it very clean.

TV fot On'chetk.

TAKE an Ox-cbee): if too largeMlf a one, waih it well aod bone it rub it over with the iigne ingredieo that are ufed to potted beef, aad kt it into 9n oven until it i% tender; then take out the,, fat, the (kin and the palate; add to a pound of the meat two ounces of the fat that fwims on the top of the liquor, beat it together in a miortar, and manage it as potted beef.

0 boil a tongue.

IF it is a dried one, fteep it all night in water, boil it three bours; if out of pickle, waft it only; boil it two bours (this for a middling-fized tongue) peel it, run a filve'r fkewer through it.

5fV ckle a Tongue.

RUB it well with fait and let it lie four or five hours, pour pfF the foul brine; take tiwo ounces of falt-petre beat fine and rub it all over the tongue; then mix a quarter of a pound of bayfait, a quarter of a pound of brown fugar, and an ounce of fait prunella (the bay-falt and fait prunella beat very fine) and rub It well over the tongue; let it lie in this pickle three or four days; nake a brine of a gallon of water with common fait ftrong enough to bear an egg hrif a pound of brown fugar, two ounces of falt-petre, and a quarter of a pound of bay-falt; boil it a quarter of an hour, feum it well; when cold, put in the Tongue; )et it lie in this pickle a fortnight or three weeks, turning it every day; either boil it out of the pickle, or bang it in wood fmoke to dry.

To roafi a Tongue or Udder.

PARBOIL the Tongue and Udder, ftick in them ten or twelve cloves, roaft them and bade them with red wine, froth them with a piece of butter. Sauce-gravy and fweet faace The Udder eats well boiled with the Tongue

To roaft a Tongue and to fluff the Udder with

Force-meat.

BOIL the Tongue and Udder until tbey are tender peel the Tongue and 0ick five or ten cloves into it, if agreeable; raife the Udder, wa& the infide with the yolk of an egg, make a good force-meat of veal an4 fill it; tie the ends clou: together and roaft them; bafte them with red wine and butter: an hour will roaft them. Sauce- 'good gravy and currant jelly.

To flew an Ox Tongue.

' PUT it to ftew with juft water enough to cover it, let it Maimer two hours; peel it, and put it into the liquor again, with fome pepper, fait, mace, cloves, and whole pepper tied in a bit of fine cloth; a few capers, chopped turnips, and carrots fliced, half a pint of beef gravy, a little white wine, and a bunch of fwcet herbs; let it ftew very gently until it is tender, then take out the fpice and fweet herbs and thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flower, '

Ox Tongues fried.

BOIL them till they are tender, cut them into flices, and feafon them with a little nutmeg, cinnamon, and fugar; beat the yolk of an egg well, and with a feather rub it over the flices of Tongue, adding a little lemon juice; make fome butter boiling -hot in the trying pan (which it is when it has done hifsing) put in the flices when they are enough. Serve them up with white wine, fugar, and melted butter well beat in a t)oat.

To marinate Ox Tongues

BOIL them till tender, and peel them, when cold, put them into a veflel that v((ill hold them at i'ull length; make a pickle of white-wine and white-wine vinegar (as much as will fill the veflel) fome nutmegs, ginger fliced, mace, whole cloves, a bunch of fweet herbs, confifting of parfley fweet marjoram, fage, winter favory, thyme, and bay-leaves j boil them well, when cold put them to the Tongues, with fome fait and fliced lemoA 5 clofe them up. Serve them in flices in fome of the liquor They may be larded, if agreeable.

To pot Ox Tongue.

. DO it as for pickling: when it has lain its time, cut ofF the root, boil it until it will peel; then feafon it with fait, pepper, cloves, mace, and nutmeg, all beat fine; rub it well in while itis hot, put it into a pan, pour melted butter over it and fend it to the oven j an hour will bake it j then- lef it ftand to cool, rub a very little more fpice over it, and lay it into the pot it IS to be kept in j when the butter it was baked in is cold, take it from the gravy, clarify, and pour it over the Tongue; if there is not enough to cover it, add more. Partridges, pigeons, or ' any other birds may be laid on each fiide the butter muft be an ipch, higher than the Tongue.

Ox Palates Jiewed.

CLEAN four or five palates, put them into an earthen pan with water to cover them; tic them down, bake them (or boil them) when tender peel them, cut them into pieces, flower them; put then) into fome good gravy, with an onion, a Jittle pounded ploves, a piece of lemon -peel, and fome catchup; flew them half an hour, take out the peel and onion y add fome moreJls, forced-meat balls, and lemon juice, and if to be had artichoke bottoms boiled and quartered. Garniih with lemon fliced, or the peel cut like ftraws

Ox Palates pickled.

WASH the palates clean with fait and water, then put them to boil in fome more fait and water, fcum them very clean; let them flmmer four or five hours, and feafon them with pepper, clpves, and mace; when they are tender cut them into pieces and let them cool. Make a pickle of half white- wine and half vinegar, boil it, and put in the. fpice that was boiled with the palatev; add fix or feven bay-leaves and fomp frefh fpice; when both arc cold, put them toget)ier and keep theni for ufe.

Ox Heart.

MIX bread crumbs, chopt fuet (or bit of butter) parfley chopt, fweet marjoram, lemon-peel grated, pepper, fait,, and nutmeg, with yolk of egg; fluff the heart, and bake or roafl itwjth a poor man's jack. Serve it with gravy, a little red winp in it, liielted butter, and currant jelly in boats. Some lard it with bacon,

Tripe.

BOIL it with a few fmall oniofts; ferve' it in the liquor j melted butter in a boat. Or dip it in batter and fry it.

Tripe a la FricaJJee.

LET it be very white, cut it into flips, put it into fonie boiled gravy with a Ijttle cream and a bit of butter mjxpd with flover, flir it till the butter is melted; add a little white wine, lemonpeel grated, chopped parfley, pepper, and fait, pickled mufhrooms or lemon-juice; fhake all together; flew it a little.

Ox Feet fried.

BOIL them till tender, fkin and fplit them, take out the bones and fry them in butter; when they have fried a little, put in fome mint and parfley fhred fmall, a little fait, fome beaten pepper; beat the yolks of eggs, fome mutton, gravy and vinegar, the juice of a lemon or orange, and nutmeg: lay it in the difliy and pour the fauce over it. Some love a little ihced onion in it.

Skirts EAT well, broiled, and they make an excellent pie.

Kidneys MAKE gooi gravy.

DireSions to chpofe VeaL

TH £ fleOi of a bull-calf is firmer than that of a cow, but then it is feldom fo white; the fillet of a Cow-calf is generally preferred, on account of the udder; if the head is frefli, the eyes are plump, but if ftale, they are fuftk and wrinkled.

If a Ihoulder is ftale, the vein is not of a bright red; if there are any green or yellow fpots in it, it is very bad.

The breaft and neck, to be good, (hould be white and dry; if they are clammy, and look green or yellow at the upper end, they are ftale.

The loin is apt to taint under the kidney; if it is ftale it will be foft and flimy.

A leg (hould be firm and white; if it is limber, and the flefh flabby, with green or yellow fpots, it is not good.

Different pieces of VeaU

Fore garter.

THE flioulder, neck, and breaft; the throat fweetbread, and the wine-pipe fweetbread, which is the fineft, and belongs'' to the breaft.

Hind garter.

THE loin and the leg, which contain the knuckle and fillet.

The Head Tongue, Pluck,

WHICH has the heart, liver, lights, nut, melt, kidneys, and fkirt.

The Feet.

Boiled VeaL VEAL hould be well boiled; a knuckle of fix pounds will

. take

THE lady's assistant. 141

take very near two hoars: the neck muft be alfo well boiled, in a good deal of water; vif it is boiled in a cloth, it w'Al be whiter ferve it with tongue, bacon, or pickled pork, greens of any fort, broccoli, and carrots, or onion-fauce, wbite-iauce, oyfter-fauce, pariley and butter or white celery-auce.

To boil a Knuckle or Breaft of Veal after the NewEngland manner.

BOIL it till it is tender then lake fome veal gravy properly feafdned thicken it with butter rolled in flowery and' a couple of eggs y put the veal m the diih and pour the (aoce over it

Roaft Veal

WILL take a quarter of an hour to a pound;, paper the fafe of the Toin and fillet, ftufF the fillet and fhoulder with the following ingredients; a quarter of a pound of fuet chopped fine, parfley and fweet herbs chopped, grated bread and lemon-peel, pepper, fait, nutmegs and yolk of egg; butter may fupply the want of fiiet; roaft the breaft with che caui on tiU ft is almoft enough het take it oiF; flower if and bafte it veal iquire to be more done than beef. For fauce-fallad, pickles, potatoes broeeoiliy eucumbers raw or ftewed, French beans, peafe, colliflowery celeiy raw or ftewed.

Breaft of Veal ftewed white.

CUT a piece ofF each end; make a force-meat as follows: Boil the fweetbread and cut it very fnutll, fome grated bread, a little beef'fuet, two eggs, a little cream, fome nutmeg, fale, and pejer; natx it well together,' and ftufF tiie thin part of the breaft with tome of it,, the reft mae up into Iktte balls; fkewer the &in ctofe down, flower and boil it in a cloth in milk and water make fome gravy of the ends that were out off, with half a pint of oyfkrs, the juice of a lemon, and a piece of butter roiled in flower; when the veal is enough put it m the difti $ garniih with the bls ftewed, and pour the fauge over it.

Breaft of Veal ftewed with Peafe or cut Afparagus.

CUT it into pieces about three inches in fize, try it nicely: mix a little flower with fome beef broth, an onion, two or three cloves ftew this fome time, ftrain it j add three pints, or two quarts of peafe, or fome heads of afparagus, cut like peafe put in. the meat, let it ftew gently add pepper and lilt. .

Ni?ri of Vealftewed with Celery.

TXkE the beft end of a neck, put it into a ftew-pan witH fome beef-broth or boiling-water, fome fait, whole pepper, and cloves tied in a bit of muflin, an onion, a pice of lemon-peel; ftew this till tender; take out the fpice and peel, put in a little cream and flower mixed, fome celery ready boiled and cut into lengths; boil it up.

Knuckle of Veal ftewed white.

LAY at the bottom of the pot or veflel the veal is ftewed irf; four wooden (kewers, put the veal upon them with a cruft of bread, two or three blades of mace, fome whole pepper, a bunch of fweet herbs, a fmall onion; cover it down clofe make it boil; and then let it fimmer till tender. If rice is liked, boil it ' in water by itfelf till tender; ftewing it with the veal changes its colour and makes it look greafy.

Knuckle of Veal ftewed brown.

TAKE aknucklc of veal, cut it into four pieces, juft fry it to be brown; then put to it three pints of boiling water, and let it ftew on a very flow fire near three hours put with it a bunch of fweet herbs, an anchovy, fome vermicelli and fait, with a little chyan. When it is done, take it up and pour the fauce over it.

New England wUy of hajhing a Knuckle of Veal white.

. BOIL a knuckle of veal till, it is tender, then take aljttle of the liquor it was boiled in, and put it into a ftewpan with a little milk, a blade of mace, one anchovy, a bit of lemon-peel let thefe fimmer till the anchovy is difliblved; then ftrain the liquor and put in a little cream, with a bit of butter rolled in flower; cut the veal into thin flices, and let them ftew together till the gravy is of a propcf thicknefs, fhake the pan round often; poach five or fix eggs, and broil fome fmall flices of bacon, lay the eggs upon the bacon round the veal, and lay crifped parfley between.

Knuckle of Vealftuffed and ftewed.

CUT it large, lard the upper fide with bacon; make a ftuf-' fing with bread crumbs, fuet chopped and oyfters, parfley chopped, lemon-peel grated, pepper, fait, nutmeg, and yolk of egg; ftufF it, and flcewer the fluffing well in, put it into a ftew-pan with as much water as will cover it j ftew it till tcn der, boil the liquor till reduced to the quantity that is wanted; mrxfome flower, fmooth in fome cream; boil it up in the fatice with catchup, fome oyfters, and lemon-juice j fcrve it in a 3cep difli; the larding may be omitted.

If it is ferved at bottom, fend it to table in a deep dilh, with a little fauce poured over it, and fome in boats.

Fillet of Vealftewed.

STUFF it, half- bake it with a little water in the difli, then ftew it with the liquor, and fome good gravy, a little Madeira; when enough, thicken it with flower; add catchup, chyan, a little fait, juice of orange or lemon; boil it up.

Fillet au Ragout.

LARD it, and do it as the breaft, only allow more time, as it takes' longer doing.

A Ragout of a Breaft of Veal.

HALF roaft the beft end of it, flower it, and ftew it gently with three pints of good gravy, an onion, a few cloves, whole pepper, and a bit of lemon-peel; turn it while flewing; when very tender, ftrain the fauce y if not thick enough, mix a little more fldwer fmooth; add catchup, chyan, truffles, morellsj pickled mufhrooms boil if up, put in hard yolks of eggs.

Veal d'la-mode.

CUT the bone out of a fillet of veal, and take off the ikin; make a feafoning of pepper, fait, mace, and beaten cloves, fome thyme, winter- favory, lemon-peel, and efchalot (bred fmall; take half a pound of bacon, cut off the rhind, and cut it in long pieces, dip it in the feafoning, and lard the veal with it very thick; put it into a veflel juft large enough to hold it; if any of the feafoning is left, fprinkle it over the veal j put in a little veal broth juft to cover it, half a pint of Madeira, an onion ftuck with cloves, and three or four heads of celery; let it ftew till tender, cover the top of the pot clofe to prevent the Aeam coming out; when it is enough, take out the veal, put a little of the gravy with a little flower in a hafonj mix it fmooth to thicken the fauce; pickled mulhrooms may be added, or the juice of a lemon, if agreeable.

Veal Pockets,

TAKE a fillet of fmall veal, cut it into three or four fiices, fkewer the flap round, and lard them upon one fide with bacon; feafon with thyme, &c. hang them upon a poor man's jack till half d0if6, then ftw them in fomt ftrong veal gravy, with muihrooms, truffles, morel Is, &c.

yf Harrico cf Veah

Take a neck or breaft of veal, (if the neck, cut the boriea ibort) and half-roaft it; then put it into a ftew-pan juft covered with brown gravy, and whert it is near done have ready a pint of boiled peafe, ix cucumbers pared, and two Cabbage-lettuces cut in quarters, ftewdd in brown gtvy, with a few forced-meat balls ready fried put them to the vcal, and let theiti juft iimmer: when the veal is xv the diftr, pfour the fauce and the peaft over it, and lay the lettuce and balls round it.

THeck of Veal d-la-Braize

TAKE the beft end, lai;d it with bacon rolled in parflejr chopped, pepper, falt and nutmeg; put it into a ftew-pan, and cover it with Water; put in the fcrag end with a Uttle lean bacon or a bit of hanl, n onion, two carrots, fome cfchalotr, -a head or two of cdefy, and a little Madeira; let thefe lieW gently for two hours, or till tender; ftrain the liquor, mix a little butter With fome flower, ftir it in a ftew-pan till it is brown; lay in the veal, the upward fide to the bottom of the pan let it do a few minutes till it is coloured, lay it in the di(h, ftir in fome more liquor, boil it up i fqueeze in orange or lemon juice.

Feal a-la-Dauh.

TAKE any piece of veal, fkin and lard it; put into a large foup-di(h, (proportionaible to the piece of veal,) of verjuice and white wine an equal quantity, with five bay-leaves broke into pieces, fome whole pepper, a bunch of fweet herbs,, dnd fome fait; ftir thefe well together, and then put in the veal let it foak four hours, t-urning it often; then ftir it, and lay it down to roaft at a moderate fire; put the liquor it was foaked in, into the dripping-pan, bafte the veal with it as it roafts; when it is almoft done, pour the liqUor from the dripping pan into a ilew- pan, and put the meat with it; pour rather more gravy than will cover the meat, and add two anchovies boned and cut fmalj, a large fpoonful of capers, a lemon cut in flfces, and half a dozen mulhrooms cleaned and cut in pieces; let the meat fimtner in thefe foe fome time, and then take it off.

It may be eat either hot or cold.

Veal Fricandeau

TAKE the round of a fillet, or a piece of it; fry it in butter of a good brown ) with fliced omon and a little garlic; put it into a ftew-pan with fome very ricb gravy, or cull is, ftew it till tender; thicken the gravy with fome flower, let it be very reliihing; fqueeze in a little juice of lemon.

Veal Blanquets.

TAKE a piece of veal which has been roaftcd, (but not over done) cut it into thin flices, take from it the fkin and griftles; put fome buttet over the fire with fome chopped onions; fry them a little, then fhake a little f)ower over them; fhake the pan round, and put in fome veal gravy, a bunch of fweet herbs, and fome fpice; then put in the veal, vitb the yolks of two eggs beat up with cream, a grated nutmeg, fome parfley flired final, fome lemon-peel grated, and a Tittle of the juice; ftir it one way till it is thick and fmooth, and put it in the difh.

A Leg of Veal in Difguife.

LARD the veal with nips of bacon, and a little lemon-peel cut very thin; make a fluffing as for a fillet of veal, only mix with it half a pint of oyfters chopped fmall;, put it into a veifel and cover it with water; let it flew very gently till quite tender; take it up and Ikim off the fat, fqueeze fome juice of lemon, fome muffaroom-catchup, the crumb of a roll grated fine, and half a pint of oyfters, with a pint of cream, a piece of butter rolled in flower: let the fauce thicken upon the fire; put the veal in the di(h, pour the fauce over it; garni(h with oyfters dipped in butter and fried and with thin flices of toafted bacon

To collar a Breaji of Veal

TAKE a breaft of veal, pick oflF all the fat and meat from the bones; beat up the yolks of two eggs and rub over it with a feather; take fome crumbs of bread, a little grated nutmeg, fome beaten mace, a little pepper and fait, with a few fweet herbs, and a little lemon-peel cut fmall, and ftrew over it: put a thick flcewer into it to keep it together; roll it up tight and ' bind it very clofe with twine; roll a veal caul over it, and roaft it an hour and a quarter; before it is taken up, take ofF the caul, fprinkle fome fait over it, and bafte it with butter; let the fire be brifk, and the veal of a fine brown; when it is taken up cut it in three or four flices, lay it in the difli; boil the fweetbread cut it in flices, aiid lay round it (fome like it h larded 3 larded $) pour over it white fauce, which muft be made as foN lows:

A pint of good veal gravy, half an anchovy, a tea-fpoonful of mufhro'om powder; let it boil up, then put ia half a pint of cream, and the yolks of two eggs well beat; juft ftir it over the fire, but do not let it boil, or the cream will curdle; put in fome pickled mufhrooms juft before it is fent to table.

RoUed Veal.

BONE the thin end of a breaft of veal; ftrew over it a good deal of parfley, pepper and fait to make it favoury, a little nutmeg, grated lemon-peel, and foojie fweet herbs; roll it tight, few it up, put it into aftew-pan that will juft hold it, with the bones, and water to cover it, fome whole pepper, a bit of lemon-peel, an onion, and a little fait; boil it till tender: it will keep a week in cold weather. It may be eat cold, but is better cut in dices dipped in egg, than in bread .

crumbs, and fried; thicken fome of the liquor with a littk flower; add pickled mufhrooms, a little cram, catchup, and a lew morells, pepper and fait; pour the fauce into the dii lay in the veal; five dices make a pretty difti.

Shoulder of Veal rolled ftewed in a. Braize.

BONE it; fpread it as broad as poffible; fpread over it fome forced-meat; lay on that, at little diftances, long flips of ham and bacor; place in the intervals, firft anchovy, then onion, mufhropms, parfley, hard yolks of eggs, and fo on, all chopped; then lay over then) what forced-meat is left; roll it up very tight, bind i with tape or in a cloth: put into a ftew-pan fome ilices of bacon, bf and onion, then the rolled veal, carrot, fiveet herbs, pepper and fait, then more ilkes of beef and bacon, with what hot water is fufficient; ftew it till tender, take it out, Mfipe it very clean, firain the liquor through a piece of dimity; take what is necefiary of it, with a ladle-full of cullis; thicken the fauce, make it palatable i add juice of orange or lemon; ferve it hot for a firft courfe, or when cold flice it; Arain the liquor as before dtrcdted which will jelly; lay fome ef it round the fliced veal.

A Poloe of Veal

TAKE a pound of rice, put to it ar quart of veal broth fame mace, and a little fait; ftew it over very flow fire till it is thick; butter the bottom of the ftew-pan, beat up the yolks cf fix eggs and ilir Into its n take a diib, butter it, lay fisme of the rice at bottom, and put upbn it a neck or breaft of veal, half-roafted, cut into five or fix pieces; lay the veal clofe together in the middle, and cdver it all over with rice; wafh th rice over with the yolks bf eggs, atid bake it an hour and a half, then open the top, and pour in fome good thick gravy; fqueezQ in the juice of an orange.

A Portttgnefe Poke.

TAKE a leg of veal, about twelve or fourteen pounds, cut into pieces; an old cock or hen, (kilned and cut aifo into pieces, bones and all $ pot them into a veflel with three gallons of water, eight or ten blades of mace, half a pound of bacon, two onions, and fix or eight cloves; cover them clofe and boil them very flowly till the liquor is half wafted, and the meat is quite Boiled down; (this muft be done the day before it is wanted) the hoKt day put this liquor into a faucepan with a pound of rice, and let it ftand over a very flow fire till the rice is very thick and dry; great cre muft be taken that it does not burn: turn it into a difh; garnifh with hard eggs, in quarters. It is generally eat with roaft fowls, in another difii

A Grenade of feal.

CUT fome thin flices from a fillet of veal of a moderate breadth, and lard them half way With bacon; then take a dozen fquab pigeons, let thetn be picked and trufled 5 put them into a pan of boiling water; let them lie in it two or three minutes 5 fet a fteW-pan upon the fire with fome good gravy, put into it a dozen of niuflirooms, picked and fliced, and three veal fweetbreads cut and fliced; put the pigeons to thefe ingredients, and fet the ftew-pan over a very flow fire; when the pigeons and fweetbreads are enough, thicken the gravy with fome rich cullis: add fome cock's-combs ahd fome artichoke-bottoms fhred fnfiall 5 lei thefe ftew a little while, and then fet them to cool.

Cut fome thin flices of ham and bacon, put in fome forced meat, then the larded, veal int6 a flew-pan, and put the ham and bacon over it, and put in fome yolks of eggs over the ham and veal, and then more forced-meat; then put in the ragout of pigeons, and turn the flices of veal and bacon; put over them rfiore forced-meat rubbed over with yolks of eggs; cover them Vith ficds of bacon: cover the ftew-pan clofe, and put fire over and under it 5 take care it does not burn; when done, turn it iotQ a hot difh, take off the bacon, fkim ojf the fat, dut 10 ibni vcat-culli$, zM fervc it hot.

Terrine of Veal Griftles.

TAKE a good quantity. of veal griftles, from the breaft or any other part; wafh them in two or three watery, then fet them on a fieve to drain; put feme butter into a ftew-pan fet it over a (low fire; put in a piece of butter when it boils, which is when it has doiie hiffing; put in the griftles, and aa onion ihred very fine, fome pepper and fait, fome fweet herbs Ihred fine, and fome flower: let thefe fry a little, then pour in, fome gravy, and let them ftew; then cut to pieces three good cabbages, or imperial lettuce, and put them in to ftew; when it is enough (kim q(F the fat, then pour in fome cuUis of bam or bacon, and ferve it up

Veal Colhps.

CUT them about five inches long, not fo broad, and not too thin; rub them with eggs, and ftrew over them fome crumbs of grated bread, arfley chopped, grated lemon-peel pepper, fait, and nutmeg, with a few leaves of thyme ftired fmaU fet them before the fire in a difti or Dutch oven; bafte them,'Vhen a nite bi-own, turn them; thicken fome rich gravy with a little flower; add catchup, chyan, muftirooms, and hard yolks of eggs; boil this up, and pour it over them.

Scotch Collops.

CUT them from the leg; fry them a good brown, but not too much; take fome good gravy, thicken it with a little flower, boil it a few minutes; add chyan, catchup, truffles, morells, fait, mufhrooms pickled, grated lemon-peel; fimmer this up, juft heat the collops through, add what gravy came from them, but do not let them boil, or they will be hard, which i a great fault; add forced-meat balls, hard yolks of eggs; lay round little flices of bacon notched and toafted; fliced lemon

Scotch Collops white.

PUT a lump of butter into a ftew-pan, fet it at a diftance over a gentle fire; when the butter is juft melted, lay in the collops, keep turning them till there appears a thickifli gravy; put this into an earthen pan, put more butter and more collops in the fame manner, till all are done; then pour the gravy from them into a ftew-pan, with a little crearn mixed with a little flower, white pepper, fait, lemon-juice or pickled mu(h rooms, and a few oyfters; boil this up, put in the collopi, heat them through. Forced-meat balls boiled may be added.

Veal Cutlets.

CUT part of the neck into cutlets; fhorten them, fry them a nice brown; ftew them in fome good gravy tijl tender, with a little flower mixed fmobth in it 5 then add catchup, chyan, fait, a few truffles and morells, pickled mulhrooms. Forced-meat balls may likewife be added.

Cutlets in Ragout.

TAKE fome largft cutlets from the fillet; begt them flat, and lard them; ftrew over them fome pepper fait, crumbs of bread, and fhred parfley; then liiake a ragout of veal fweetbreads and mufhrooms; fry the cutlets in melted bacon, of a line brown; then lay them in a hot difli, and ppur the ragout boiling hot over them.

Cutlets with four Sauce.

CUT them moderately thick j put them into a faucepan covered with water, when half done let them drain and cool; make a thin batter of eggs and a little flower, fet a frying-pan on the fire with fome hog's-lard; when it is hot dip the cutlets in the batter, and make them a fine brown. For fauce - v,erjuijce, fait, and pepper; mix it and fend it up with the cutlets. Tlofe that diflike this fauce alay drefs them with gravv or culijs.

Veal Olives.

CUT them thin from (be fillet (iftt is large, one flice will make three olives 5) rub over them fome yolk of egg, ftrew on them fome bread crumbs, mixed with parfley chopped, lemon-peel grated, pepper, fait, and nutmeg; lay on every piece a thin flice of bacon, not too fat; roll thm up tight, flcewer them with fmall fkewers, rub the outfide with egg, roll them in bread crumbs, &c. lay them in the Dutch oven, let them do without burning; they take a good deal of time, as they are thick. Pour the following fauce into the difli - Take a pint of good gravy, thicken it with flower; add catchup, chyan, pickled muflirooms; boil this up a few minute; forced-neat balls may be added.

Veal Olives A4amode.

TAKE two pounds of veal; beat it fine, as for forcedmeat; the yolks of two eggs, two anchovies, half a pound of marrow, a few muflirooms, pickled or frefli; half a pint of oyfters, fome thyme, fweet marjoram, parfley, fpinach, lemonpeel fait, pepper, nutmeg, and mace, finely beaten; mix all

L 3 well

150 THE LApY ASSISTANT.

well together: take a veal caul, .lay a layer of bacon, and a layer of the ingredients, roll it in the veaj caul, an4 cither jroaft or bake it; when it is done cut it intp fltces lay it in the difli, and pour good gravy over It CUT fome flices of veal the bi:eadth of three fingers, and twice that length, an4 the t;hicknefs pf a crownpiece; make a Ceafonipg of fvveqt herbs, fome grated brctadj pepp, (air, and a little nutmeg; beat up the yolks of two eggs (withput the whites) fet on a frying-pan ith a piece of butter, when it is boiling' hot dip the veal in the egg, and then ii tho feafoning; tover them with it very thicl; throw them into th pan and brown them; put them into a hot difli and fqueeze 4 Jemon over them: pour the fat but of the pan, put in fome gravy or cullis, fqueeze n, fom? len;oia fiake it round the pan till it is boiling hot, and then pour it over thp veal y if it is not thick enough, mix a little flbwer and gravy ijpt a lafon, and then pour it into (hat in the frying-pan let it bgil, and ferve it up.

J'q drefs cfild Veal.

FRY the veal brown, thiqn put it where the butejp njaj drain off; afterwards ftew it with, an, eq.ual quantity of wbitj wine and vinegar; feafon it to the tafte; throw the fuckers of artichokes, with the horny part cut off, into it when the Veal is put im • •

Cold Veal hajhedf DO it as the cold, calf's-head; or when fliced, flower it, put it into a little gravy, with grated lemon-pqel, pepper, fait, and catchup; boil it up j add a little juice of lemon: ferve round it toafted fippets.

Minced VeaU

CUT the veal very fine, but dp not chop it; take a little Ivhlte gravy or water, but gravy is better, a little cream or milk', a bit of butter rolled in flower, and, fome grated lemonpeel; let thefe boil till like a fine thick qream; flower the vekl, fhake a little fait and fome white pepper over it; put it into the fauce-pan to the other ingredint, and let it be quite hot: it muft not boil after the veal isin, or it wijl be hard: before it is taken up, fqueeze fome juice of lemon into it

i it is agreeably, put fippets iinder. it.

Tir

I

tHE LADY'S ASSISTANT. i5f

'o collar a Breaft of Veal to eat cold.

80NR a breaft of veal neatly; make a feafoning of fcalded iarflty chopt ftnall, a little winter-fevoury, thyme, fweet- marjoram, and a few leaves of fage, likewife chopt fmall; a Rttle grated lemon-eel, fome beaten cloves, mace, pepper, anJ fait; half a dozen anchovies cut fmall; ftrew this Over the veal, roll it up very tight, and bind it clofe with narrow tape; tie it in a cloth, boil it very tender in vinegar and water; put in fotne cloves, mace pepper, and fait; do not put in the collar tiH the liquor boils; when it is tender take it up, and when both are cold, take off the cloth, lay it in a pan, and pour the lin quoP over it; if it does not keep, ftrain it through a coarfe cloth; boil it and fcum it, wipe the collar dry; ftrain the liquor again through a piece of dimity after it is boiled and' when cold pour it over the collar, and tie it up very iclofe.

Bnafi of Veal in Galantine.

BONE a breaft of veal, and beat it quite flat; then mak a feafoning with fweet herbs, parfley, thyme, fome grated lemon-peeU mixed with pepper fait, and grated nutmeg; ftrew this 4nixture over the veal, roll it up round as tight a& poilible, and tie it up in a napkin; put it into a fmall pot with fome good brotfh, juft enough to cover it; put in a buncli tf fweet herbs, let it ftew two hoars; when the liquor is a good deal reduce4 4)ut in a pint of mountain and fome bruifed mace; let it boil up two or three times, then take it ofF and' fet it to cool in the liqnor: when it is quite cold, take off the napkin and fet by the veaL Some like it fent.to table whole, but it is better cut in flices.

0 boil Veal like Sturgeon.

TAKE a fmall delicate fillet of veal, from a,cbw dalf; take off the fkin, and then lard it all over, top, bottom, ahd fides with fome bacon and ham; put into a ftew-pan fome flices of 1)acon and veal; ftrew over them fome pepper, fait, and fweet hrbs; then put in the fillet with as much broth as will juft cover t!tittti; cover the ftew-pan very clofe, and let them fimmer very gently; when the veal is near enou, put in a bottle of while win, an onion ihred, a few cloves, a little mace; put oh the cover of the ftew-pan, fet it over a ftove, and lay fome charcoal upon it; when it has been kept hot ten minutes, take it off the fire and remoe the charcoal If it is intended to be eat hot, the following fauce muft be made while it is ftewing - Set on a fauce-pan, with a glafs of gravy, aglafs and a half of vinegar, half a lemon iliced, a large onion fliced, and a good deal of pepper and fait; boil this a few minutes and ftrain it; lay the meat in a dilh, and pour the fauce over it. If it is to be eat cold, it muft not be taken out of the liquor it is ftewed in, but let by to cool all night, and it will be exceeding good.

To tot VeaL

TAKE a part of a knuckle or fillet of veal, that has been ftewed, or bake it on pufpofe for potting; beat it to a pafte,, with butter, fait, white pepper, and mace, pounded prefs it down in pots, pour over it clarified butter.

Marbled Veal.

DO the veal as above; boil a tongue very tender, flice it, beat it with butter, white pepper, and mace pounded; put a layer of veal in the pot, then ftickJn lumps of tongue; fill up the fpaccs with the veal, pour over clarified butter. It makes a pretty di(h iliced

Veal in Jelly.

CUT a piece out of the leg; put it into a ftew-pan, with as much veal broth gs will be fufficient for the jelly; when reduced, fome Madeira, an onion, a bunch of fweet herbs, half a lemon, pepper, fait, a little mace, and a flice or two of boiled ham; let this ftew till the veal is tender; ftrain the liquor through a piece of dimity, the rough fide upward, firft dipped in cold water; then boil in it two ounces of ifinglafs, and add lemoii-juice, wine, &c. as may be neceiTary; pafs it through a bag: the veal fhould be wiped dean before it is cold, and may be put into the jelly in the fame manner as a chicken; or lay the veal in a plate, break the jelly a little and heap upon it.

Veal Ham.

TAKE a leg of veal, cut ham fafliion, two ounces of faltpetre, one pound of bay and one of common fait, and one ounce of juniper-berries bruifed; rub it well into the veal j lay the (kinny fide downwards at firft, but let it be well rubbed and turned every day for a fortnight, and then let it be hung in wood fmoke for a fortnight. It may be boiled, or parboiled and foafted.

CALVES

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 153

CALVES HEADS.

Caifs Head boiled.

WASH it very clean, parboil one half, beat up the yolk of an egg, and rub it over the head with a feather,, then ftrew over it a feafoning of pepper, fait, thyme, parfley chopt fmall, ihred lemon-peel, grated bread, and a little nutmeg; ftick bits of butter over it, and fend it to the oven; boil the other half white in a. cloth, put them both into a difh; boil the brains in a bit of cloth, with a very little parfley, and a leaf or two of fag6 5 when they are boiled, chop them fmall, and warm them up in afaucepan, with a bit of butter and a little pepper and fsAt; lay the tongue, boiled and peeled, in the middle of a fmall difh, and the brains round it; have in another diih baqon or pickled pork; greens and carrots in another.

To hajb a Calfs Head white.

BOIL half a calPs head in milk and water, cut it in fiices; when coid flower it, and put it into a ftew-pan, with fome veal gravy, a little beaten mace, a little fait, a few morells, a few 4richoke-bottoms parboiled, fome oyfters with their beards taken off, ftewed in a good piece of butter rolled in flower; put in the liquor, the yoiks of two eggs well beat half a pint pf cream; ftir all together till it is of a good thicknefs, and juft before it is taken up, put in fome pickled mufhrooms, and a little of their liquor; if they are put in before, the cream is apt to turn. Garniih with forcedmeat balls fl:ewed. Pai:boil the brains in a bit of cloth, and chop them fmall; put them into a faucepan, with a bit of butter, a little white pepper and fait; make them quite hot, and fill fome patties; fill others with flewed forcedmeat and oyflers: garnifh the calPs head with them.

Calfs Head hajhed brown.

HALF the head only fhould be hafhed, as a whole one makes too large a difh; parboil it, when cold cut it into thii fiices, and the tongue; flower it pretty well, put it into a ftewpan with fome good gravy, a quart or more, a glafs of Ma-r deira, an anchovy wiped and boned, a little pounded cloves, cbyan, a piece of lemon-peel 5 let thefe flew gently three quarters of an hour; then add fome catchup, a few trufHes and morells, firft wafhed; pickled or frefh mufhrooms; if frefh, a little juice of lemon; ftew thefe together a few minutes; add forcedmeat balls fried, and hard yolks of eggs. Dip the brains in hot water fkin them, beat them fine and mix them with a little grated ated lemop'-pceU parfley' chopped, and favoury lrbs, favoury ipice, chyan, fait, bread crumbs, and yolk of egg; fry thefe in fmall cakes; garnifh the hafli with them, oyfters fried, and iliced lemon. If for a large compatty, boii ihe other half of the head, rub it over with yolk of egg, ftrew oft bread crumbs, with pepper, fait, a little nutmeg, grated lemon'pee, and chopprf parfley; bafte it before the fire, let ife be a nke brown.

lay it on the haih.

Tojiew a Calf's Head.

LET it be well waflied, and laid in water for an hour; take out the brains, bone it, take out the tongue and the eye&; make a Ibrced-nieat with two pounds of beef fuet, and as much lean veal, two anchovies boned and wafhed clean,, the peel of a lemon, and a nutmeg grated, with a little thyme; chop all thefe together, and fome ftale bread grated; beat up the yolks of four eggs and mix with them Make part of this forced-meat into fifteen or twenty bafe; then' boil five eggs hard, half a pint of oyfters waihed clean, and half a pint of &eh mQfliroomsy if they ace to be got: mix thefe with the reffcol: the f(Mcediwear, and SfufF the head from where- the bones were taken; tie it u cafefuliy with a packthread, put it into twoi quarts- of gravy with a blade or two of mace; let it be clofe covered, and it muft ftew very flowly two hours. While the head is ftewing beat up the brains with fome lemonthyme and parfley ihred very fine, fome grated nutmeg;, and the yolk of act egg mixed with it; fry half the brains in dripping, in. little cakes, and fry the balls. When the bead is done, keep it hot, with the brainrcakes and ballsy bcforethe fine; ftrainofF theiiquor the head was ftewed in,, add- to it fome ftewed trufHibs- and morellsr, and a few pickled muflxrooms;. put in the other half of the brains chopped, boil them- all up. together, and let them fimmer a few minutes 5 put the head' into a hot difli proper for the table, pour the liquor over it, lay the balls and the braincrakes round it.

a roafi a Caip HeaL

WASH- the head very clean, take out the bones, and dry it very well with a cloth;. make a feafoning of beaten mace, pepper, fait,, nutmeg, and cloves,, fome fat bacon cut very fmali, and fome grated bread; ftrew this over it, roll it u,jfkewet it with a fmall fkewer, and tie.it with tape;, roail it,. and- baAe it with butter; make a rich veal gravy, thickened with butter and rolled- in. flower.

Some

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 155

$ome like muihrooais an4 the fac part q( 4yiFs but it k Very gppd without.

The German Way of irejftng a Calfs liead.

TAKE a large calfs head, with great part of the neck cut with it; fylit it in half, fcald it very white and take out the jaw-bone; take a laige fiew-pan or £auce-pan, and lay at the bottom ijome flice of bacon then fotne thift beef-fteaks, witl fome pepper and fait thejn lay in t)ie bead pour in fome beef-brotb) a large onion ftuck with cloves, and a bunch of (weet herbs; cover the ftew-pa vy clofe, and fet it over a fiove (Q fiew; then make a ragout with a quart of gopd beef-gravy and half pint of red wifte; let the wine well boiled in the gravy: add to it two fweetbread parboiled and cut in flices, fome cock'scombs, oyfters, mufiirooilis, truffles and morelJs; jet thefe flew till they are tender: when the head is ftewed take it up, put it into a difli, take out the brains, the eyes, and the bone$ then flit the tongue, cut it into fmall pieces, cut the eyes in pieces alfo, and chop the brains; put thefe into a bakingdifll, and pour fome of the ragout over them, then take the head) lay it upon the ragout, pour the reft over it, and on !hat fome melted butter; then fcrape fome fine Parmefan cheefe and ftrew It over the butter, and fend it to the oven; it does not want much baking, but only requires to be of a fuie brown.

CaU Calfs. Haad, bajbed.

CUT it into flices, iioytet it, put tO; it a little boiled, gravy a liule white wine, fome crem,. alittlb catchup, white pepper, fait, and nutmeg, a few oyfiecs and their liquor, fbred lemonpeel; boil, this up gendy together; ai few pickled muooms, or frefh, and a little lemon-juice, or lemonrjuice.only. This may be enriched, with truffle and. mor.clls parboiled, forcedmeat balls, and hard eggs.

To collar a Calfs Head.

TAKE a calf's head with the Ikin on,, fcrfdoff the hair, parboil and bone it; the fore paft muft be flit: boilthe tongue,, peel it, and cut it into thin flices, and the palate with it; put them with the eyes into the middle of the head; take fome pepper, fait,, cloves, mace, ard beat thc, nutmegr grated, fcaidd parilcy tbynap, favoury and fwet, marjoram,, cut ty fmall;.

beat the y)lks of thr or, four eggs, fread: them over the head, andthen ilcw. oi the feafonipg,. rail it- up.v£fy tight, and tie it round with ta)Q boil it genfjy fpr three hou(J9 in a3 much water as will cover it: when the head is taken out, fea fon the pickle with fait, pepper, and fpice; alfo a pint of white wine videgar: when it is col4 put IQ the collar, and when fet tp tabU cut it in flices.

0 €ollar a Calfs Head to eat like Brawn.

TAKE the head with the (kin and hair on, fcald it till the hair will come oiF, then cleave it down, and take out the brains and the eyes, wa(h it very clean, and put it into a pot df clean water boil it till the bones will come out; then (lice ihe tongue and ears and lay them all even; throw,a handful of talt over them, and roll it up quite clofe into a collar;boil it near two hours $ when the head is cold put it into brawn piekle.

Mock Turtle.

TAKE a calf's head and fcald oiF the hair, as from,a pig, then clean it, cut ofF the horny part in tbin flices, with as little of the lean as poffible; chop the brains $ hve ready be? tween a quart and three pints of ftrong mutton or veal gravy, with a qurt of Madeira wine, a large teafpoonful of chyan, a large onion cut very fmall, half the peel of a largp lemon, ibred as fine as poffible, a little fait, the juice of four lemons, and fome fwet herbs cut fmall; ftew all thefe together till the head is very tender; let them ftew about an hour and a half, then have ready the back ihell of a turtle, lined with a pafte made of flower and water, which muft firft be fet in the oven tp harden, then put in the ingredients and fet it into the oven tp brown; when that is done, lay the yolks of eggs boiled hard and forced-meat balls round the top.

Some parboil the head the day before, ta:e out the bones, and then cut if into flices.

SWEETBREADS.

Sweetbreads roafted.

PARBOIL 'them; when cold, lard them with bacon, and roaft them in a Dutch oven, or on a poor man's jack: fpi: fauce- plain butter, catchup and butter, or lemon (auce

To fry Sweetbreads.

CUT them in long flices, beat up the yolk of an egg, and rubxit over them with a feather; make a feafoning of pepper, fait, and grated bread; dip them into it, and fry them iti butter: for fauce - catchup and butter, with gravy or lemon-fauces fiarnilh with fmU flices of toafted bacon and crifpqd parfley.

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 157

fFhiie FricaJJee of Sweetbreads.

SCALD and flice them as before; thicken fome veal gravy with a bit of, butter mixed with flower, a little cream, fome grated lemon-peel, and nutmeg, white pepper, fait, a little mufliroom powder and liquor; ftew this a little, put in the fweetbreads, fimmer them, ibaking the pan fqueeze in a little lemon-juice.

Brown FricaJJee of Sweetbreads.

SCALD two or three, flice them, dip them in the yolk of an egg, mixed with pepper, fait, nutmeg, and a little flower; fry them a nice brown 5 thicken a little good gravy with fome flower, boil it well: add chyan, catchup, or mufhroompowder, a little juice of lemon; flew the fweetbreads in this a few minutes; garnifh with lemon.

A Ragout of Sweetbreads.

PARBOIL them, rub them with yolk of egg; flrew on bread crumbs, lemon-peel, nutmeg, pepper, and fait; road them in a Dutch oven; thicken fome good gravy with a little flower; add catchup, chyan, a little juice of lemon; boil this up, pour it to the fweetbreads; artichoke bottoms may be added, cut into quarters; cut lemon or orange-peel like flraws for garnifh.

Sweetbreads forced.

PARBOIL them as for a ragout; put forced-meat in a caul in the fhape of a fweetbread; roaft that in a Dutch oven; thicken a little good gravy with flower; add catchup, a little grated lemon-peel, pepper, fait, and nutmeg; boil it up, with a few pickled mufhrooms, or lemon-juice. Let the fweetbreads flew a little in this gravy; then lay the forced-meat in the middle the fweetbreads at the ends.

Sweetbreads larded.

PARBOIL two or three fweetbreads; when cold, lard them down the middle with little bits of bacon, on each fide with bits of lemon-peel, on each fide that with a little pickled cucumber cut very fmall; flew them gently in cullis or rich gravy, thickened with a little flower; ada mufliroom powder, chyan, and fait if necefTary; a little lemon juice. Garnifh with pickles.

Sweetbreads and Palates fricajfeed.

PARBOIL a fweetbread or two; flew two or three palates

9 till

J58 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

till very tender; blanch them, cut them in pieces, and flicc the fweetbread; dip thcfe in egg, ftrew over them very fine br6ad Crumbs, fcafoned with pepper, fait, nutnfieg, and pounded doves; fry and drain them 5 thickeii fome good gravy with a little flower; add catchup, chyan, fait if nccefliary 5 ftew them in this about a quarter of an hour; a few pickled mufhrooms, or lemonjuice j lamb-ftones may be added, patboiled and fried.

Or,

PALATES do very well alone,' drefled as above; or' with the fweetbread roafted and put in the middle of the di£b.

To drefs a Calfs Pluck.

BOIL the lights and part of the liver, roaft the heart, fluffed with fuet, fweet herbs, and a little parfley, all chopt fmall, a few crumbs of bread, fome pepper, fait, nutmeg, and a little lemon-peel; mix it up with the yolk of an egg.

When the lights and liver are boiled, chop them very fmall, and put them in a fauce-pan witha piece of butter rolled in flower, fome pepper and fair, with a little lemon or vinegar, if agreeable; fry the other part of the liver as before mentioned, with, fome little flices of bacon; lay the mince at the bottom, the heart in the middle, and the fryed liver and bacon round, with fome crifped parfley. For fauce- plain butter. It is a large but it may be eafily diminifhed,

J Scotch Haggas.

CHOP the heart, lights, and chitterlings of a calf, with a pound of fuet cut very fine, ftafoned with pepper and felt; mix it with a pound of the befl: Scotch oatmeal; roll it up, and put it into a calf's bag; a pint of good cream, with a little allfpice and beaten mace mixed with it is very good, but foine like it better without.

To make it fweet,

TAKE the chitterlings, heart, lights, and fuet, with fome grated nutmeg, a pound of currants wafbed and picked, a pound of raifins ftoned and chopped, and half a pint of mountain, mixed well together, let it boil in the calf's bag two hours i jt miift befent to table in the bag.

TrtE LADY'S ASSISTAN,li 15

CALF'S LIVER.

To roafi a Calfs Liver.

SPIT itaud then lard it with bacon. For fauce- good gravy

A Calps Liver ftewed.

LARD the liver, and put it into a ftew-pan, with fome falt whole pepper, a- bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, arid a bladeof mace; let it ftew till tender, then take it up, cover it to keep hot; ftrain the liquor it was ftewed in, fkim off all the fat.

thtckeA it with a piece of lutter rolled in fiower and pour it over the liver.

Calfs Liver fry ei.

CUT it in dices, and fry it in good beef-dripping or butter let the pan be half full, and put the liver in when it boils, which is, when it has done hfHing: have fome rafhers of toafted bacon, and lay round it, with fome parfley crifped before the fire: always lay the bacon in boiling water before it is either broiledy fryed, or toafted, it takes out the fait and makes it ten der. Sauce - plain melted butter, a little poured over the livcr the reft in a fauce-boat.

Calfs Chitterlings.

CLEAN feme of the largeft of the calf's guts, cut them into lengths proper for puddings, tie one of the ends clofe; take fome bacon and cut it like dice, and a calPs udder, and fat that comes oiF the chitterlings; chaldran blanched and cut alfo; put them into a ftew-pan, with a bay-leaf, fait, pepper, efchalot cut fmall, fome pounded mace, and Jamaica pepper, with half a pint or more of milk, and let it juft fimmer; then take ofFthepan, and thicken it with four or five yolks of eggs, and fome crumbs of bread; fill the chitterlings with this mixture, which muft be kept warna, and make the links like hogs-puddings; before they are fen t to table, they muft be boiled over a moderate fire; let them cool in their own liquor: they fervc in fummer ivhen hogs-puddings are not to be had

To fiew Calfs Feet.

TAKE a CalPs footy divide it into four pieces, put it to flew with half a pint of water; pare a potatoe, take a middling onion peeled and iliced thin, fome beaten pepper, and fait; put thefe ingredients to the Calf's foot, and let them jfimmer verjr ' foftiy for two hours: it is very good.

3 FricaJJei.

i6o THE LADY'S ASSISTANT FricaJJee of Calfs Feet.

BOIL them and take out the long bones, fpHt them, and put them into a ftew-pan, with fome veal gravy, and a very little white wine; beat the yolks of two or three eggs with a little cream, and put to them a. little grated nutmeg, fome fait, and a piece of butter; ftir it till it is of a proper thicknefs.

Ragout of Calf's Feet.

BOIL the feet, bone and cut the meat in flices, brown them in the frying-pan, and then put them in fome good beef gravy, with morells, truffles, pickled muflirooms, the yolks of four eggs boiled hard, fome fait, and a little butter rolled in flower. For' a fick perfon, a Calf's Foot boiled, with parfley and butter, is efteemed very good.

Mock "Turtle.

TAKE two calf's feet, and one chicken, cut them into pieces as for a fricaflce; make the feafoning with three large onions, a large handful of parfley, and a few fweet herbs; chop them 1 together; then feafon the neat: let the calf's feet ftew two hours and a half in three quarts of water; then put in the chicken, let it ftew 'half an hour; then take the juice of two lemons, a tea-cup full of Madeira wine, fome chyan pep er; put that in laft: let it ftew all together half an hour, and ierve it up in a foup-di(h.

Forced-meat balls of yeal may be laid at top, and hard eggs

To make favoury Jelly.

BOIL either two or four calf's feet, according to the quantity which is wanted, with ifmglafs, to make it a ftiiF jelly; one ounce of picked ifinglafs to two feet is about fufHcient, if the ifinglafs is very good; boil with thefe a piece of lemon-peel, an onion, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome pepper-corns, a few cloves, a bit of mace, nutmeg, and a little fait; when the jelly is enough, ftrain it; put to it juice of lemon, and white wine, to the tafte; boil it up, pulp it through a bag till fine; the white of an egg may be added before it is boiled.

pireSlions bow to cboofe Mutton.

YOtJNG mutton, if fqueezed with the fingers, will feel very tender; if it is old, it will remain wrinkled, the fat will be alfo clammy and fibro.us: iri ram-mutton the grain is clofe, ft is of a. deep red, and the fat fpungy: in ewe-mutton the flefh is paler than in weather, and has a clofer- grain. Short-fhanked ttiuttoA is reckoned the heft.

Different joints of Mutton.

Fore- Quarter.

THE heck breaft, and fhoulder: the two necks cut toge ther are called the chine,

, . Bind Rafter,

THE leg and the loin: the two loin cut together are called the iaddle. The head and pluck are generally foM together.

•, 0 boil Mutton.

MUTTON ihould be boiled a quarter of an hour to a jound: ferve it with mafhed turnips and carrots or caper fauce

•'r to a neck, efchalbt fauce.

• •

J'o boil a Leg of Mutton with coUiflower andfpinacb.

CUT a leg of mutton venifon-fafhion, and boil it in a cloth; have three or four colliflowers boiled in milk and water, pull them into fprigs, and ftew them with butter, pepper, fait, and a little milk; ftew fome fpinach in a fauce-pan; put to the fpinach a quarter of a pint of gravy, a piece of butter and flower;. when it is enough, put the mutton in the middle, the fpinach round it, and the coUiflower over all; the butter the coUiflower was ftewed in muft be poured over it, and it muft be melted like a fine fmpoth cream,

To roajl Mutton.

A leg of fix pounds will take an hour and a quarter; of twelve pounds, two hours; a fmall faddle, an hour and half, a large one near three hours. Paper a faddle: if garlic is not diflikedy fluff the knucklp part of the leg with two or three cloves M of it: a breaft will take half an hour at a brilk fire; a large neck, an hour; a fmall one, a little more than half an 'hour; a fhoulder near as much time as a Jeg. . For fauce - ptatqes, pickles, fallad, celery raw or ftewed, broccoli, French beans9 coUiflower; or to a ihoulder of mutton, onion fauce.

Mdik Venifon.

CUT a hind quarter of fat mutton like a haunch of veai&ni let it ftcep in the Iheeps blood for five or fix hours, then let it hang in cold dry weather for three weeks, or as Ibng as it will keep fwect; rub it well with a cloth, then rub it over with frefli butter, ftrew fome fait -over it, and a little flower;. butter t fheet of paper and lay over it, and ajiother over that, or fome pafte, and tie it round if it is large, it will take two hours and a half roafting; before it i taken up, take off the paper or pafte, bafte it well with butter, and flower it; let the jack go round very quick, that it may have a good froth. Sauce - gravy and curraitt-'jelly

ofiuff a Leg of Mutton with Oyjlers.

' MAKE a forced-meat of beef-fuet chopt fmalJ, the yolks of eggs boiled hard, with three anchovies, a fmall bit of onion, thyme, favory, and fome oyAers, a dozen or fourteen, a)l cut fine fome fait, pepper, grated nutmeg, and crumbs of bread, . mixed up with raw eggs; fluff the mutton under the fktn in the thickeft part, under the flap, and at the knuckle. For fauce-.

fome oyfter-liquor, a little red-wine, an anchovy, and fome.

more oyfters ftewed and laid under the mutton.

jinotber way.

CUT feveral holes' in the mutton, beard fome oyfters, and roll them in crumbs of bread and nutmeg; put three oyfters into each holej if it is roafted, cover it with a caul; but if it is boiled, put it in a cloth, and pour oyfter fauce all over it.

A Leg of Mutton au Hautgont.

LET it hang a foltnight in an airy place, ftsflT it With gar" lie, and rub it over wkh pepper and fait, and then roaft it.

Sauce-good gravy, with a large fpoonful of redwiiie boiled in it.

Leg of MuUon a-laDemie

TAKE a leg of mutton and lard it with bacon, Mfroaft it, and then pyt it in as fmall a pot at will hold it with a quart of mutton, graivy, balf a pintof inegar fome whole ipLC bay-leaves, fwcct-marjoram, winter- favor y, and fome green onions; when it is tender taice it up, and make the faiice with fomf of the liquor, mu&rooms, diced lemon, two anchovies a fpoonfui of colourings and a piece of butter; pour fooie over the mutton, amd the reft in a boat,

0 boil a Leg of Mutton a-lalore.

TAKE a leg of mutton of feven or eight pounds, let it hang as long as it will keep; beat it flat, and feafon it with pepper, fait, and cloves j fet a pot on the fire with fome parfley at the bottom, over that, fome dices of bacon and a bunch of fweet herbs; then lay in the mutton, ftrew over it fome' pepper and fait, a bjade or two of mace, half a grated nutmeg, and as much water as will cover it; let it ftew very gently, clof? covered down; keep fome water boiling to fill up the pot as the liquor waftes: thus let it ftew till the mutton is done: do not fill the pot up with water the laft time, but with a pint of white-wine: when this is well boiled, take up the mutton and lay it in the di(h.

Some make a fauce for it, while it is.ftewing, with mafhrooms cut fmall, two middllng-fized onions cut fmall, a ctove of garlic, and fome leaves of tarragon, or ibme tops of garden erefs; put thefe together into a ftew-pan, with a glaft of oil, and another of white-wine, a gill and a half of rich gravy, and 9 little juice of lemon; fet thefe ingredients over a ftove, cake ofF the fat as it rifes, and tafte if there is acid enough in it, if not add fome more lemon. Thofe who do not like this fauce, may ufe ftroBg gravy thickened with butter.

Leg of Mutton -la-Royale.

TAKE off all the fkin, fat, and fliank-bone; lard 1t with bacon, feafon it with pepper and fait: take three or four pounds of thick-flank bcefj or any lean piece, or a piece of leg of veal; let that alfo be larded, flower the meat, and brown them in a frying pan; then put it into a pot, with three quarts of water, a bunch of fweet herbs, an oriion ftuck with cloves, a few blades of mace, fome pepper and Iklt, a glafs of red-wine, and a little catchup; let thefe ftew very flowly for two hours, or till the meat is tender; there may be added truffles, morells muflirooms, and gr'avy, all or feme of them, but it is good without i lay the mutton in the middle of the di&, an3 ciit the other mat in dices, and lay round it, ftrain the fauce over it.

A Ragout of a Leg of Mutton.

LET a fmall leg of mutton hang as long. as it will keep % cut thin collops from it the long way, pick out the fmews, ibafon the meat with pepper and fait; ftrew over it two or three efchalots chopt, and a little parfley; flower it, put it into a ftew-pan with a bit of butter; ftir them till near done; put to thm half a pint or more of cullis or good gravy, chyan if, heceflary, a little catchup, or muftirooni powder, more flower if the fauce is not thick enoiigh; fimmer the meat a few iinutes, fervc it direflly, or it will grow hard garnifh with pickles.

A Shoulder of Mutton with Rice. .

TAKE a ilioulder of mutton and half-boil it, then put it in a fie w- pan, with two quarts of mutton-gravy, a quarter of a pound of rice, a tea-fpoonful of mufhroom powder, with a little beaten mace, and fiew it till the rice is tender; then take up the mutton and keep it hot; put to the rice half a pint of cream and a piece of butter rolled in flower j.flir it well round the pan, and let it boil a few minutes: lay the mutton in the dim, and pour the rice over it.

A Shoulder of Mutton in difguife.

LET a flioulder be half-roafted; then take it up and cut ofF the two upper joints, and both the flaps, to make the blade round; fcore the blade in diamonds; then ftrew over it a little pepper and fait, fome crumbs of bread, a little grated lemon. peeJ, and nutmeg; fet it in the oven to brown; then cut the meat ofF the fhank and the flaps in thin flices; put them to the gravy that runs from the mutton, and put a little good made mutton gravy to it, with two fjoonfuls of walnut catchup, one of the colouring, fome chyan pepper, and one or twa efchalots cut fmall; the nheat muft be done juft tender, if it is done too much, it will oe hard: thicken the fauce with butter rolled in flower, lay the hafh in the difli with the fauce, and the blade-bone in the middle, which muft be of a fine brown ', put fome pickles in the diib.

Shoulder of Mutton hajhed,

CUT the blade-bone nicely off, fcore it, pepper, (alt, and broil it brijwn; cut the remainder or fome of the meat into flices; thicken fome good gravy or beef-broth; add efchalot chopped, catchup, chyn, walnut-pickle; boil thefe together; put

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 165

put in the fliced meat, (hake it up till hot thorough; lay the blade- bone on the hafh; garnifli ith pickles.

Shoulder of mutton rolled. See Shoulder of FeaL

To boil Mutton the Turkijh way.

LET the meat be cut in flices, wa(h it in vinegar, put it iii a pot, with whole pepper, rice, and two or three onions j ftew' thefe very flowly, and (kim them very often; when it is tendep take out the onions, and put fippets ip the diih under them.

' To ftew a Loin of Mutton.

TAKE a loin of mutton cut into ftcaks, put it into a faucepan with water enough to cover it; ftew it very gently, and when it has been Ikimmed once or twice, put into it three or four fliced onioiis, fome turnips, whole cloves, fliced ginger, and a bunch of fwect herbs, pepper, and fait; before it is taken up, put in fome capers: put the meat when done upon fippets., (if they are liked and pour the ingredients over it.

Loin of Mutton forced

BONE it; make a fluffing with bread-crumbs, parfley chopped, and fweet herbs, grated lemon-peel, nutaieg, pepper, fait, iuet chopped or butter, yolk of egg; put this where the bones were taken out, few it up, roaft it: good gravy in the difh.

To roaft a Loin of Mutton the Turkijh way,i

MAKfe fome ftufling of grated bread, fome beef marrow, thyme, parfley, lemon-peel, favory, two fmall anchovies, all chopped fmall; two or three cloves, and beaten mace, ixiixed up with the yolks of two eggs; raife the fkin of the loin, and put the fluking under it; then fatten it down and roaft it. Sauce fome good gravy, with a fpbonful of red wine put into it.

Tv drefs a Saddle of Mutton.

TAKE a faddle, and take off the (kin very neatly near the rump, without taking it qiite off, or breaking it; take fome Jean ham, truffles, green onions, parfley, thyme, fweet herbs, all choppe4 fmall, with fome fpice, pepper, and fait; ftrcw it over the mutton where the fjcin i$ taken offj put the flcin over it neatly, and tie over it fome white paper well buttered, and roaft it; when it is near enough, take off the paper, ftrevjf over it fome grated bread, and when it is of a fine brown, taii;e it up. Sauce- fome good gravy.

M 3 Mutton

i66 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

Mutton kebobbed.

JOINT a loin of mutton -between every bone, feafon k with pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, dip tbem in the yolks of eggs, and have feafoning of crumbs of bread and fweet herbs, and dip I them in: put them together in their original fbape, and roaft them on a (jmall fpit before a quick fire; put a difli under, and bafte them well with butter; ftrew crumbs over them whil they are roafling; take the gravy that runs from them, after the fat is taken off, and put to it a pint of drawn gravy, with two fpooofuls,of catchup, mixed up with a tea-fpoonful of ikwr) mix it well together, and boil it ups when the mutton islnthediih pour thisi'auceoverit.

0 drefs a Neck of Mutton.

LARD it with lemon-peel cut thin in fmall lengths, boil It in fah and water, with a bunch of fweet herbs, and an onion ftuck with cloves; when it is boiled, have ready for fauce, a pint of oyfters ftewed in their own liquor, as much vealgravy, two anchovies diflblved and flrained into it, and the yolks of two eggs beat up in a little of the gravy; mix thefe together till they cotfie to a proper thicknefs, and pour k over the meat. i

Mutton Harridf.

CUT a neck of mutton, or a loin, into (hort fleaks; fry them, flower them, put them into a ftew-pan, with a quart or three pints of beef broth, a carrot diced, a turnip, an onion ftuck with cloves, a few pepper-corns, fome fait; let them ftew till tender; they will take three hours, as they £hould do gently: take out the mutton, ftrain the fauce, put to it carrots cut in wheels or any fhape,, turnips in balls, and celery cut to pieces, all bdited ready; fin mer thefe a minute ot two in the fauce, lay, v the mutton in the difli, pour the fauce over. If it cannot be ' fervcd inunediately, put the mutton into the fauce to keep hot.

Mutton a-la-Maintenon,

CUT Tome Ihort fteaks from a neck of mutton; make a forced-meat with crumbs of bread, a little fuet chopped, or a bit of butter, lemon-peel grated, Dired parfley, pepper, fait, and nutmeg, mixed up with yolk of egg; pepper and fait the fteaks, lay on the forced-meat i butter fome half flieets of writiiig-paper, in each wrap up a fteak, twifling the paper neatly; fry them, or do them in a Dutch oven -, ferve them irt the paper, a little gravy in the dill), fome in a boat; garnifli with pickles.,

THE LAUY's ASSISTANT. i6

Breaji of Mutton grilled.

HALF boil it, fcore it, pepprer and fah it well, rub it with yolk of egg, ftrew on crumbs of bread and chopped parflcy; broil it, or roaft it in a Dutch oven; ferve it with caperfaace.

To collar a Breaft of Mutton.

TAKE the flcin off, and bone it, roll it up in a collar like the breaft of veal; put a quart of milk af)d t quarter of a pound Gf butter in the dripping-pan, and bii&e it well while it is roafting Sauce - good gravy in the diih aad ia a boat, and currant jelly in another.

Mutton Steaks baked.

CUT a loin of mutton into fteaks, feafon them with pepper and fait; butter a difh and lay them in: take a quart of miik fix eggs well beat, and four fpoonfuls of flower; beat the flower and egg togethet in a little milk, and then put the rtft to it; put in iome beaten ginger and fait, pour it pvir the a(ks, and fend it to bake; half an hour will bake it.

Muiidn Cutlets.

SLICE fmne cutlets from the £ilet about an inch thick, anil iud them with bacon; tfaea fry tlKsi in butter wfaon tbey ate of a fine brwiH lay tliem in the diih; have foonc parboiled fweQCbiad8, feme pickled miiihrooais, two fpoonffls of cchup, in fame muttoa gravy, with a piece of butter ndled in flower ftir it round the pan till it is the thicknefs of cream lay the cutlets inhe di0i and pour fauce over them.

Mutton Collops.

TAKE a leg of mutton which has hung fome time, and cut It in thin coUopS; tajceout all tbefinfews, and feafon them with fome fait, pepper, beaten mace, fome fhred parfley, thyme, .

and two efchalots; put a large piece of butter in a ftew-pan, and when it is quite hot pujt in all the collops, and keep Airring them with a wooden fpoon till they are three parts done; put in half a pint of ftrong mutton gravy, fome juice of lemon thickened with butter and Jlower let them fimmer four or five minutes not bnjger. Or they will be hard 3 lay them in a 4ilbt and pour 4e fauce over them.

Mutton bafhed.

TUT an otritm into ftnne gravy, wfth femfe pepper and fait, a little catchup or walnut-pickle; thicken this a little with fonas

M 4 flower.

i68 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

flower, boil it a few minutes take out the onion, put in thJ mutton cut thin, and any gravy that may have run froqi it, a little garlic vinegar; juft nmmer it up, fhaking iit till thoroughly hot, but do not let it boil, for that makes all hafhes hard: garnifli with pickles. If there is no gravy, boil the mutton bones, with an onion, a clove or two, a bit of lemonped, a bunch of fweet herbs, and a few pepper-corns -, ftrain it.

To drefs Rumps and Kidneys.

TAKE half a dozen rumps and ftew them' in fome muttoti gravy, more than will cover them; let them ftew gently for half an hour, then take them up and let them ftand to cool; put into the .gravy a quarter of a' pound of boiled rice, an onion ftuck with cloves, and a blade of mace j let it boil till the rice is very thick; take the rumps and rub them over 'with the yoUp of an egg well beat, and then in crumiss of bread, a little pep per, fait, grated nutmeg, and lemon-pee, and a very little thyme j fry them in butter of a fine brown. When the rumps are fte wing, lard fome kidneys ' and fet them in a tin oveh to roalt.

When the rumps are fried, take them out to drain; pour the fat out of the frying-pan, and put in the rice; ftir it all together round the pan, and then lay the rice in the di(h; lay the rumps round upon the rice the narrow ends to meet inltitie iiddle; boil four eggs hard, cut them in quarters, and lay'he kidneys and hard eggs upon the rice between the rumps. . . •

Mutton Hams.

MIX one pound of coarie fugar, one pound of common fait, one ounc6 of falt-'petre; rub the ham, turn it often, and bafte it vvith the pickle; dry it. It eats better broiled, than boiled,, '

DireStions how to cboofe Lamh.

IF the vein in the heck of the 'fore-quarter looks of a fine blue, it is frelh; if yellow or green, it is very ftale.

In the hind-quarter, if there is a faint difagreeable fmell near the kidney or if the knuckle is very limber, it is not jgood.

The

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 169

The head is very good if tjiei ycs are plump an4 bright jf funk and wrinlcled, it is ftale.

. Different Pieces of Lamh.

. Fore garter.

JTHE fliouldar, neck and breaft: (the neck and breafl: are called a courfe.)

C Hind garter.

v' - The Leg and Loin

The Head.

THE Pluck is generally fold with the head, which containlf.

the liver, lights, heart, nut, and melt: the Fry contains the iwcetbreads, lanib's-ftones and fkirts, with fome of the liver.

Grafs Lamb to boil

IT fliould he boiled a quarter of an hour to each pound: ferve it with fpinach, carrpts, cabbage, or broccoli.

. Grafs Lamb to roaft,

A LEG of five pounds wilt take about an hohr; other joints in the fame proportion. For fauce- fallad, pickles, broccoli, coHiflower French beans, peafe, potatoes, cucumbers raw or ftewed, or mint fauce.

Grafs Lamb Steaks.

PEPPER and fait them, fry them; when enough, lay them in a difh, pour out the butter, (hake a little flower into the pan, pour in a little bee broth, a little catchup and walnut pickle; boil this up, ftirringit; put in the fteaks, give them a ihake round.

Hind garter of Houfe Lamb to drefs.

BOIL the leg three quarters of an hour, or an hour; cut the loin into fteaks, dip them into egg, ftrcw on a few crumbs of bread, fry them a nice brown, lay them round the leg, and a good deal of crifped parfley. For fauce - ftewcd fpinach.

Fore garter to roafti

HOUSE lamb muft be well roafted; a fmall fore-quarter will take an hour and a half; a leg three quarters of an bour or an hour. For fauce - feUad, broccoli, potatoes, celery raw or ftewed. Or for a fore-quarter of lamb, cut off the fhoulder, pepper and fait the ribs fqueeze over a Seville orange.

Hwfe

170 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

fioufi Lamh Sfeaks white.

STEW them in milk and water til! ey arc tender, with a fmall bunch of fweet herbs, a (mc of lemon-pee), a little fait, and fome white pepper; have ready fome veal gravy, fome oiuihroom powder, a little crem mixed up ith a little flower Ihake the fteaks roud in this fauce, and juft before they are taken up put in a few pickled mufhrooms.

Houfe Lamh Steah brown,

SEASON them wfth pepper, fait, nutmeg, grated lemonpeel, and parfley chopped (but dip them nrft in egg;) fry Them 4ick thicken fome good gravy; add a very little red Vf'v catchup, and (bme oyfters; boil thefe together; put ia the fteaks, juft heat them Palates may be added flewed ten der, forced-meat balls, and hard egs.

N. B. It is a very good difli, and oonrenient when poultry are dear.

Fricaffee cf LnmVs SiontSj white.

SKIN them, and ftew them in fome Tal gravy; when they are near enough, add to them a little cream, fome ftewed forcedmeat balls, morells, and a bit of butter rolled in flower j juft lefofe they are taken up, add a few pickled mufhrooms.

Fricaffee of Lamb's Stones brtmn.

THEY may be either houfe or grafs lamb. Skin them, 4ip them in yolk tf egg and flower, fry them; thicken fome gravy (with Sower, mumroompowder, (alt, grated nutmeg, white pepper, grated lemon-peel; boil this up; put in the Jaoab's ftones, beat them through; add forced-meat balls fried, and pickled mufhrooms, or lemon-juice.

Tq ragout a Fvre mrier af Houfe Lamb.

CUT off ttkQ knuckle bone, take off the fkinj lard it all iver with bacon, and iry it of a nice light brown then put jt ia a flew-pan, and juft cover it with mutton-gravy, a bunch of fweet irbs, fome pper, fait, beaten mace, and a little whole pepper; cover it clofe, and let it flew for half an hour; pour out the liquor, and ukecaje to keep the lamb hot; flrain ofF the avy, and hav neady half a pint of yflprs &ied brown, jlour ati che fat from them, add them to the grav, with two xonfils f red wine, a few mufhrooms, and a bit 9f butter fcfUed m floMiier; bovi all togeolier, with the juice of hif a lomon 5 lay ohe laml)inthe di&, and pour the iauce oveir k.

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 171

To f era a Hind garter of Hcufe Lamb.

CUT off the &ank, and with a knife raife the thick pact of the meat front the bone; make a forced-meat with fome fuet, a fw fcalded oyfters cut fmalj, fotoe grated bread, a little beaten fhace, ptfpt)er, nd fak mixed up with the yolks of two eggs; fiufF it with this under where the Aieat is raifed'up, and under the kidney; let it be half-roafted, then put it in a large ftewpan with a quart of mutton gravy; cover it and let it ftew very gently; when it is erK)ugh, take it up cMtd keep it hot, fcum off the fat and drain the gravy; add to it a glafs of Madeira, one fpoonful of walnut catchup, half a kmon, a little chyan, half a pint of flewed oyfters, with a piece of butter rolled in flower $ pour it over the lamb.

TV drts f LamVs Htad and Pur4manci.

WASH it very clean; taUce the bhkck pft from the eyes aal the gall from the liver; lay the head ia warm water boil the lights, heart, and part of the liver; chop and flower them, and tofs them up in a faucepan with fome gravy catchup, a little pepper, aIt, lemon-juice, and a fpoonful of cream; boil the head very white, lay it in the middle of a diih, the minced meat round it; the other part of the liver fried, with Tome very fmall bits of bacon on the miAce meat, and the braids fried in little cakes and laid on the rim of the difli, With (oAi crifped parfley put betwten: pour a little plain melted butfter over the bead.

Direiliens to cboafe Perk.

PORK, if it is meafly, is venr dangerous to cat; it may be eafilv feen, the fat beii full of little kernels: if it is young, the lean will break if pinched, and the (kin will dent by nipping it with the fingers; the fat will be foft and pulpy, like lard: if the rind is thick, rough, and cannot be nipped with the fingers, it is old: if the flefh is cool and fmooth, it is frelh; if it is clammy, it is tainted; it will be worfe at the knuckle than at any other pfX%.

Different pieces of Pork.

fort rtifr THE fpring and the foreloin, the fpare-rib and griikin are

cut

172 THE LADYs ASSISTANT,

cut from the fore-quarter: the fpring is generally falted and boiled, and the fore-loin roafted; but fome like them both oafted

Hind Quarter CONSISTS only of the leg and the hind-loin. The leg is tsither boiled or roafted, and the hind-loin is generally roafted.,

Th£ Head, Tongue. Ears.

' • A N I)

The Feet.

THE Entrails are called the haflet, which contains the liver, crow, fweetbreads, kidneys, and (kirts. There are befides the haflet, the chitterlings and guts, which wbei cleafied make faufages, and black and white puddings,

The Bacon Hog

13 cut very different, to make hams, bacon, and pickled pork, fpare-ribs, chines, and griflcins. Hog's lard is the fat of (he bacon hog. ..,..

Many are fond of the liver, fried with bacon.

Bacon.

THE fat will feci oily, and look white, and the lean of a good colour, and will nick clofe to the bone, if it is good; but if there are yellow ftreaks in the lean, it is, or will be rufty very foon.

If the rind is thin, it is young; but, on the contrary, if it is thick, it is old.

Harns

HAMS with fhort fhanks are beft; put a knife under th? bone of the ham, if it comes out clean and fmells well, it is good, but if it is daubed and fmeared, and has a difagreeable fmell, it is not good.

Brawn.

IF old, the rind is thick and hard; if moderate, it Is young: if the rind and fat are very tender, it is barrow or fow brawn.

To boil Pork: PORK (hould be very well boiled; a leg of pork of fix pounds will take about two hours; the hand muft be boiled till very tender. Serve it with pcafc-pudding, favoys, or any greens.

S

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 173

Roaft Perk

SHOULD be well done; a leg of twelve pounds will take three hours. StufF the knuckle with chopped fage and onion pepper, and fait: ferve it with gravy in the difh. Very young pork may be fkinned, aiid drefled in quarters. For fauce-- po-.

tatoes and apple-fauce.

Do not fcore it, but rub it over with a feather and fome oil.

To barbicue a Leg of Pork.

TAKE a leg of pork, and lay it to roaft; put a good deal of red-wine into the dripping-pan, and bafte it well all the time it is roafting; if there is not enough put in at firft, add more, it will take a bottle or. three pints: cut the fkin from the hottom of the (hank in rows an inch broad; raife every other row and roll it to the (hank; have ready a pint of ftrong gravy, and put to it a pint of red-wine, two anchovies, a bunch of iweet herbs, the yolks of four eggs boiled hard and pounded fine, with a quarter of a pound of butter, the juice of a lemon, two fpoonfuls of catchup; boil the gravy and red-wine well together, and the anchovy with it: ftrain thefe off, and add the other ingredients; let them boil a few minutes: froth the pork, take it up, and pour the fauce over it-put fome in a boat.

To fiuff a Chine of Pork.

TAKE a chine of pork that has hung four or five days; make fome holes in the lean, and ftuff it with a little of the fat leaf, chopped very fmall, fome parfley, thyme, a little fage and efchalot cut very fine, feafoned with pepper, fait, and nutmeg: it muft be fluffed pretty thick; have fome good gravy ia the difh. For fauce - apple-fauce and potatoes.

Pork Cutlets.

SKIN a loin of pork, and divide it into cutlets; flrew fome parfley and thyme cut fmall, with fome pepper, fait, and grated bread over them: broil them of a fine brown; have ready fome good gravy, a fpoonful of ready-made muflard, two efchalots mred fmall; boil thefe together over the fire, thickened with a piece of butter rolled in flower, and a little vinegar, if agreeable.. Put the cutlets into a hot difh, and pour the fauce over them.

Pork pickled.

BONE it, cut it to pieces; rub each piece with common fait ', lay them on a flanting boards that the brie may run off:

the

174 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

the next day rub each piece with pounded falt-petre; dry fome fidt, and put a layer at the bottom of the pan, then a'layr of porky fo on till the pan is full: fill all the hollow places .with fait, and lay fait on the top; cover the pan. Half a pound of falt-petre is enough fbr a middle-fized pig

RUB a ham with a quarter of a pound of falt-petre; let it lie twenty-four hours; Uil one quart of ftrong; old beer with, half a pouAd of bay-fair, half a pound of brown fugar, a pound and a half of common fait pour this on the ham boiling hot, rub and turn it eyery day for a fortnight, and bafte tC with the liquor when there is opportunity.

This is a very good receipt for curing a ham

Hams the Torkjhire fVay.

BEAT them well; mix half a peck of fait, three ounces of falt-petre, half an ounce of falt-prunella, five pounds of coarfe fugar;. rub the hams well with thi$, lay the remainder on the top; let them lie three d aye, then lung them up; put as much water to the pickle as will cover the hams, adding fak till it will bear an egg: beil and ftrain it; the next morning put ia the hams, prefs them down io th.t they may be covered; let them lie a fortnight; rub them well with bran; dry them.

The above ingredients are fufficiem for three middling-fized bams

NevT England Hams.

FOR two hams, take two ounces of falt-prunIla; beat it fine, rub it well in, and let them lie twenty- four hours; then take half a pound of bay-felt, a quarter of a pound of brown fait, a quarter of a pound of common fait, and one ounce of falt-petre, all beat fine, and half a poua.d of the coarfeft fugar; rub all thefe well in, and let them lie two or three days; then take white common, falt and make a pretty ftrong brine, with about two gallons of water, and half a pound of brown fugar; boil it well, and fcum it when cold;, then putiii the hains, and turn them every two or three daya in the pickle for three weeks then hang them up ia a chimney, and fmoke them well a.

dliy or two with horfe litter; afterwards let them hang about a week on the fides ofsthe kitchen chimney, then take them down; keep them dry in a box with bran covered over them. They may be eat in a month) or will keep v£ry well one year

mjiphalia

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 175

Wejifbalia Ham.

RUB it with half a pound of the coarfeft fugaf, and let iC fie till night, then rub h with an ounce of fait- pet re beat fine a pound of common fait; let it lie three weeks, turning it everyday; dry it in wood fmoke, or where turf is burnt: whea it is boiled, put into the veffel it is boiled in a pirit of oak faw A Ham to hoiU

STEEP it all night in foft water; a large one (hould fimmer three hours, and boil gently two; a fmall one fliould fimmer two hours, and boil about one and a half; pull off the fkin, rub it over with yoft of egg; ftrew on bread crumbs; fet it before the fire till of a nice light brown.

A Ham to roafi.

TAKE off the fkin, and ftcep it three hours in warm wa.tcr; then take it out, and pour over it a bottle of Madeira, and let it foak all night: before it is fpitted, put a pafte all over it, as far venifon; pour what is left of the Madeira into the dripping, with feme more, if it is 3 large ham, and bafle it with the wine while it fs roafting: it muft at firft be laid at a diftance from the fire, which muft be a very good one; when it is half ne put it nearer, and when near enough take off the pafte bafte it well with the wine, and ftrew it over with bread crumbs, or (hred parfley ftir the fire, snd make it of a fine liht brown,

A gammon of bacon h very good done the Ikme way.

Ham a-la-Braize.

TAKE off the (kin, and lay it in foak all night; take fome flices of beef and bacon, beat and feafbn them well ith fweet herbs and fpice lay tbem at the bottom of large kettU, with oiidsperitit, and carrota; fi)ncie fweet heris arnd parfley put in the hm;. lf thfirt fide uppcrtnoft;. lay on fomc flices of beef, ad over tiiat iUccs of bftccm; then lay on ibme carrots, pGirfnipa, $i iweet herbs $ ctr it very clofe, and cover the top with pafte; puc a flQrw:fire dVer tni under it, and let it ikw twi?lf ItoMtei; then put it. ia .an eaitben difii, ftrew k over with grated bread, and brown it with a falamander.

Baton. . .

RUB thetfitches with common fait exceedingly weTI; let them.

lie fo that thebrine can run from them: in about a. week p4t them into a tub for the purpofe, rubbing off all the fait: rub the

flitches

,176- THE LADYs ASSISTANT £itches with one pound of falt-pecre, pounded and heated $ the next day rub them well with fait, dry apd hot; kt them lit a week, often rubbing them y then turn them add more hot fait; let them lie three weeks oi a month in all, rubbing. them well; then dry thenu The hog may be either fcalded or iinged, but £nged is beft.

A Hozs Head like Brawn.

WASH it well, boil it till the bones will come out; wheii cold put the infide of the cheeks together, with fait between; put the ears round the fides; put the cheek into a cloth, prefs them into a fieve, or any thing round; put on a weight for two days; have ready a pickle of fait and water, with about a pint of malt boiled together; when cold put in the headp

Mock Brawn.

TAKE two pair of neat's-feet, boil jthem very tender and pick the ilefli entirely from the bones: take the belly-piece of pork, boil it till it is near enough, then bone it, and roll the meat of the feet up in the pork very tight, then take a ftrong cloth, with fome coarfe tape, and roll it round very tight % tie it up in the cloth, boil it till it is fo tender that a ftraw may be run through it; let it be hung up in a cLoch till it is quite cpld after which put it into fome foufing liquor and keep it for

Soufe for Brawn.

TAKE a peck of bran, feven gallons of water, a pound of common fait, a fprig of bay, and a fprig of rofemary; boil it half an hour, ftrain it off, let it ftand till it is cold, then put in the brawn.

Excellent Meat of a Hogs Head.

BOIL a head out of the pickle tongue pickle till it will bone i take the; ikinofF whole, chop the meat quick, whilft it is hot, feafon it with black and Jamaica pepper, nutmeg,, and a little fait, if neceilary; prefs it into a pot, the (kin put top and bottom s put on a weight; turn it out when cold; put it into a pickle made with the liquor it was boiled in, vinegar, and fait if neceflkry i bojl and fcum it: it muft ftand to be cold.

Another Way.

TAKE a pig's head out of the red pickle, and boil it till the bones will come out with eafe; take fome fcalded parfley and fage, with a little all-fpice the fat and lean of the head,

(take.

i

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 177

(take ofF the ikin) beat them while hot in a marble mortar, till they are like pafte, and put them while warm into a tin half-melon; when it is cold turn it out. It eats well, and looks very pretty, ftuck with fprigs of green parfley. 1

A Ragout of Pigs Feet and Ears.

TAKE them out of fouTe, fplit the feet, dip therti in egg, then in bread crumbs and chopped parfley; fry them in hog'slard, drain them; cut the ears in long narrow flips, flower them, put them into fome good gravy; add catchup, morells, and pickred mulhrooms i ftew them, pour them IntQ the dilhy lay on the feet.

Or,

THEY are very good dipped in batter and fried, eat with melted butter and muftard.

To fickle Pigs Feet and Ears.

WASH the feet and ears very clean, put a bay-leaf between every foot when they are well fdaked, add to them cloves, mace, coriander-feed, and ginger; put a bottle of white wine to three pair of feet and ears, fome bay-leaves, a bunch of fweet herbs: let them boil foftly till they are very tender, then take them out of the liquor, lay them in an earthen pot s when cold lake oflF the fat, and ftrain the liquor over them. They eaC well cold, or warmed in the jelly thickened with butter rolled in flower: or take the feet and ears out of the jelly, dip themt in yolk of egg, and then in crumbs of bread, and broil them, or fry them m butter; lay the ears in the middle and the feet round: or ragout them.

Soufefor Pigs Feet and Ears.

BOIL bran and water, let it ftand to be a little four i or, if it is not four foon enough add a little vinegar.

HogS Puddings.

BOIL one quart of clean picked grotts, drain them; the next day put to them a quart of blood, one pound of beef fuet Ihred, pounded mace, cloves, and nutmeg; two pounds of the leaf cut into dice, a leek or two, a handful of parfley, a little thyme and fweet-maijoram chopped, and fome penny-royal; fix or eight eggs, a pint of raw cream, half a pound of bread crumbs, that have had a pint of fcalded milk poured over them feafon high with pepper and fait; fill the fldns about half fuU prick them juft as they arcr boiled for which puxpofe have two

N kettles

178 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

kettles, half- boil them in one, ihffc thehi to the other; faiy them before the lire on clean ftnaw fiotl the .gnotts about three quarters of an houn

Another Way to make Hofs Puddings.

TAKE the fmalleft oatmeal, and fok it in hogs-bIood; put to it a quart of good cream, or more, if required j grate fome bread to make it of a proper thicknefs, and mince in the marrow of two or three bones; put in a leek, and fome pennyroyal flired very fine; break in the yolks of fix eggs, and three whites; put in fome fait, and Jamaica. pepper beat fine, and fome of the hogsleaf cut in fmall fquare bits: mix all thefe 5?vell together, and fill the guts. While the hogs bleed, ftir the blood, put ii a handful of fait, and keep flirring till it is cold, then ftrain it through a fieve for uf; waib the fmall guts very clean, and rinfe them in feveral waters: fliift the water often; and when they are ufed wafh them in rbfe water.

Alfond Hogs Puddings.

ONE pound of (hred beef fuet, half a pound of fwcet almonds blanched and beaten, fix or-feven bitter ones, half a pound of grated bread, a little pounded mace, eight yolks and four whites of eggs beaten, one pint of boiled cream, fweetened to the tafte; fill the ikins half full, prick them; boil them a quarter of an hour.

Rice Hogs Puddings.

DO them as above, only rice iiiftead of almonds; add a Few currants.

Marrow Hog's Puddings.

A QUARTER of a pound of fweet almonds, blanched and beaten, with a little rofe water, a pound of Naples bifcuit grated, half a pound of- marrow, twelve eggs, half the whites, fome cream to make them ofa-go6d thicknefs, fweetened, a little pounded cinnamon, and nutmeg grated, fome fait, and a very little rofe wate j rinfe the fkins in rofe water, but let them firft be peifedly clean j fill the fkins, but firft lay the marrow in water to take out the Wood; then mince it fmall, mix it with the other ingredients and fill the fkins.

Saufrges.

TWO pounds of lean pork, three pounds of chine fat free frop fldn, fome fage leaves fchopped, pounded cloves, pepper

and

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 179

t

and fait; beat it fine, and either prefs it into pots and roll it Dvben it is ufed, or put it into (kins.

Beef and fuet make very good faufages.

Fery fine . Scmfages.

TAKE part of a leg of pork or veal pick it clean from fkin or fat; to every pound add two pounds of beef fuet, ihred both fever ally very fine; mix them well with fslge leaves chopped fine, pepper (alt, nutmeg, and pounded cloves, a little grated lemon-peel put this clofe down in a pot; when it is ufed, mix it with yolk of egg a few bread crumbs 5 roll it into lengths.

German Sauages.

BOIL a belly piece of pork till tender cut it into dice, put to it fome hog's blood, with rice flower, or other flower, to thicken it; (eafon it well with pepper, what fait is neceflaiy, and pounded cloves; put this into the great fkins, which nil about half full; boil them; when enough, they will fwim: the pork is beft to be out of the pickle for hams, &c

Bologna Sauages.

TAKE an equal quantity of beef, veal, pork, beef fuet, and bacon (the middle of the flitch) all boned; chop them together very fine; take foiiie fage-leaves and fweet herbs choipcd very fine, enough to give them a flavour, with fome pepper and fait; fluff one of the large guts, and bail it foftly: an hour will do it Prick the gut to prevent its burfting, and then lay it on clean ftraw '

Dutch Saufages.

TAKE a pound of len beef, and half a pound of beef fuet minced very fmall, with three quarters of a pound of beef fuet cut in large pieces; feafon them with black pepper, nutmeg, and cloves, fome garlick (hred fmall, a little white-wine vinegar, bay fait, and common fait, a glafs of red wine, and a glafs of rum; when thefe ingredients are well mixed together, fluff the latgeft,gut which can be got- fluff it very light- -hang it up a chimney, and fmoke it with faw-duft for a week; hang the faufages in the air to. dry, and they will keep a year They are very good boiled, orroafted with tpaft under them.

Spanijh Saufages.

PARBOIL a gammon of bacon, or part of a lean ham, an ince it with an equal quantity 6f fine iard and fome boiled garlick, fage, thjrme, and pepper, hutmeg, and fait; mix them With the yolks of eggs, and a3 much wine as wiil make it pretty thick; fill them in guts as big as four common faufages; hang them three or foui" daysin a chimney: eat them with oil and vinegar, or boil them

Oyfter Saufages.

TAKE the lean of the infide of a loin of mutton cleaned from the (kin and ftrings, the fame quantity of the kidney fuer, and double the quantity of oyfters, bearded and wiped dry $ chop all together very fmall, and feafon them with pepper and fait, then roll them up in flower, the fize of faufages, and fry them in butter.

31? clarify Hogs Lard.

CUT the leaf to pieces, put it into a jar, fet it into a pot of boiling water till the fat melts pour it clear ofE

BireSlions to cboafe Pigi

THE fow is preferable to the boar, the fle(h has a bettelr flavour and iis more tender: if it has no difagreeable fmell, or green fpots at the belly qv tail, it is freh. Shortnecked pigs are beft j but they fhould be dreflled the day they are killed

• A Pig to roaji.

PUT into It chopt fage, a piece of butter as tig as a walnut, and a little pepper and fait; few it up, rub it over with a little fweet oil on a feather, fpit it, and flower it very well all over, keep flowering it till the eyes drop out, or the crackling is hard; when the pig is of a nice brown, and the fleam draws to the fire, rub it well with a Bit of cold butter In a cloth J cut ofF the . head, fave the gravy which runs from it; cut oflF the ears and jaw-bones, (which are to be laid at the ends and on the fides of the difh; cut the pig down the back quite through, bruife the brains, chop the fage; put thefe to fome rich gravy, and what has been faved in the roafting; pour fome of this into the diih, the reft in a boat i put a pig-iron againft the middle of the fire while roafting, or it will be apt to burn. For fauce - good gravy, plain bread-fatice or breads fauce with currants.

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. i8i

Pig dreffed like Houfe Lamb.

TAKE the fore-quarter of a pig, about fix ttVs old; (kin it and trufs it as a fore-quarter of lamb; flower it, fprinkle a little fait over it, and fend it to table nicely frothed. With mint-fauce or fallad it will eat like lamb. When it comes to table, cut ofF the flioulder and fqueeze a Seville orange over it: half an hour will roaft it.

The hind-quarter is very good roafted,in the fame manner.

31? harhicue a Pig.

TAKE a pig nine or ten weeks old, fcalded, &c. as for roafting; make a fluffing wifh a few fageleaves, the liver of the pig, and two anchovies boned, wafhed, and cut very fmall; put them into a mortar with fome crumbs of bread, a quarter of a pound of butter, a very little chyan pepper, and half a pint of Madeira wine; beat them to pafle, and few it up in the pig: lay it down, at a geat diflance, to a large brifk fire finge it well; put into the dripping-pan two bottles of Madeira wine, and bafte it well all the time it is roailing; when it is half-roafled, put into the dripping-pan two French rolls; if there is not wine enough in the dripping-pan, add more: when the pig is near enough, take the rolls and fauce and put them into a fauce-pan; add to them one anchovy cut fmall, a bunch of fweet ho-bs, and the jiiice of a lemon; take up the pig, put an apple in its mouth, and 9, rpl on each fide, then ftrain the fauce oyer it.

Some barbicue a pig of fix or feven weeks old, and flick blanched almonds all over it, but bafte it with Madeira in tht fame manner.

J Pig in Jelly.

TAKE a pig and cut it into quarters, put it into a flewpan, ith a pint of Rheni(b or Lifbon wine, a quart of water, a little lemon-peel, the juice of three or four lemons, two or three cloves: ftew it over a very flow fire for two hours take it up, lay the pig in the difh it is intended for; flrain the liquor, and when it is cold fcum off the fat, leave the fettling it the bottom; warm the jelly again and pour over the pig; ferve it p cold in the jelly.

Pigs Pettitoes c.

BOIL the heart, liver, and lights, a few minutes, (let the feet do till tender;) fhred them, take a little of the liquor they were boiled in, fome pepper, fait, and nutmeg, a little grated

N 3, lemon

i82 THE lady's ASSISTANT.

lemon-peel j ftir in the mince with a bit of butter and flower, give it a boil up: ferve it with the feet fpHl laid on the top, and toafted- fippets.

General DireSiions for Soup and Broth

GREAT care muft be taken to keep the pots, fauce-pans ard covers, at all times, very free from gfeafe and fatid, but more particularly for foups and broths: be careful that they otily fimmer; and always obferve that the foup or broth does not tafte of one thing more than another: and be particularly careful that all the herbs and greens are well picked and wafhed.

Broth for any Soup or Stew.

CUT a leg of beef in pieces, or any lean part, and a crag of mutton; put water to it according to the quantity of the meat; and a little fmall beer: when it boils fcum it, add onions, lemon- pet, whole pepper, a bunch of fweet herbs, fait, and a few cloves; let this ftew till properly reduced, ilrain it, keep it for ufe Veal may be added to it, if thought necefiary.

Soup and Bouillie,

FOR the bouillie, roll five pounds of brifket of beef tight with a tape; put it into a ftew-pot, with four pounds of the leg of mutton piece of .beef, about fcven or eight quarts of Vater; boil thefe up as quick as pbflible, fcum it very clean; add one large onion, fix or feven cloves, fome whole pepper, two or three carrots, a turnip or two, a leek, two heads of celery; ftew this very gently, clofe covered, for fix or feven hours; about an hour before dinner ftrain the foup through a piece cf dimity that has been dipped in cold water; put the rough fide upwards: have ready, boiled carrots cut like little wheels, turnips cut in balls, fpinach, a little chervil and forrel, two heads of endive, one or two of celery cut in pieces; put thefe into a tureen, with a Dutch loaf or a French roll dried, after the crumb is taken out; pour the foup to thefe boiling hot; add a little fait and chyan. Take the t.ipe from the bouiilie, ferve it in a fcparate difh; maihed turnips and fliced carrots, in two liitle 'difhes. The turnips and carrots ihould be cut with an inftrument tht may be bought for that purpofe.

Hodge

TE LADY'S ASSISTANT, i

CUT a pjece of brifket of heef into pieces, put water to it, a bunch of fweet herbs, an onjon, fbme whole pepper in a bit of muflin, a carrot or two cut into pieces; when it has boiled fome time, add a turnip or two cut into pieces, two or three heads of celery cut into pieces; ftew all till tender: lettuce may be added, young cabbage, and a few green peafe; if the turnips re put in at the firft, they will be boiled to ma(h.

Another.

CUT a piece of brifket of beef rnto eight or ten pieces put it into a vefTel that will hptd about a. gallon, beiides the meat, &c. put in three full quarts of water, one quart of fmall beer, or rather lefs j fcum it well, put in onions, carrots, turnips, Celery, black pepper, a little faltj when the meat is tender, . take it out; Arain the foup; put a bit of butter into a ftew-pan, and a fpoonful of flower; ftir it till brown, but be fure not to let it burn take the fat off the foup, put it into the flew-pan, ftew it with the beef in it, and the niceft part of three or four favoys: when they are tejder, ferve it; turnips and carrots may be ferved with thefe, without the favoys, with fpinach, celery, and endive.

N. B, In all thefe foups, any fort of fpices or roots may be added, or omitted.

Leg of beef cut to pieces, and ftewed fix or feven hours, with carrots, and the other ingredients, makes very good foup a little fmall beer is an addition to all brown foups,

A cheap Soup.

TWO pounds of lean beef, fix onions, fix potatoes, one carrot, one turnip, half a pint of fplit peafe, four quarts of Vater, fome whole pepper, a head of celery, a Britiih herring; when boiled, rub this th ough a coarfe fieve; add fpinach and celery boiled, dried mint) and fried bread.

I

Veal Soup.

CUT the meat ofF a leg of veal in thin fiices, cut it clean from the bone; break the bone in pieces, put the meat in a large jug or jar, put in with it a hunch of fweet herbs, half a pound of Jordan almonds blanched and beat fine, pour on it four quarts of boiling water; cover it clofe, and let it ftand all nijj;ht by the fire; the next day. put it into an earthen veflel; let it ftew very "flowly till it is reduced to two quarts. Cake off the

N 4 fcum

j84 the lady's assistant;

fcum very clean, as it fifes ixrhile boiling; ftrain it, and let it ftand to fettle, then pour it clear ofE and put it into a dean fauce-pan, mix with it either boiled rice or vermicelli.

Three ounces of rice or two ounces of vermicelli,

Calfs Head Soup.

TAKE a Calf's Head, wa(h it clean flew it with a bunch of fweet herbs, an onion ftuck.with cloves, mace, pearl barley, and Jamaica pepper; when it is very tender, put to it fome flewed celery; feafon it with pepper, and ferve it with the head in the middle.

A rich Gravy Soup.

CUT feven or eight pounds of lean beef to pieces; put it into a ftew-pot with a (hank of ham, or a bit of lean bacon, a little bit of butter; lay on the meat two or three carrots fliced two onions, a turnip, half a dozen cloves, three heads of celery, a bundi of fweet herbs; cover the pot clofe, fet it over a flow fire, at a diftance, that the gravy may draw out gradually, which pour off; then let the meat brown over a fire rather quick, but take care it does not burn, as that will quite fpoil the foup; pour over the meat fix or feven quarts of water; let this fiqimer, or boil very gently, till reduced to about feven pints, or as it is liked for richnefs; put to it the gravy which was drawn from the meat, ftrain it; when cold, take off the fat; heat the Soup with vermicelli, and the nicefl part of a head of celery boiled and cut to pieces, chyan, and a little (alt; carrot may be added cut into fmall pieces and boiled, with fpinach and endive; or the herbs without the vermicelli,' or vermicelli only; a dried French roll, the crumb firft taken out.

Make the foup the day before it is wanted.

Ni B. All foups arid ftews are bieft done in an earthen veflTe, made with a clofe cover; it gives them a rich flavour, and is always ufcd by Fjfench cooks. '

Cow'beel Soup.

TAKE fi pounds of mutton, five pounds of beef, and four of veal, the coarfeft pieces will do; cut them acrofs ynt a knife; put them into a 'pot, with an old fowl beat to pieces, and the knuckle part of a ham'; let thefe ftew without any liquor over a very flow fire but take care it does not burn to th pot; when it begins to flick to the bottom, ftir it about, and then put in fome good beef broth that has been well fcummed from the fat; then put in fome turnipsi carrots and cele cut

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 185

fmall, a bunch of fwect herbs, and a bay-leaf; then add fome clear broth, and let it ftew about an hour j while this is doing, take a Cow-heel, fplit it, and fet it on to boil in fome of the fame broth; when it is very tender, take it ofF, and fet on a ftew-pan, with fome crufts of bread, and fome more broth; let them foak for eight or ten minutes: when the foup is ftewcd enough, lay the crufts in a tureen, the two halves of the Cowheel upon them; and then pour on the foup, which will be very; rich and good.

Soup a-laReinCm

PUT into a flew-pan two pounds of lean veal cut into flices, two or three flices of ham or lean bacon, a carrot, a large onion fliced, four pepper-corns, a dozen coriander feeds; let thefe draw very gently j add four quarts of beef-broth, and let it boil gently one hour; ftrain it, pound the white of a roaft fowl; blanch and beat half a pound of fweet almonds, half a dozen of bitter; bruife four yolks of eggs boiled hard; mix thefe with the foup; rub it through a napkin, heat it and add a little cream; keep it ftirring, do not let it boil; put into the tureen the crumb of a French roll whole.

Soup Lorraine.

BLANCH a pound of almonds, beat them in a mortar, with a very little water to keep them from oiling; put to them all the white part of a large roaft fowl, and the yolks of four poached eggs; pound all together as fine as poflible; take three quarts of ftrong veal broth, let it be very white, and fcum off all the fat, put it into a ftew-pan with the other ingredients, and mix them well together; boil them foftly over a ftove, or on a clear fire; mince the white part of another roaft fowl very fine; feafon it with pepper, fait, nutmeg, and a little beaten mace; put in a bit of butter as big as an egg, and a fpoonful or two of the Soup ilrained, and fet over the ftove to be quite hot; cut two French, rolls in thin flices, and fet them before the fire to crifp; take one of the hollow rolls which are made for oyfter loaves, and fill It with the mince; lay on the top as clofe as poflible, and keep it hot; ftrain the foup through a piece of dimity into a clean fauce-pan, let it ftew till it is the thicknefs of cream; put the crifped bread in the difli or tureen, pour the foup over it, and place the roll with the minced meat in the middle.

Soupe de Sante.

TAKE a dozen pounds of gravy-beef, put it into a pot, with water enough to cover it and two quarts over; put in fome

9 pepper

i86 THE LADY'S AtBSIST A'UV.

pepper, fait, fpicSes, and a few-iwect HcrBs; bofl it very foftly, till the goodneft of the meat is all irt the brorfi: tWmay be fet on and boiled 'over night; in the mornin'g', fet on a pofwith 9 knuckle of veal, and a fowl, an old cock will do; ftrain the beef from the broth; put to it the veal, and fet it on toftew; put to it nutmeg fl iced j two or three blades of mace: let this fimmer till the meat is boiled down, (the liquor will be as ftrong as jeUy) then put in a large flice of bacon ftuck with cloves; let it boil five minutes after the bacon is in, take it up and ftrain it off, then cut into thin pieces a quarter of a pound of bacon; lay it at the bottom of a llew-pan and put to it a piece of butter; over this, lay five poundsof veal cut into thin flices, i'et this over a clear fire to colour; when it crack,. put in fome of the fat from the hot broth, and ftir it very little; flice two middling carrots, three turnips, and one onion: throw thefe in, with fome parfley cut fmall, feme thyflne-lfeaves- ftript:from the ftalks, fome whole pepper, and' fome freflimufbfooms; fry all thefe well together, and when of a good colour, put it afl into the pot of broth; fome of th Inth muflbe left to foften $he bread for the foup.

When all this is ready, take fome endive and Dutch lettuce, fome chervil and celery, wafli and drain them very well, cut them fmall put them into a fauce-pan and pour fome of the broth upon them; ftew them, and thea cut off the crufts of two French rolls; boil them up in ihrde pints of brotb and ftrain it through a fieve; put this to the herbs that are ftewing; when this has boiled up with the herbs, pour all together into the pot of foup, and let it boil a quarter of an hour j be very careful to fcum off the fat: then lay in the bottom of a tureen, fone French bread in flices, or the crufts of rolls dried, before the fire, but they muft be foaked in a little of the broth firft; when thefe are laid in the. tureen, have ready a nice young fowl .

i)oiled very white, and lay in the middle upon theraj then pour in the foup: this quantity is for a large family but if it is made for a fmall one, it will ferve many times, and be better pvery time it is warmed up. This is an exceeding rich good foup,

Sante Scupe the Englijb way.

TAKE ten or twelve pounds of gravy beef, a knuckle of veal, and the knuckle part of a leg of mutton, a couple of fowls, or two pld cocks will do as well, a gallon of water; let thefe ftew very fofcly till reduced to one half (fet them on to ftei the night before;) add to them fomcrufts of bread; put in

a bunch

TWE LADY'S assistant: 187

2F bunch of fvrcet herbs,, feme cdery, forrel, chervil, and purflain, if agreeable; or any of them may be left out: when it is ftrong and' gpod,, ftrain it.; fend it to table, with either a roaft or boiled fov4 or a piece oB roaft or boiled neck of veal; ia the middle, fomc fried bread iH' a plate.

Scupe au Bourgeois.

TASIK a dozen heads of endive, and four or five bunches of celery; wafh them very clean, cut them into fmall bits, let them be well drained from the water, put them into a large pan, and pour upon them a gallon of boiling water; fet on three quarts of beef-gravy made for foup, in a large fauce-pan 5 ftrain the herbs from the water veYy dry: when the gravy boils, put them in; cut off the crufts of two French rolls, break them, and put iritb the' reft; when the herbs are tender, the foup is cnt)ugh; z boiled fowl may be put into the middle, but it is very good' Without.

If a while. foup is liked better, it fhould be veal gravy.

Soupe Pttree.

TAKE fonie fine young green peafe, put them on to boil in a fmall quantity of water;, give them a boil or two, and then pour away the water; ftrain the peafe in a fieve, and pu't them into a marble mortar, beat them to mah, and put them by; then put in' a frying-pan half a pound of butter, a quarter of 'a pound of bacon cut like dice, two onions cut fmall, a fprig of thyme, a little parfley, fome pepper, fait, cloves bruifed, and the crufts of two French roll's; fet the pan on a moderate fire,, and ftir it about till the bread is crifp, and the reft of a good brown; then put it into a ftew-pan, and pour to it three quarts of rich broth; let this fimmer together for half an hour, but be careful to fcum off. the fat as it rifes, and when it is quite clear from fat, put in the peafe; ftir all together, and let them boil two or three times, then ftrain it through a hair fieve, and it will run through of a fine thicknefs j put fome fried bread into the tuicen, and pour in the foup. It may be ferved up without any thing elfe; but there is generally foitiething put in the middle: a knuckle of veal boiled or ftewed Very white is good, and when in fcafon, a green-goofe, or ducklings roafted, make it very elegant.

Blue Peafe Soup.

TAKE a quart or three pints of blue peafe, fet them on to boil in a great deal of water 3 when they are boiled quite tender,

beat

188 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

beat the peafe to mlafh, and then pulp them through afieve, put them to fome ftrong veal broth; let them fimmer till the foup is of a proper thicknefs (before the peafe are put to the broth mix them with fome juice of fpinach to colour them, or the juice of the leaves of green wheat this is better than the juice of fpinach, as the colour from wheat-leaves is finer, and it has no particular tafte; when the foup is enough, add fome fpinach, lettuce, and cabbage, firft fried and then boiled; boil up thefe in the foup; add a little chyan, fcum any fat that mayarife, put in a little chopped mint, and fend it to table.

Green Peafe Soup.

BOIL four or five pounds of the knuckle or fcrag of veal to rags, in four or five quarts of water, with fait, pepper, a little mace, an onion; ftrain this; put to the liquor one quart of old peafe; boil them till tender, pulp them through a fieve; add about a pint or more of young peafe, halfboiled, fpinach, lettuce j and cabbage, firft boiled, then fried; boil all together till the peafe are enough; add a little chyan, fcum oiF the fat that rifes from the greens; add a little chopped mint; boil the meat the night before. Neck of lamb will fupply the place of veal.

Peafe Soup.

CUT three or four onions, (two only if large) two carrots, fome fpinach, celery, endive, a turnip, into a ftew-pan; fry them with a bit of butter, fo as to be as little greafy as poffible; put them into a ftew-pot, with four quarts of water (if the foup is to be very rich, as much beef broth) fome roaft beef bones if they are to be had, a red herring, or a bit of lean bacon, a quart of fplit peafe; let this fiew gently tilK the peafe are very foft; pulp them through a fine cullender, or a coarfe fieve; when cold, take off the top, heat the foup with celery boiled and cut to pieces, fpinach, endive, and a little chyan; cut fome bread like dice, fry it very dry, put it into a tureen, pour in the foup; add a little dried mint, rubbed very fine, or if preferred, the 'herbs may be fried after they are boiled; fome gravy that has run from a piece of meat is a great addition: if the foup does not appear quite thick enough, mix a little flower very fmooth, and add to it; but be fure boil it up a few minutes, or the flower will tafle raw; .the liquor of a leg of pork makes good peafe foup in a common way, or any bones boiled.

Savoj

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 189

Sav€y Soup

TAKE five large favoys, cut them in quarters and boil thetA % little in water; ftrain the water ofF; when they are cool, fqueeze them dry from the water, then put them into a fauc6)an, with as much beef gravy as will cover them: fet the fauce-.

pan on a moderate fire, cover them very clofe, and let them ftcw two hours; then fet on a large frying-pan, with a quarter of a pound of butter; fhake in fome flower, and ftir it till it is brown . peel a couple of onions, put them into the butter, and ilir it well about; when thefe are fried brown, pour in a quart of veal gravy, mix them all well together; foak fome crufts of French rolls in the gravy where the favoys are ftewed, and lay them at a little diftance from each other; then pour in the gravy and onions This is a very rich good ibup.

Hop-top Soup.

TAKE a fatge quantity of Hop-tops, in April, when they are in their greateft perfediion; tie them in bunches twenty ot thirty in a bunch; lay thm in fpring-water for an hour or two, tirain them well from the water, and put them to fome thin peafe foup; boil them well, and add three fpoonfuls of the juice of onions, fome peppery and fait; let them boil fome time longer; when done, foak fome crufts of bread in the broth, and lay them fn the tureen, then pour in the foupw

This is a plain foap, but vefy good; the French pour in fome crayfifli cullis.

Brown Turnip Soup

CUT four pounds of gravy-beef in thin fliccs, put It into a, ftew-pari, with a little fat bacon; fry it brown, put in two turnips ahd oiie fliced carrot; when it is brown, and the gravy runs from it, put into ht pan fome good beef broth, cloves, ftiace, pepper, a foiihch of fweet herbs, four young onions, and a fprig of parfley; Ifet thefe ftew till the gravy is very rich, then ftrain it through a fieve: have ready a duck half-roafted, put it whole into the foup; then cut fome turnips like dice, and fry them brown in butter; put them into the foup, let the duck ftew in the foup till it is enough 5 fcrvc it up with the duck in the middle.

Soup notth Sorrel and Eggs.

•AKE a knuckle of veal, and the chump end of a leg of mutton, with a bunch of fweet herbs, pepper, fait, cloves, and mace 5 ftew it very flowly till it is rich and ftrong; ftrain it oiflF,

and

N.

190 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

and put into it a young fowl; cover it, and let it ftew again very flowly; then take two or three handfuls of forrel well wa(hed, cut it in pieces, not too fmall; fry it. in butter, and put it into the foup; let it all boil till the fowl is tborouohly done, fcum it very clean, and fend i( to tables fome lay poached eggs round.

It may be eat without the eggs and forrel, and is very good.

Afparagus Soup.

CUT four or five pounds of beef to pieces; fet it Over a fire with an onion or two, a few cloves, and fome whole black pepper, a calf's foot or two, a head or two of celery, a very little bit of butter; let it draw at a dift an ce from the -fire; put in a quart- of warm beer, three quarts of warm beef broth, or water: let thefe ftewtill enough; ftrain it, take off the fat very clean put in fome afparagus heads cut fmU (palates may be added, .boiled very tender) and a toafted French roll the crumb taken out.

Chefnut Soup.

TAKE fome dices of ham or bacon, a pound of veal, a pigeon cut into pieces, a bunch of fweet herbs, and ati onion, a little pepper, fome mace, and a piece of carrot; lay the bacon or ham at the bottom of the ftew-pan, fet it over a flow lire till it begins to flick to the pan; then put in a cruft of bread, znd pour in two quarts of beef broth; let it boil foftly till one third is near wafted; then ftrain it off; take half a hundred of the heft chefnuts, roaft and peel them; let them ftew in beef broth, enough to cover them, till they arc quite tender; add them to the foup which was ftrained off 1 feafon it jwith fait, and put in a fried French roll.

Vermicelli Slup.

CUT a fcrag of mutton, the knuclde part of a leg of veaU and two pounds of beef, into pieces put them into a veffel with a little bit of butter, a bit of lean ham or bacon, four heads of. celery, a bunch of fweet herbs, a large onion or two, three large carrots, two turnips, a few truffles and morells; cover this clofe, fet it over a flow fire for half an hour then pour in a gallon of boiling water; let it fimmer gently tilL enough; ftrain the foup, heat it with two ounces of vermicelli y add jiift the white part of a head of celery, cut into lengths and boiled, a fmall French roll, the crumb taken out: the celery may be omitted: put in afparagus heads cut fmall.

Rid

THE LAiDY's ASSISTANT. 191

Rice Soup

TAKE -a fowl,. with the tops of the ribs of beef, and put them into a pot with a gallon of water; ftew them the night before they are wanted, till it is good broth, and foak at the fame time two large tea cups full of rice well picked; in the morning, put the rice into a ftew-pan, and ilrain the broth to it by degrees while it is ftcwing, ftir it often; let it ftew above an hour, then take a little of the broth, arid fqueeze in a little faffron, juft to colour it; fqueeze in fome juice of lemon; toaft fome crufts of French bread, and put them in; let the foup fimmer a little, take ofF the fcum that rifes; ferve it ' with a boiled fowl in the middle.

Hare Soup.

TAKE a large old hare cut into pieces, put it into a pan or jug, with a little fait, two large oiiions, one red herring, three or four blades of mace, half a pmt of red wine, three quarts of water; fend it to the oven and bake it three hours; then ftrain it ofF into a large ftew-pan, put into it three ounces of French barley or fago, ready boiled; fcald the liver of the harC) bruife it, and rub it through a hair ileve with the back of a fpoon 'y add it to the foup, with a quarter of a pound of butter I fet . it over the fire, keep ftirring it, but do not let it boil.

Giblet Soup.

FOUR pounds of gravy beef, two pounds of fcrag of mutton, two pounds of fcrag of veal; put to this meat two gallons of water, and let it ftew very foftly till it is a ftrong broth; let it ftand to be cold, and fcum oiF the fat; take two pair of giblets well fcalded and cleaned, put them into the broth, and let them fimmcr till they are very tender; take out the giblets, and ftrain the foup through a dimity; put a piece of butter rolled in flower into a ftew-pan, make it o( a light brown; have ready chopped fmall, fome parfley, chives, a little pennyroyal, and a little fweet marjoram; put the foup over a very flow fire; put in the giblets fried, butter, herbs, a little Madeira wine, fome fait, and fome chyan pepper; let them fimmer till the herbs are tender, then fend the foup to table with the giblets in it.

Pocket Soup.

TAKE off all the. meat, but leave out the flcin and fat, from a large leg of veial, and boil it in four quarts of water till it is a ftrong jelly; keep the pot very dofc covered, and let it but 10 juft

192 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

juft fimmcr; when it is a very rich jelly (which will be eafily known, by taking fome out in a fpoon and letting it ftand till it is cold) then ftrain it through a fieve into an earthen pan; when it is cold, take off all the fat; then take a large ftew-pan with boiling water, fet it over a ftove; take fome well glazed cups and nil them with jelly, which muft be taken up very clear from the fettling at the bottom and fet them in the ftewpan of water (great care muft be taken not to let the water get into the cups, as it will fpoil it;) let the water boil gently all the time, till the jelly is as thick as glue; take them and let them ftand to cool, then turn them out upon fome new coarfe flannel, which will draw out all the moifture; in fix hours turn them on more frefli flannel, and continue fo to do till they are quite drv; keep them in a dry warm place, and in a little time they will be like a piece of glue, which may be carried in little tin boxs in the pocket; when they are wanted pour a quart of boiling water on a piece of glue as big as an egg, and ftir it till all the glue is melted; feafon it with fait; and if herbs are agreeable, boil them in fome water, and pour that water over the glue; or chop the herbs when boiled, put them to the glue, and pour the boiling water over both.

Brown portable Soup.

BONE a large leg of beef, takeoff the fat and (kin, take all the finews clean from the bones; put it into a ftew-pot, with four gallons of foft water; when it boils, put in fix anchovies ' half an ounce of mace, twenty cloves, half an ounce of whole white pepper, two or three onions cut in half, a bunch of thyme, fweet marjoram, winter favory, parfley, and a carrot ciit into pieces, with the bottom cruft of a twopenny loaf well baked; cover it very clofe, and let it fimmer very gently for fix or feven houjis; then ftir it together, and let it funmer till it is a very rich jelly, which may be known by the fame rule as is mentioned in the pocket foup; then take it and fh-ain it through a coarfe hair bag; do it in the fame manner as the pocket foup.

This is exceedingly good for all foups, fauces, or gravies: -when it is ufed for foup, prepare it as the pocket foup:. for change, rice may be boiled, or barley, vermicelli, or celery cut fmall, or truffles and morells; whichever is put in muft be tender; then ftir in the glue, and give it a boil and any of the ingredients lyith it. - If it is ufed for gravy, pour the boiling water on whatever quantity is wanted i when it is melt

cd,

I

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 193

ed) put into it any other ingredients as in the other fauces, as this is only inftead of a good gravy; and it may be made either eak or ftrong by adding more or lefe 6f the glue.

Inftead of tin boxes, put it into ftone jars; keep it clofb covered in a dry place free from damp.

For white portable foup, take a leg pf vea!, and bone it, with two dozen of chicken feet waded clean and cut into pieces; put all into a large (lew-pot, and fimmer gently for feven or eight hours, and then manage this iikewife as the pocket foup.

Mock Turtle Stmp.

LET the head be fcalded with the fkin on; pull off the bornypart, which cut into pieces about two incnes fquarej Wafh and clean thefe virell j dry them with a cloth; put them into a ftcw-pan, with four quarts of brotti, fweet bafil, knotted tnarjoram, favory, a little thyme, fome parfley, all chopped fine; cloves and mace pounded; chyan, not too much; fome green onions, and efchalot chopped; a few frefh mufhrooms chopped;' half a pint of Madeira; ftew all together gently, till reduced to two quarts; heat a little broth, with a gill of cream, fome flower mixed fmooth in it; the yolks of two eggs; keep thefe ftirringove a gentle fire till near boiling; then add them to the foup, ftirring it as it is poured in, for it is very apt to curdle; then let ail ftew together for an hour, or more: when it is ready to fend to table throw in forced-meat balls boiled, hard yolks of eggs: when off the fire, fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, and half an orange,; the balls muft be (eafoned £is the foup; the mufhrooms may be omitted. The quantity of foup may be incrcafed, by adding ntfore broth, with calves feet and Ax palates boiled tender and cut into pieces.

The Broth for the Mock Turtle Soup.

. THE calf's head, when the horny part is taken off; fix or feven pounds of beef; a calf's foot or two; two carrots, a turnip, two onions, a fhank of ham, one head of celery, cloves, whole pepper; a bunch of fweet herbs, a piece of icmon-peel, a few truffles, eight quatts of water; ftew thefe 1 ftraift it.

FISH SOUPS,

Stock for hroivn or white Fifh Soups.

TAKE a pound of fcate, four or five flounders, and two jpounds of eth i cut them into pieces, put to them as much

O water

194 THE lady's ASSISTANT.

water as will cover them, feafon thetn with mace, an onio ftuck with cloves, a had of celery, two parfley-ropts fliced fome pepper and fait, a bunch of fweet herbs; let it fimme an hour and half, covered (own (clofe; (train it ofF for ufe: if it is for brown foup, fry the fifh firft in brown butter, and .then do it as before mentioned: if will fiot keep more than two or three days.

Eel Soup.

TAKE two pounds of eels, put to them tYP quarts of water, a cruft of bread, two or three blades of mace, fom whole pepper, an onion, and a bunch of fweet herbs; cover them clofe, and let them ftew till half the liqior is wafted j ftrain it; toaft fome bread, and cut it fmall if the foup is not rich enough, it muft boil till it is fironger; a piece of carrot may be added, if agreeable. This foup will be as good a&'if meat was put into it. A pound of eels maizes a pint offoup. ' ' ' '

Scate Soup.

TAKE two pounds of fcate, ikin and wafh it, boil it t fix quarts of water; when it is boiled, take the meat fromt the bones; take two pounds, of flounders, wafh them clean, put them into the water the fcate was boiled in, with fomd lempn-peel, a bunch of fweet herbs, a few blades of mace fomi? horfe-radifh, the cruft of a penny loaf, a little pardey, and the bones of the fcate 5 . cover it very Tlofe,,and let it hmmer till it is educed to two quarts; then ftrain it off, and put to jt an ounce of vermicelli, fet it on the fire and let it boil very foftly; Cake one of the hollow rolls (which are made for oyfters) and fry it in butter; take the met of the fcate, pull it into little flices, put' it into a fauce-pan, with two or three fpoonfuls of the foup; ftiake into it a little flower and a piece of butter, fome' pepper and fait; ftiake them together in a faucepn till it is thick, then fill the roll with • it 5 pour the foup into the tureeil put the roll into it, and fend it to table.

Mufcle Soup.

TAKP a Jiundred of mufcles, wa(h them very clean, and put them into a fauce-pan till they open; take them from the fliells, beard them, and ftrain the Ijquor through a lawn fievc; beat a dozen of cray-fifli very fine, with as many almonds blanched in a mortar; then take a carrot and ftnall parfnip fcraped, and cut in flices, fry them brown in butter; take the mufcle liquor, with a fmall bunch of fweet berbsy a little parllcy.

THE LADrs ASSISTANT. 195

parfley, and horfe-rsidiib, with the cray-fih and almonds, a little pepper and fait, and half the mufcles, with a quart of water, or more; let it boil till all the goodnefs is out of the ingredients; then ftrain it off to two quarts of the white fifh ftock; put it into a fauce-pan; put in the reft of the murdesy a few mufbrooms and truffles, a leek wfhed and cut fmall i take two French rolls, cut out the crumb, fry it brown, cut it into little pieces, and put it into the foup; let it boil together for a quarter of .an hour, with the fried carrot and parfnip; at the fame time take the crufts of the rolls and fry them crifp; take the other half of the mufcles, a quarter of a pound of butter, a fpoonful of water; ihake in a little flower, fet them on the fire till the butter is melted; feafon it with pepper n4 ff It; then beat the yolks of three eggs, put them in, ftir thein all the time for fear of curdling; grate a little nutmeg; when it is thick and fine, fill the rolls, pour the foup into the tufeen and fet the rolls in the middle

Oyjier Soup.

TAKE what quantity of fifh ftock will be wanted; then take two quarts of oyflers without the beards, beat the hard part ina mortar, with yolks of ten hard eggs; put them to the fiih ftock, fet it over the fire; feafon it with pepper, fait, and gi'ated nutmeg; when it boils, put in the eggs; let it boil till it is of a good thicknefs, and like a fine cream,

Lobfter Soup.

TAKE a pound of veal, cut it into thin flices, half a pound of the lean of a loin of mutton; feafon thefe with pepper and fait; then take a large fowl, draw it, and take out the fat; fet thefe on in a fmall pot, with a gallon of water, and a bunch of pariley; take a couple of middling lobfters, or three fmall ones; take the meat out of the tails and legs, and bruiie the body iVith the (hell in a marble mortar very fmooth, niince the meat very fine, and (hake over it fome pepper, and a little (alt; put all this into the pot, and cover it very clofe; when it has been fome time ftewing, put into it a few cloves, and fome whole pepper; when it is reduced to half the quantity, ftrain it oiF; if it is not rich enough, add to it fome good cullid

Cray-fifb Soup.

BOIL a quarter of a hundred cray-fih; take the flxells from the tails of fix or eight of the largeft;' leave the tails to the bodjes sd take oiF the little daws, leave the large ones on;

O 2 take

196 t'Hfe LAtTs ASSISTANT.

take off the tails Trom the beft, picked clean from the (hells;(thc(e are all for garnlftij) bruife all the Siells and remaining bodies to a,pafte, l?ith the fpawn of a large lobfter. - BroWii a pound and a half of thornback, maid, or any white fifh iliced in a ftew-pan, with a bit of butter; fet it Over a ftove, Vith good broth, the cromb of two French rolls; let it fimmer till the fifh and rolls are tender; mix the bruifed fifh with it, and rub it through a cloth; let it juft boil: put the crufts . of the French rolls in a difti, pour the foup over them. - N6 jTeafonihg but fait: gariiifii the tureen difh with the cry-iifh iaved as above,

SOUPS WITHOUT MEAT.

Soufe Mature.

MELT half a pound of butter in a ftew-pan, fhake it weH round; whe.n it has done hiffing, throw in fix middling ofiions fliced, fliake the pan well round for five minutes; then put jn four or five heads of celery cut fmall, a handful or two pf fpi'nach, a cabbage lettiicc, and a bunch of parfley, all cut fmall; fhake thefe well in the pan for a quarter of ap hour, ilir in ifome floWer, and pour two quarts of boiling water into ir, with fome ftale crufts of bread, feme beaten pepper, three or four blades of mace beat fine j ftir all together, and let it boil gently for half an hour; take it ofF, beat the yolk's of two eggs, and ftir in 5 frtit in a fpoonful of vinegar, and ihen pour it into lPhe'txrccn.

Another way.

TAKE;one quart of green moratto pieafe, three qtrarts oT foft water, four onions iliced, flowered, abd fried in frefli butter, the coarfe ftalk of celery, a carrot, turnipj and parfnip, with whole pepper and qnace 'to the tafte; all thefe muft ftew very gently tcjgether, till the pulp will force through & fieve; have ready a handful of beet .leaf and root, fofhe 'celery and fpi- 1

nach, whhph muft be firft blanched, and fteWd fender ih " the ftrained liquor; have the thfrd oV a pint of fprnach-jurce, which muft be fiirred in with caution, when the foup is ready to be ferved up, and not Tufiered lo bpil after it is pat in, bfccaufe it will cut die: a cruft 6T breadv Qni? tops of afparagus dUd artichbke b&ttbnas my be add€d

Onion Soup'.

BROWN half a pound of butter, with a little fiorer;

take

THE LADTs ASSISTANT. 197

tke care it does not burn: when it has done hifling, flice 4 dozen, of' large white onions, fry theoi very geqfly till tlie) a.e tender; then pour to them, by degrees, two quarts of boiling water, (baking the pan well round as i is poured in; add alfo a cruft of bread; let it boil gently for half an hoqr; feafon it with pepper aid flt: take the top of Frei?ch rojl anijl dry it at the fire; put it'ipto a fauce-piu with (qm oif thf foup to foak it; then put it into the turepo: let the f9up boil fome time after thiB onions re tender, as it gives the foup a great richnefs; ftraia it off, aid pojar i( upon the Frc roll,

Gren Peafs Soap without Meat.

TAKE a quart of old peate, and boil them in water tiH they are quite tender, and rub them through a fie ve with the 'back of a fpooix; melt half a pound of butter, and rub through with them; then boil a quart of young peafe: whea they are enough, add the butter and pulp to the young peafe, and their liquor; keep flirrlng till they are enough, and feafon xitii .

fait and pepper to the palate.

It is a very good way to make green peafe foup like the foup maigre, putting tbp quart of peafe to thicken it, inftead of the%gg3.

Another tjoay.

TAKE a quart qf green peafe, boil them in a gallon of wter till tender, with a bundle of mint; (train the pulp and liquor through a coarfe fieve into a faucepan; add to it a cabbage lettuce ctt fmall, a liandful of fpinach clean waflied and cut fmall, a leek cut fmall, a quart of young peafe, and a little fait; cover them, and let it boil gently till it comes to two quarts; the herbs muft be very tender'; theii fend it to table.

Brown Souf without Meat

PUT into a clean fauce-pan three quarts or more of water,' with rafpings fufficient to thicken it; two or three onions cue crofs, fome wbplie pepper, apd a little ialt; cover it clofe, ad let it bpjl abpit an hour apd an half; drain it oiF through a lv: th?n have cl, endive, jeiituce, inachi aid aqy pfhr herbs not Ci4t top fmall; fry then in butter; then talfe a dn ij:ev-pan that is large enough for the ingredients; put in a goqd piecp of butter, a duft of Qojver, andlceep flirring it till it is of a fin brown; then put in the herbs and foup; bpil it till the herbs are tender, and the foup of a proper thicknefsj;

O 3 put

198 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

put th foup into a tureen, and Tend it to table; have foin fried bread in a plate, and feme in the foup, if agreeable.

JFhite Soup without Meat.

PUT into a clean fauce-pan two or three quarts of yrater the crumb of a two- penny loaf, with a bundle of fweet herbs fome whole pepper, two or three cloves, an onion or two cut acrofs and a little fait; let it boil covered till it is quite fmooth; take celery, endive, and lettuce, only the white part; cut them into pieces, not too fmall; boil them;, flrain the foup off into a clean ftew-pan; put in the herbs, with a good piece of butter ftirred into it till it is melted; then let it boil for fome time till it is very fmooth; if any fcum arifes take it ofF very clean; foak a fmall French roll nicely rafped in fome of the foup; put it in the middle, pour in the foup, and fend it to table.

Peafe Soup without Meat.

A Britifb herring; with a pint of peafe, celery, &c. make good peafe foup.

S'umip Soup without Meat.,

TAKE a bunch of turnips, pare them, and put them into a gallon of water, with half an ounce of white pepper, an onion fiuck with cloves, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome mace, half a nutmeg, and a large cruft of bread; let them fimmer near an hour and an half; urain it through a (kve; waib four or five heads of celery very clean, cut them into fmall pieces, put them into the foup, with two whole raw turnips, and two young carrots cut in pieces; cover them very clofe, and let them ftew; then cut fome more turnips and carrots in dice, flower and fry them brown in butter, with two large onions cut thin; put theoi into the foup, with fome vermicelli; let it all ftew very foftly till the celery is fender, ahd the foiip good.

Milk Soup.

TAKE two quarts of new milk, with two fticks of cinnamon, a couple of bay-leaves, a very little baiket-falt, and a very little fugar; then blanch half a pound of fweet almonds while the meat is heatiAg, beat them up to a pafte in a niarble mortar; mix with them, by degrees fome milk; while they are beating, grate the peel of a lemon, with the almonds and a little of the juice 5 then ftraiii it through a coarfe iieve, and

mix

THE LAE)1fs ASsiStAisTf. 199

biix it with the milk that is heating iii the ftew-pan, and let it jboil up.

. Cut fome dices of French bread, and dry theih before th fire; foakthem a little in the milk, lay theih it thfe bottom oF tbfe tdreen and then pour in the foup.

BROTHS;

Beef Broth.

TAKE a leg oiF beef, brak the Ixine in two or three, tolaces, put to it a gallon of water, two or three blades of mace, a little parfley, and ia cruft of bread; boil the beef very tender ftrain the broth, and pour it into a tureen; if agreeable, the meat may be put in with it: toaft fome breads cut it into fquares and put it in a platp.

Drini. ..'... .

T AtCE a pound of lean beef, take o(F the fat and fkiii, cut it into pieces, and put it into a gallon of water, with the lih- jder-cruft of a penny loaf, and a very little falt; let it boil till jt is reduc to tw6 Quarts; Ilrain it off, and it is a very good (drink.

If it is for veiy weak ftomachsi it muft be weaken

Scotch Barley Broth,.

. TAKE a leg of beef, and chop it' all to pieces; put to it three gallons of water, a Cruft of bread, and a carrot; let it, fimmeir very (lowly, till it is reduced to half the quantity; then ftrain it off, and put it into a pot, With five or fix heads of celery cut fniall half a pound of barley, k bunch of fweet herbs, fome plrfley ciit fmalj, n onion, and fome marigolds; let it boil an hoUr; then take a large fowlj put it into th broth, and let it boil till the broth is very good then fend it tb table, with the fowl in the middle.

Before it goes to table, the fweet herbs and the onion muft be taken oiit. This broth is fometimes miade with a (heep'shead inftcad of bfcef: the head niuft be chopt to pieces. The broth js very good without the fowl.

Veal Brth

STEW a knuckle of veal with four or five quarts of water, bvo ounces of rice or vermicelli, a little fait, and a blade of 0iace

O 4 Mutton

apes THE LADt ASSISTANT

Mutton Bretb.

BOIL the fcrsig in between three and four quarts of wader $ feum it as (bon as it botis and put to it a carrot, a turnip, 2 eruft of fareaxt, kn onion, a fmall Ikindle of herbs; Let theOs flew; put in the other part of the neck that it may be boiled tender y when enough, take out the mutton, ftrain the btoth; put in. the mutton again, with a few dried marigolds, chives, Or young onions, and a little parfley chopped y bojl thefe about a quarter of an hour: the broh and mutton may be iiryed to-' getner in a tureen; or the meat in a feparate diih: do not fencf up the fcrag, unlefs particularly liked. Some do not like herbs; the broth Tx9: then be ftrained off. Send up mafhed turnips in a Httle difh. Th6 broth may be tkickene either with crumb vS bread, or oatmeal

Another for- Jick People

TAKE a ppQnd,Of two of tjae chump, end of a loin of imrt'' ton i tak off the fkin and the greteft part of the fat, and iXk the fuet from the under part put it into a fauce-pan, with a quart of foft waer to a pound of meat, a little fait and upper cruft of bread, a blade of mace, and a little whole pepper fcum it Very clean, and kt it iimmer an hour; pour the brx)th clear off, and fend it to table: the mutton will be fit to eat Sauce - maihed turnips biit donot boil ttrem in the broth.

Viper Broth.

Take a large fowl, dcaw i.; tace out all the fat and the' breaft-bone fill the body with pOey, a handful of pimpernel, and a head of endivq; put thefe into three pint$ of Wter, with a little fIt and pipper; &t it on a flow nre, ad let it (imtacf till there h ofily a quart left; then kill a viper, flfin it an4 take, out the entrails, cut the flefh into fmall pieces, put it inicy the broth, with the heart and liver cut acrofs, two blades of mace, and fm,aH bit o£ cinnamon; cover it up and let it boil till it is re4uped to a pint ( by this time the ileih 0 the viper will be confumd then, ftrain it o and pre& it; very isytd Is •IviH fervc twice

FISH

F I S H.

THERE IS a general, rule in chopfing moft kinds of fifli; if thIr- gills are red, their eyes plump, apd the. whole fijli Itiff, they arq good: if, on the contrary, the ills are pale, the eyes funk,, and the fih flabby, they are ftale."

T U R T J. E.

To drefs a Turile.

WHE the ttirtle is kiHed, cut the hack from, the helljc, tod wa(h it cleQ from' the blood In three or four waters, with, fom fait; cut the fins from the back fcald and fcrape them 4:lean from the fcales; put the neat in a faucepan, with a little fait, and rather more water than will cover it; let it flew, but .

fcun-it very cleaQ all the time: if the turtle is. large, put mio it a bottle of white wine; if final, a pint will io; the Wine muft not be put in till it has ftewed an hour anxLa half, and the icum ha3 done riilng; if the wine is put in before, it will make the turtle hard: put into it, while it is ftewing an onion or two fhred fine, with a little thyihe, parfley, black pepper and fait: when it is ftewed very tender, take it out of the fauce-pan, and cut it into fniall pieces; wih the backfhell very cleaii frorp the blood, then rub it with pepper, fait, thyme, parfley, and onions fhred fine, and mixed together; pu the meat into the fhcll, with a layer of feafoning between every layer of meat till the fhell s full; cover it with feafipning: if it is a. large turtle, two pounds of butter mufl be. cut into bits, and laid between the feafoning and the meat. The fpup miift be thickened with butter rolled in flower. A large turtle will take an hour and a half.

Another way to 4refs Turtle.

When the turtle is killed, cut the bk from the bplly, and %afh ij clean from the blood in thrcjc pr fur waters with fait; then take frotn the back-fhell ajl the meat and entrajj, except the fat, vtrhich mufl be baked with the flcU cut it inxo pieces of a moderate fize, taking from it all the bones, and put them, with the fifts (which mufl be fcalded and fcraped

clean)

464 tHE LAbYs ASSis t Alsf fr

clean) into a pot, with the head, a gallon of water, fait, and two blades of mace: wh it hoil fcun it clean;, theh pu$ iii a bunch of thyme, parfley, fweet herbs, and fome youni onion?, and the veal part of the turtle, (except a pound and a half, which miift be made into forced-meat hHs) with a little chyan pepper: wheii it has bbile4 in the foup an hour, take it out. The entrails, which are reckoned the beft, mufl: ht fpUt open, fcraped and made clean, cut into jiiiali pietes, and pul into the other part. The paunch, or maw, muft be fcalded IkinneB, and cut into pieces, and put to the reft, with the lights, heart, and liver; piit it altogether inlo iaiice-paii with half a pound of butter, a few efcbalots, a bunch of thyme, parfley, and fweet herbs, fome fait, white pepper, mace, beaten cloves, and a little chyan pepper: let it ftew half an hour oveit a good charcoal fire put in with it as much of thb bhoth as tvill cover it, iciihi it well; and when it is half done, put in a pint and a half of Madeira wine: ijt will take four or five hours doing i when it is almoft done, fcum it, and thicken it with, fome flowet and veal gravy the thicknefs of a fricaflee: make fonte forcedmeat balls with the veal partj which was left, about the bignefi of a walnut; fry them, and put them into the ftew: if it has any eggs, let them be cleaned and boile4; if there are none, boil twelve or fourteen hard eggs, then put the ftew (which is the callepafh) into the back-fhell, with the eggs and balls over it and put it into an oven to brown; the liver, lights, sitid heart fhould be taken from the callepafli: before it is put iiito the fhell, the callepy muft be flaflied in feveral places and feafond with butter, chopt thyme, fweet herbs, parfley onions fait; white pepper, and a little chyan: put a piece into each flalh, fome over it, and a little flower; bake it in a tin or iron drippmg-pan, in an oven; the back-ihell muft be rubbed over with feafoning made of pepper, falt beaten mace, fweet herbs, parfley, and onion fhred fine; bake it in a dripping-pan which muft be dohe before the ftew is put iii.

The fins, when boiled very tender, muft be taken oiit and put into a ftew-pan, with fome good pale veal gravy, a very little white vtine thickened with a little of the gravy and flowery and fisrvfed in a dilh by themfelves.

The lights, heart, and liver, which were ftewed with tBe callepafh, muft havfe a little more feafoning added to them, and when warmed up, ierved in a difh by themfelves. Strain oS the foup, and ferve it in a tureen or foup-difh,

Courfi

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. ao

A Courfe of "turtle.

Callepy.

Lights, &c. Soup. Fiflsi

Callepaih.

T U R B O T.

0 cbooje ifurbot.

IF good, they (hould be thick and' plump, the belly a yellow .White; if they appear blueilb, and thin, they are not good. They are in feafon the greateft part of the fummer i and are generally taught in the Britiih and German Ocean.

To boil a Turbo f.

MAKE a biinc with a handful or two of fait, and a gallon or more of water; let the turbot lie in it two hours before it it to be boiled, then fet on a fifli-ketde with water enough to cover it, and about half a pint of vinegar (or lefs, if the turbot is fmall;) put in a piece of horfe-radifh: when the water boils, put in the turbot, the white fide uppermoft, on a fifhplatb: let it be done enough, but not too much, which V9 be eafily known by the look; a fmall one will take twenty minutes, a Idrge one half an hour; then take it up, and fet it on a fi(h-plate to drain before it is laid in the difh. Saucelobfter-fauce and white fauce.

Turbot boiled in Gravy.

TAJCE a middling-fized turbot, let it be well wafhed, and wiped very dry; then take a deep ftew-pan, put in the fifh, with two bay-leaves, a handful of parfley, a large onion ftuck with cloves, fome fait and pepper j heat a pint of white wine boiliiig hot, and pour it upon the turbot, then ftrain in fome very ftrong veal gravy, ttivt than will cover it j fet it over a ftove till it is near enough, and then remove it on one fide, that the full ftrength of the ingredients may be infufed into it: hen it is quite done, put it on a hot difh, ftrain the gravy into a fauce- pan, with fome butter and flower; pour fome over the turbot, the reft in a fauce-boat.

Plaice, Dabs, and Flounders, may be drei&d the fame way

To boil a Turbot au Court Bouillon with Capers.

TAKE fmall turbot, wa(h and dry it, then take fome (hyme, parfley, fwcet herbs, and an onion fliced -, put them

into

204r .THE LADY-'s ASSISTAlT

into a ftew-pan, then, lay. if th turbot, (the ftew-pan (houM ' be but juft big enough to hpld the fifc) ftrew over the fiftk the fame herbs that are under U, with Tome chives and fweet bafil; thii ppur in an equal quantity q white wine and white wine vinegar, till the iifli is cave;ed; then ftrew in a little bay- fait, with feme whole pepper; fet the ftew-pan over a gentle ftove, increafirig the he by degwes, till it is enough; then take it off the fire; but do nof take the turbot out: fet a fauce-pan on the fire, wit)i a ppuiv4 Qf butter, two anchovies &lit. bfa9d anff,wad, two lge fp()fMls of cers cut ial), fpri)p chives wpjp, an4 littl PPPfa 0lt iogne nutmej; £16,4 little flower .fpcof)fiil of vinjsgr n$i a little yaFer; fet the fauce-pan oyer the ftove nd keep (faking it roun for feme time, and then fet the turbot on to make it hot; put it in a difh, and pour fomc of the faucc over it; lay fome horferadifh ooiixbd it, and put what remains of the fauce ia a boat.

Siols, Flounders, large Plaice, or Dabs, are very good done this way.

70 fry trot.

IX Vf be a ftiU. tirlpt 5 cut it crofs as if ijt erc ribbed; Vb9 it is qjuite 4ry3 flpYfr it, and put it in a large fryiqg-pan, i(itj bojlipg lr efipugh t9 coyer it; fry it till it is boyrn then drain' it; de th pan, put intp it claret or wjte wia, alm'oft enough to cover it, anchovy, flt, niig, and a little ginger; put in the fifli, and let it ftcw till half the liquor is wafted; then take it out, and put in a piece, of butter rolled in flower, and a minced lemon; let them fimmer till of a pro per thicknefs; rub 4 hot di(b with a piece of efchalqt j lay the turbot in the difh? and pour the fauce over it.

SALMON.

7'q choofi Sajmtb

SALMON, if oew, the flefli is of a figc rc4, liut particularly fo at th? giljis i he fcaUs Oioiii4 le very bright,?n4 tfap fife very ft.iff. the Thfis felfW i ftfOPraUy efteeiwed thf beft, though fome prefer that wMct i cagbt if the aeverxi.

It i in kign i P ffirinff

To boil SabiWH

IT requjfes to be vell bojljpd; a piece not very thick will tfik hOf 2111 km: boil l)f?rfe-radiJfti i the wicri frie

fmelts

THE "LABY ASSISTANT. 205

fmelts may be laid found it; garnMh with horfe-fadifh and iliced leitaon.-Aiichovy fauce, and plain butter.

To hoil Salmon crimp.

WHEN the falmon is fcaled and gutted, cut ofT the head and tail, and cut the body through into dices an inch and a half thick, throw them into a large pan of pump water: when they are all piit in, fprihkle a handful of bay -fait upon the va ter, ftir it about, and then take out the fifli; fet on a large deep ftew-pan, boll the head and ti% but do not fplit the head ) put Xi fotoefalt, hot no vinegar: when they have btJffled ten minutes, fcuip the water very clean, and put in the flices; when they are boiled enough, take them out, lay the head and the tail in the difh, the fliceis round. This muft be for a large company. The head or tail may be dreiTed alone, or with one or two llices $ or the dices alone.

It is done in great perfeSiion in the falmon countries; but if the falmon is very freih, it will be very good in Londont

Salmon boiled in Wine.

TAKE fomc flices of bacon, fat and lean together, a pound of veal cut thin, and a pound and a half of beef; ftrew over them fome pepper and fair, and put thcin in k deep ftew-pah; then a fine piece of frefh falmon, cut out of the middle; piit it into the ftew-pan upon the other ingredients, pour in as mjach Water as will jaft cover it, and ho more; fet it over a gen'tf6 fire till the falmon is almoft done, then porur the water entirely away, and put in two quarts of white wine, with an onion cut in pieces, ibme thyme and fweet marjoram ftripped from the ftalks; let them Irew gently, and while thpy are doing, cut a fweetbread into thin dices, then cut the flitfes acrofs, and ftpw them in a feuce-pan with fome rich veal gravy; when they.are enough, add a quarter of a pint of effence of ham: take up the falnion, lay it in the diA, and pour the fweetbread nd its fauce over it.

To hroil Salmon.

TAKE fome fllccis cut from a fine falmOn, wipe thfn ckan and dry; melt forifie butter fmooth and fine, with a little flower and ba(ket fait, put the pieces of falmon into it, and roll them about that the butter may cover them all over; then lay them on a nice clean gridiron, and bfoil theili over a clear but very dow "fire: while the faJmon is broihng, make fauce with a couple, Df anchovies wa1b6d toned, and cut into foraH pieces, a leek 9 cut

to6 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT;

fcut into three or four long pieces: fet on 9 fauce-pan with fotnif butter and a little flower, put in the ingredients, with fome ca pers cut fmall, fome pepper and faltand a little nutmeg; add Jo them Cpme warp water, and two fpoopfuls of vinegar; Ihake the fauce-pan till itboils, and the fauce is done: when the falmon is enough on one Ifde, turn it on the other till it is quite enough $ take the leek out of the fauce pour it intQ a ' fiifh, and lay (he broiled falmon upon it v ' '

Salmon in Cafes.

TAKE a piece of falmon, cut it in fmall pieces, feafoi them with pepper fait, and nutmeg; take as many half (heets of paper as pieces of falmon, and put a piece of falmon into each of the half (heets of paper, fold the paper that nothing can run out, pour a little melted butter over the paper, and then ftrew fome crumbs of bread over the butter; .piit them in a tiii oven before the fire, but take care the paper? do not burn: when they are enough, ferve them up as they are, without iauce.

STo drefs Salmon a-la-Braize.

MAKE a. forced -meat as follpM: - -Take a large eel, flit if Open, and take out the bone, and talce the meat quite clean from jt; chop it fine, with two anchovies, fome Ipmon-peel cut fine, a little pepper, and grated nutmeg, with forqe parfley and thyme cut fine, a yolk of an egg boiled )iard $ mix them all together, and roll them up in a piece of butter; then take 9 large piece of fine falmon, or a falmon- trout, put the forcedmeat in the belly of the fih, few it up, and lay it in an oval ftew-pan that yxXX juft lojd it; then take half a pound of frefli butter, put it into a ftew-pan; when it is melted, (hake in a littl flower; ftir it till it is a little brown; then put to it a pint qF fid-broth, with a pint of Madeira; feafon it with fait, mac, cloves, and whole pepper tied t a muflin rag put in an onion and a bunch of fweet herbs; ftir it all togetlier, and put it to the fifh; cover it down very clofe, and let it ftew: when the filh is almoft done, put in fome frefl or pickled mufhrooms, truffles, or morells cat in pieces; let them ftew ail together till the fifli is quite done; take the falmon up carefully, lay it in a dilh and pour the fauce ovr it. '

TV roll Salmon.

TAKE half a falmon from the bone; take oflF th headf fcale and wail it) make a feafoniiig with oyfters cut fmal',

''''•'"'•', iboic

tHE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 29

fqme parfley cut fmall, and fome O'utnbs of bread, with pepper, fait, nutmeg, and mace: roll it up tight, put it in a deep )ot, and bake it in a quick oven. Sauce- -anchovy, or fhrimps; pour it over itt

Baked Salmon.

TAKE a piece of falmon, and cut it in dices an inch thick; make a forced-meat as follows: - Take fome of the flefli of the ialmon, and the fame quantity of the meat of an eel, with a few mufhrooms; feafon it with pepper, fait, nutmeg, and cloves; beat it all together till it is very fine; boil the crumb of an halfpenny roll in milk, beat with it four eggs till it is thick, let it cool, and mix it all together with four rw eggs: take the (kin from the falmon, and lay the flices in a diih; cover every flice with the forced meat, pour fome melted butter over them, and add a few crumbs of bread: lay sf cruft round the diih, and ftick oyfters round it; put it into an oven, and when it is of fine brown, pour over it a little melted butter, with fome red ine boiled in it, and the juice of a lemon.

To drefs pickled Salmon.

TAKE a piece of pickled falmon, lay it in pump water all hlght, then lay it on a fifli-plate, and put it in a ftew-pan; put to it three fpopnfuls of vinegar, a little mace, fome whole pepper tied in a bit of muflin, a whole onion, a nutmeg bruifed, a pint of white wine, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome parfley, fome leqaon-'peel, and a quarter of a pound of frefli butter i'olled in flower; let thefe be covered very clofe, and iimmer over a gentle fire near a quarter of an hour; then take up the falmon, lay it in a diih, keep it hot before the fire; let the fauce boil till it is of a proper thicknefs; take out the fpice, onion, and fweet herbs, and pour it over the fiih,,

A jole of falmon does well this way.

To pot Salmon.

TAKE a falmon that is quite freih, fcale, waih, and dry it well, flit it up the back, and take out the bone; mix fome ated nutmeg', mace, pepper, and fait, and ilrew over the hih; let it lie for two or three hours, then lay it into a large pot, and put to it half pound of butter; put it in an oven and let it bake an hour: when it is done, lay it on fomethin flat, that the oil may run from it; then cut it to the iize of the pots it is to be put in; lay the pieces in layers till the pots are edj with the ikin upperitioA; put a board over it lay on a 5 weight

468 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

werght to prtfs rt till cold; then take the board and ivieight olPi end potjt xvtr it clarified butter: it ray be fertt tx table in pieces, or cut into flices,

To drefs dried Salmon.

LAY it in foak fof two or three hours, then lay it on the gridiron, arid Crake a little peoper Over it.

S t U R G E O N.

To choofe Siurgton, .

STURGEON to be good, the flcfti fhould be very White, itifi a ffe biie veins, the grain even, the fkin tender, good ealbUred, and ibft; all the veins and griftlcs fhould be blue: fach as is bmivn or yellow the fkin harfli, tough, and dry, is bad: When good, it has a pleafant Tmellj when bad a very difagreeable onfe: it fhould cut firm Vithout crumbling. They arfe taten in the Severn arid Tyne, fome few in the Thames i but they are generally caught in the northern feas at the mouth of the Volga. The females are as full of roc as our carp, which is taken out and fpread upon a table, beat flat, and fprinkled with fait; they then dry it in the air and fun, and afterwards in ovens. To be good, it (hould be of a reddifh-brown colour, ahd very dry k is eat with oil and vinegar, and it is called Caviare.

To boil Sturgeon.

TAKE a j3iece of fturgeon, let it be well cleaned, then put it into a veffel with two quarts of water, a pint of vinegar, a ftick of horfe-radifh cut into pieces, two or three bayleaves, fomd lemon, fome whole pepper, and little fait: let the fifh boil foftly in this liquor till it is enough. Sauce - diffolve an anchovy in a very little Water, and flrairt it; then put in a verylarge piece of butter, (near a pound) roll it in floWer, and melt it very fmooth; then add the body of a crab or lobfter bruifed two fpoonfuls of catcliup, the fame of whke wine, and fome fhrlmps: boil all together; fqueeze in fome lemon and horfe radifh; pour fome of the fauce over, tbe fturgeon, thg reft in fauce- boats,

M

Te roajl Sturgeon. .

TAK£ a piece of frefli ftiirgeo'n, let it weigh about nine 6t ten pburids; put it in ftlt and water for eight "hours, do nbt fcile It; fpit it, attd bafte it Well with butter a ouarcer t)f an hour i then fttt over it fl&ttlte criimbs of bread, flower, nutmeg,

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. tQi

meg, pepper, fait, a little pounded mace, and fweet herbs ried; mix all together, and continue batting witlj the butter and ftrewing the feafoning over it till it is enough, ' Make the fauce for it as follows:-TjikQ a pint of fmaTl ravy, fome horfe-radifh, lemon-peel, fome whole pepper, mace, a bunch of fweet herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves, an anchovy 'diflblve4 land ftrained, half a pint of white wine j fet it on the fire to boil a quarter of apThour; then take a pint of oyfters, bearcj fheqi and ftew them in their own liquor; put fome of the licjuor to the fauce, roll a piece of butter in flower, and thicken it, ftrain off the gravy to the butter and oyfters; (hake the fauce-pi round, and let it boil: put the lurgeon in a di&, and poiir tthe fauce over If. .

TAKE a fturgjppn, draw it, and divide it down the back iij equal fides, and then into pieces put it' into a tub with water and fait. wa(h and cleanfe t well j bind it up with tap or bafs, ana boil it in vinegar, watr, and fait; take care no to boil it too tender: when it is enough, lay it to pool theij pack it up clofe with the liquor it was boiled in.

Pickle to keep Sturgeon.

TAKE as much water as will cover it; put in fome brat till it looks white, boil it till it is fmooth, then flrain it fweeten it with fugar: when coldj puf in the fturgeon: it will keep half year, . . '

COD.

To choofe Cad

THE gills fliould be very red 2 they (hould be very thick a the neck, and the flefli fhould be very white; they fliould be firm, and of a bright clear colour 2 when they are flabby, they:re not good. ' They are in feafon from Chriftmas tp La4yV day; and are caught in the Britifh feas,

To boil Cod.

SET on aiiih-kettle of a proper fize for the cod; put ia a Jare quantity of water, with a quarter of a pint, or more, 9 vinegar, a handful of fait, h i fticfc of hqfc-radiih; Idt thefe boil pgejher apd the pu in,the fiih; when jt is enougb (which will be known by feeling the fins, and by the idok of jthe fijQ la it tp drain, put it on a hot fifliplate and thexi in a warm difti, wi the liver cut in half aiid laid oacachfide Sauce- (hrimpSy or oyfterraiice.

Cod's Head and boulders.

WASH it, ftrew fait orer it, put vinegar and fait into the ater: if the head be large, it will cake an hour's boiling Oyfter-fauce, and white Tauce, or what other is agreeable.

The fi(h may be grilled in the following manner: - Strip off the ikin when boileo, fet it before the fire, hake fiower over it, fcafte it i when the froth rifes, ftrew over it bread-crumbs; let it be a nice brown. GarniQi with fried oyfters, the roe, ver, liorfe-radiiby and lemon

Tojlew Cod.

TAKE fome dices of cod cut as for boiling; feafon theni with grated nutmeg, pepper fait, a bunch of fweet herbs, an onioh ftuek with cloves;, put them into a ftew-pan, with half a pint 6f thite wine, and a quarter of a pint of water; cover them Ipffe, and (tt them funmer for five or fix minutes; then fcueet in the juice of a lemon, a few oyfters, and their liquor firained t piece of butter rolled in flower, and a blade or two of mace; cover them clofe, and let them fiew foftly ) hake the pan often, to prevent its bllrnitIg when the filh is enough, take out the Onie ad fweet herbs, lay the cod in a wsum dilb and pour the £iuce over it.

0 hroil Cod.

CUT a cod in flices two inches thick, dry and flower them well; make a good clear fire i rub the gridiron with a piece of chalk, and fet it high from the fire: turn them often, till they are quite enough, and of a fine brown. They require a great deal of eare to prevent them from breaking, Lobfter or fkitimp iauce.

7q ctivip Cod.

TAKE a' eod (it ihouU be very new) cut it into fliceiS, and throw it into pump water and fait: fet over a ftove a fiflikettle, or ftew-pan, according to the quanthy of fifh) almoft full of fpring water and fait enough to make it tafte brackiflii make' it boil very quick, and then put in the flicea f cod, and keep them boiiitig fcnm them very clean: they will take about eight or nine minutes; then take out the fifls aod lay them on t tate. Shrimp or oyfter'fauce.

To

ttik LAbTs ASSISTANT. 211

To ir&ii trirped Cod.

PUT a gallon of pump water into a poti and fet ft oa the fire, with a handful af fait; boil it up feveraj times, and kisep $t fclean fcummed; when k is well cleaned from the fcuril, take iniddling tzod, is fre& as pofiiUe, throw it inlso tub of frtih utnp W'ater; let it lie a fiew minUtes and thbn cut it into fiices twoiiithcs thick, throw tlcfe into lie boiliiig bHe, and let it boil.brifkly a few minutes; then take out the flices j take gret tare hot to break them and lay thai on a fieve to drain j yhi6a they art wtH drisd flower th and lay them at a dif -tanfc' upon a very good fire to broiK Lobfter or Ihrimp fauce

To frkaffh Cod,

TAKE a poiihd of a large cod, and the founds (which ttiuft i)e blanched and if dried, thfcy hiuft be boiled till tennder) aifo the •roe blanched and waihed clean, and the liver; cut theih in toind pieces, puttlien? al4 into a llewpan, the large pieces of cod in the middte, with a bunch of fweet hetJbs a quarter of a .jpint of broth) or boiling water, and half a pint of red winQ fome beaten mace an onion feme grated nutmeg, and fome fait; Cover them tiofe and let them ftew five or fix minutes then put in d doeen o oyfters, with eir liquor trained, and a piece of butter rolled in flower j fliake the pan round till they iSire enough, and the fauce of a good thicknefs; take out the fWeet herbs and onion, lay the iifl in a difb, and pour the Tauce over it. It may be done white, by putting in white wine inftead of red

To bake Cod.

DRAW a cod at the gillsj wafh it well and dry it lard it with a fat eel; then take, a pint of oyfters, fome fweet herbs cutTmall) foiiw grated bread the yolks af two or three eggs With fome fait pepper, cloves, and grated nutmeg; mix thefe ingredients together,. ftuiF the cod at the gills and lay it in a baking-difhi but put it upon fomething to keep it hollow from the bottom (there are things xnade on purpofe;) put into the difh a pint of red wine, and bafte the cod well with butter before it is put into the oven: when it is done pour off the liquor which is under the cod into a fauce-pan, with fome SQirimps or oyfters, an anchovy waftied and boned, and a piece of butter, rolled in flower: let thefe boil together, ftir it one way till of a proper thicknefs. The ood lies beft in the diik -Wrth its tail turned in its mouth.

A 4mall Sahnon oi TMitis good baked in this iHanaer;

aia THE LADY's ASSISTANT. .

To broil Cofs Sounds

TAKE out the founds quite whole, and throw them into boiling water a few minutes, then rub them well with fait, to take off the (kin and the black foulnefs; they will look white and delicate: flower them fprinkle fome pepper and fait on them, and broil them at a good diftance upon a clear briflc fire.

Some eat melted butter with them, but anchovy fauce is preferablet,

To fricajfee Cods Sounds white.

CLEAN them in the fame manner s when they are broiled; only put them into a fauce-pan with nutmeg and beaten mace, and a very little water; oour tp them cream enough for .fauce, and a piece of butter rolled in flower; fhake the faucepan round till it is of a proper tbicknefs; pour it into a di(h, . and fend it to table.

To fricajfie Cods Sounds brown.

PARBOIL them a little, rub them with fait, take ofi the black flcin; let them fimmer till tender, flower and fry thea, or brown them in a Dutch oven; thicken fome good gravy with a bit of butter rolled in flower, a fpoonful of catchup; add fome pepper, fait, and lemon-juice; tofs up the founds in the iauce.

SKATE.,

To choofe Skate.

IF good, they are very white and thick; if too freih, they cat tough; but if ftale, they have a very difagreeable fmell.

To boil Skate.

BOIL it in fait and water, with a little vinegar. Anchovy fauce.

To crimp Skate.

CUT into long flips acrofs, about an inch broad; have •ready a gallon of pump water, wherein a pound of fait has boiled half an hour and- been well fcummed; put in the Ikate, let it boil quick about three minutes, then take it up, drain it, and fend it to table. Sauce - butter and anchovy, or butter and jnuftard.

To fricajfee Skte white. "1

WASH it very clean, and cut the meat from the bones into pieces; put it iJitfo ftew-pan 3 to two pounds of the meat put

liajf

I

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT, aig

half a pint of water, a little fait, beaten mace, nutmeg, and a bunch of fweet herbs: when it has boiled three minutes, take out the fweet herbs, put in a piece of butter rolled in flowejc, a little white wine, and a quarter of a pint of cream; ihake the pan one way till it is thick and fmooth.

6 fricajfee Skate brown., .

TAKE the fifli as above, flower it, and fry it of a fine light brown in butter 5 lay it before the fire to keep hot; pour the butter it was fried in out of the pan then put in a piece of butter as large as an egg, well mixed with flower; ilir it round till it is quite fmooth, then put in a little beaten pepper, mace, •an onion, a bunch oB fweet herbs, an anchovy, and a quarter of a pint of water; ftir it round till it boils, then pour in a fpoonful of catchup, a gill of red wine, and a little lemonr juice; ftir it well together, and let it boil; when it is enough take out the fweet herbs and onion, then put in the fifh to heat, and fend it to table

H E R R I N 'G S.

To cboofe Herrings.

HERRINGS to be good Ihould have their gills of a fine red their eyes full, and the whole fifli ftilF and very bright j if the gills ar of a . faint colour, the fifh limber and wrinkled, they are bad. They are a falt-water fifh, and are generally caught, in the North fea.

The goodnefs of pickled herrings confifts in their being fat, fiefhy, and white.

Red herrings, when good, are large, firm, and dry; the OUtfide of a fine yellow, with a good roe or melt.

To drefs Herrings.

THE general way of dreffing herrings, is to broil or fry them, with melted butter

To boil Herrings.

THE propereft time for boiling herrings, is when they come before and at the beginning of the mackerel feafon; they are by many people reckoned better than when full of roe: the flefh is much poorer than at this feafon, when their breeding time is over, and they have had time to feed and recover their flefh.

Clean half a dozen herrings, and throw them into a pan of cold water, ftir them about, and change the water once; fet on a ftew-pan, with water enough to cover them, fome fait,

P 3 and

U THE LADTi ASSISTANT,

end a Uttl vinaF; when ihe water boHs, put in the herrings s when they are enough lay t4ieni on a fjik-late in a warm diih Saue- feftRel foiled and chopc ftnall, wiih melted butter.

AnQpb€r Saue for- Herrings.

BREAK two new-laid eggs bct up the yolks with feme pepper fait, and nutmeg, fbakc in a little flower; take an anchovy, walhr and bone it,, and cut it ftnall; melt half a pound of butter, with a Httb vinegar in the water, (hake in a little flower, and mix all well together; let it boil till it is of a proper thicknefs; fqueeae n the juice of a lemoo and add a little tnuftard.

Xo baif: Herrings.

WASH and ftleari thfem take out the rocs, wafli theB and put them in again; take fome Uack pepper, a few cloves, and fome fait; mix them together, and rub it all over the fi(b; lay theni ftrait in a pot, with fome bay-rteaves between j cover them over with allegar rape vinegar, or half vinegar and water is as well; coyci thm over with a white paper, and over that aiheet of thick brown paper; bake them in a moderate oven. If they are baked la goo4 allegar they will keep two or thre months Soma who bake theo in visegar and wafier, pour the fy& liquor frm tliem, pit pn fome frefh, and fend thim to the oyen agajn.

7o pickle Herrings.

TAKE off the heads, and take out the ros, wah and y9ft them; to a dozen and a half, put cloves, mace, and nutmegs pounded, of each a quarter of an ounce; feafon high with fait and pepper; put them into an earthen pan, cover them with the beft vinegar, bake them. They will keep three jtnonths. Do not take oi the ium when it rifes.

• t . .

5 D I E S.

o •

To chJe Sphs:

TO g, tljey hould be thick aitd firm, the lly of a fine cream colour; if they incline to a blue-white, and the body flabby, they are not good. They are taken in the Britifti Teas, and the Mediterranean. They are in feafon at Mjdfummer

THEY ibuld be j'oilcid to filt and ivaton-nAnchovy fauce

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 215

To boil Soks wi$b wbiie Wine.

TAKE two or three pair of micidlmg foks; when they are (kinned antf gutted, wa(h them in fpring water, theQ put them on a difh, and pour half a pint of white wine over them tarn them two or three times in it, and pour h away; then cut off th heads and tails of the foles, and fet on a ftewpan with n little rich iifli-broth; put in an onion cut to pieces, a bunch of fweet herbs, pepper, fait, and a blade or mace; when diis boils, put in the foles, and with them half a lemon cut ia flices with the peel on; let them fimmer flowIy then take out the fweet herbs,, and put in a pint of ftrong wRite wine and a piece of butter roUed in flower; let them all fimmer together till the foles are enough

While the fifli is doingi put in half a pint of veal avy, and ' a quarter of a pint of efTence of ham; lot it boil a little take lip the foles and pour this over it. '

To hit Soles i-la-Pranfoifeu

TAKE an earthen difh, and put into it a cuart of water,.

With half a pint of vinegar ikin and clean a pair of foles, put them into the yinegar and water, let them lie two hours, thea take them out and dry them with a cloth then put them into a ftew-pan with a pint of white wine a quarter of a pint of water, a vtry. little thyme, a little fweet-marjoram, winter-(ayoury and n onion ftuf k with four cloves put in the foles, fpxinKle a very little bay-falt, and coyer them qlpfe; let them fimmer "Very gently till they are enough; take them out, lay them in a warm difll before the fire; put into the liquor, after it $ drained, a piece of butter foiled in flower, let it boil till of a proper thicknefs, lay tbft fqlea ii (t), nd pour the fauce over them. '

A fmall turlot, or iqr flat 6& may be drfjcd ii) fhe iam9 nner.

f g boil l$oles the T)u€b way.

TAKE a pJlir of jarge foes, (kin, gut, and waOi them very clean in fpring water fet then) on in a ftew-pan, with fome water and a little fait hen it boils put in the fole, and let them boil a few Qiinutes; (ben put on a fauce-pan, with fome parfley cut fmall, in a little atei: let it ftand till the water is all confimed, then fhake in fpme flower, and put in a good pie of butter; ihake tiieoi 1 together till all is well mixed, then lay the foles, when they are grained;; upon a 4iih, and pour the fauce over them, . " '

P 4 T(f

2?.

ii6 fHE liADYs AslSTANfi

To fry Soles.

SKIN them, rub them oveir with yolk of egg, ftrew on thttri very line bread crumbs, or flower them fry them with a bride iire.-- Anchovy fauce

Tojfiew Soles.

TAKE the fifli from the bone, cdt each into eight pieces; )Ut into a ftew-pan a ijuart of boiled gravy, quarter of a pint of Madeira, or white wine, feme white pepper pounded, grated nutmeg, a piece of lem(5n-peel i ftew thefe together for near an hour; add fome cream, a piece of butter mlx£d with flower j keep the faU'ce ftirring till it bolls, put in the filh, ftew it for a quariier 6f an hour j take out the leition-peel, fqueeze in fomc lemon-juice; the fifli may be ftewed whole in the fame fauce; ftnd if more conyenient, cut the fifli, as before direSed, and make a little gravy tvith the bones and head

J 7q drefs Soles in Fricandeau

: WASrti jgut, fcfape, dry' and flcin the foles; take oflT their Keads, tails, iahd fins; lard them with fmall bits of bacon, and flower them; fet on a ftew-pan with fome melted bacon wheii it boils put in the foles fingly, and let them be of a fine delicate coioUr I take them up cut fome muihrooms aiid truffle upon them; put in fome eilence of h'ain, fome veal-cullis, and veal-gravy, more than fufiicient to coyer them; lay the larded fide uppermbft, and let thejn fimmer very flowly over a gentle fire; when they are done pour the fauce into a difh, fqueeze in the juice bf a lembi lay the f6le$ in the diih and fejrvp them Up hoU

To fricajfee. Soles.

FRY them of a nice brown, drain them j make a few ball ivith a fmall fole boned and chopped, a little grated bread, and lemon-peel, parfley chopped, pepper, fait, nutmeg, yolk of egg ft piece of butter; fry thefe: thicken fome good gravy (and ipme red wine, not too much) with a lijLtle flower; boil it up; add chyan, catchiup, and lempiri-juice; lay in the fifli an4 balls ilmme them a jfew hiihutes. Qarnifb with lepipn

. To hake SoleK ...,₯

WHEN the foles are waflied, gutted, and (tinned, cut otf their heads and tails, flit them along the back, and feafon them ivithfalt, pepper, fweet herbs, parfley, and whole chives: rub ft di with Gutter and lay in the' foles, pour a little melted

butter

i

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 2if

butter over them, and ftrew ovar that fome bread grated fine % bake them of a fine brown; and when enough, tak6 oiF all the fat; pour fome anchovy fauce in a difh, and lay the foles upon it.

WHITING.

To cbvcfe Whiting.

THE firmhefs of the body and fins, and the rednefs of the gilla are alfo the rules to be obferved in whitings. They are genoi rally caught on the Engliih coafts, and are in feafon in January Februarys and March.

To boil Whitings.

BOIL them in the fame manner as cod, haddock or any other fifh. Saucer- anchovy, or catchup and butter.

To broil Whitings.

LET the fire be ve-y clear; wa(h the whitings in fait and water, dry them well in a cloth, iSower them, chalk the gridIron', and let it h hot before they are laid on. Sauce - (hrimp or oyfter.

Make it a rule always to chalk the gridiron before any fiih is laid on to broil., .

To fry Wbitifigs.

WASH, gut, and ikin them, turn their tails in their mouths, dry them In a cloth, and flower them, well all over; nil the frying-pan with lard enough to cover them; when it boils, put them in, and fry them of a fine brown, lay them on a coarfe cloth to drain, thpn put them on a warm difh. Sauce(hrimp, oyfler, or anchovy. They are a proper garnifh for Salmon or Cod.

HADDOCK.

Td cho'ofe Haddocks.

THEY jjre ehofe by the Times rules as the cod, and are a very good fifli when in feafon, which is in July, Auguft, and September. They alfo arc taken on the Englifli coafts.

Haddocks boiled.

SALT and hang them up two or three hours before they are drefled, boil them in fait and water.-- Anchovy fauce.

Haddocks

tiB THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Hadd$cks hnikd.

BROIL them as whttings - AncKovy fauee

Haddock baked.

DRAW out the infide of the ills, wafh t very clean, fill ' it with bread crumbs, parfley and fweet herbs chopped, grated lemonpcel, nutmeg, fait, pepper, a bit of butter, and yolk of egg mixed; fkewer the taU in the mouth, rib it wit;h yolk of egg, ftrew on bread crumbs, fick on bit$ of butter bake it in a common or Dutch oveii a little waler and white wine in the difli; a bit of mace and lemon -peeL-Oyfteir fauce, white, fifh fauce, or anchovy fauce put to tle fauce what grayy is the di(h, firft fcumming it.

M A C H E R E I.,

TV cb0ofe MaehreL

THE gonefs of them is known by the fme rules that herTings are chofe; they are taken on the French and Englifh ceafts, and are in feafon in May and June.

7d hcil Mehrd.

BOIL them in fait and water j a very little vinegar.-Fcnnel lauce, and coddled goofebrriet

0 fry or hroil Mackerel.

THEY may be fried or broiled, and are excecdirig good either way, ftufFed with bread crumbs, parfley chopped, lemonpeel grated, pepper, fait, and nutmeg, mixed with yolk of egg. - Anchovy fauce' and fennel facc.

They are very good fplit open, the heads cut off, peppered, iung up for four or five hours, and then broiled i with fenne find parfley fcalded in melted butter for fiuce.

STc collar Mackerels

DO them as eels, only omit the fage 9iid add fweet 'berbs z little lemon-peel and nutmeg.

0 pickle Mackerel.

CUT each into for or five pieces j feafon them very high with pepper,, nutneg pounded qloves, and falt make little flits with a pen-knife, put in the feafoning j fry them in oil a good brown, draip them very dry, put them into vinegar. If they are to be kept any tioie pour oil on the top

S

THE l.ADy$ ASSISTANT- 219

THEY are potted in die iame manner as eels.

7(? bake Macktrd.

CUT off the heads; wafh and dry them in a doth, cut them open, rub the bone with a little bay- fait beat fine; take fome mace, black and white pepper, a few cloves, all beat fine lay them in a long pan, and between every layer of fi(h put two jor three by-leaves., cover them with vinegar; tie writing-paper over them firft, and then thick brown paper doubled; they muft be put into a very flow oven, and will take a long while doing; when they are enough uncover them, let them ftand till they are cold, then pour away all the vinegar they were baked in, cover them with fome more vinegar, and put in an omoA ftuck with cloves; fend them to a very flow oven again, and let them ftand two hours. They will keep a great while. Always take them out with a flice; the hands will fpoil them. The great bones taken out are good boiled.

0 foufi Mackerel.

LET them be waflied and cleaned; take out the roes, boil them in fait and water; when they are enough, take them out, and lay them in a deep difh; pour away half, the liquor they were boiled in, and add to the reft of the liquor as much vinegar as will cover them, with two or three bay-leaves. They Siould lie two or three days before they are eaten.

"To dry Mackerel.

THEY muft be very frefh. - Gut and wafh them very clean, cut off their heads, fpfit them down the back, and lay them quite flat, hang them up by the tails to drain; this muft be done in a very cool place. Take a pan and ftrew fome fait at the bottom fprinkle the fi(h well with fait, lay them in the pan, belly to belly, and back to back; let them lie in the faltr twelve or fourteen hours, then wafli the fait clean off, and hang them up to drain for half an hour; pepper the infides a little, and lay them to dry on ftones laid aflant towards the fun; never let them be out when the fun is not upon them, nor till the dews are difperfed, for the ftones they are laid upon ihould be warm and dry. They will be perfey cured ip a week's time; bang them up by their tails, putting their ipiides together, in h dry place, but not in any finoak.

Tbey muft be either fried in boiling oil, or broiled before, or

on

j

aao THE LADY's ASSISTANT:

on a very clear fire, and bafted with oil on a feather. SauCe Will hot be wanted, for if they ire good they will be very liioift and mellow; if they fhould be dry, a little melted butter and parfley, or crimped parfley

PILCHARD.

To cboofe Pilchards.

THE pilchard is a fmall falt-water fifli; it is larger than the anchovy, but a great deal lefs than the herring, and is jgood dreflcd frefc, or lightly faked,

T R u r.

To cboofe Trout.

IT is a very fine frefh-watef fifh; all the kinds of this fiih tre excellent, but the beft are the red and yellow trout The female are reckoned the beft, and are known by having a lefs head and deeppr body than the male their freflinefs is known by the fame methods tha.t have, been already mentioned for other fiih. They are in high feafon the latter end of May.

To boil Trout.

BOIL them in vinegar, water, and fait, a piece of horfe fadiih.- White fauce, anchovy fauce, plain butter.

To fry fmall Trout.

DRY them, rub them with yolk of egg, flower or ftrew fine crumbs of bread on them, fry them.-- Anchovy fauce

To fiew a Trout.

IT fliould be a fmall one; ftufF it with grated bread, a piece of butter, parfley chopped, lemon-peel grated, pepper, fait, nutmeg, favoury herbs, yolk of egg, mixed; put it into a ftew-pan, with a quart of good boiled gravy, fome Madeira, an onion, a little whole pepper, a few cloves a piece of lemon-peel; ftew it in this gently till enough; add a little flower mixed in fome cream, a little catchup; boil it upfqueeze in fome lemonjuice

To broil Trout.

CLEAN and walh the trout, dry them well in a cloth, tie them round with packthread from top to bottom, to keep tbcm entire and in (hape; then melt fome butter, with a good deal of baflcet-falt; pour it all over the trout till it is perfeftly covered)

1

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT, sat

I

covered, then p9t it on a clear fire, at a great diftancc, that it may do gradually. Sauce - wah and bone an anchovy, cut it very fmall j chop a large fpoonful of capers; melt fome butter, with a little flower, pepper, fait, and nutmeg, and half a fpoonful of vinegar: when the trout is done, lay it in a wariQ difb, and pour the fauce over it.

To marinate Trout.

TAKE the trout, and fry them in oil fufficicnt to cover them, put them in when the oil is boiling hot; when they are crifp, lay them to drain till they are cold; then take fome white wine and vinegar, of each an equal quantity; with fome fait, whole pepper, nutmeg, cloves, mace, diced ginger favoury, fweet-marjoram, thyme, rofemary, a bay-leaf, and a couple of onions; let thefe boil together for a quarter of an hour c put the fifb into a ftew-pan, pour the marinade to them hot; put in as much oil as white wine and vinegar, which muft he according to the quantity of filh which is done, as the liquor muft cover them, and they will tjiea keep a month Serve them with oil and vinegar.

To foufe Trout.

TAKE a brace of middling trout, let thean be washed and gleaned, then take three pints of white wine ivinegar, a quart of water, an onion fiuck with cloves, a little lemon-peel, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome pepper, fait, clovies, mace, and a grated nutmeg; let thefe all boil together in a ftew-pan large enough to hold the trout: when is has boiled fome time, put in the £(h; when they are enough, lay them in a diih till they are cold; pour ofF the liquor, take out the onionand herbs and Jet it ftand till it is cold, then take ofF all tthe fat clean pour it oyer the fifli, and they will be fit to ufe the next day: if they are to be eat hot, fend them to table with fhrimp or lobfter- fauce made of this pickle, with fried fmdts laid round the difh. Salmon, pike, or almoft any kind af filh may be Jone this way: they are good cold.

• 7i collar Trout.

TROUT are collared like eels. .

PIKE,

To cboofi Pike.

THEY are chofc ty the jednefs of the gills, the ftiffnefs

and

H THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

and fides; then i-oll it in the melted butter: fet the gridiron at a great diftance froni the fire, whfch muft be very clear; lay the pike upon it, and let it be well done; when it is almoft enough put it near the iire that it may be brown. Sauceh-r anchovy or flirimp,

"To pat a Pike.

SCALE it, and cut ofF the head; iplit it, and take out the back-bone; ftrew it over with bay-ialt and pepper; cover it, and bake it; then take it out and lay it on a coarfe cloth to cain; when it is cold, lay it in a pot that will jaft hold it, and over ilr with clariged butter.

It tnu( be well drained from the gravy, or it will not keep.

0 foufe Pike.

' WHEN the pike is gutted, wafhed, and fcaled, lay it intq a large flew- pan, with a much water as will cover it, a few by-leaves, fome cloves, and mace; let it ftew till a ftraw will run through it; then take it up, and put to the liquor fome white- wine, and white-wine vinegar, with an anchovy; let it fimmer till the anchovy is difTolved; wheii both are cold, put the pike into the pickle, which iU jelly, an4 keep fof fone time.

CAR P,

7 choofe Carp,.

THEY fhould, if poiTible, be drefled as foon a they are eaugtit; if they are dead, it is moft likely they will be wafled, as they will live a long while out of the water. The beft way to j.udge of them, is by the fame rules by which other fiih arp chofe,

0 boil Carp.

SCALE and draw it, fave the blood; fet on fome water in a ftew-pn with yinegar, fait, and hprferradifh; when it boils, put in the carp; if it is a good fize, it will take near half an hour; let it boil genly for fear it fhould break. Sauce - take the blood, with foiyie red wine fome good ftrong gravy, an onion or two ibred, a little whole pepper, a blade of mace, a nutmeg quartered; let all thefe ftew together: thicken the fauce with fome butter rolled in flower; ferve up the fi(h with tlie fauce poured over it; fqueeze in fome juice of jepopt

0 roafi Carp.

When the carp are cleaned, fcaled, c, fcotch them, and

,3 y

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 225

fli them over With the .yolk of eggs; then flrew over them thopped parfley, thyme, pepper, falt and nutmeg; mix all together; fpit them on a lark-fpit, or put them into a Dutch oven; bafte them with red wine mixed with anchovy and butter.

Sauc - red wine, gravy, anchovy, and the melts of the carps, all tbgether: the roes muft be dipped in yolk of egg, and fried; lay fried fippets under them.

oftew Carp brown.

PUT into a ftew-pan a quart of good gravy, the blood of the carp,(if agreeable) half a pinfof fmall beer, (lut if bitter, only a quarter of a pint) a quarter' of a pint of red wine, a large onion half a dosen cloves, a piece of lemon-peel, and horieradiih: let them flew gently till reduced t6 the quantity that is Wanted: ftrain the liquor; add to it catchup, lemon-juice, fome of the hard roe bruifed, chyan, a little fait, if neceffary: fimmer this; and if ilot thick enough, mix a little flower fmooth in fome gravy, and boil it up in it, ftirring it. Let ibe carp be boiled, and well drained on a cloth; put it into the fauce; fimmer it two or three minuted: let the remainder of the roe be mixed with egg, a little grated lemon-peel and nutmegs fried in little cakes: garniih the difh with .

thefe, fippets cut with three corners and fried dry, horfe-radifh, and ilicea lemon.,

To drejs Carp au Blue,

TAKE a brace of large carp, wafli and gut them while they are alive, as foon after they are taken out of the water as poffible; fplit them down the back, and cut them into different pieces as quick as poflible; lay one carp in the difh, the fcaly fide upwards, and cover it all over with fait; then lay the other upon it, and cover that alfo very thick with fait; have ready boiled three pints of white- wine vinegar, a large flick f horfe-radifh cut into flices, a grat piece of parfley-root, fome ginger, a nutmeg flicec, black pepper, and all-fpice; pour this, liquor and ingredients upon it boiling hot (there muft be enough to cover it) let it fland four or five hours; then fet on a fifh-kettle three parts full 6f water, with a little fait, a large flick of horfe-radifh cut into pieces, fome parfley-root, ginger black pepper, all-fpice, and vinegar; let this boil for half an hour, and fcum it very clean; then put the fifh, vinegar, and all that is in the difh, into the fifh-kcttle; let it boil fifteen minutes;fcum it all the time it is boiling: fend it to table quite hot; the fcales will be blue and look very pretty.

Q Sauce-

226 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT ' Saucefugar, vinegar, horfe-fadiih) and meltod butter j tt anchcvy and melted butter.

To fry Carp,.

SCALE and gut a brace of carp, waih them ckan, dry them well in a cloth, flower them, and put them into a fry ing-pan of boiling lard; let them be of a fine light brown; fry the roes, and cut fome thin flices of bread with three corners, fry them: lay the fiih on a coarfe cloth to drain; then put them into the diih, the roes on each fide, th toafts between.-Ancbovy fauce.

To broil Carp,

WHEN they ate fcaled and gutted, flit them down the back, rub them with melted butter, pepper, and fait;, broil them at a diftance from the fire: before they are quite done, flower the gridiron to make them a fine brown. For fauce-- make a ragout with the foft roes, artichoke bottoms, muibrooms, onions, and capers; lay them in the difh, and pour the ragout over them

To boil Cafp au Court Bouillon.

TAKE a brace of carpy fcale, draw, and puH out the fins, put them into an earthen an; fet on a quart of vinegar, put in a tea-fpoonful of bay-falt: when it boils, pour ft over the carp and let them ftand till they are cold; then fet on vinegar enough in a ftew-pan to boil them in: when it boils, put them in, and boil them gently till they are enough: before they arc.

quite done, put in half a pint of white wine, with three bay leaves, a fpoonful of white pepper, an onion, and four cloves let all boil together a little while, and when the carp is thoroughly done, take them up, and lay them on a napkin.

Sauce-ftrain off the liquor; add to it an anchovy cleaned and boned, a little ftrong gravy, a few pickled mushrooms, and 2 piece of butter rolled in flower: let it boil; and when of a proper thicknefs, pour it into a fauce-boat.

Carp and Tench ftewed white

TO one quart of boiled gravy, a quarter of a pint Of Madeira, or white wine, a blade or two of mace, fome whole pepper, a bit of Aemon-peel, and horfe-radiih, a large onion and two anchovies; let thefe fimmer very gently an hour or more; ftrain it; put to it fome thick cream, a piece of butter mixed well with a large fpoonful of flower; ftir this over the fire till the butter is melted, and the fauce boils up, or it will

10 be

i

Ttt£ LADY'S ASSlStAKt. 247

t)e greafy; fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon; add more wine and fpice, if agreeable; boil the fifh, drain it well pour the fauce over iu Garnifh with lemon;

Carp and iTencb ftewed brown.

CLEAN and dry them $ flower and fry them a nice brown and dry: iimmer for a quarter of an hour three pints of good gravy, a full pint of red wine, a few cloves, a piece of horferadifii, a good onioh, a little ehyan, fome catchup $ put in the fifh, ftew them gently till enough, clofe covered j take them out, ftrain the faucc; add fome of the roe bruifed, and, if not thick enough, a little flower mixed fmooth with a little gravy; boil this up lay in the fifli, fet it over the fire for a minute or two. Garniih with the roe boiled, or made into cakes as before lemon, and horfe-radi(h.

To bake Carp.

. WHEN thj5 carp are fcaled, gutted, and waflied, take a deep earthen difh that will hold them, rub it all over with butter; lay in the carp; put i the difli a bunch of fwcet herbs an onion, an anchovy, fome black and whit pepper, fait, cloves, mace, with a little white wine; cover it over clofe and fend them to the oven: if they are large, they will take am hour; if fmall, lefs time will do them: when they are done, .take them out with care, put them Qver fome hot water to keep warm, cover them very clofe: fcum all the fat ofF the liquor they were baked in and ftrain it into a fauce-pan add to it half a pound of butter rolled in flower,

TENCH.

To choofe Tench.

They are a fin frefh-water fifli, and (hould be dreffed Alive: the way to judge pf their frefhnefs, is to examine the gills, which fiiould be red, and hard to open, the eyes bright, the body firm and ftiflF. The tench is covered with a flimy matter, which, if clear and bright, is a good fign. They are in feafoa in Julys Auguft, and September, ., To boil fencb.

SCALE them while alive, gut them, sftid wafli their infideg with vinegar 5 put them into a ftw-pan, when the water boils, with fome fait, a bunch of fweet herbs, lemon-pefel, and whole pepper; put in the tench, cover the ftew-pan clofe, and let them bci quick till they ire done; then ftrain oflf fome of the

02 liquor

228 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. .

liquor in a fauce-pan; and add to it fome walnut- liquor, a little white wine, a little gravy," an anchovy, and fome oyfters or fhrimps; boil thefe ingredients together; thicken them up with butter rolled in flower, with a little lemon fqueezed in: pour fome over the fins, the reft in fauce-boats.

0 roafi Tench.

WASH them and clean them well from their dime; make a little hole as near the gills as poflible; take out the guts, and clean the throat; make a fluffing with fweet herbs, a little parlley, a few crumbs of bread, a little grated lemon-peel, and nutmeg, with a little bit of butter, mixed all together) and ftufF the fifh with them; tie the fi(h to the fpit, with two or three ' iplinters, and roaft them; mix butter and vinegar, and bafte them with it. - Anchovy, flirimp, or ojrfter fauce.

10 fry Tench.

TAKE a brace of tench, gut,, wafh, and dry them well in a cloth; then flit them down the back, fprinkle a little fait over them, aitd drudge them with flower ) fry them of a fine brown in boiling lard. Sauce- anchovy, with muflirooms, truffles, and capers, all chopped fmall and ftewed in gravy, with the juice of a lemon, and a little fifh cullis.

To foufe Tench.

DRAW thi tench at the gills, and cut them oflf", and they will boil the whiter: put into the water fome vinegar, fait, bay-leaves, a bunch of fweet herbs, whole cloves, mace; wipe off the flime, but do not fcale them: when they are boiled, wafh off the loofe fcales: ftrain the liquor through a jelly bag, and put fome ifinglafs into it that has been foaked, and boil it: lay the filh into the difli, ftrain the liqUor through the bag into the difli over the fifti: let it ftand till it is cold, before it Is ufed.

This jelly will fcrve to jelly lobfters, prawns, or cray-fi(b, hanging them in a glafs by a thread at their full length: fill the glafs with the jelly while it is warm i when cold, turn it out of the glafs,

PERCH.

To choofe Perch.

They are not -fo much efteemed as carp and tench, though a very good fiefli- water fifh; they are judged to be new, by the livelinefs of their eyes, and the ftiffnefs of their fins. They are in feafon from Michaelmas to March.

To

1

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 229

Tofry Perch.

SCALE, gut, and wafli them very clean; fcore them at fome diftance on the fides, but not very deep; dry them well, and flower them all over; fry them in oiled butter: when they are of a fine brown, lay fome crifped parfley round the fifh.

Sauce - plain butter --Some make the following fauce: two ounces of browned butter; put to it fome flower, a k chives chopped fmall, fome parfley, a few frefli muihrooms cut fmall, nd a little boiling water; lay the perch into this liquor, fter they are fried, and let them ftew gently for four or five minutes; then lay them in a warm di(b; add two large fpoonfuls of capers cut fmall thicken it up with butter and flower, and pour it over them.

0 broil Perch.

THEY muft be very frelh. - Scale, gut, and wafli them; then dry them very well in a napkin: melt fome butter, enough to dip the perch in all over; roll them about till the butter flicks well to every part of them: fet the gridiron over a clear brifk fire, but at a great height above it (the perch muil be well done before they are browned) when they are near enough, put the gridiron nearer the fire, to brown them. For fauce- fet on a fauce-pan with fome butter, a little flower, a bit of leek, two fpoonfuls of vinegar, a lijtle water, fome pepper, fait, a little grated nutmeg, and two or three anchovies wafhed and boned: keep the ingredients fhaking round in a fauce-pan while the fifh are doing ! when they are dorie, take out the leek, and pour the fauce over the fiih.

IVater Souchy.

MAKE perch or flounders very clean j put them into a flew-r pan, with cold water, (enough for broth) a very little whitewine, vinegar, and fome Tt; take off the fcum; boil them gently for a quarter of an hour; ferve them with the broth; put in fome parfley-roots ready boiled, and flrew over parfley boiled of a nice green; bread and butter on a plate

SMELTS,

To chocfe Smelts.

IF good, they fhould be of a fine filvei hue, very firm, and have a very agreeable fmell, extremely like a cucumber, Tho.y jii taken in the Thames, and in other great rivers,

0.3 7i

J30 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT,

ofrf Smelts.

DRY them; rub them with yolk of egg, flower, or ftrew fine bread crumbs on them; fry them; lay the tails together io the middle of the dilh. - Anchovy fauce.

Smelts in favoury Jelly.

SEASON them with pepper and fait; bake, and drain them: when cold, pour jelly over them; or break the jelly, and heap over them.

To pot Smelts.

DRAW out the infide; 'feafon them with fait, pounded mace, and pepper, butter on the top; bake them: when near cold, take them out, lay them upon a cloth; put them into pots; take oS the buf:ier from the gravy, clarify it with more, pour it on them

To pickle Smelts.

TAKE a large jar that will hold a quarter of a peck of fmelts; take half an ounce of nutmegs, a quarter of an ounce of mace, half an ounce of falt-petre, half an ounce of pepper, quarter of a pound of common fait, all beat very fine; wafli, clean, and gut the fmelts; lay them in rows in a jar; between, every layer of fmdts, ftrcw the feafonlng, with fome bay-leaves; boil red wine enough to cover them; pour it boiling hot over them; cover them with a plate: when cpjd, tie tften dovn clofe. They are better than anchovies.

Another way.

DRAW out the infide, all but the roe; put their tails intq their mouths; boil them a few minutes in fait and water, vinegar, and pepper-corns; take out the fiih: when the pickle 19 fold, pour it ovpr them

MULLETS.

To cboofe Mullet.

THE fea-mullets are better than the river mullets, and the ired than the grey: they ihould be very firm, to be good. They are in feafoQ ii Auguft.

To toil Mullets.

BOIL mpllcts in fait and water: when they are enough, pour away part of the water, and put to the reft a pint of red wine, foQie fait and vinegar, two onions fliced, with a bunch pf fweet herbs, fom? (luuneg, beaten mace sd the juice of 4

ft

THE LADVs ASSISTANT. 231

Jbmon: boil thefe well together, with two or three anchovies j then put in the filh; and when they have fioimered in it fomc.

time, put them into a difli, and ftrain the fauoe over them: flirimps or oyfirers may be added.

To iroil Mullets.

SCALE and gut them and cut gafhes in their fides, dip them in melted butter, and broil them at a great diftance from the fire. Sauce- anchovy, with capers, and little Seville orange or lemon fqueezed into it.

To fry Mullets.

SCALE and gut them; melt fome butter, and pour it into a deep difh; fcore the mullets acrofs the back, and dip them into the Sutter; then fet on in a ftew-pan fome butter; let it clarify s fry the mullets in it: when they are enough, lay them OQ a warm dilh. Sauce- anchovy and butter

ROACH.

To choofe Roach.

THEY arc a very coarfe and honey fiih: thofc are much better which are taken in rivers, han thofe which are caught in ponds. They re in feafon in April and May.

To boil Roacbi

SCALE, gut, and wafh them; wipe them back them ioi three or four places on the fides j put into a ftew-pan fome fmall beer, vinegar, and water, (enough to cover the fiih) fome fait, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome parfley, and a ftick of horfe-radi(h diced:. when it boils, put in the fifh. Sauc&anchovy

To fry Roach.

SCALE and gut the roach, wafh them in fait and water, wipe them very dry; then flower, and fry them in boiling lard; let them be brown and crifp, and lay them into a warm di(h 1 pour the fat out of the pan put into it a piece of butter; ' and when it boils, fry fome fage and parfley crifp i Uy it oa the roach. - Anchovy fauce.

GUDGEONS.

To choofe Gudgeons.

THEY are cbofe by the fame rules as other fiih; they come

232 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

in before Midfutnmer, and are to be had till near Chriftma; they are takeri in running fireams.

To drefs Gudgeons.

DRESS them as fmelts,

B A R B L E.

To cboofe Barbie

THEY are chofe by the fame rules as other fifh; and are caught in rivers.

To boil Barbie.

BOIL them after the fame manner as mullets.

To Jlew BarbUn

•TAKE a large barbie, fcale, gutj and walh it in vinegar and fait, afterwards in water; put it into a dew-pan, with el- broth, enbugh to coyer it; let it ftew gently; then add forae cloves, a bunch of fweet herbs, and a bit of cinnamon: let then ftew gently till the fiih is done; then take it out, thicker the fauce with butter and flower, apd pour it oyer the filh.

EELS.

To cboofe Eels.

THE filver eels, which are taken in the Thames, are generally the beft, and are the right filver eels: they (hould be drefle4 alive. They are always in eafon (exqept in the height of fummer.) The Dutch ejels, which are fold at Billingfgate-market, are very bad. There is no fifh in which there is a greater difference than in eels.

To boil Eels.

BOIL them in fait and water, • Sauce- parfley and butter

To Jlew Eels with Broth.

GLEAN and gut the eels; wafli them; put them into a fauce-pan, yrith water, juft enough to cover them; put in a cruft of bread, and two or three blades of mace; coyer them and let them ftew very flovyly till they are enough: put them into a dijih with the broth. Sauce - plain butter, or parfley and butter. The broth' is rich, and good for fxck or weai

9

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 233

To ftew Eels.

CUT them into pieces; pepper and fait them; put them into % little ftew-pan, with fomp boiled gravy, or a little beef broth, an onion with two or three cloves ftuck into it, a bit of lemon peel, a glafs of Madeira; ftew thefe gently: when the eels are enough, which they will be in half an hpur, or thereabouts, take them out, and the onion and lemon peel; mix fome flower with a little cream, loil this in the fauce; add more wine, if there is not fufficient, aid chyan fqueeze in fome lemon-juice, put in the eels

Anotbir way.

PUT one ounce of butteV into a ftew-pan; when it is melted throw in a handful of forrel cut grofly, about a dozen fage leaves cut fine, five pounds of eels cut to pieces, peppered sind falted, two anchovies boned and minced, a large onion, the peel of a qurter of a lemon j(hred fine, half a nutmeg grated,balf a pint of lyater; let thefe ftew gently half an hour; take put the onion, Tqueezcf in lemon-juice; lay toafled bread round the difl) cut ree-cqrnerd, Half the quantity makes a fqiaU diih.

To hroil or roaft Eeh.

SKIN and clean a large eel; mix bread crumbs, grated le inon-peel, parfley chopped, pepper, fait, nutmeg, a few oyfters chopped, a bit of butter, and yolk of egg; ftufT the eel, few i up, turn it round; rub it with yolk of egg, ftrew over it fine bread crumbs, ftick on bits of butter; a little water in the difh: liake it either in a common ot Dutch oven. Setve it with the white- filh fauce; add to it what gravy coms from, the fifh iirft taking ofF the fat: the oyfters in the ftuffing may be omitted. - Or, ftrip the ikin off the eel to the tail, fcotch it, rub it with pepper and fait; ftufF it with the above ingredients, drw the (kin over it; (kewer it round, hang it in the Dutch oven, .

roaft it; or put it on a gridiron, at a great diftance, over a clear fire; let it be near done, then fet it Ipwer to brown.- Anchovy pr white fifli fauce.

Eels fpitcbcocked.

WHEN (kihned and cleaned, flit open the belly, lay it flat, xt do ipiot bone it; cut it in pieces the length of a finger, rub t with yolk of eg j ftrew over it fine bread crumbs, pepper, fait, nutmeg grated, lemon-peel, chopped parfley; broil it. - . nchovy fauce.- -Or, do it whole, done with the above ingre-r dientSji

234 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

dients, turned round and fkewered $ then broiled, or. roafted la a Dutch oven. - Anchovy fauce.

7ofry Eels. "

CUT them in pieces; (eafon them with pepper, felt, and nutmeg; flower (;hem, fry them in butter. They are a pretty gamifh for moft iiih -If they are fmall, turn them round, and fry them whole.

0 hake Eels.

TAKE the eels, ftrip and clean them; take a (hallow pan, and cut the eels in lengths according to the depth of the pan; put them in, and let them ftaod upright in it; it fliould be full ! put in a little water, foQie fait, pepper, efchalots cut imali, fome fweet herbs, and a little parfley cut fmall; fet them into the oven to bake: when they are done, take the liquor that comes from them, put it into a fauce-pan, and thicken it with a piece of butter roiled in ilower, and a little white wine.

Eels a-la-Daube.

XAKE three large eels, and a brace of large tench, clean the Ikins of the eels well with fait, and walh them in two or three waters; then cut one open, and ftrip the (kin off; lay it fiat, pick the flefh of the eel and of the tench from the bones; mince and fcafon it with pepper, ialt, cloves, and mace; grate in three parts of a nutmeg; cut the flefh of two more eels into long pieces, fuch as are cut for larding; cut open another, ikin, and lay that flat; then cut out the flefh of a couple of large eels into long flips; then lay a layer of eel upon the firft flcin, and then a layer of mince-oieat; upon this put more eel, and upon them more minced-meat, till all is ufed: prefs it down with the hand, and ay over it the other (kins; tie them round tight, and in fuch a manner that the whole may be kept entire; then wrap it carefully up in a linen cloth, and put it into a fauce-pan with fome fifli broth; fet it ever a flow fire, and let it ftew flowly for fome time: when it is three parts done, pour in a pint of red wine, and put in half a dozen cloves, a couple of bay-leaves broke, fome whole white pepper, and fait; cover up the fauce-pan, and let thefe ftew till the eels are quite done; then take it off, and let it all cool together.

This di(h the French eat inftead of our collared eels: they cut it into flices; it looks very nice and eats well.

ft

Celland

THE LADY.s ASSISTANT, 35

' Collared Eels

SLIT them up the back, take out the bones, wafli aiid dry them well; ftrew over them icalded parfly and fage chopped, pepper, and fait; roll them tight, tie them up in clothe; boil them in fait and water, with the heads and bones, peppercorns, ginger, and a little vinegar; boil them till tender; ti. the cloths tight, bang them up: when Xh& pickk i cold put.

them in.

Petted Eels.

RIP open the 6els, bonp, and cut them into pieces; wa(h and dry thim ye'ry well; fefon them high with pepper, fait, and nutmeg: put them Jnto a pot; lay on pieces of butter; bake them;,pour ofF all the gravy, pref&ng them hard, that none maj rfenain; pour on clarified butter.

'"V- T . 0 pickk Eels.

T'ATCE fome eels, fkin them, flit them down the belly, take out the bones, rub them well all over with common falt let them lie three days, and turn them every day; then take them out of the brine, wafh them in water, and wipe them dry with a cloth; feafon them with nutmeg, cloves, mace, and a bay-leaf: roll them in a collar, and tie them .tight ifi a cloth; boil them in an equal quantity of white- wine and vinegar: when they are tender, take them out of the liquor, and kt them to cool: when they are cold, put them into the fame rTquop again; if there is not liquor enough, boil fome more "yinejgar, white-wine, and' fpices: fet them upon their ends whi) ey are cooling, and they will keep their fliape much better.

To fry Lampreys.

CUT off the heads, and fave the blood that runs from them; then wafli them well in warm water, dry them in a cloth, fry them in a little frefh butter tiH half-done; pour out the fat, and put in a little white- wine; ihake the pan round; put in a little whole pepper, nutmeg, fait, fweet herbs, and a bay-leaf few capers, a piece of butter rolled in flower, and the blood; Ihake the pan round often, and cover them clofe: when they are done, take them out; drain off the fauce; fqueeze in the juice of a lemopi nd pour it over the filh.

To hroil Lampreys.

WASH them very clean in warmwater; ctit them into pieces QieU iome blotter and roll them in % make a feafoning

with

23$ THE LADY'i ASSISTANT.

with grated bread,. fome pepper, fait, and fweet herbs cut very fmall: after- the fifh is well rubbed ui the butter,- dip it into At feafoning, and broil it over a cFear, gentle fire Sauce-- take fome colouring for fauce, and add to it fome chives cut fmall, parfley, mufhrooms, capers, an anchovy minced fine, fome pepper, and fait; put to it a little fi(h-broth, and fome fiQi-cullis to thicken it; boil it, and ftrain it over the fi£h.

To ftew hampreys.

. TAKE the lampreys, fkin and gut them-grate fome lemonpeel, and put to it fome pepper, fait, beaten cloves, and mace ipix thefe together; (kewer the lampreys round, and dip them in the feafoning; put fome flices of butter intq a ftew-pan put in the fi(h, with half a pint of good fifh-gravy, a quarter of a pint of white- wine, an anchovy, a bunch of fweet herbs, and an onion fliced; turn them often: when they are tender, take them out; ftrain ofF the fauce, and thicken it with half a fpoonful of flower mixed in a little gravy; put in the iiih, and let them be quite hot; then lay them into a difb, ad pour the fauce over them.

To pot Lampreys.

SCALD and fcrape them, take out the infides, efpeclally the black firing; feafon with pepper, fait, and mace; put them into a pan, and bake them in a flow oven; when they are done, take them out of the gravy, put them iito a clean pan, and cover them with clajrified buttier

To bake a Collar of Fijb.

SKIN and gut a large eel, wafli it very clean in two or three waters; half-boil it; pick all the meat from the bone; make a ibafoning with beaten mace, pepper, fait, nutmeg, fweet herbs, parfley) a little grated lemon-peel, and fome grated bread 3 beat thefe and the fleftl of the eel together in a mortar very fine; let them all be well mixed;, then take a flat fifli that will roll well, either turbot, flcate, foles, or thornback; take all the bones and flns from the flat flfli, and lay upon it the forced-meat (but leave a little of it) roll it up very tight, open the (kin of the eel, and bind up the collar with it; let it be flat at top and bottom, that it may lie well in the difli; butter an earthen iih, and fet it in upright flower it, and flick pieces of butter on the top, and at the edges, that it may run down on the Hfli let it be baked enough, but great care muft betakfen to' prevent its being broke put a quarter of a pint of watr into the di(b,

For

THE LADYs ASSISTANT, i

Vox fauce - take the water the eel was boiled in, and the bones of the eel, with:the fins, &c. of the other fi(h; put them into a fauce-pan, with a bunch of fweet herbs, an onion, fome tnace, cloves, and white pepper; let thefe ftew till reduced to a quarter of a pint; ffrain it; add to it three or four fpoonful of fifli-cullis, a few truffles and niiorclls, a few mufhrooms, two fpoonfuls of catchup, or half a one of foy, a piece of butter rolled in flower; feafon it with a little fait, and giVe ft a.boils then take the forced- meat which was left, mix it up with the yolk of an egg into little balls, and fry them: when the fi(h is done, lay it in the diih, pour the fauce over it, and lay the balls round.

This does well in a Dutch ovea.

FLOUNDERS.

0 cboofe Flounders.,

THEY fhould be ftiiF, their eyes bright and full, their bodies thick: they are both fea and river fi&; and fliould, if pof fible, be drefled alive. They are in feafon from January to March,

and from July to September.

It

J'o boil Flounders

PtJT on a fteW-pan, with water fufficient to Cover the quantity of founders which are to be draft; put in fome vinegar and horfe-radifli: when the water boils, put in the fifh, but let them be well cleaned and their fins cut oS do not let them boil too fail, left they break: when they are enough, lay them on a fifh plate, the tails in the middle. Sauce - parfley and butter.

Plaice and dabs' are boiled in the fame manner.

To fry Flounders Dabs, or Plaice.

PUT oil, rendered lard, or dripping, into a frying-pan, fufficient to cover the fiih; let the fat boil before the fifli is put in dry the fifti well with a cloth and flower it: when friedj lay it on a coarfe cloth to drain.

To ftew Flounder Sj Dabs, or Plaice.

CLEAN the flounders, and cut ofF the fins; put them into a fiewpan, with as much water as will cover them; put to them an anchovy fplit, a blade of mace, fome fait, a fpoonful of lemonjuice, and an efchalot; let thefe fimmer very flowly till they are enough fcum them very clean; lay them to drain in a diih, but keep them hot; then ftrain off the liquor into the

flew-pan.

ftsS THE LAlXs ASSISTANT.

ftew-pan, put to it a piece of butter rolled in flower, a fpoonful of catchup, feme pickled muihrooms, and a j;Iars of white wine: let it boil till it is of a proper thicknefs j if there is any fcum, take it clean ofF, and pour the fauce over the fifh.

Another way.

TAKE the fih and fry them of a fine, brown; then take them up, and add to the butter they were fried in, water £uflicierrt to make feuce for the quantity of iifh that are done; to a qtrart of water two anchovies and an ombn fliced, a fpoonftrl tf catchup, and two fpooAfuls of red wine; let it iinimer a quarter of an hour, then put it into the difh: let them ftemf very flowly a quarter of an hour, then take them out; put them into a warm di(h, and thicken the fauce with butter and flower give it a boil, andrain it off; pour it over the fi(h

0 fricajjee Flounders &?f .

CLEAN the fiih, and take off the black ikin, but not the iivbite; cut the flefh from the bones into long flices, and dip them into yolk of egg; flrew over them fome breadrafpingaf and fry them in clarified butter: when they are enough, lay them, upon a plate, and keep them hot For fauce - take the bones of the fifb, boil them in feme wate; then put in an anchovy, fome thyme, parfley a little pepper, fait, cloves, and mace: let thefe fimmer till the anchovy is difTolved; then take the butter the fifh was fried in, put it into a pan over the fire; (bake fome flower into it, and keep ftirring it while the flower is fhaking in; then ftrain the liquor into it, and let it boil tiH it is thick; fqueeze fome lemon-juice into it; put the fifh into a dijfh, and pour the faiice over them.

St or Tujk Fijb.

SOAK it a day or two, according to Its fize and faltncfs lay it on bricks or ftones all night; put it again into water the day it is ufed, and boil it.- Lirg requires a great deal of doing; it muft only fimmer; ibmetiipes it will take two hours fimmering, after twelve hours foaking. - Water-cod need only be boiled and Well fcummed. - Scotch haddocks ihould be laid iii foak all night; they may either be broiled or boiled; if broiU cd, they Ihould be fplit afunder. For fauce - egg- fauce, parfnips whole or mafhed, potatoes, and plain butter or when boiled, pull the fait filh into flakes, pour over it eggfauce, or ma&ed parfnips.

SPRATS.

7

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. '239

S P R A T S '

To cboQfe Sprats.

They arc !hofe by the fanie .rirlcs as herrings. They ar In feafori all be winter.

To lake or broil Sprats.

DO them as herrings.

To pkile Sprats Uh jinthoviis. - . TAKE a peck of the beftfpsats, (they muft- be very frcfli) not wafibed or wiped, but as they come ouf of the watery have rey two pounds of cbiuQion fait, four pounds of falt petre a quarter of a pound of bay-fak, tlvo ounces of i&k pfunelta, to pennyworth of coehineal, pouided aUma.mor tar and mixed together; put them into . a ftoiw pot or finttR barrel 5 lay a row of fprats, then a layer of tke falts, and fo on till the pot is fuUj prefs them hard down, cover them clofe; let them 'ftand fix months, and they will be fit for ufe.

A barrel is beft, as they can then be turned bottom upwards every week. . "

To pickle Sprats.

' DO them in the fame manner as herrings.

LOBSTERS.

To chcofe Lohjiers.

THElfe tails, if frefli, fliould be ftifF, and pull up with % fpring; if ftale, the tail will be febby. This direSUon is for boiled lobfters. It is better to buy them alive, and boil them; but then they will fometimes live till they are quite fpent: if they have not been long taken, the claws will have a quick, ftrong motion upon fqupezing the eyes. The heavieft are efteemed the beft. The cock-lobfter is known by the narrow back-part of his tail; the two uppermoft fins withm his tail are ftifF and hard: but thofe of the hen are fo£t, and the tail broader. The male, though generally fmaller than the femak, has the higheft fiavour in the body his ileih h firmer,, .and the colour, when boiled, isredder

To butter Lobfiers.

WHEN boiled, take out • the ipeat cut it into pieces; put to it a little gravy the infide of the lobfter, and the fpawn bruifed, a very little white wine, pepper, fait, nutmeg, gitated Jcmon-pecl, a piece of butter mixed with flower, and a little lemon

440 THE LADts ASStStANt.,

iemnjuice; .ftir this together; Jet It boil up: quarter tti chine; pepper, fait, and broil it j lay it iround the difh on hd reft. Garnilh with diced lemon.

Antftber waji

CUT the lobfler in pieces, as before put to it a little water, pepper, fait, nutmeg, a piece of butter mixed with flower i boil it up.

To Jiew Lobfteri.

WHEN the Ibbfters are boiled, pick the meat clean front the Ihells take a pitit of water, a little mace, a little whole pepper, aqd the (hells of the lobfters; let thei;n boil till all their goodnefs is out: firain off the liquor, and put it into a fauce-pan; put in the lobfters with a piece of butter rolled in flower, a fpoonful or two of white wine, and a little juice of lemon: let them boil, and then tj them in the difh

To btoil Lobfters.

WH£N the lobfters are boiled, fplit their tails and chines, track the claws, pepper and fait them; take out their bodies, and what is called the lady; then put them again into the hells, and then upon the gridiron over a clear fire; likewife the tails and the claws; bafte them with butter, and fnd them to table with melted butter in a boat

Td rodft Lobfttr.

MORE than half-boil it; fet it in a Dutch oven, bafte it well till nicely frothed ferve it with melted butter.

To pot Lobftir.

BOIL it well, pick out all the meat and ihfide; feafon high with pepper, fait, and nutmeg beat it fine, with butter enough to make it mellowj put it down clofe in the pot; fet it into a flack oven for two or three minutes $ pour over clarified butter.

Another way

SEASON the meat from the claws and infide, as before direded, and pound it lay fome at the. bottom of the pot, then the tail wqII feafoned; fill the pot with the remainder i pour over clarified butter.

C R A 6 S.

To cboofe Crabs.

THEY Will not keep fo long lobfters: when they are

I . . m

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 241

in perfe£Hon, the joints of the legs are ftifF, and the body has a very fweet fmell; when they have been kept too long, the joints are limber, the eyes look dead and loofe, accompanied with a very bad fmcll.

To butter Crabs.

PICK out the fifli, bruife the infidc; heat it in a little gravy, with a little wine, fome pepper, fait, nutmeg, a few crumbs of bread, a piece of butter, with a very little flower fome vinegar or lemon-juice.

Crai browned andferved in the Shell.

LEAVE the great (hell whole, mince all the fi(h, fhred fome .pai;fley, mu(hrooms, or truffles, a little young onion; fry thefe, put in the minced crab, with the in fide bruifed, fome pepper, fait, and grated lemon- peel; ftir this about, fhake on fome flower, and add a little lemonjuice, with fome good gravy; let this fimmer up, fill the fliell or (hells; ftrew over crumbs of bfead; brpwn them in a Dutch oven, or with a falamander,

PRAWNS AND SHRIMPS.

0 choofe Prawns and Shrimps.

WHEN in perfedlion they have a very excellent fmell; they are firm and fliff; the tails alfo are the fame, for they turn ftiffly inwards: when the prawns are freflb, their colour is very bright; but when they are ftale, the tails grow limber, they lofe the brightnefs of their colour, and grow pale and clammy.

Shrimps are of the prawn kind, and are known to be good or bad by the fame rules.

TV Butter Prawns or Shrimps

MELT a piece of butter mixed with flower, in fome good gravy, keep it ftirring; put in the fi(h, with a little nutmeg grated, pepper, and fait; (immer them up, lay toafted bread round, cut three-cornered.

Cray-Fijh and Prawns in Jelly.

PUT feveral into favoury Jelly, taking care they lie (eparate.

To pot Shrimps.

WHEN boiled, feaibn them well with pepper, fait, a little pounded cloves; put them clofe into a pot, fet them for a few jninutes into a flack oven i pour over clarified butter

R Cray

242. THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Cray-Fijh with white auce.

WHEN boiled, pick the fhells from the tails, ajid from tfie great claws; take off the ftnall claws; thicken feme white gravy with cream, flower, and a bit of butter; add pepper and fait, a little chopped parfley; heat the cray-fifli in this j ferve it very hot. Oiily the tails may be done.

Cray-Fyijh difguifed.

WHEN boiled, take the great (hells from the bodies, and the fhells from the tails, leave the large claws intire on the bodies, take off the fmall ones; put into the bottom of a difli parfley, a little onion, rpufhrooms, fweet herbs, all chopfJed; place the cray-fifh on this round the difb, the tails towards the middle, and fo in rows till the diih is covered; pour in fome good gravy a little thickened, and lemon-juice; ftrew crumbs of bread, pepper, fait, and nutmeg all over thd top; heat and brown this in a common or Dutch oven.

OYSTERS.

To choefe Oyjlers

THE goodnefs of oyfters confifts in their being healthy and properly relifhed; the Pyfleet, Colchefter, and MiJford oyfters, ar6 by far the beft; but the native Milton are reckoned very good, being the whiteft and fatteft: they are known to be alive and vigorous when they clofe faft upon the knife, and let go as foon as they are wounded in the body. They fhould be' eat as foon as opened, for they foon become poor and flabby. The Rock oyfters are the largeft.

Oyfters ftewed.

WASH them in their own liquor, ftrain them;. put tbera into a fauce-pan, with fome white pepper pounded, a little beaten mace, a little cream, a piece of butter mixed with flower; ftir this till it boils, throw in the oyfters, fimmer theni till enough y add fait, if wanted: toafted fippets round the diih.

Oyfter Loaves.

STEW them as above; fill little Dutch loaves with them.

A Ragout of Oyfters.

MAKE a batter with two or three eggs, pepper fait, grated lemon-peel, chopped parfley, a little flower dip in the oyfters, fry them, drain thorny pour the fat out of the pan, (hake in 10 fome

TMe LAbYs ASSISTANT. U3

lome flower, put to it a little good gravy, ftir it over the fire till brown and thick; add a little more gravy, the oyfter-liqiior ftrained, a little white wine; throw in the oyfters, fliake them jound, fiminer them a little. Thirty oyfters make a pretty difli.

Oyfters on Skewets.

PUT a bit ot butter into a fbw-pan, throw in large oyfters and fome mufhrooms, witK pepper, fait, pounded cloves, parfley, and fweet herbs chopped, a daft of flower; ftir thefe about half a minute, then put the oyfters on filver flcewers, a mulhroom between each; roll them in crumbs of bread; broil them; put into the ftew-pan a little good gravy, let it be thick and palatable; a little lemon-juice. Serve the oyfters on the fkewers 3 the fauce in the difti,

Oyfters fcollopeL

WASH them in their own liquor, ftrain the liquor to them 5 put fome into fcolloped-fliells, ftrew over them bread crumbs, with a little pepper, a bit of butter; then niore oyfters, bread crumbs, and a bit more butter at the top; fet them into a jDutch oven, let them be a njce brown.

Forced Oyfters in Shells.

SCALD the oyfters in their own liquor, chop them; add parftey and anchovy chopped, crumbs of bread, lemons-peel grated, pepper, (alt, nutmeg, a little cream, yolk of egg, a piece of butter, and fome whole oyfters; fill fome fcoUopedr fliells, ftrew over a few crumbs of bread, brown them in a Dutch oven;

Oyfters in Shells another way.

PUT a bit of butter in a ftewpan, throw in oyfters, chopt mufhrooms, and parfley, grated lemon-peel, pepper, and fait, a little young onion, or efchalot; ftir them about a minute, fill the fhellsr, put in a bit of butter and the oyfter liquor; ftrew over crumbs of bread, brown them.

To fry Oyfter Si

MAKE a better with the yolic of one or two eggs, a little nutmeg, fome beaten mace, a little flower, and a little fait; dip in the oyfters, fry .them in hogVlard, a light brown. If agreeable, a little parfley may be flircd fine and put into the batter.

K

it i Oyftm

244 THE lady's ASSISTANT.

Oyfters a-Ia-Dauhe.

. MAKE a feafoning of parfley, bafil and chives, cut very fmall; open the oyfters, loofen them, but do not take them out of he bottom-fhell; put a little of the feafoning to each oyfter, with pepper, and a little white wine j put on the top-fhell, and fet them on the gridiron j lay from time to time a red-hot hovel over them: when they are enough, take off the upper -(hell, and fend them to table in the under one..

Oyfters friidl

DIP them in yolks of eggs that are beat with flower, fait, and ntitmg; fry theiti a light brown i they are proper garnilh for cod, and calf's head haihed, &c.

0 pickle Oyfters.

WASH the oyfters, and ftrain the liquor off very dear; add to it a little white-wine vinegar, with' fome fait, whole pepper, a race of ginger, two or three bay-leaves, with an onion 5 boil thefe together, then put, in the oyfters, and let them boil very gently till they arc tender; take off the fcum as it rifes; when they are enough, take them out with a fpoon; when the pickle is cold, put them up in a pot or fmall barrel, fiop them up clofe. They will keep five or fix weeks.

Ory

WASH them about in their own liquor; ftrain the liquor; boil the oyfters gently in it till enough, fcumming it; take out the oyfters; put to the liquor a little vinegar and Lilbon wine, a few black pepper-corns, a little msice, nutmeg, and fait; boil this together j when cold, put it to the oyfters j keep them clofe covered in a barrel or jar.

M U S -G L E S.

Ragout of Mufdes.

MELT a little butter in a ftew-pan, take the mufcles out of the ftiells, fry them a minute with a little chopped paifley, then fhake over them a little flower, put in a little cream, pepper, fait, nutmeg, and lemon-juice; boil them up; if they are to be brown, put good. gravy inftead of cream

Or,

When the mufcles are well cleaned, ftew them without water till they open, take them from the fliells, fave the liquor; put into a ftew-pan a bit of butter, with a few muftirooms

chopped.

TH5 LADY'S ASSISTANT. 245

chopped, a little parfley, and a little grafeil lemon-peel; ftir this a little about, put in fome good gravy, with pepper and.

fait; thicken this with a little flower, boil it up, put in the mufcles with a little liquor; let theqi be hot.

N, B. When mufcles are ftewed, throw among them a half crown, or any piece of filver; if that is tttit difcoloured, the mufcles may be eat with the greateft fafety, without taking any thing out of them, as is the ufual method.

ANCHOVIES.

To cboofe Anchovies.

THEY are preferved in barrels with bay-falt; no other fi(k has the fine flavour of the anchovy. They are caught upon the coafts of Provence and Catalonia, in May, June, and July.

The fineft arc thofe which look red and mellow, and the bones moift and oily; the flefh (hould be high-flavoured, and the liquor fhould look reddifli, and have a fine flavour.

P O U L T R Y

T U R K I E S.

To choofe a Turkey CocL

IF young, it has a fmooth black leg with a (bort fpur, the eyes full and bright, and the feet limber and moifl:; take care the fpurs are not cut or fcraped. If it is ftale, the eyes will be funk, and the feet dry.

vl • - .

Hen Turkey,

THE hen turkey is known to be frefli or ftalc?, old or young, 'by the fame rules; only, if (he is old her legs will be red and rough; if (he is with egg, the vent will be foft and open; if the vent is hard, (he has no eggs.

To boil a Turkey.

MAKE a fl;uffing with grated bread, oyfters chopped, grated lemon-peel, pepper, fait, nutmeg; about four ounces of butter, or fuet chopped, a little cream, yolks of eggs, to make it a light fluffing; fill the craw; if any is left, make it into balls; flower the turkey; pat it into water while cold take .oiF the

R 3 fcum

fi46 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT,

fcum as.it rifes, let.lt boil gently; a middling turkey will take about an hour. Boil the balls, lay them round it, with oyfter fauce in the difli, and in a boat. The ftuffing may be made without oyflers; or it may be ftuffed with forced-meat, or faufage-meat mixed with a few crumbs of bread and yolks of eggs.

If pyers are not lb be had, white celery fauce is very good, or white fauce.

To boil a Turkey au Bourgeois.

LET the turkey be trifled for boiling; feton -a pot with fome water and fome fait, a large handful of chopt parfley, and four or five pepper corns; when it boils put in the turkey, and Jet it boil very gently till it is enough, but be very careful it is not done too much; when it is near done, fet on a faucepan, with a piece of butter rolled in ilower, and a little water; cut fome parfley very fmall, and put into it a thin flice of garlick, two anchovies, a tea-fpoonful of lemon-peel, cut like dice, a little juice of lemon, and fonae fait; let thefe ftew to gether, and then thicken it; take up the turkey, and pour the fauce over it.

To ftew a Turk,

TAKE a pot, large enough to hold a turkey, lay at the "bottom foqr fkewej acrofs, and iipon thefe lay the turkey; pour in aquart of good veal gravy, and a bunch of celery cut very fmall, with fome beaten mace; let thefe flew as flow as poffible, till the gravy is mofe than half cohfumed; then roll a large piece of butter in flower, and put into the pot; when it is pielted, put in a glafs of Madeira or wjiite wine: if thege i not fauce enough, add a little ftrong veal gravy, but thep butter jnuft be added to make it of a proper thicknefs; when the turkey is tender, take it up, and pour the fauce over it - pickled mufhrooms, or oyflers, may be added to the fauce.

Turkey ft ewcd with Celery.

STUFF the turkey as when Hewed brown, (leaving out thp oyflers) or with forced -meat; boil it till near enough, with an onion, a little whole pjper, a piece of lemon-peel, and a bunch of fweet herbs in the water; have fome celery cut into lengths and boiled till hear enough; put them into fome of the liquor the turkey was boiled in; lay in the turkey, breaft downwards, flew it a quarter of an hour, or till it is done; but do not overdo it; take it up: thicken the fauce with a piece of butter rolled in flower, and fome good creams add fait and phyan.

THE IvADY's ASSISTANT. 247

Turkey Jlewed brown,

TAKE a fmall turkey and bone it; fill it with a forcedmeat made as follows: - Take half a pound of veal, and the meat of two pigeons, a tongue out of the pickle, boiled and peeled; chop all thefe ingredients together, and beat them in a mortar, with fome marrow from a beef bone, or a pound of fuet from a loin of veal j feafon them with two or three cloves, two or three blades of mace, and half a nutmeg, dried at the fire, and pounded, with fome fait; mix all thpfe well together; fill the turkey, and fry it of a fine brown; put it into a pot that will juft hold it, lay forpe (kewers at the bottom of the pot, to keep the turkey from flicking; put in a quart of good beef gravy, cover it clofe, and let it flew for half an hour very gently then put in a glafs of red wine, one fpoonful of catchup, large fpoonful of pickled mufhrooms, fome truffles, morells, and a piece of butter rolled in flower; cover it clofe, and let it flew half n hour longer. Fry fome hollow French loaves, then take fome pyfters, ftew then in a fauce-pan, with a bit of macie, their liquor, a little white wine, and a piece of butter rolled in flower; let them ftew till they are pretty thick, fill the loaves with them; lay the turkey in the difh, pour the fauce over it; lay the loaves on each fide.

Turkey ftewed brown another way.

CUT the turkey up the back; take out the entrails, and . thg bones out of the body, leave on the rump, legs, and wing bones; chqp fome oyfters, fuet, marrow, or a piece of butter, ' lemon-peel grated, the crumb of a French roll foaked in cream, pepper, fait, nutmeg, parfley chopped, yolks of eggs; fill the turkey with this, few it up, lard the breaft; half-roaft it, put it into a veflel that will juft hold it, with three pints of cullis, or gopd gravy (more if the turkey is large) let it ftew gently an hour and a half, or two hours; when tender, thicken the fauce with a little flower, but firft fcum it. Add fome oyfters and their liquors, frefli or pickled muftirooms a little chyan, lemon-juice, if neceflfary.

A fowl may be fjtewed in the fame manner,

To roaft a Turkey

A middle-fized one will be roafted in an hour. - Make a fluffing with four ounces of butter or chopped fuet, grated bread, a little lemon-peel, parfley, and fweet herbs chopped, pepper, felt, and nutmeg, a little cream, and yolks of eggs r ijll the craw with this, or with forced-ipeat; papr the brr

R4

448 THE lady's assistant.

till near done, then 'flower and baftc it. For fauce - gravy alone, or brown celery fauce, or mufliroom fauce. i'or a turkey poult, gravy and bread fauce

As foon as any kind of poultry is laid to the fire, flower and bafle It.

To roafi a Turkey with Oyfters.

WHEN it IS trufTcd for roafting, cut the liver to pieces, and fet it over the fire in a flew-pan, with half a pint of oyflers Wafhed, and their liquor, which mufl be flrained, fome pepper and fat, two bay-leaves, two blades of mace, a piece of buttef rolled in flower 5 let theje flew very gently about ten mixiuteS) and then take them off; finge the turkey, and fluff it with the oyflers; cover the heart with thin flices of bacon, and put a buttered (heet of paper over it; fpit it, and lay it down to a good fire, but at a dlflance. While it is roafling, fet on a ftew-pan with half a pint of efTencc of ham: take a pint of oyflers, throw them into boiling water: take off the beards,then put them into the eflence of ham: add a little lemonjuice, give them a boil. When the turkey is enough and in the difb, pour the fauce over it.

To roaft a Turkey the Italian Way.

TAKE the liver of a young turkey, and mince it very fine, tvith fome chopped parfley, and two or three hanvifuls of frefh mufhrooms, fome pepper, fait, and more than an ounce of butter; mix thcfe well, together, arid put them into the body of the turkey; put on a flew-pan with a piece of butter, fome efchalots. Tome pepper and fait; when it is hot put in the turkey, turn it often that it may be of a fine brown, and lay it to cool; then wrap fome flices of bacon over it, and cover it all over with paper; put it upon a fpit, and lay it down to roafl. For fauce- cut fome large mufhrooms very fine, with 'twice the quantity of parfley, a few green onions, cut friiall: put on a fauce-pan with half a pint of white wine; when it is hot put in thefe ingredients: add fome pepper and fait, the juice of a lemon, two cloves of garlick whole; let them boil, and then put in a quarter of a pint of rich gravy, and a fmall tea-cup full of oil; let all boil up once, or twice, then take out the gar lick, and put in a piece of butter rolled in flower.

Lay the turkey in the diOi, and pour the fauce over it.

To roaft a Turkey with Cray-Fijh.

TAKE young turkey, in Oftober or November, let it be

truffed

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 249

truflcd as for roafting; make Come forced-meat with fome fat bacon, fuet, and the white of a chicken, all cut as fine as poffible, and fome frefh mufhrooms minced very fine; mix thefe ingredients well together, with fome fait, pepper, the leaves of fweet herbs picked clean from the ftalks, and a little grated nutmeg; chop them all together after they are mixed, then boil fome crumb of bread in rich cream, put it to the forced-meat; then take the yolks of two new-laid eggs, beat them well, and mix the forced-meat with them: ftuiF the crop of the turkey, raife the (kin a little upon the breaft, and put as much of the forced-meat as will go in without tearing it; if any is left put it into the body, and with it a ragout of Crayfifh made as follows:- Walh fome cray-fi(h and boil them in water, then pick out the tails and bodies; cut fome muihrooms, but not fmall, fome truiBes in thin flices, fome artichoke-bottoms and afparagus-tops, boiled and cut into pieces; mix all thefe together with the cray-fi(h, put them into a fauce-pan With a piece of butter, fome nutmeg cut in flices, pepper, fait, three or four flices of lemon, a little onion cut fmall; let thefti all fimmer over a flow fire, and when enough put in fome cullis of cray-fi(h to thicken it. Put fome of this ragout into the body of the turkey, tie up both ends, (kewer and fpit t for roafting; ftrcw fome fluffing over it, then fome flices of bacon, and over all fome buttered paper; let it have a good fire and be thoroughly done; when it is enough take oflF the paper and bacon, and pour over it the reft of the ragout.

Turkey forced.

MAKE a fluffing as above, raife the (kin from the breafl, put under it a little of the fluffing and fill the craw; lay on the breaft thin flices of bacon tie them on; roaft the turkey; take the bacon off: ferve the turkey with the following fauce- • Thicken fome cullis with flower, boil it with fome oyfters, mu(hrooms pickled or fre(hj if the latter, lemon-juice; if the firft, catchup or mu(hroom-powder and liqqor: efchalot chopped, chyajrt, fait, and pounded fpice if necefTary; a littleMadeira, if the cullis requires it: take care not to break the (kin of the breaft in ftuffing it.

Forced fowl is done in the fame manner.

J Turkey in Jelly.

MAKE a jejly as follows: - Take a fowl, (kin it and take out all the fat; take four pounds of leg of veal, without any fat m (kin, put the fowl whole and the veal into a fauce-pan, but

take

259 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

take care it is wll tinned; put to them three quarts of water I let the fire be very clear; they muft be well fcummed, but do not let them boil, only fimmer very gently; put in fome hite whole pepper, two or three blades of mace, half a nutmeg, dnd a little lemon- peel; they muft be fix or (even hours ftewing; when it is a ftiflF jelly, which will be known by trying St in a fpoon take off all the fat, but take care not to ftir the meat in a fauce-pan. Some time before it is done, put in a little fait, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon; when it is done, ftrain it through a clean fieve, but it muft not be poured quite to the bottom. While the jelly is making, boil the turkey very white, and let it ftand till quite coJd, then pour the jelly over it, and let it ftand to be quite cold before it is Tent to table. This is a good.difli for a cold entertainment.

Fowls, or any kipd of birds, may be done in this manner.?

ji glazed Turkey.

THE turkey muft be young, but not fmall; vhen it is picked, drawn, and finged, lay it a little while over a clear charcoal fire, but turn it often; have ready a ragout of fwectbreads j take ofF the turkey, fplit it down the back, fill it with this ragout, few it up, and lard it with bacon; then hy at the bottom of a deep ftew-pan, firft fome flices of ham, then fome flices of veal, and then fome flices of. beef; lay the turkey upon thefe, ftrew over them fome fwect herbs, and over them clofe; let thefe flew over z flow fire; when they are enough, take off the ftew-pan, take out the turkey, and then pour into the pan a little good broth, ftir it about, and ftrairi off the liquor; fcum off the fat, fet it over the fire again, and boil it to a jelly; then put in the turkey, and fet the pan over a gentle fire of a ftove; it will be foon well glazed; then pour into 4 difti forne eflence of ham, and then put in the turkey.

Turkey bajhed.

MIX fome flower with a piece of butter, ftir it into fome cream and little veal gravy till it boils up; cut the turkey in pieces, not too fmall, put it into the fauce, with grated lemon peel, white pepper, and mace, pounded, a little mufliroon-: powder or catchup; fimmer it up. Oyfters may be added.

FOWLS.

To choofe a Cock or Hen Capon or Pullet.

IF a cock is young, his fpurs will be horjt; but be very

careful

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 251

)9;reful they are neither cut nor pared: if they are ftale, their vents will be open; if new, they will be clofe and hvd.

Hens are beft juft before they bpgin to lay, and yet full of egg: ff they are old, their combs and legs will be rough; if young, tkey will be fmooth. A good capon has a thick Uelly and a large rump; thfjre is a particular fatnefs at its breaft, and the comb is very pale.

To host Fowls.

A large one will be boiled in half an hour; boil it in a pot by itfelf fcum it very clean, it will be better than if boiled in a cloth;'pour fome melted butter over the breaft j ferve it vitU tongue, bacon, or pickled pork; cabbage, favoys, broccoli; any greens or carrots, and oyfter fauqe, white celery fauce, or white fauces

TV boil Chickens.

A large one takes twenty minutes, a very fmall one fifteen.

For fauce- parfley and butter, or lemon fauce.

Another way.

LAY the chickens in fcalding water, till the feathers will flip off, but do not let them be in long, as it will make the (kin hard and will crack it; when they are drawn, let them lie in fcummed milk two hours, trufs them, their heads under their wings, finge and flower them, put them into cold water, cover them clofe, and fet them over a very flow fire; fcum them well; when they have boiled very flowly for five or fix minutes, take them ofis and keep them clofe covered in the water near half ian hour (they will be white and plump) before they are fent to table; fet them over the fire to keep hot; tke them up, drain (hem, and pour nelted butter or white fauce over them.

To roajl Fowls.

WHEN the fowls are laid to the fire, finge them with fome white paper, bafl:e then with b'tter, then drudge over them fome flower; when the fmoke begins to draw to the fire, bafte and drudge them over again; let the fire be brifk, and fend Jhem to table with a good froth. A large fowl will take three quarters of an hour, a fmall one twenty minutes. For fauce- gravy, egg fauce, mufiirooms, and white or brown celery fauce.

. To roaji Chickens.

fi jareone will take half an hour, a frpall one tvfenty minutes.

25 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

flutes. For fiucc - gravy, parflcy and butter, or mufliroom' fauce.

Roajl Fowls to eat like Pbeafants.

THEY muft be full grpwn; live the heads on, trufs them likip pheafants., ld thcni with bacon, and few will know the difference. For fauce - gravy and bread fauce

Another way to roajl Fwjols.

MAKE fome forced-meat with the flefti of a fowl cut fmall, t pound of veal; beat them in a mortar with half a pound of beef-fuet, as much crumb of bread, fome muflirooms, truffles and moreils cut (mall, "fome lemon-peel grated fine, fome beaten mace, a few fweet herbs, and fome parflejt mixed together, with the yolks of two eggs; bone the fowls, fill them with th forced-meat, and roaft them. For'faotse - ftrong grivy, with truffles, morel Is, and muihrooms.

Fowl roajted with a Ragout of Oyfterj.

MAKE a forced-meat, to which add a dozen oyfters, ftuff the craw; cover the breaft of the fowl with bacon fliced, then a iheet of paper, roaft it; take fome cuHis, or good gravyi put jn the oyfters, with their liquor ftrained, a little mufliroompowder, or catchup, lemon-juice, thicken it with flower; add chyan and fait if wanted, boil it up: when the fowl is done take off the bacon. Serve the fauce in the difli.

This fauce is proper for any roafted fowls or chickens.

• a roaft a Fowl with Chenuts.

ROAST fome chefnuts of a fine brown, without burning; take off the ikins and peel them; take about a dozen, cut them fmall, and bruife them in a mortar; take a quarter of a poun4 of ham or bacon, and beat it till it is .very fine; chop finall a .handful of pajpfley, a few fweet herbs, a little, pepper, fait, mace, nd nutmeg; mix all thefe well together, and put them into the fowl; tie the neck very tight, and hang it up by the legs, roaft it with a ftring and bafte it with butter. For fauce - take fome more chefnuts, peeled and fkinned, put them into fome good gravy with a little white wine, and thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flower.

This is the German way of drefEng fowls.

Foils fluffed.

MAKE a forced-meat with half a pound of beef-fuet, as much crumb of bread grated fine, the meat of a fowl 3 wt

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT, asi

cut very faiall; beat thefe in a mortar, and a pound of veal with them fame truffles, morells, and mufhrooms cut fmall, a few fweet herbs and parfley fhred fine, fome grated nutmeg, pepper, fait, and grated lemon- peel; bone the fowls, fill them with this forcecj-meat, and roau them. For fauce - good gravy, with truffles and morells. The fowls may be krded.

Fowl with Rice called a Pillow.

BOIL a pint of rice in as much water as will cover it, wjidi black pepper, a blade or two of mace, and half a dozen 'Cf6ves, tied up tn a bit of cloth; when the fice is tender take out the fpice; flir in a piece of butter; boil a fowl and a piece of bacon, lay them in the difli, cover them wiih the rice; lay round the di(h and upon the rice, hard eggs Qut in halves and quarters, lengthways, and" onions, firft boiled and then fried,

m

Fowl bdjhed. ' "

CUT it to pieces, put it into fome gravy, with a little tream, catchup or mufliroom powder, grateii Jemon-peel, and nutmeg, a few oyflers and their liquor j' a piece of butter mixed with flower; keep it ftirring till the butter is melted; lay fippets in the difh.

Towl-ftewcd. Sec Turkey.

fowl forced. See Turkey.

Fowl d'la- Braize.

TRUSS It as for boiling, feafon the infide with pepper and sit; put at the bottom of the veiTel a flice or two of beef, lay over the fowl fome thin flices of lean bacon, and bits of veal, an onion fluck with cloves, a bunch of fweet herbs, a carrot, half a lemon, pepper, and fait; fet this over a flow fire for ten minutes, then put to it about three pints of warm beefbroth or water; heat a glafs of Madeira and pour in, ftew this till the fowl is tender; ftrain the gravy through a piece of dimity, the rough fide upward, firfl: dipped in cold water; mix a little flower with it, boil it up, pour it over the fowl. Oyfl:ers are a great addition.

Cbickem a-la- Braize

DO them as fowl; enrich the fauce with a fweetbread, bx-palate boiled tender and cut to pieces, truffles morelis, and artichoke-bottoms boiled and quartered.

Chickm

'

254 THE LADY'S ASSIStANT.

Chicken broiled.

CUT it down the back, pepper and fait it, broil it; poxir brer it white muihroom fauce, or melted butter with pickled inufhrooms

Cold Chicken friedi

QUARTER it, rub the quarters with yolk of egg; &vtw oh bread crumbs, pepper, fait, nutmeg, grated lemon-peel, and chopped parfley; fry them; thicken fome gravy with a little flower; add chyan, mufliroom-pawder or catchup, a little lemon-juice; pour it into thediib with the chicken.

Chickens in Afpic,

PUT the pinions, livers, and gizzards, into two fmall thickens, .virith a piece of butter, fome pepper and fait, cover them with fat bacon, then with paper; fpit them on a lon ikewer, tie them to a fpit, roaft them; when cold, cut them up 5 put them into the following fauce, fliake them round in It, let them lie a few minutes before they are difhed: - Take what cuUis is fufficieftt for faiice, heat it with fmall green onions chopped, o£4f(alo.t, a little taragxn and green mint pepper and fait. Z Jjjf 1 Curree of Chickens.

CUT two chickens as for fricaffee, wafli them in two or three waters; put theajkinto a ftew-pan with as much water a9 will cover them j fpmikle over them a large fpoonful of fait, let them boil till tenderifh, covered xlofe, fcum them well when they firft begin to boil; take upe chickens, put the liquof into a bafon; put half a und Mutter into a pan, brown it a little, put to it two cloves of flic, a large onion diced, let thefe fry till brown, fhaking the pan; put in the chickens, ftrew over them two large fpoonfuls of currec-powder; cover the pan clofe, let the chickens do till brown, often (baking the pan; put in the liquor the chickens were boiled in, let all ftew till they are tender: if acid is agreeable, when the chickens are taken ofF the fire, fqueez in the juice of an orange or a lemon. Put half a pound of rice picked, nd waihed in fait and water, into two quarts of boiling water; boil it briflcly for twenty minutes, ftrain it through a cullender, Ihake it into a plate, but do not touch it with the hands, nor a fpooni iferve it, with the curree in a feparate di&.

UtU

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT- igS

White Fricajfee of Chickens.

Skin them, cut them to pieces, lay- them in warm water; ftew them in a little water, with a piece of lemon-pee), a little white wine, an anchovy, an onion, two or three cloves, a bunch of fweet herbs; when tender take them out, ftrain the liquor, put a very little of it into a quarter of a pint of thick cream, with four ounces of butter, a little flowet: keep it conftantly ftirring till the butter is melted; put in the chickens, a little grated lemon-peel, and pounded mace, a little lemonjuice and raufh room- powder; fhake all together over the fire.

If agreeable, put in pickled muflirooms, and omit the lemonjuice.

Brown Fricajfee of Chickens.

SKIN them, cut them to pieces, fry them a nice brown, in frefh butter, drain them on a fieve, pour ofF the butter; put (bme good gravy or beef broth into the pan, firft fhaking in fomc flower, keep it ftirring over the fire; add catchup, a yery little efchalot chopped, fait, chyan, and lemon-juice, or pickled mulhrooms boil thefe up; put in the chickens, ihake them round. • .

Chicken pulled.

TAKE a chicken that has been roafted, or boiled, if underdone the better, cut oflF the legs, and the rump and fiHe-bones together; pull all the white part in little flakes, free from fkin, tofs it up with a little cream, thiickellW wifh- a piece of butter mixed with flower; ftir it till the butter is melte, with pounded mace, white peppr, and fait, a little lemonjuice.

Put this into a difh, lay (tie rump in the middle, the legs at each end, peppered, faked, alj) broiled •

Chicken hafhed called Bicbamele.

CUT a cold chicken to pieces, Httle bones and all; if there rs no gravy, make a little with the Jong bones, onion, fpice, &c flower the chicken, put it into the gravy, with white pepper, fait, nutmeg, &nd grated lemon-peel; let it boil; then ftir in an egg mixed with a little cream; when it is takeiji oflT the fire, fqueei&e in a little lemon-juice; put it into a difh, lay over ic fome bread crumbs; brown them with a falamander.

Chicken in Jelly.

POUR fome jelly into a bowl; when €oM, lay in a cold f oafted chicken, breafl downward; fill up the bowl with jelly juft warm but as little as pofTible fo as not to be fet; when

quite

256 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

quite cold, fet the bowl in warm water juft to loo'en the jelly, turn it out j put the chigken into the jelly the day before it is wanted.

GEESE.

To cboofe Geefe.

THE bill and feet of a young goofe will be yellow, and there will be but few hairs upon them; if old, they will be red: if it is frefli, the feet will be limber; if ftale, they will be ftifFand dry., Green geefe are in feafon from May or June, till they are three months old: they fhouJd be fcalded. A flubble goofe is good till it is five or fix months old, and (hould be picked dry. The fame rules will do for wild geefe, with regard to their being old or young.

To boil a Goofe,

SALT a goofe a week, and boil it an hour. For fauce- onion fauce, or cabbage boiled or fiewed in butter.

Another way.

TAKE a goofe, finge it, and. pour over it a quart of boiling milk; let it lie in it all night, then take it out, dry it well with a cloth; cut fmall a large onion and fome fage, put them into tbe goofe, few it up at the neck and vent, hang it up by the legs till next day, then put it into a pot of cold water, cover it clofe, and let it boifoftly for an hour.-Onion fauce.

To ftnoke a Goofe.

TAKE a large ftubble goofe, take off all the fat, dryt well infide and out with a cloth, wafli it all over with vinegar, and then rub it over with fome conimon fait, falt-petre, and a quarter of a pound of coarfe fugar; rub the falts wcU in, and let it lie a fortnight; then drain it well, it up in a cloth, dry it in- the middle of a chimney. It (hould hang a mouth.

Sauce-'--onions, greens, &c.

Goofe roafted.

IT muft be feafoned with fage and onion, cut very fmall, and mixed with pepper and fait; an hour will roaft it: boil the fage and onion in a little water before they are cut, it prevents th'eir eating fo ftrong, and takes off the rawnefs. For fauce- gravy and apple fauce A Goofe

THE LAbrs ASSISTANT. 257

A Goofe a-la-Mode.

TAKE a large ftubble goofe; when it is picked, bone and jlit it down the back; take a fowl, and do it in the fame manner; take alfo a neat's tongue, boil and blanch it; feafon the Fowl with pepper and faltj and beaten mace, and roll it round the tongue, but firft put fome beef-marrow over the tongue; then put the fowl into the goofe, and few it up but put fome thin flicies of ham or bacon round the fowl before it is put into the Koofe; put the goofe into a fmall pot, with two quarts of beef gravy, and the bones of the goofe and f6wl when it begins to boil; let it ftew very gently an hour, tien take up the goofe, fcum all the fat off the gravy, ftrain it and put in a glafs of red wine, two fpoonfuls of catchup, a veil fweetbread parboiled and cut in flices, fome truffles, morclis, and mufhroomsy a piece of butter rolled in flower, and fome yolks of eggs boiled hard, with a little pepper and fait; put in the goofe, cover ic clofe, let it fteW half an hour longer, then take it up, put it into a difii, and pour the ragout over it i take care to fcum ofF ihe fat

0 marinade a Goofe.

CUT it up the back) bone it; make a ftufloing with a few fageleaves, an onion or to, two apples, bread crumbs, pep per fait, lemon-peel, nutmeg, yolk of egg; ftufF it, few up the back half-roaft it, or fry it; Aew it with good gravy, (clofe covered) till tender; put in a little red wine flram and fcum lle fauce; add chyan, catchup, a little flower, fait, if tieceflary, a littk lemon-juice boil this up a minute or two$ pour it over the goofe.

J Giblets.

SCALD and clean ihetn well cut ofF the bill; divide the head; (kin th itt ftew them with water (enough for fauce) a fprig of thyme, fome whole black pepper, an onion; let them do till very tender; ftrain the fauce; add a little catchup, ahd 'flower, if the fauce is not thick enough: lay fippets toafted round the difh.

D U C K S,

0 choofe Ducks.

THE legs of a duck, when frefli killed, are limber; if it is fat it is hard and thick on the belly; if it is ftale, the feet are dry and ftiflT: the feet' of a tame duck are thick, and inclining to a

? S duflcy

5158 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

dufky yellow j a wild duck has reddfh feet, and fmaller than the tame one

Ducklings (hould be fcalded; ducks picked dry.

Tnme 'Duck boiled.

POUR boiling milk and water over it; let it lie an hour ot two; boil it gently in plenty of water full half an hour. - Onioil fauce.

To boil Buck a-la-Frangoift.

TAKE a pint of rich beef gravy, and put into it two dozeii of roafted chefnuts peeled, with a few leaves of thyme, two fmall onions if agreeable, a little whole pepper, and a race of ginger J then take a fine tame duck, lard it, and half-roaft it; put it into the gravy; let it ftew ten minutes, put in a quarter of a pint of red wine: when the duck is enough take it outj boil up the gravy to a proper thicknefs j fcum it very clean from the fat, lay in the duck in the di(h, and pour the fauce over it.

Tame Ducks roajled.

SEASON them with fage and onion fhred, pepper, and fait; half an hour will roaft them. - Gravy-fauce or onion-fauee.

Always ftew the fage and onion in a little water, as It prevents its eating ftrong, and takes oiF the rawnefs.

Ducklings roafted. •

THEY are not to be'feafoned: they will be roafted in rather lefs than half an hour. For fauce - gravy and goofeberry-lauce.

Duck ftewed LARD it or not; half-roaft it; put it into a ftew-pan, with a pint or more of good gravy, a quarter of a pint of rd wine, onion chopped fmall, or efchalot, a piece of lemon-peel, chyan, and fait; ftew it gently, clofe covered, till tender; take out the duck, fcum the fauce, boil it up quiclc, pour it over the duck: add truffles and morells if agreeable.

Ducks ftewed with Cucumbers.

HALF roaft it, and ftew it as before; have focne cucuftk bers and onions fliced, fried and drained very dry, put theai to the duck, ftew all together.

Duck ftewed with Peafe.

HALF roaft it, put it into fome good gravy, with a little mint rnJ ih ee or four fage-leaves chopped ftew this half an hour, 10, thicken

I

triEl LAbYs ASSISTANT. 259

tliicken the gravy with a little flower; throw in half a piQt of green peafe boiled, or fome celery; then omit the ihinit.

Dutk a4a-Mdde.

TAKE half a piht of rich gravy, a bunch of fWeet herbs, two cfchalols, and an anchovy fplit; let thefe ftew till the anchovy is diflTolved: take a duck, divide it into four quarters fry them brown, pour off the fat' j ftrain off the gravy and put to them; let thefe ftew gently a few minutes, then put iri a quarter of a pint of red wine; let it ftew till the duckis enough then take it out; let the fauce boil a little, and be fure.to fcum off all the fat; lay the duck in the diftl, nd pour the fattce over it.

Buck H'la-Bralze,

LARD it; put a flice or two of beef at the bottom of the Xeffel, then the duck a bit of bacon, and fome more beef fliced, a carrot, an onion, a flice of lemon, whole pepper, a bunch of fweet herbs; cover this,clofe, fet it over the fire a few minutes, fhake in fome flower, poxir in near a quart of beef broth, or boiling water, a little red wine heated j ftew it about half an hour; ftrain the fauce, fcum it; put ib it chyan, and more wine, if neceflary, efchalot and tarragon chopped, aWery little mint, a little juice of lemon If agreeable, add artichoke bottoms boiled and quartered.

Buck hajhed.

WHEN cut to pieces, flower it; put into ftew-pan fome gravy, a little red wine, efchalot chopped, fait and pepper, a piece of lemon; bail this; put in the dutk, tofs it up, take out the lemon.-Toafted fippet$

, •'•

AWiWbucktotoafii

WILL take fiill twenty minutes. - Gravy-faucc.

Widgeon of Eafterling to roHfti Will take near twenty minutes. - Gravy-fauces

To eat Wild Buck Widgeon, or Eajlerling in ferfeion.

HALF roaft them; when they come to table, flice the breaft, Hrew oil pepper and falf, pOHr on a little red wine, and fqueeze

$ tbt

6o THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

the juice of an orange or lemon over; put fome gravy to this, (ei the plate on a lamp, cut up the bird, let it remain over tlike lamp' till enough, turning it.

i

Teal to roaji WILL be done in fifteen minutes. - Gravy-lauee

WOODCOCKS.

ftf choofi Woodcocks.

7£Y inhabit only with us in the winter, zxii ate befl a fortnight or three weeks after they firft come in, when they are vefted from their long flight over the fca; they are very highflavoured birds; if tbey are fat, they wiU feel thick and firm i that is a proof they are in fine condition: they will alio fee! thick and hard in the vent, and have a vein of fat by the fide of the breaft; a lean one will feel thin in the vent: if new killedy it will be limber-footed, and the head and throat clean $ when tfaey are flale, the foot will be ftifF and dry, the mouth and throat witl be foul and fometimes run at the noftrils

To hoil Woodcocks.

TAKE a pound of lean beef, cut it into pieces, and pat it into a iauce-pan, with two qiiarts of wter, an onion ftuck with three or four cloves, two blades of mace, and feme whple pepper $ boil all thefe gently together till hlf is wafted then ftrain it oiF into another faucepan i draw the wopdpjpk9 and lay the trail an a plate; put the woodcocks into the gravy, and let them boil for twelve minutes; while they are doing, chop die trail and liver (mall; put them into a fmall' fauce-pan, with a little mace, pour on them five or fix fpoonfu)? c the gravy the woodcocks ar bpiled in; then take thc crumb of a ftale roll, rub it fine in a difli before the fire; put to the trail in the fmall fauce-pan, half a pint of red port, a piece of butter rolled in flpwer i ftt all over the fire, and fliake it round till the butter is melted, then put in the crumbs of bread, and (hake the fauce-pan rounds lay the woodcocks in the difh and pour the fauc over them.

Tojtew Woodcocks.

SLIT them, but take nothing out; then fry them in fome melted bacon, jufi to make them brown put them into a flewpan, with fome good gravy, fait, pepper, chives, and the juice.

of ctiuikroomsi with a little juice of lemon fqzed intg it.

r

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 45i

7o roaft Wtdcdcks and Snipes.

TWENTY minutes will roaft the firft, fifteen minutes the latter j put under either, while roafting, a toaft, to receive the •trailj iwhich lajr under them in the difli. For fauce-rtifelted butter afid gravy.

Woodcocks a-la-Franfoifi.

WHEN ffhey are picked, draw them snd trills tbeht; l&rd (their breafts with broad pieces of bacon % roaft them, and fenre them upon toafts dipped in veijuicc.

lV0dcoch hfariouf.

MAKE d forced-ifeat with fome veal, much beef fuet chopped and beat in a niortar) an equal qtiantity of crumbs of bread, with a littte beaten mace, pepper, and fait, fome parfley, nd a few fweet herbs; mix it up with the yolk of an egg; take the woodcocks and half-roaft them; lay fome of the forcedmeat round a ftfiall baking-difh; chop the trail, arid throw it all over the diOi lay the woodcocks in the di(h; take fome good

fravy, truffles, mrblls, and mufliroofns, a parboiled fweetread cut into pieces, fomd artichoke bottoms cut into fmail pieces 5 let them all ftew together, heat up with a little white wine J pour it into the grsfvy, and keep it ftifrlng till it is of a proper thicknefs; fer it to cool, and then pour it over the woodcocks; have ready the yolks of a fbw eggs boiled hard, which lay in hefe and there -, work up the remainder of the forced-meat, and roll it out like pafte; lay it over the bh'ds, fauce, and eggs j clofe thedges, wafli it over with the yolk of n egg, and fend it to the oven: half an hour will bake it: fend it to table quite hot.

To hajh Woodcock or Partridge.

THICKEN a little gravy with fome flower, chop a little efchalot, vhrch put to it', with a very little red wine, chyan, arid fiIt; boil this up put in the woodcock or partridge cut into pieces; rtiake it hot thfough; if woodcock. Work the trjul iooth with a little gravy, and ptft into it.

T& fft Wooicdcks.

THEY arc done as pigeons.

Snipes

MAY be dreiled in the fame manner as woodcocks

S3 PJGEQNS.

t$3 THE J.ADY's ASSISTANT.

PIGEONS.

To cboofe Pigeons.

WHEN new, they arp full ant) fat at the vent, and limberfooted if they are old, their legs are large and red j if ftale, the toes are harfh the vent Ipofe, open, and green: the tame pigeons are preferable to the wild ones; they fhould be large 'in the body, fat, and tender; the wild pigeons fhould be large in the body, and tendier. The wood-pigeons are of the nature of the wild pigeons, only larger.

To boil PigeonT.

THEY will not take mpre than a quarter of an hour; they jhould be boiled by themifelves, and may be eat with bacon, greens, fpinach) afpgragus, or parfley and butter.

To boil Pigeons with Rice.

STUFF the pigeons asfor roafting, and boil them near a quarter of an hour in feme good mutton gravy; boil feme rice tender in milk, but be careful it does not burn; when it begins to be thick, beat up the yolks of two or three eggs, witi two or three fpconfuls of cream, a little nutmeg, ftir it together till it is quite thick; put a bit of butter rolled in flower, and fliake it round: lay the pigeons in the difh, put the gravy tp the ricCj mix it together, and pour it over them.

To boil Pigeons with Artichokes. .

TAKE fome artichokes, boil them, and take oyt the bot7 toms; boil fome pigeons, but take care they are not overdone; while they are boiling, make a ragout of fweet herbs and frefli mulhrooms; they muft be all hot together, and there muft be as many pigeons as artichoke bottoms; firft lay in the diih the artichoke bottoms, then pour on fome of the ragout; then lay a pigeon uppn every bottom, ihake a very little pepper over the pigeons, and prick their breafts in two or three places with a fork; then fliake oa a little ba(ket-falt, and iquecze over that fome Seville orange, then poiir over it the reft pf the ragout.

Pigems ft ewe d.

MAKE a fluffing with the livers parboiled and bruifed, a piece of butter, a fewbrea crumbs, pepper, fait, pounded cloves, parfley,. fweet Jierbs chopped, and yolk of egg; fiU.the pigeons, tie them at eAch end, half-roaft or fry them,' put them into fome good gravy or beef broth, with an onion ftuck .:": with

' THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 263

vniii cloves, a bunch of fweet hierbs, a flice of lemon; let them flew very gently till tender; ftrain the fauce, fcum off the fat; put to it pickled mufhrpoms, chyan, forced-meat balls fried, and hard yolks of eggs. The pigeons may be larded.

jinother way.

HALF roaft or fry the pigeons; ftew tbem in culHs: when they are tender, fcum the fauce, thicken it with a little flower; add a little chopped efchalot, forced- meat balls, bard yolks of £ggs, chyan, and lemon-juice

0 roaft Pigeons.

THEY take about twenty minutes roafting.- Chop fome parley fmall; mix it with fome crumbs of bread, pepper, and fait, with a bit of butter; ftuff the pigeons, roail them on a poor inan's ja:k. For fauce- parfley and butter.

0 broil Pigpns,

TRUSS and fluff them in the fame manner as for roafling; let the fire be very clear, and the gridiron high from the lire 5 take care they do not burn. For fauce - parfley and butter.

They may be fplit and broiled, they are fooner done j but they are in general reckoned beft broiled whole.

Pigeons a4a-Daub€.

MAKE a forced-meat with a pound of yeal (according to ' he quantity which is wanted) .nd a pound of veal fuet beat thefe very fine in a mortaf; mix with them an equal quantity of grated bread, a little lemon-peel cut very fmall, with pepper, fait, fome parfley ibred fmall, and a very little thyme, fome pepper, fait, nutmeg, and fome beaten mace; break the breafl: bonqs that they may lie flat; mix the jngredients with the yt)lk of an egg; fill the pigeons, flower them, and fry them jufl: enough tp make them brown in feme butter: while this is doing, make fome gravy in a large fauce-pan, lay at the bottom fome flices of bacon, then the fame of veal, then of beef, and then veal, all cut very thin, a bunch of fweet herbs-, an onion, a piece of parrot, fome whole pepper, a little mace, four or five cloves, a little cruft of bread toafted brown and hard; cover them down very clofe for fi or ftven minutes, ihake in a little flower, and pour in fome boiling water, more than will coyer the meaf; let it ftew very ioftly clofe covered, but well fcurapied, till the gravy is very rich and good;,.then ftiain it off,; . • S 4. put

%64 THE LADY ASSISTANT.

put it into a clean fauce-pan; put in the pigons and let them ftew till they are tender.

To drefs Pigeons au SoleiL

MAKE a forced-meat with half a pound of veal, a quarter of a pound of mutton, and two ounces of beef; beat them in 4 mortar, with fome pepper, fait, and mace, till they are a pafte; then take the yolks of three or four eggs, beat them up well, and put then% into a plate; mix alio a quarter of z, pound of grated bread, and two ounces of flower, put it into another plate; put on a ftew-pan with a little rich beef gravy,, tic lip three or four cloves in a bit of ihuflin, and put into the gravy; put in the pigeons let them Hew till they are almoft enough, then take them up, and kt them before the fire to keep warm; then fet on a frying-pan with fome good beef dripping, enoughs to cover the pigeons; when it boils, take them one at a time jojl them in the meat that was beat, then in the yolk of egg, roll them in it till they are quite wet, then ftrew them over vwith the bread and fiower, put them into the boiling dripping, nd let them remain till they are of a fine brown.

Pigeons en Compote

TRUSS the pigeons with their legs in their bodies; buffirft ftuff them with good forced-meat (made in the fame manner as for pigeons a-la-Daube) let them be parboiled, then lard them with bits of bacon feafoned with pepper, fpices, minced chives, and parfley; lt them ftew as gently as pof)ible; while they are ftewing, make a ragout of cocks-combs, fowls livers, truffles, morells, and muibrooms, met little bacon in a frying-pan, and put them in, (hake the pan round two or three times; then put in ibme rich gravy, let it fimmer a little, then put in fome culli of veal and ham to thicken it; take the pigeons, drain themy and put them into this ragout; let them juft fimmer in it, then take them up, put them into a diih, and pour the ragout oyer them.

Pigeons aux Poires.

CUT off their feet, ftufF them with good forcedmeat in the ihape of a pear, roll them in the yolk of an egg, then in crumbs of bread; put in a leg at the narrow end to make them Iciok like pears; rub a difli over with a piece of butter, lay them in the djfli (do not let tbem touch each other ) bake them: . hen- they are doae lay them in Mother difb and pour into it

fome

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 265

fome good grzvyj thickened with the yolk of an egg, or btttter rolled in fioTMr, but do not pour it over the pigeons.

Pigeons fourtout.

THEY (hould be large tame pigeons; a forced-meat ihould be made for them as follows:- Parbojl the livers, and bruife them fine, fome boiled ham beat fine in a mortar, fome muibrooiiis cut fmall, a little chopped parfley, a clove of garlic (hred fine, and two or three young onions minced, fine; mix all thefe together, with a little pepper and fait, and a fweetbread of veal parboiled and minced fine; fill the pigeons with thefe ingre dients, tie them clofe, cover each pigeon with forced-meat, tie them in a paper to keep it on; roaft them and while they are doing, heat fome effence of ham, pour it into a difh, and lay the pigeons upon it.

Pigeons in Frieandeau.,

WHEN they arc drawn, trufs them with their legs in their bodies, lard them with bacon, flit them, then fry them in butter of a fine brown; then put them into a ftew-pan, with a quart of good gravy, a little lemon-pickle, a little colour ing, a tea-fpoonful of walnut-catchup, fome chyan, and a little fait, with a few trufiles and morells, and fome yolks of harct eggs; lay the pigeons in the diib, pour the fauce with the ingredients over them.

Pigeons aux Gratin.

When they are picked, drawn, and wafhed, flit them down the back, and then ftufiF them; make a ftufiing as follows:-Cut the livers very fmall, young onions, mufhrooms, parfley, truf fles, morells, and fweet herbs, all cut fmall, fome bacon fcraped fine, with fome pepper, fait, and nutm; when they are fiuffed, lay in a difh fome flices of veal and ham, and the pigeons ipon them, then more flices of ham and veal upon the pigeons, but no more feafoning; cover them with another difl, much fmaller than that they are put in; take a wet napkin and put round the rim of the difl,to prevent the fteam evaporating; put it into a ftew-pan over a fmall ftove, and let it ftew very foftly till it is done: when it is taken up, put in a little wafrm eflTence of ham.

Pigeons a-laBraize.

TAKE fome large pigeons, pick, draw, and trufs them; then take a ftew-pan, and lay at the bottom fome thin flices k

bacoAt

266 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

bacon, veaU and onions; feafon the pigeons with pepper, fait, fome fpice beat fine, and feme fweet herbs, lay them into th ftew-pan, then lay upon them fome more flices of veal and bacon; let them ftew very gently over a ftove, the top of the ftew-pan put down very clofe; when they are ftewed, make a ragout with veal fweetbreads, truffles, morells, champignons j the fweetbreads muft be blanched, and put into a ftew-pan, with a ladle-full of gravy, a little cullis, the truffles, morells, &c. let them all ftew together with the pigeons; when they are enough, put them into a difli, and pour the ragout over them.

Pigeons a I ' Italienne.

TAKE fome young full-grown pigeons; when they are pickr cd, drawn, and trufled, fet on a gridiron over a charcoal fire, lay on the pigeons, turn them round two oi- three times, then take them off; they fhould not be on above'two minutes; then tie the legs to the bodies, that they may be round and tight; take a ftew-pan, lay all over the bottom anl fides of it, fome flices of veal, apd a little ham; ftiake over them a very little pepper and fait, put in fome blades of mace, and leaves of 3ail; then put in the pigeons, and ftrew over them fome poriander feeds, fome more pepper and fait, fome fli(:es of lemon and onion, a little grljck, a glafs of ftrong white-wine, nd half the quantity of oil; then lay over them fqme (lics of ham an veal 5 fet the pan over a "flow fire. While the pigeons are ftewing prepare an Italian ragout: -Cut fome muftirooms very fmall, and fome champignons; put fome oil into a ft:ew-pan, and ftir hefe in with it; add to them a little garlick, and fome efchaJot, fet them over the fire only one minute, then pour in fome veal gravy, a glafs of white-wine, and fome eflence of bam; let all thefe heat together 5 then put in a fliced lemon, ftir it about bat let it be hot through; fcum off the fat, then put the ragout into a ftew-pan well tinned; take the pigeons out of the pan they were ftewed in, and wipe them that they may be quite dry; then put them into the ragout, fet them over a gentle ftove to be made quite hot; put them into a difb, and fend them tq table.

Tohroil Pigeons a Pit aliens.

TAKE a couple of fine large tame pigeons, pick and draw them, mince the livers very fmail, and the livers of a couple of fowl with themj cut a large onion very fmall, a fpoohful'of chopt parfley, and more than an ounce of fcrapcd bconj mi's

m

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 27

pll tbefe together, and &ew them a little in afauce-pan, with a little veal-gravy; when they are half done, divide it, and put one half into the pigeons; put a gridiron over a flow fire, and lay on the pigeons, let them do very flowly; when they are near enough, put them clofer to the fire, to colour them. For fauce - put a little gravy into a fauce-pan, cut a clove of garr lie very fmall, and let it boil; theaput in a glafs of oil, and a fpoonful of lemon-juice; when it is hot, thicken it with a piece pf butter rolled in flower; when the pigeons are enough, lay them in the difh, and pour the fauce over them

Pigeons a-la-Tarfare, with cold Sauce.

SIN,GE the pigeons, and trufs them as for boiling, beat them quite flat with a cleaver, but their (kin muft not be broke on the back or breafl:; feafon them with pepper, fait, clovfes and mace, dip them in melted butter, then in grated bread; Jay them upon a gridiron and turn them often; if the fire is pot very clear, lay them upon a flieet of writing-paper iJutitered, to keep them from being fmoaked. For fauce - take a piece of onion or an efchalot, an anchovy, and two fpoonfuls of pickled cucumbers, capers, and muihrooms, mince thefe 'very fmall, each by itfelf; add a little fait, pepper, five or fix fpoonfuls of oil a fpoonful of water, the juice of a lemon; mix thefe well together, with a fpoonful of muftard; pour this fauce cold into the difh: when the pigeons are broiled, lay them upon it.

Pigeons baked.

SEASON them with pepper and fait, put a bit of butter into each, pour over them the following batter - three eggs, two fpoonfuls of flower, half a pint of milk, a little fait, Cold pigeons fried. See Chicken.

Pigeons with a ragout of oyfters. See Chicken, omitting ' the fluffing.J

, Pigeons' in Pimlico.

PARBOIL the livers, bruife them, with fome of the fat nd lean of ham or bacon, fome muflirooms, truffles, parfley, and fweet herbs, beaten mace, pepper, and fait; beat thefe all together very fine, and mix them with the yolks of eggs; ftuflT the pigeons, then roll them in a thin flice of veal, over that a thin flice of bacon j wrap them up in writing-paper, put them upon a fmall fpit and roaft them; make for them a ragout of truflies, mtwells, muflirooms, and parfley cut fmall; put them into a fauce- pi), with forpe rich vpal-gravy, and a piece of

butter

268 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

butter rolled in flower to thicken it; the pigeons will take near an hour's roafting, bafte them while they are doing; when they are enough, tiike them up and pour the ragout over them, leave feme of the forced-meat, mix k with fome milk or cream, and put it into little hollow bits of puff-pafte for patties; bake them, and laj them round the pigeons.

Pigeons in Dljuife.

DRAW and trufs them, feafon them with pepper and fait j make nice pufF-pafte, and roll each pigeon in a piece of it, tie them in a cloth, apd take care the pafte does not break; boil them ill a great deal of water; they will take an hour and a Half boiling; take great care, when they are untied, they do not break; put them into a diib, and pour a little good gravy to them.

. A Bifqite of Pigeons.

TAKE fome very ftrong gravy, fuch as is made for foup dq fame; put a good quantity of this over the fire, cutinto it the? crufts of two French rolls; let it boil together fome time, theft pour in a quart of rich veal-gravy, boil it all up together; when the bread 9 foft, pour it into a fieve, put under it a largO pan, rub the bread through the fieve with the back of a fpoon; boil eight fquab pigeons very tender; take alfo fifteen or twenty cocka-combs, blanch them in warm water, boil them with the pigeons in good broth; the cocks-combs muft boil half an hour longer than the pigeons while they are doing, blanch a fweetbread, and cut it into fmall pieces like dice; cut alfo a few very fmall cocks-combs, and fry them together in fome butter, let them be a fine brown, lay fome of the largeft cocks-combs round the rim of a large foup diili; warm the bread and gravy, pour it into the dth, lay in the pigeons,' let them be quite hot; lay the cock-combs and fweetbreads on the top. It is an ele-r gant diih.

A Pupton f Pigeons.

TAKE fome fquab pigeons, when they are picked and drawn, make a large quantity of good forced-'meat, roH a piece out flat, and la it in the bottom of a difli, but firft butter the difh well; cut thin flices of bacon and lay over the forced'meat; then put in the pigeons, let them lie clofe, but not one upon the other: upon the pigeons, and between them,' lay cocks-combs, palates botfed tender, a fweetbread parboiled and cut into pices, and over thefe ay fome tops of afparagus cut fmall, fome mufiirooms, and ibme yolks of eggs boiled hard; when the difli is iA roll out

another

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 269

ilnother piece of forced -meat, and cover it entirely; bake it wheiw it is done, turn it into another difli, and pour round it fome very rich gravy

Tdjug Pigeons

WHEN the pigeons are picked and drawn, let a little watef jufl: run through them; paAoil the livers, and bruife them vtrith the back of a fpoon.mix with them fome pepper, fait, grated nutmeg, lemon-peel, and parfley flired very nne; mi with them as much fuet as liver, cut very fmall, and the yolk? of two eggs boiled hard and cut very fine j mix thefe together with raw eggs, and ftuiF the pigeons, tie up the necks and vents; dip the pigeons in water, then feafon them with pepper and fait; lay them in, the jug, with two or three picdes of celery; flop them very clofe, that no fteam may come out; fet them in a kettle of cold water, lay a tile on the top of the jug, let it boil three hours take them out, put them into a difh; take out the celery, and put in a piece of butter rolled in flower, ihake it round till thick, and pour it over the pigeon?

Pigeons in Jelly.

THEY are done in the fame manner as chickens.

Poited Pigeons.

SEASON them very high with pepper and fait, put thendi into a pot with blotter in lumps, bake them; pour off the fat and gravy; when it is cold take the butter from the top, put more to it s clarify it, pouf it over the pigeons put fingly into a pot, with a little more feafoiiing. added to them.

Another viay

BONE the pigeons, turn them infide out, rub therh with little falt-petre; let them lie four days; feafon them very high with pepper and fait, a littlt pounded mace; turn them again pit them clofe into the pot, leaving a vacancy in the middle of the pot y bake them; pour off all the gravy, prefs the pigeons tight together, pour over clarified butter let them ftand in a cool place three or four days before they are wanted. Do feveral in a pot

0 fickle Pigeons.

BONE the pigeons, take the meat of fome of them, and ikin it, beat, it in a mortar, and add to it a little beaten mace, fome pepper, fait, thyme, and parfley cut fmall, fome long flips of fat bacon j roll ail thefe together, ftiiff fome of ttie

pigeons

iyb tH L.AdVs AsSlSfTANT.

pigeons which are boned with it; then take feme of the liVef bruife them with a fpoon, and feafon them with the fame fort of feafoning that was uftd before with, the raeaJt adding a Httl more thyme cutfmall; llufFfome of the pigeons with this, and jhe remainder with, pepper, fait, and parfley cut fmall, or oyfters, but they muft be parboijjpd firft; put on the fire in a fauce-pan liquor enough to cover the pigeons, made of white wine and water, an equal quanti, and one quarter of vinegar, with fonie whole pepper, mace, fait, and a little nutmeg i when thefe boil put in the pigeons, let them boil half an hour; then take them out, and let them lie till they are cold j if the liquor they were boiled in is not feafoned high enough, add to it fome more beaten pepper and vinegar j when it is cold put the vinegar into it; let them lie two or three days, and they will be fit for ufe,

Q U A I L S.

70 choofe ailsi

THE beft come from France and Germany, where they arcf fatted, and the fatteft are reckoned the beft

0 roaft ails.

TRUSS the quails, and make a ftufEng for them with beeffuet and fweet herbs chopped very fmall, feafoned with a little fpice; put them upon a fmall fpit, when they grow warm bafte them with water and fait, then drudge them and bafte them with butter For fauce - difFolve an anchovy in good gravy,with two or three efchalots cut very fine, and the juice of a Seville orange lay fome fried bread crumbs round the difh.

Another way.

HAVE ready a very clear fire; put round each quail a flice of bacon, and over that a vine-leaf j fpit them, and lay thenir down at a moderate diftance from the fire, for if they aretbo near, it fpoils them, and if they are kept too far off, they never have their right flavour. Sauce - the fanae as above-mentioned

0 roaft Fieldfares.

WHEN they are picked and drawn, lard them with baconsput a paper round them, and lay them at a diftance from the fire; when they are near done take off the paper, and let them bc.of a fine brown. Sauce - gravy or melted butter

PLOVERS.

THE Lady's assistant. i7i

PLOVERS.,

To cboofe Plovers.

WHEN new, they are limber-footed: when fat, they feel hard at th vent; when lean, they feel thin in the vent: when ilale, they are dxy-footed. Thefe birds will keep a long time fweeti-r-There are three forts of plovers, the grey, green, and baftard plover, or lapwing.

To boil Plovers.

BOIL them in good celery-fauce, white or brown: or they, ihay be roafted as any other fowl, with good gravy in thediih

The general way of drejfmg Plovers is as follows.

GREEN plovers roaft like a woodcock, without drawing; and the trail to run upon a toaft; - with good gfavy for fauce.

Grey plovers fhould beftewed. - Make a forced-meat with the yolks of two hard eggs bruifed, fomc marrow cut fine, artichoke bottoms cut fmall, and fweet herbs, feafoned with pepper, fait, and nutmeg: fluff the birds, then put them into a fauce-pan with fome good gravy (juft enough to cover them) a lafs of white wine, and a blade of mace; cover them clofe, and et them ftew very foftly till they are tender 5 then take up the plovers, lay them into a difh, keep them hot put a piece of butter rolled in dower to thicken the fauce; let it boil till fmooth; fqueeze into it a little lemon; fcum it clean, and pour it over them.

To drefs Ruffs and Reifs.

THEY come from Lincolnfhire, They may be fatted like chickens, with bread, milk, and fugar: they feed very faft, and will die with fat if not killed in time. Draw and trufs them crofs-leggcd like fnipes i roaft them. For fauce - good gravy thickened with butter, and a toaft under them.

• To- ftew Larks or any other fmall Birds.

T AlCE fome larks: when they are drawn, put them into a ftew-pan to fome melted butter or bacon, an onion ftuck with cloves, fome mufhrooms, and fome livers of fowls; tofs them all together, with, a little flower; moiften them with fomq gravy; and when a little wafted, beat an egg in a little cream or milk, with fome parfley cut fmall amongft it; pour it into a ftew-pan; ftir it rounds but do not let it boil; fqueeze a lemon into it.

f.

tyz THE LADVs ASSISTANT.

0 roaji Larks.

LET them be put upon a finall bird-fpit: they will fakd fifteen minutes: fry fome crumbs of bresid and ftrew HA Ovtt them. For fauce- plain butter in 4 boat.

'Larks a-la-Franpfie.

Truss them with the legs acrofs and put a fage-leaf ovef their breafts; put them upon a long thin (kewer betwten every lark put piece of thin bacon ) then tie the (kewer to a fpi't and roaft them at a briflc clear fire: bade them with butter, and ftrew over them fome crumbs of bread mixed with flower: fry fome .bread crumbs of a fine brown in butter; lay the larks ixiitid the diih the bread crumbs in the middle.

Larks barded .

WHEN the larks are truflTed, cut fome pieces of bacoH larger every way than a lark; fpit them lipoh a ikewr (as before direSled with one of thefe bards between Jvery one of them 3 when they are near done, throw over them fome bread crumbs and a little fait. For fauce - bread-fauce and plain butten

A Ragout ef Larks.

FRY them, with an, onion ftuck with cloves, a few truffles, and mufhrooms; pour oiF the fat; (hake over the larks, &c. a little flower; put to them ftnne good gravy; ftew them till Enough; if there is any fat, fcum it on: add chopped parfley lemon-juice, pepper and fait, if neceflary.

Larks MUX Poires.

HCK the larks, and trufs them as clofe as poffible; cut 6fit one leg feafon them with pepper and fait: Make a forced-meat as follows:Take a veal fweetbread as muck fuet, fome mufh rooms, and fome morells, a little lemon-peel, aiid fome fwet Jierbs; chop them very fine; mix them with the yolk of an egg; wrap every lark in fome of this forced-meat, and ihape it like a pear, leaving the leg for the ftalk; wafh them over with the yolk of an egg, and ftrew over them crumbs of bread; bake them in a gentle oven of a fine brown, and ferve tbem without fauce.

Larks in Jelly.

PUT feveral into the jelly in What manner is agreeable,

The French cooks brought in the term barded j they call a thin flat ilicc ot bacon fit to wrap round any things a bard of bacon

9 taking

rME LADY'S ASSISTANT. 273

tricing care they liefeparate. Any fmall birds may be done this way.

• 0 roaft Ortoians.

LET them be picked and finged, but not drawn, put them upon fkewers with bacon round them; tie them to the fpit: when they are enough, ftrew oyer them grated breads

Another way.

' SOME fpit them fide-ways, with a bay-leaf between, and ly fried crumbs of bread tound the diih

J'o pot Moor-game.

SEASON them with pepper, falt and pounded cloves rubbing it thoroughly in the infide; roaft them quite enough: when cold put them into potting potsj ftrewing over more feafoning; pour on clarified butter $ leave the heads out.

EGGS.

To drefs Eggs &c.

N a commbn way, boil them - Or poach them, and fervO them on a buttered toaft, or on ftewed fpinach or foitel.

Or J with Sdufages.

PKY fome fauftges, and after them a flice of bread; lay the Aufages on it, with a poached egg between each link: if the toaft is too ftrong fried, butter it a little.

Or J with Artichoke Bottoms.

BQIL the bottoms; lay a hard yolk of egg in each bottom melted butter poured ovir.

Buttered Eggs.

TAKE yolks and whites, fet them over the fire with a bit of butter, a little pepper and fait j..ftir them a minute or two j when they grow thickilh, and a littje turned la (mall lumps, pour them ott a buttered toaft

A Fricajfee of Eggs.

BOIL them pretty hard, flice themj take a little veal -gravy,

T little

i

r

274 THE LAtyTs ASStStANt.

a little cram and flower, a bit of butter, nutfneg, fait, peppef) chopped pariley, and a few pickled mufhrooms; boil this,up; pour it over the eggs a hard yolk laid in tke middle of the diih s toafted fippets.

, ji Ragout of Eggs.

BOIL ten or twelve eggs hard 5 put them into Cold watef let them lie a little, they peel the better; ihell them carefully ct the whites length-ways with a fmall knife, fo that they may be neatly halved, the yolks left whole; cut a few trufflea and morells in pieces, boil them in a few fpoonfuls of water take a little of this liquor, fome gravy, chopped parfley, pepper, falt and nutmeg, a little catchup, a few fmall pickled mufhrooms i thicken the fauce with a little flower; boil it up with the chopped truffles and morells; fill the whiter of the eggs with crumbs of bread erifped, heap them high; lay the yolks between, pour over the fauce. If there is no gravy they will do without.

Eggs fried.

BOIL fome eggs hard, flice them, frjr-them quick iii butter) take •them out with a flice, lay them before the fire; pour the fat out of the pan, Ihake in fome flower, young onions, or cfchalot chopped, a little beef-brothj pepper, fait, grated nutmeg, and a little lemon-peel; boil this up; if not thick enough fax in a bit of butter- mixed with flower; pour the fauce over the eggs.

Eggs iviib Cucumbers.

. PEEL fome cucumoers; cut them in half, take out the feeds, flice them and fome onion fteep them in fait and vinegar an hour, dry and fry them; when a little brown flower thegi; put to them fome good gravy, let them ftew; the fauce muft not be thin; if not tart enough, add a little lemon-juice, and pepper and fait, if wanted; poaclv or fry fome eggs, then cut the whites neatly round, ferve them on the cucumbers.

N. B. Eggs may be ferved in the fame manner, with ftewed celery, peafe, lettuce, afparagus, endive or any other roots or with a ragout of mufhrooms

j Fricaffee of Eggs, with Onions and Mufhrooms.

BOIL them hard; take the yolks out whole, cut the whites in flips, and fome onion and mufhrooms, fry the onion and

mu&rooms threw in th whites tura them about a little if

any

fHE lady's assistant. 27$

zhy fat pour it ofF; flower the onion, &c put to it a littld good gravy, boil this up; add pepper and fait, and the yolks.

Eggs a-la-Tripe.

TAKE eight eggs, boil them hard, dip them in cold watfr, and take off the fhells; cut them into four quarters; put a little butter into a ftew-pan, let it melt, fliake in a little flower; H;ftir it with a fpoon, then put in the eggs, throw a little grated nutmeg- all over, a little fuetj a great deal of parfley cut fmall fiiake the pan rounds pour in a little cream turn the pan round carefully that the eggs do not break. When the fauce is thick and fine, take up the eggs, and pour the fauce all over them

Eggs 'la-Mode de Portugal

TAKE a couple of large lemons, ftraih the juice through iieve into an earthen pipkin, add to this a tea-fpoonful of baf ket-falt, and two ounces of very fine fugar; fet it over the fire, and when it boils break into it four eggs; ftir them with a filver fpoon till they will not ftick to the fauce-pan, which is a fign that they are enough; pour them into a foup-plate and ftrew over them a little very fine fugar; heat a falamander redhot and hold over them which ivyill glofs them and they will look well.

0 force Eggs.

TAKE two cabbage-lettuces, fc5d them in water With a few muflirooms, parfley, forrel, and chervil, then chop them very fmall, with the yolks of hard eggs j feafon them with fait and nutmeg, then Hew them in butter: when they are enough, put in a little cream, and pour them into the bottom of a difh: take the whites and chop them very fine with nutmeg, fait, find parfley lay this round the difh, and a hot falamander over thediih.

Lettuce and Eggs.

TAKE two Cabbage-lettuces and fcald them, flice them, and tofs them in a fauce-pan with a piece of butter, feafon thent with pepper, fait, and a little nutmeg; let them ftew half an hour, chop them well together: when they are enough, lay them in the difh Fry fome eggs nicely in butter, and lay upon them.

To make Egg Balls.

TAKE a large, deep frying-pan, put into it three pints of clarified butter, make it boiling hot, flir it with a flick till it runs round very quick then break an egg into the middle of

T 2 it.

276 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

it, and turn it round with a ftick, till it is as bard as a poached egg; the whirling round of the butter will make it as round as a bah; then take it up with a flice, and put it on a difh before the fire; they will keep hot half an hour, and yet be foft: as many may be done as are wanted, in the fame manner. They are very good with ftewed fpinach, or any thing elfe.

TV make a Bijh of Whites of Eggs. y

TAKE the whites of twelve eggs, beat them up with four fpoonfuls of rofe-water, fome grated lemon-peel, and a little nutmeg; fweeten them with fugar, mix them well, boil them in four bladders; tie them in the fhape of an egg, and boil them hard, they will take half an hour; lay them in a difh; when cold, mix half a pint of thick cream, a gill of mountain, and the juice of half an orange all together i fweeten it with fine fugar, and pour it over the eggs.

Eggs with Gravy.

POACH fome eggs in water, with a little vinegar in it; cut the whites round neatly; lay the eggs in a difh; pour into the difh fome clear relifhing gravy.

Eggs bajhed.

BOIL eggs hard, flice them; fry an onion fliced in butter j put in the eggs,. a little good gravy, chopped parfley, pepper, and fait: ferve them hot.

An AmUt.

BEAT fix eggs with a little flower; put a quarter of a pound of butter into a frying-pan; when the butter is hot, pouf in the eggs; flrew on parfley and chives chopped, pepper, fait, and nutmeg; fry it brown on the under fide; do not turn ity but brown the upper fide with a falamander.

An Amtet of Afparagus.

BEAT fix or eight eggs with fome cream, cut the green heads of afparagus about the fize of peafe,- firfl boiled; mix them with the eggs, fome pepper and fait; fry this in batter, either the fize of the pan, or the fize of fritters

EsZ with Oranse Juice.

( SQUEEZE the juice of a couple of large Seville oranges, flraiii it through a fieve, and mix it with as much Water, and a fpoonful of white wine; break eight eggs, beat up the yolks . and

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 27

and whites together, with a little bafket-falt, and fiir in by degrees the juice and water; fet on a ftew-pari with feme rich mutton gravy, pour in the eggs, and keep ftirring it well together, that it may not thicken at the bottom or fides of the pan: when they are done, put them into a fmall diih.

0 pickle Eggs.

BOIL the eggs very hard; peel them, and put them into f:old water, (hifting them till they are cold. Make a pickle of white-wine vinegar, a blade of mace, a bunch of fweet herbs, and a little whole pepper; take the eggs out of the water, and put them immediately into the (pickle, which muft be, hot; ftir them a good while, that they may look all alike; untie the herbs, and fpread them over the top of the pot, but cover them with nothing elfe till they ar turned brown: they will be fit to eat in nine or ten days.

ruife fome cochineal; tie it up in a rag; dip it in the vinegar, and fqueeze it gently over the egg, and then let the rag lie in the pickle This is a great addition. '

RABBITS.

0 choofe Rabbits

THE rules are the fame for choofing Rabbits as Hares.

0 boil Rabbits.

BEFORE they arc boiled, hold the heads for few minutes in a fauce-pan of water that is boiling, which will pre-: vent the difagreeable appearance they otherwife have qn cutting up; then boil them half an hour or thereabouts, according to their fize. - Onion fauce, or parfley and butter, the liver inred and mixed with it.

21 roajl Rabbits.

' THEY will take twenty minutes or half an hour, according to the fize; hold the heads for a few minutes in boiling water before they are laid down. For fauce- parfley and butter, with the liver parboiled and fhred: but they are beft fluffed with chopped fuet, the liver parboiled and bruifed, bread crumbs, grated bread, and a little lemon-peel, chopped parfley and

T 3 fwee(

ayg THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

fweet herbs, yolk of egg mi?ced, pepper, fak, and fiutniieg gravy in the difh. ' '

Rahbits collared itb Afpic Sauce.

BONE two or four fmall rabbits, leaving the head? entire; make a forc-nreat with bits of the rabbits that come from the bones, &c. a little efchalot, a bit of butter, a little fcraped bacon, pepper, fait, parfley chopped, grated lemon-peel, the crumb of a French roll, a little cream, yolks of eggs, nutmeg; lay this over the rabbits, roll them up to the head, fkewer them, take care to keep in the forced-meat at the ends; lay a flice or two of beef at the bottom of a veffel of a proper fize; put in the rabbits, lay over them fome thin flices of bacon, not too fat, a bit of veal, the rabbit bones, an onion ftuck with cloves, carrot, a flice of lepion, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome whole pepper, a glafs of Madeira, fome warm water; (lew them gently in this n hour and a half; take them up, ftrain and fcum the fauce; take a fufficient quantity of it, and if there is;ny cullis, add a ladlefull; efchalot, taragon pimpernel, a ver little thyme and marjoram, a little parfley, a few frefh or pickled mulhrooms, all chopped, the herbs fine; fait, chyan: wipe the rabbits clean; pour" the fauce over them, with what orange or lemon-juice is agreeable,

Rabbits fricaflTeed white. See Chicken, pinttting the pickled mulhrooms.

Rabbits fricaflTeed brown See Chicken.

Rabbits pulled.

HALF boil them, with an onion, little whole pepper, bunch of fweet-herbs, a piece of lemon-peel pull the flefh into flakes; put to it a little of the liquor, a piece of butter mixed with flower, pepper, fait, nutmeg, chopped parfley, the liver boiled d bruifed; boil this up, fhaking it round.

PortUguefe Rabbits.

TAKE a couple of rabbits, cut off their heads, turn the backs upwards, the two legs ftripped to the end, and truifed ivith two fliewers like chickens, the wings turned like the pinions of a chicken; lard and roaft them with good gravy: if they are boiled, they fhould not be larded, but fent to tld)le witb bacpn or greens, or celery fauce.

jRahbits

THE LADYs ASSISTANT; 279

Rabbits In Cajferole.

TAKE a couple of rabbits, divide them ihto quarters, flower them if they are not larded, and fry them in butter; then put them into a ftew-pan, with fome good gravy, a glafs of white wine; feafon them with pepper and fait, a bunch of fweet herbs; cover them down clofe, and let them ftew till tender, then take up the rabbits; ftrain oflF thi fauc?, thicen it with butter nd llower, and pour it over them.

Rabbits Surprizi.

TAKE two young rabbits and roaft them, cut their heads oiF very glofe to the fhoulders $ take ofF all the meat from the back, cut it into fmall pieces; take fome milk thickened with a piece of butter rolled in flower, a little nutmeg,, and fome fait i put in the rabbits, and let them ftew fix or eight minutes, till the fauce is as thick cream; make a forced-meat with a pound of veal, as much fuet, an equal quantity of bread-crumbs, two anchovies, fome grated lemon-peel, a little thyihe, and a grated nutmeg; let the veal and fuet be firft chopped, and then beat in a mortar, then let it all be mixed together, with the yolks of two eggs; place it round the rabbits, leaving each fide of the back-bone open, to put the meat in which was cut ofF; lay in the meat, and fmooth it over with a raw egg; make it fquare at both ends, and butter a difli or a mazarine, andput them upon it carefully; bake them three hours, let them be of a fine brown J put them into a difli, and pour over them gravy thicklened with butter; fqueeze in the juice of a lemon.

OLIOS.

OLIOS were an invention of the Spaniards, and their receipts for them are far better than thofc of the French: and this which follows is the beft of them.

Spanijh Olio.

TAKE fome griftles from a breaft of veal, from a brifket of beef, and from a breaft of mutton; fome fheep's rumps cut in pieces; they muft all be about the bignefs of a finger j take alfo five pounds of beef fteaks, and put them into a ftewingpot, with a quantity of ftrong beef-broth, a bUAch of leeks, a

T 4 large

286 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

large bunch of celery picked very clean: they muft ftew till the rumps and griAleSi are tender; then put in two pigeons a brace of partridges, two pair of hog's feet and ears, the knuckle end of a harii, half of a fine white-cabbage, fome pepper, fait) bunch of fweet bafil, a couple of onions, and fome cloves; cover thefe over with fome beef fteaks cutthick, and over them fome veal cut into fteaks; pour a little frelh broth tiport them, and leave them to ftew oyer a gentle fire: let tle whole ftew till the liquor is evaporated, arid the ingredients begin to ftick at the bottom, then put in fome more broth: vrhiie thefe are ftewing, fet qn fome large peafe, that have been foaking for four-and- twenty hours in water; fet thefe on to boil in fome gravy. The Spaniards ufe a particular fort of peafe, called Garavances; they are large and not unlike our gteypjeafe: but if thefe are not to be had, any large peafe will do: thefe muft be boiled very tendeii and be ready when the olio is. As the broth boils away, put in fome more, which muft: boil a quarter of an hour feafon the olio to the palate with pepper and ialt; have ready a large foup-difli, take out the ingredients one by one, lay them in the difti; the griftles and the roots muft be difperfed in different parts among' the other things; then pour over them the peafe and their gravy, and then put in a proper quantity of the gravy. It is not to be eat as a foup, but as olio; the ingredients to be eaten in preference to the liquor. 1 hofe that like the foup may hve it iii a bafon yrith toafted brdad.

ji French Olio.

Take five pounds of fteaks, cut very thick, from the leg of mutton, piece of beef put them fntp a deep ftew-pan;;• add to them five pounds of veal (any part will do) and a leg of inutton of fix or feven pounds, it muft be ikinned and the fat taken off; cover it down very clofe, and fet it over a ftove with a moderate fire, let it ftand till the gravy begins to run; ftir up . the fire, and let it ftand till the meat begins to ftick to the pan, tilt not longer, as it muft not be too brown; pour a little beef gravy intp it and ftir it about; when it is all wellmixed, put it into a pot, fet it upon the fire, covered very clofe, but put in as much gravy as will fill the pot; then take a, dozen carrots, nine parfnips, eight onions, and half a dozen turnips; put thefe into the pot, with a bpnch of leeks, a bundle of celery, and a haidful of mignonette; let thefe boil well together, and fhen put in a fowl, a turkey, and a brace of pigeons; add two

pounds

THE JADY's ASSISTANT. 281

pounds of ham, cut in thick flices; keep it boiling, and as the fcum rifes, . take it off very clean: while tbefe are doing, take four French rolls rafped, pare off the crufts, and put theoi into a ftew:pan with a little of the olio liquor; when they are foft, put them into a tureen or a very deep foup-difh; pour in the broth; let there be fome celery and fome of the other root put in, with fome of the beft pieces of the meat, and the pigeons put in whole. This is the plain French olio; but they often put in partridges to ftew in the gl-avy, and fometimes they half-roaft them before they put them ih

0 make a Pepper Pot.

TO three quarts of wate put a fmall cabbage, two large handfuls of fpinach, a head of lettuce, two or three onions, and a little thyme; cut them very fmall, and let them ftew with two pounds of mutton, till they are quite tender; boil with them fome little dumplings made of flower and water, and a piece of pork a little falted: half an hour before it is taken up, put in a lobfter or -crab, picked very fmall, and clean from the iheil, with a little fait and chyan pepper.

G A ME.

VENISON.

CHOOSE venifon by the fat: if the fat is clear, bright and thick, the clefts clofe and fmooth, it is young j but a very wide tough cleft Ihews it is old.

If venifon has been kept fome time, it will firft change at the haunches and fhoulders: run in a knife, and as the fmell is fweet or rank, it is new or ftale; if tainted, it will look greenifh, or inclining to be very black.

he Fore garter

CONTAINS the neck, breaft, and fhoulders,

Th(i Hind ter

CONTAINS the haunch, which is the leg and part of the loin cut together,

The

2£i THE LADrs ASSISTANT,

The Entrails AR£ Cfilled the utnbles, which are generally made into a pie.

fo boil a Haunch or Neck of Venifon.

RUB it with fait, and let it lie four or five days j flower, and boil it in a cloth: to every pound of venifon allow a quarter of an hour. For fauce- boil fome colliflowers in milk and water, fome turnips, young cabbages, and beetrooft Lay the venifon in wddle and the vegetables round.

To roaft Venifon.

WHEN it is fpitted, put; over it a flieet of paper, theft a pafte pf flower and water, over that a flieet of thick paper well tied on: a haunch, if it be large, will take four hours; a neck and flioulder about two hours and a half, according to the fize: juft before it is fent to table, tke off- the papers and pafte; flower, and bifle it with butter. For fauce - gravy and fweet fauce in feparate boatsTi

To drefs a Breaft of Venifon.

ROAST it or fry it j put fome gravy into a ftew-pan, with a little flower, red wine, and currant-jelly, a litt lemonjuice; boil thefe together; put in the venifon, juf( let it heat without boiling. ' ' ' .

To fiew Venifon.

TAKE a pint of good gravy, as much red wine, a large fpoonful of currant jelly; cut the venifon into flices, and flower it; put it with the ingredients into a ftew-pan, let it fimmer till tender; take up the venifon; thicken the fauce with a piece of butter rolled in flower, and pour oyer the meat.

To fry Venifon.

IF it is the neck or breaft, bone it; if the fboulder, the meat muft be cut off the bone in flices: make. fome gravy with the bones; then take the meat and fry it of a light-brown, take it up and kep it hot before the firej put feme flower, to the butter in the pan, and keep ftirring it till it is quite thick and brown; take care it does not burn; ftir in half a pound of jGne fugar beat to a powder, put in the gravy that came from the bones, and fome red wine; make it the thicknefs of a fine cream, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon; warm the venifoa 'in it put it in the difh and pour the fauce over it

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT- a8

0 pot Venifon.

POUR red wine over the venifon, and piit about a pound pi butter at top; put a pafte over the pan, bake it well, take it clean from jthe gravy, beat it with the butter that rifes to the top, and more if necefiary, pepper, fait, and pounded mace; po( it, fet it into the oven for a few minutes; pour over clarified J)utter. '

0 drefs the Umhles of Beer.

TAKE the kidneys of a deer, with the fat of the heart; feafon them with a littl pepper, fait, and nutmeg; firft fry fhem, and then ft?w them in fome good gravy, till they are tender; fqueeze in a little lemon: ake the &irts and fluff them with a forced-meat made with the fat of the venifon, fome fat of bacon, grated bread, pepper, mace, fagc and onion chopt yery fmall; mix it with the yolk of an egg; when the Ikirts are fluffed with this forced-meat, tie them to the fpltto roafl: but firft lard them with thyme and lemon-peel: when they are done, lay the fkirts in the middle of the difli, the fricaffee round it.

HARE AND LEVERET.

IN the choice of a hare, both the age and freflinefs arc to be confidertd; if the claws are blunt and rugged, the cars dry and tough and the cleft wide and la;ge9 it is old; if on the (Contrary the claws are fmooth and fliarp, the ears tear eafily, gnd the cleft in the lip not much fprcad, it is young. If frefli and newly killed, the body will be fliff, and the flefli pale; if the flefb is turning black, and the body limber, it is not new.

But a hare is never bad till it fmells

To know a real leveret: there fliould be a knob, or fmall Jfotit near thp foot, on its fore-leg; it not, it mufl be a hare,

To roaft a Hare.

STUFF it with a pudding made of bread crumbs, chopped fuet, the liver parboiled and bruifed, lemon-peel grated, flired parfley, and fweet herbs, pepper, fait, nutmeg, the yolks of two eggs; few up the hare; put a quart of fmall beer into the dripping-pan, or three pints, according to the fize of the hare; bafte it with this till the whole is ufed, then flower the hare and bafte it with butter; fend it to table with a fine froth. I have tried all the different things recommended to bafte a hare vUb 9nd never found any thing fo good as fmall beer, A fmall

hare

284 THE LADY'fi' ASSISTANT:

hare will take an hour and a half, a large hare two hours For fauce- gravy, melted butter, and fweet fauce.

To drefs a Hare.

• WHEN the hare is cafed, cut it in two juft below the ribs; cut the fore-quarters into pieces, and put them into a clean ftewpan, wkh a blade or two of mace, an onion ft uck with cloves, ibmc whole pepper, an anchovy, and a bunch of fweet herbs; cover them with water, and let them ftew gently; make a pudding, and put into the belly of the other part; lard and roaft it, flower and bafte it well with butter, or fmall beer f when the ftew is tender, take it out with a fork into a difb, and ftrain off the liquor j t into it a glafs of red wine, a fpoonful of good catchup, and a piece of butter rolled in flower; fliake all together over the fire till it is of a good thicknefs: take up the roaft hare, and lay it in the middle of the di(b, with the ftew round, and fauce poured over it - Some good gravy in a boat.

Another way to drefs a Hare.

STUFF the hare, lard it, and trufs it as for roafting; put it into a fi(h-kettle, and put in two quarts 6f ftrong beef-gravy, one of red wine, a lemon cut in flices, a bunch of fweet herbs, a nutmeg, fome pepper, a little fait, and a few cloves; cover it very clofe, and let it fimmer over a flow fire till it is three parts done; then take it up and put it into a difli, and ftrew it over with crumbs of bread, a few fweet herbs chopped fine, fome grated lemon-peel, and half a nutmeg 5 fet it before the fire, and bafte it till it is of a fine light brown: while the hare is doing, fcum the gravy, thicken it with the yolk of an tggy and a piece of butter rolled in flower: when the hare is enoughj put it into the difti, the reft in a boat.

Hare hajhed.

CUT it into fmall pieces: if any of the pudding is left, rub it fmall in fome gravy; to which put a glafs of red wine, a little pepper and fait, an onion, a flice of lemon i tofs it up till hot through take out the onion and lemon.

Hare Jlewed.

CUT oflT the legs and flioulders, cut out the back-bone; cut the meat which comes off the fides into pieces; put all into a veflel, with three quarters of a pint of fmall beer, the fame of water, a large onion ftuck with cloves, fome whole pepper, a flice

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 285

a (lice of lemon, fome fait; ftew this gently for an hour, clofe covered; then put to it a quart of good gravy; flew it gently two hours longer, or till tender; take out the hare, rub half a fpooriful of flower fmooth in a little gravy; put it to the'fauce, boil it up; add chyan and fait, if neceflary j put in the hare: when hot through, ferve it In a tureen diih. It is an exceeding good difli.

Hare jugged.

CUT it and put it into a jug, with the fame ingredients as Before, (but neither water nor beer) cover it clofe; fet it into a kettle of boiling water, which keep boiling three hours, or till the hare Is tender; then pour the gravy into a ftew-pan, put to it a glafs of red wine, and more gravy, if there is not fufiicient, a little chyan; thicken with fome flower; boil it iip, pour

it over the hare; a little lemon-juice.

, • • •

Hare jugged another way.

, JOINT and cut it into pieces; take the liver, fcald, and.

bruifeit with the back of a fpoon, mix it with a little beatert mace, grated lemon-peel, pepper, fait, thyme, and parfley Ihred fmall, and a whole onion with a clove or two ftuck in it; lay the head and neck at the bottom of a jar or jug, lay on it fome feafoning, a very thin flicc of fat bacon, then fomel hare, feafoning, and bacon till all is put in; fl:op the jugvery clofe with a cork, to prevent any water from getting in, or the fteam from evaporating; fet it in a pot of water; let it boil three hours, or till the hare is tender; then have ready fome ftrong beef-gravy boiling, and pour it into the jug, till the hard is more than covered; hake it round, and pour it into the difh; take out the onidn. Have fdme gravy id th6 diih, if there jQiould not be enough.

Some Jard the pieces of hare, and leave out the flices of bacon.

!to drefs a Hare the Swifs way.

TAKE a hare, cut it in quarters, and lird tberii, ftrew over them fome pepper, fait, and beaten cloves; put them mto a ftew-pan, with beef-broth enough to cover them; fet the ftew-pan over a very gentle fire, covered down very clofe, and let them ftew till they are three parts done; then pour in a bottle of red port; fet Jt On again till it is enough: when the hare is near done, make the following fauce - Parboil the liver, and then bruife it with the back of a fpoon; put this with what blood could b'faved from the hare, into a fauce-pan, with half a

fpoonful

i6 fHM LaP"s AssiSTAijf;

fpoonful of vinegar; fet it upon the fire; and while it is heii ingy chop a fpoonful of capers, and the meat of a dozen olives mix thefe together with the ingredients in the fauce-pan; makei them quite hot.

Take out the hare lay the pieces in at diih, and pour the £iuce over them.

To pot d Hare.

LET It hang for fottie days; cut it into pieces, bake it, witH

• i little beer at the bottom of the pan fome butter, on the top 5 pick it from the bones and finews, beat it with the butter froiri the top of the gravy,, adding enough to make it very mellow, feltj pepper, and pounded cloves; put it into pots, fet it a few minutes into a flack oven; pour over clarified butter,

Hare-Cake in Jelly.

BONE the hare pick out the finews, add an equal quantity? of beef J chop thefe and pound them j add frefh mufhrooms, efchalot, (and garlick, if agreeable) fweet herbs, pepper, and fait, two or three eggs 5 mix thefe with bacon and pickled cucumbers cut like dice, put it into a mould iheeted with fliced of bacon; cover it, bake it in a moderate oven j when cold, turn it out: lay over it the following jelly:- a pound and aL half of fcrag of veal, a flice of ham, two or three cloves, a little nutmeg,, fome fweet herbs, a carrot or two, fome efcha • lot, two bay-leaves," an ounCe of ifinglafs, with fome beefbroth; ftew this till it will jelly; pafs it through a fiaie ficve then through a bag; add fome lemon-juice.

PARTRIDGES.

To choofe Partridges.

THEY are in feafon in autumn. If young, the bill Is of i, dark colour, and the legs yellowilE; if rfew, the vent will be firm; if they are old, the bill will be white, and the legs blue; if ftale, the vent will look greenish, and the fkin will peel whea touched with the hand

To boil Partridges.

LET them be covered with water: fifteen minutes will boil them. For feuce - celery fauce, liver fauce, muflxroom fauce or onion fauce.

Partridges Jlewed.

STUFF the craws with bread crumbs, a bit of butter, lesoon-peel grated, efchalot chppped, parfley, pepper, fait, nutmeg.

THE LADrs ASSISTANT. aSr

iffieg, yolk of egg; rub the infide with pepper and fait; half roaft them; ftew them with cullis, or rich gravy, and a little Madeira, an onion, a piece of lemon-peel, favoury, fptce, if neceiTary, for about half an hour: take out the onion and leinon-peel; thicken with a little flower; add chyan, catchup, &c. if neceflary i boil it up. Garnifh with hard yolks of eggs add artichoke-bottoms boiled and quartered.

Partridge with afpic fauce See Chickens.

Partridge a-la-Braize. See Chickens.

Partridge to roaji.

IT will be done in lefs than half an hour For fiice gravy and bread fauce. '

Partridges in Panes,

TWO or three roafted partridges; if under-done, the better; mix them with the crumb of a penny loaf, or more, foaked well with hot gravy, half a pound Of fat bacon fcraped, two artichokes, and a few truffles and morells boiled and chopped, yolks of eggs, pepper, fait, nutmeg, and grated lemon-peel % put this into moulds ia the fhape of an egg, fheeted with thin ilices of fat bacon. Serve them with jelly between and ovet them.

Partridges d-la-Paifanne.

WHEN they are picked and drawn, trufs the partridges, and put them upon an iron fkewer; tie them to the fpit, lay them down to roaft; put a piece of fat bacon upon a toafting-fork aind hold it over the partridges that as it melts it may dropupon them as they roaft: when they are well bafted with this,, duft over them fome crumbs of bread, and fbme fait; cut fome efchalots very fine, with a little gravy, fait, and pepper, and the juice of half a lemon; mix all thefe together over the fire and thicken them up; pour them into a difh, and lay the partridges upon them.

Partridges a-la-Polonefe.

TAKE a brace of partridges; when they are picked and drawn, put a piece of butter into their bellies, put them on the fpit, and then cover Jthem with ilices of bacon, over that with paper, and then lay them down to a moderate fire: while they are roafting, cut fome efchalots very fmall, and as much parfley; mix thefe together, and add fome thin flices of ginger,, with fome pepper and falt take a piece of butter and work them

5 "P

288 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

up into ftiff pafie: when the partridges are near enough, take them up, gently, raifc up the wings and legs; under each wing and leg put a piece of the piafte, then hold them tight together, and fqueeze over them a fmall quantity of orange-juice and a good deal of zeft from the peel. Send them up hot, with, fome good gravy in a faute-boat.

Partridges d-la-RuJe.

TAKE fome young partridges; when they are picked and drawn, cut them into quarters, and put them into fome white wine; then fet on a ftew-pan with melted bacon over a briik fire; throw in the partridges, turn them two or three times $ then pour in a glafs of brandy, and fet them over a flow fire; when they have ftewed fome time, put in a few muflirooms cut in liices, and fome good gravy; let them fimmer brifkly, and take up the fat as it rifes: when they are done, put in a piec of butter rolled in flower, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon.

Partridges rolled.

TAKE young partridges, and lard them with ham and bacon; ftrew over them fome pepper and fait, with fome beaten mace, fome ihred lemon-peel, and fweet herbs cut fmall; then take fome thin beef-flieaks, (there mufl: be no holes in them) ftrew over thefe fome of the feafoning, and then fqueeze on them fome lemon-juice; lay a partridge upon each fieak, and roll it up, tie it round to keep it together, and pepper the outfide. Set on a ftew-pan with, fome flices of bacon, and ah onion cut into pieces; lay the partridges carefully in, put to them fome rich gravy, and let them ftew gently till they are done; then take th6 partridges out of the beef, lay then in difh add pour over theni fome rich eflence of ham.

PHEASANTS,

-I •

71(7 choofe Pheafants.

THEY are of the Engliflh cock nd hen kind, very beautiful, and of a fine flavour i the hen is much valued when with egg i the cock has fpurs, the hen has not: if the cock pheafant is young, the fpurs ibould be fhort and blunt, or round; if they are long and fharp, he is old. Examitie the ben at the vent; if that is open and green, it is a fign (he is ftale; if ihe is with cgg it will be foft; if they are ftale, and ate tubbed hard with the finger, the fkin will peel.

THE LADVs ASSISTANT. i9g

To boil Pbeafants.

fiOIL them in a great deal of water: if large, three quarters 0f an hour will boil them; if fnrall, half an hour. For fauce'white celery ftewed and thickened with cream a bit of butter rolled in flower; lay the pheafants in the difliy and pour the fauce over them.

To Jiew Pheafants.

STEW them in a ftVong veal-gravy (the gravy muft more than cover them 5) while they are doing, (which muflf be very gently) takl fome artichoke -bottoms parboiled and cut into pieces, fome roafled chefnuts blanched and cut into four, a little mace beat fine, fome pepper, fait, and a little white wine ! when the gravy is half-wafled, fcum it very clean and put in the ingredients; if it is not thick enough put into it a piece of butter rolled in flower; let itboil; ifuthere is any fcum, take it ofF: lay the pheafants in the difly, and pour the fauce over them.

Pheafants i ritaltennt.

TAKE the livers and cut them fmall: if only one pheafant is to be drefledy take but half a dozen oy iters, parboil them, and put them into a flew-pan, with the liver, a piece of butter, fome green onions and fome parlley, pepper, and fait, fome fweet herbs, and a little all-fpice; let them ftand a very little time over the fire, and ftufF the pheafants with them; then put it into a flew-pan, with fome oil, green onions, parflcy, fweetbafil, and lemon-juice, for a few minutes; take them off, cover the pheafant with flices of bacon, and put it upon a fpit i tie fome paper round it while it is rooiling. Take fome oyfters, flew them a little in their own liq'ubr; take a ftew-pan, put into it the yolks of four eggs, half a lemon cut into fmall dice, a little beaten pepper, a little fcra7ed nutmeg, a little parfley cut fmall, a rocombole, an anchovy cut fmall, a little oil, a fmall glafs of white wine, a piece of butter, and a little ham cullis; put the fauce over the fire to thicken, take care it does not burn; put in the oyflers, and make the fauce relifiiing: when the pheafant is done, lay it in the diib, and pour the fauce over it.

Pheafant a4a-'Brai%e

TAKE a flew-pan, put a layer of beef at the bottom, thett the fame of veal, a thin flice of bacon, a little bit of carroU an onion ftuck with cloves, a bunch of fwcet herbs, fome

U black

''

2$o THE LAbY's ASSISTANT.

black and white pepper, and a little beaten mace; then put in the pheafant, lay over it a layer of veal, and the fame of beef to cover it; fet it upon the fire five or fix minutes; then pour in two quarts cf boiling water; cover it down very clofe, and put a damp cloth round the outfide of the cover, to prevent the fteam evaporating: it will take an hour and a half, as it rouft ftew very gently: then ' take up the pheafant, and keep it hot; let the gravy ftew titi there is about a pint; firain it ofF, and pu it into a fauce-pan, with a fwectbread, which muft have been ftewed with the pheafant, fome truffles and morelis, fome liver of fowls, artichoke- bottoms, and afparagus-tops: let thefe firnmer together in the gravy, then add two fpoonfuls of catchup, two of red wine, and a little piece of butter rolled in flower; let them ftew five or fix minutes: lay the pheafant in the difti, pour the ragout over it and lay round the difli a few forced-meat balls;

A .A. A A .iti. M. A • ?. . A A -.

SPICES.

Giffger.

GINGER is a root which grows in the Eaft-Tndies, and in many parts of America; the plant which fprihgs from it has leaves like flags; it bears fmal flowers. The beft comes from Calcutta, but very good from many other places. It is dug up in Auttimn, then Waflied, and fpread on thin hurdles, fupported on treflfels. That which is found, and of the deepeft yellow, Is beft.

Cloves.

WE have cloves from the Dutch. They have deftroyed them in the Molucca iflands, and are propagating them in the ifland of Ternate. They are the fruit of a large, beautiful tree, and are gathered before they are ripe. The tree has leaves like the bay. The clove is firft green; as foon as it begins to tura a little brown, it is gathered, long before it il ripe. What are left upon the trees grow very large, and are called the mother of cloves; the fmall ones are gathered in the middle of the day, and laid in a ibady, airy place to dry

Mau

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 291'

Mace and Nutmeg.

THESE two fpiccs arc produced from the fame tree, which is large and beautiful; the leaves are long, and of a fine green; the flower is like an apple bloilbm; the fruit is round, and the fize of a middling peachy which it very much refembles. The nutmeg is the kernel and is covered by the mace. The fruit is cut open, the mace taken off, and that and the nutmeg aref dried in a cool, airy place.

Some diftingiim the nutmeg into male and female. The common nutmeg is the female; the other is longer, and lef valuable. They are produced from the fame tree, which is not unlike our pear-tree 'in its manner of growing. Its leaves whether green or dried, have, when bruifed, a very agreeable fmell. It grows in the Eaft-Indies. The beft mace is foft, oily, and fragrant. The nutmeg ihould be fpund, hard, and heavy, of a pale colour on the outfide, and finely marbled within.

The Dutch fupply us with nutmegs and mace, the whole fpice-trade being in their hands.

Cinnamon.

CINNAMON is the produce of the ifland of Ceylon. It is the inner bark of a beautiful tree. The leaves are like thofe of a bay-tree; of a fine fpicy tafte, and moft agreeable fmell.

The bark, when frelh, has little tafte; its flavour grows higher as it dries. The fineft is in fmall quills, of a bright colour, a ftrong fmell, and a fharp, biting tafte. Sometimes they extraEt an oil from it before it is brought over; it is then very infipid, and Caflia bark is often amongft it. The tfte is ther beft way to judge of its excellence; that which has loft its oil, is lefs fharp and quick. After holding the Caflia fome time in the mouth, it turns to a kind of jelly.

Pepper.

THERE are three kinds of pepper; the black, the white, and the long. The Chyan and Jamaica pepper are not of that kind, though called by that name. There are two forts of white pepper; one is made by fteeping black pepper iu fea ater, and then taking ofF the fkin; the other is the fruit of a different plant, but very like the black pepper. Thefe are both long, trailing plants; they have jointed ftalks, and are fmall: the fruit follows them. It is firft green, then red(jifli, and of a deep purple en ripe, but grows black and wrinkled when drng.

U a Pepper

g2 THE LADYs ASSlSTANf.

Pepper is gathered in November; the white is larger afld milder th m the black. It conies from the £aA-Indies. That iK'hich is Jargeft, a: d moft free from duft, is the beft. The; long pepper is of the fame nature, but milder.

Allfpice.

THIS fplce IS called Jamaica pepper, from the place of its growth i and all fpice, from it having the tafte of all othef" fpices. It is the fruit of a large tree: the leaves are broad the flowers are fmall, and grow in bunches; after which comes the fruit, which is gathered when ripe, and dried in the fhade When it is good, it is large, full, and of a good colour. It is a very good fpice for common nik but not equal to the others in flavour.

urmerick

IS the root of plant of an oblong figure; it is generally in pieces from half an inch to an inch in length and at the utmoft furface, the thicknefs of a man's little finger: it is very lleavy, hatd to break, and not eafily cutwith a knife: the outfide is of a fine whitilh grey, with a tinge of faint yellow j but, when it is broke, the infide is of a fine yellow, if the root is frefh. It grows redder by keeping, till at laft it will become of the colour of faffron in the cake; thrown into water, it foon gives it a fine yellow tinge It is eaSIy powdered in a mortar and, according to its difierent age, makes a yellow, an orangecolour, or reddifli powder. It has a kind of aromatic fmelU fomethinc like ginger: the tafte is acrid, difagreeable, and bitter, ft is brought from the £aft-Indies, where they ufc it ijn fauces and foods

SALTS.

THERE are two kinds of faltj the eommon, and falt-petre The firft is made from the fea- water, from falt-fprings, or elfe du out of the ground. The other is colleQed from old Walls, or the clifFs of rocks, in a rough ftate 5 or from certam earth, and afterwards refined. We have the falt-pctre rough from the caft, and we refine it here. The common fait, of feveral kmds, is dug or made in Europe

Of the common fait there are four different kmds 5 fea fait, bay fall, rock fait, and baflcet fak. Sea fait is made by boiling and evaporating fea water pver the fire. Bay fait, by evapofating fea water in pits, clayed on the infide by the heat of the fun. Balkct fait is made by boiling away the water of fait

? fpnngs

k

THE LADrs ASSISTANT. 293

fprings over the fire. Rock fait is dug ot of the ground and when very fine, is called flt-gemme. There are only two kinds of falt-petre; they go by different names: that which is purified is called falt-petre, and that w)iicb is rough as it conies from abroad) is called petre-falt. The pure falt-petre is much firongCr than the other.

SUGAR.

SUQAR is the produft of the Eafl and Weft-Indies. It is a kind of reed, but is called a fugar-cane. The reed is of the nature of ours, only much larger. The fugar is made of its juice boiled up to a confiftence. At firft it is very coarfe and "brown, but is refined, after it is brought over, biy our fugarakers.

OIL.

THERE are many forts of oil, but only one ufed for the table, which is that produced by the olive, Thofe which we eat, are gathered before they are ripe; but when the oil is to b& preiTed from them, they are left upon the tree tiH full ripe, and prelled when they are almoft rotten We have oil from mofi: of the warm parts of Europe, but it is diflSrent in purity and value, by the lefler or greater care taken ia the " making of it. Italian oil is generally the fineft That of Lucca and Florence is particulariy efteemed. They mile very good oil in France. In the choice of oil, we are to judge by the fmell and tafte. It fhould be free from both. In general, any fmell or tafte is a fault. Oil Ihould be quite pure and infipid; its only quality being foftnefs. In cold weather, oil con feals, and its purity may be guefled by its appearance for the ner the oil, the fmalier are the lumps.

VINEGAR.

To make common Vinar.

TAKE a middling fort of beer, but indifferently hopped; when it hss done wording, and is quite fine, put into it fome rapes; maih them together in a tub, let it ftand till it fettles, then draw it off very clear, and put it into a calk; cover the bung with a piece of flate, then fet it where the fun may come upon it, for thirty-five or forty days; by that time it will be fit for ufe It is very good fined, and kept from growing mufty

U 3 Vinegar

29+ THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Vinegar made of Sugar and Water.

TO two quarts of water put one pound of brown fugar, boil and fcum it well; add two quarts of cold water, and work it with a toaft fpread with yeaft; ftir it nine days fuccefSvely, then put it into a cafk, and let it ftand from April till September in the fun the cafk not flopped, but covered with a board

White Wine Vinegar.

FILL a caik with good white wine, but do not put in the bung; fet it where the fun may come upon it, or in any other hot place in a little time it will be fit for ufe.

Vinegar of foul Wine.

BOIL it till one-third is wafted; while it is boiling, take care to fcum it very clear; then put it into a cafk, and fome chervil with it; flop it clofe, and it will foon be fit for ufe Vinegar may be made of any fruits, flowers, herbs, or roots, by putting them into the vinegar, and letting them fland till it fmells or taftes of them.

Garlic Vinegar.

A quart of vinegar, eight cloves of garlic, two fliced nutmegs, and fixty cloves.

Goofeherry Vinegar.

BRUISE fome goofeberries that are quite ripe, and to three quarts of water put one of goofeberries; let it fland twentyfour hours, then flrain it through canvafs, and after that through a flannel bag; put one pound of coarfe fugar to every 'gallon of (his liquor; flir it well together; put it into a cafk, and let it fland nine or ten months, then it will be fit for ufe.

•The longer it ftands the better.

The water muft be boiled, and fland till it is cold, before it is mixed with the goofeberries. This is good vinegar for pickling.

Raijin Vinegar.

•TO every two pounds of Malaga raifins put four quarts of fpring water; lay a tile over the bung, and let it in the fun till it is fit for ufe. A flone bottle will do as well as a cafk. If it is put in the chimney-corner, and kept there a proper tim . it dpes as well as if fet in the fun.

Vinegar of Rofes.

TAKE dried rofes, put them into double glafTes, or a flone

bottle i

i

v

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 295

bottle; a handful or more to a quart of white-winc vinegar; fet them in the fun, or by the fire, or m a warm oven, till their virtue is cxtradied 5 then ftrain it, and keep it for ufe.

Tarragon Vinegar

To every gallon of ftrong white-wine vinegar put a pound of tarragon leaves, ftripped from the ftalks juft as it is going to bloom i put it with the vinegar into a ftone jug, to foment for a fortnight, then run it through a flannel bag; to every four gallons of vinegar put half an ounce of ifinglafs diffolved in cyder; mix it well with the vinegar: then put it into large bottles, and let it ftand one month to fine; then rack it off, and put it into pint bottles for ufe.

' Elder-Flower Vinegar.

GATHER the elder-flowers before they are too much blown; pick them clean from the great ftalks, and dry them in the fun, when it is not too hot; put a handful of them to a quart of the beft white-wine vinegar, and let it ftand twelve or fourteen days; then ftrain it, and draw it ofF, and put it into the veftel, but keep a quart out and make it very hot; put it into he veftel to make it ferment; then flop it clofe for ufe, and draw it off when wanted.

To make Ferjuicei

TAKE fome crabs; when the kernels turn black, lay them in a heap to fweat; then pick them from the ftalks and rottennefs, ftamp them to a mafh, and prefs the juice through a bag of coarfe hair-cloth into a clean veffel; it will be fit to ufe in a month. If it is for white pickles, diftill it in a cold ftill. It is alfo good to put into fauces, where lemon is wanting.

Vinegar in Balls.

Take bramWe-berries when half-ripe, dry them, and then beat them to powder; make it up into balls, with ftrong whitewine vinegar, as big as nuts j dry them very dry, and keep them in boxes; when -it is wanted, take fome wine, or a little ftale beer, difibive a ball in it, and it will become ftrong

vinegar.

Green bramble- berries put into good wine, will make vinegar in an hour.

TRUFFLES.

TRUFFLES grpw like mufhrooms, but never appear above

U 4 ' the

aS THE lady's ASSISTANT,

the gjouitd in their ntur ftate. They generally lie ten inches deep i after they are ripe, thy rot in the grounc, and young b ones grow in great numbers from very old trufge which de-!

cays The true has a very rich, tart, and high flavour when frefb, but lofes it in a great iheaiure when driedfl however they are generally ufed ip made diihes. 1 hey are common in France and Italy, and we have them in fome parts of Englandt

M O R E L L S.

MORELLS are likewife,of the muihroom kind, but they rife above the earth about three inqhes, of the bignefs of an egg, of a dulky-whitilh coloui; they have a higher flavour fre0i than dry. They grow in England, but are more common and ricier in flavour in thfs warmer parts of Europe,

CHYAN PEPPER.

THE plafit which bear$ this pod, isi raifed fometimes in ouf gardens. Its proper nme is Capiicum. From ifs growing in Africa, it is called Guinea pepper; and Chyan peppex, from its growth in America. Thp pods are long, and when ripe, of a fmooti, fine fed (rolour. Some call it Garden-coral. The powdeir of thjs is called chyan pepper, and is qiade as follows:

The ds are gathered when full ripe; they are opened, the feeds taken out, aid the pods laid to dry in the fun; whei qute dry, they are beatei to a cparfe powder. This powr der is chyan pepper in the plain eft way, but there are many ways of preparing it. Sofne oiix bay-falt with it, and others powder of muihrooms.

MUSHROOMS.

MUSHROOMS are very ufeful for fauces and made difhes, but great care ihould be ta)cen to procure the right fort. Thofe are good which grqw upon commons, but are liable to be mied with bad ones; therefore it is heft to ufe thofe from the hot beds. T)ie upper part of the right fort are of a roundifh form, like a button; the ftalk white, the under part, or gills, of a fine pale red but when broken, are very white; when they are left in the ground, they grow very large and flat, and the red part changes to a very dark colour. When they are fmall, they are calied Ifuttons, and are fit for pickling; but when they grow large, tliey are called flaps, and are put to other ufes. which wBl be mentioned hereafter Thofe which

are

'

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 2gf

krc a' fize between the buttons and flaps, are fit to ufe frefh The bad fort, which are picked up amongft thofe that grow naturally on the commoAs and in 4he fields, are not (b flat at the top; the under part, or gills, is white, inflead of the fin6 red; if they ar rubbed with the fingers they turn yellow, and when picUed are never wbite

To dry Mujbrooms.

TAKE a jarcel of mufhroom-flaps, cut off the flalks, and fcBape out the gills; put them into a fauce-pan with a little falt Jet them upon the fire, and let them flew in their own liquor i then pour them into a fieve to drain when they are dry, fend diem to a flick oven iipbh tin plates; when they are quite dry put them into fliallow boxes, and keep them for ufe.

The liquor will make catchup.

To keep Mujhrooms in Salt and Water.

MAKE them very clean, taking out the gills; boil them tender in water and a little fait, dry them with a cloth; make a flrong brine; when cold put in the mufhrooms; at the end of a fortnight change the brine; put them into fmall bottles pour oil on the top.

When they are ufed in ragouts, &c. lay them firfl: in warm water.,

Mujhroom Liquor and Powder.

WASH a peck of mufhrooms, rub them with a piece oJF flannel, take out the gills, but do not peel them; put to them twelve blades of mace, four cloves, four bay-leaves, half an ounce of beaten pepper, one handful of fait, eight onions, a bit of butter the fize of an egg, half pint of vinegar; let this fl:ew as quick as it can, flirring it till the liquor is out of the mufhrooms; drain them;' bottle the fpice and liquor when cold: dry the mufhrooms in an oven, firfl in a broad pan, then on fieves, till the will beat to powder. This quantity will make fix or feven ounces. Stop it clofe in a wide-mouthed bottle.

Catchup of Mujhrooms.

PUT flaps or large buttons into a pan, breaking them in pieces; flrew fait over them; let them fland four or five days 5 mafh them and fqueeze them through a cloth; boil and fcum the liquor, it muft be relifhing; throw in black and Jamaica pepper, a little ginger, fome efchalot bgil thefe together: when cpld bottle it.

4noiher

28 THE LADTs ASSISTANT.

Amtber way.

PUT the peeling, ftalks, and gills of large mu(brooms, into a ftone pot or jar, with a great deal of fait fet them in a cool cellar, let them ftand ten days, ftirring them every day; then fet the pot they are in into a pot of boiling water, and boil it three hours; ftrain it through a flannel bag; put 'to it feme fpice: when cold bottle it.

CATCHUP.

0 make Catchup.

PUT the peel of nine Seville oranges to three pints of the beft white-wine vinegar; let it ftand three or four months; pound two hundred of walnuts, juft before they are fit for pickling; fqueeze out two quarts of juice, put it to the vinegar; tie a quarter of an ounce of cloves, the fame of mace, a quarter of a pound of efchalot, in a muflin rag; put it into the liquor; in three weeks, boil it gently till near half is con fumed: when cold bottle it.

Catchup of Walnuts.

BRUISE a hundred or two of walnuts, juft before they are, fit to pickle; fqueeze out the juice, let it ftand all night, pour off the clear; to every quart, one pound of anchovies; bqil ic; when the anchovies are diiTolved ftrain the liquor; add half a pint of red wine, a gill of vinegar, ten clovefe of garlic; mace, cloves, and nutmeg, half a quarter of an ounce each, pounded; let this iimmer till the garlic is tender.

Another Walnut Catchup.

TAKE a hundred of the largeft nuts fit for pickling, cut them in ilices; put to them a quarter of a pound of efchalots cut through the middle; put them into a ftone mortar and bat them fine; add to them half a pound of fait, a pint and a half of the beft vinegar; let them ftand a week in an earthen pan ftirring them every day; then put them in a flannel bag, and prefs the liquor from them; add a quarter of a pound of anchovies: boril them up in the liquor, fcum it, and run it through, a flannel bag, and add to it two nutmegs fliced, fome mace, and whole pepper: when cold bottle it.

Catchup of the Shells.

IT is a very good way to pour common vinegar upon green walnuts; let it ftand two, three, or four months, as it may be

wanted 5

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 299

f anted J only, as the vinegar Ihrinks, keep filling the jar up; then take the liquor and boil it up as before mentioned 5 the walnuts will bear covering with vinegar three or four times, if done with care. The fhells of green walnuts will do, in feafons when there is not a plenty of walnuts.

Oyfter Catchup,

• BOIL fmall oyfters in their own liquor, till the goodnefs is out to every pint of clear liquor, half a pint of red wine, the fame of white mace, black, and Jamaica pepper, a quarter of an ounce each pour it boiling hot on one dozen of efch allots, half the rind of a lemon, a piece of horfe-radiih; when cold mix it with the oyfter liquor; bottle it.

Englijh Catchup.

TAKE a quart of white-wine vinegar, put into it ten cloves of garlic, peeled and bruifed; take alfo a quart of white port, put it on the fire $ and when it boils, put in twelve or fourteen anchovies waihed and pulled to pieces; let them funmer in the wine till they are difiblved when cold, put them, to the vinegar; then take half a pint of white wine, and put into it fome mace, fome ginger diced, a few cloves,, a fpoonfui of whole-pepper bruifed let them boil a little; when almoft cold, nice in a whole nutmeg, and fome lemon-peel, with two or three fpoonfuls of horfe-radifh; ftop it clofe, and ftir it once or twice a day. It will foon be fit for ufe. It muft be kept clofe ftopped.

SOY.

SOY comes from the Eaft-Indies 5 it is,made from their jnuQirooms, which grow in the woods. They are of a purplifh colour, and are wrinkled on the furface like a morell.

They gather them in the middle of the day, and wafli them in fait and water; and then lay them in a difli, mah them with their hands, and fprinkle them with fait and beaten pepper; the next day the liquor is preiTed off, and fome galangals and fpices added to it; it is boiled up till it is very ftrong, and then fome more fait is fprinkled into it. In this noianner it will keep many years.

A Colouring for Brown Sauces.

TWO ounces of butter, a quarter of a pound of very fine fugar, put over a very clear fire, in an earthen pipkin, and kept ftirring all the time; while the fugar is diflblving, that is

Galangals is a root which grows in the Eaft-Indiei.

while

jeo THE LADY'S ASSISTANT,

VhUe the froth rifes, hold it at a diftance from the fire; whei ih fugar and butter are brown, pour Jn a little red wifit, ftir it well together, then add more wine, till a quart is put in Jet it be well mixed; then put in an ounce of Jamaica pepper twelve cloves, eight efchalofs peeled, fix blades of mace, fomc inuCiiroom' pickle, a littk fait, and the rind of a lemon; boil tbffe flowly 9 quarter of an hour; por it in a hafon y whi cdd take o tbe fcum very clen apd bottk it for ufe.

SLIT cigiit lemons, pulp tbem, fill them with fait; fe tbm up, put them on a 4Jfli dry then very gradually either tty the fire or in a' flack oven, they muft be dry and hard, i )lxik three quarters of a pint of muftard-feed, tie it in a rag; tk four ounces of garlic half an ounce of cloves, fome black pepper, a gallon of vinegar, put all togei;her9 let it ftand three IKioiiths i drain nd prefs it well kt it ftaiid i bottle off tbf

: VERMICEI.LI,

IT comes from Italy. ie is a pafte rolled, and broken, ia tb.

m of worofiSt

0 make VermicellL

BREAK tfa yolks of eggs into fome fiower, mii it into 21 faff pafle and roll it as thin as it is pof&ble to roll pafte; Xzf % to 4ry in the fun and when it is quite dry, take a very (harp ikoife, cut it as thin as poffible, and Iceep it in a dry place; it will yn up into little worms, as vermicelli does; but the beft way is to, run it through a coarfe fieve while the pafte is foft. If it ia Wanted in a hurfy, dry it by the fire, aiid cut it fiall; it will ry by the fire in. a quarter of ai) hour. Thisi exceeds what COO:e$ froin abroad, being freiber

MACARONI,

IT comes from Italy. It i a bifcuiit made of almonds, (ggS towetji andfugar,

Fifl) Sauce te keep all the Yenr TAKE twenty- four anchovies, chop them bones and all tn efihalots andful of fcraped horfe-radiih four blaks of ina£lri one quvfSt of Rhenifh, or white wine, one pint of water, coie lemon cut in flices, half pint of anchovy liquor, one pint pf red wine, twelve peppercorns j boil it together till it

comes

TttE LAt)Vs ASSlStAKt, 8i

Cotnes to a quart, then ftrain it off: when cold- bottle it: tWO Ipoonfuls will be fufiicient for a pound of butter

Kitchen Pepper.

ONE ounce of ginger; pepper, cinhatiaon, cloves, and nuf tneg, half an ounce each ) fix ounces of fait: miic this well) keep it dry. It is a great addition to all brown fauces.

SAUCES For Meat Pouhry and Fijbk

Butter to meltk,

KEEP either a plated or tin faucc-pan, for thft pui-pofe only of melting butter: put a little water in the bottottii a duft of flower, fhake theiii together, cut the butter in flices as h melts, (hake it one way; let it boil up; it will be fiDadth and thick: it is, however, often met with ill done

The beft ffay to thicken Butter for Peae

Greens Fijby ic.

• PUT two Or three fpoonfufs of water in a feuce-pn juft enough to cover the bottom; when it boils, put in half a pouAil of butter; when the butter is melted, take the fauc-pan from the fire, and fhake it round for a good while, till it is vefj fmooth, which it will be, and never grow oily, although it may be cold and heated again often, and is therefore propeff to ufe on all occafions

ParJUy and Butter.

TIE up fome parfley in a bunch, wafh it and put it in fdine Voiling water with a little fait; when it has boiled up very quick two or three times, take it out chop it ytry fine afld tnix it with fome melted butter

0 clarify Butter.

MELT it rather flowly, let it ftand a littfe; when It h • poured into the pots leave the milk which fettles at the bol toin

Pm

302 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Poor Matfs Sauce.

TAKE fome young onions, cut them into water with feme chopped parfley. It is very go6d with roafted mutton.

The fame with Oil. 1

TAKE fome parfley leaves picked from the ftalks, cut it vtfry fine, and fprinkle over it fome fait; cut half a dozen young onions, take off the two outiide (kins, mix them with the parfley; put in three fpoonfuls of oil, with a very little vinegar and a little pepper; ftir them all well together.

Lemon Sauce.

PARE a lemon, cut it into flices, pick out the feeds, and chop it fmall; hoil ttte liver, and bruife it; mix thefe in a little gravy, and put it to fome melted butter, with a little of the peel chopped fine.

Mujhroom Sauce.

MIX a good piece of butter with a little flower; boil it up in fome cream, fhaking the fauce-pan; throw in fome muflirooms, a little fait and nutmeg i boil it up.-Or, put the muihroomsnnto butter- melted, with a little veal gravy, fonye falt and grated nutmeg.

White Celery Sauce.

TAKE fome flrong boiled gravy, made with veal, a gctod deal of fpice, and fweet herbs; put it into a ftew-pan, with celery cut inU) pieces two inches long, ready boiled; thicken it with three quarters of a pound of butter, rolled in flower, half a pint cf cream boil it up, fqueeze in fome lemon-juice; pour fome of it into the diih. It is an excellent fauce for boiled turkey, fowl, or veal., When the fluffing is made for the turkey, make fome of it into balk, and boil them.

Brown Celery Sauce.

CUT the white part in lengths, as before; boil and drain it; put to it fome good gravy,- with a little flower mixed fmooth in it, a little catchup PPPs, fait, and nutmeg; boil it up.

ETchalot Satue for boiled Mutton.

CHOP fo4br five efcots, put them into a little of the liquor the mutton was boiled in, fttr in a good piece of butter rolled in flower; boil it up; add a little lemon-juice or vinegar.

% Cap

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 303

. ' Caper Sauce.

TAKE foihc capers, chop half of them, put the reft in whole 5 chop alfo a little parfley very fiae, with a little bread grated very fine, and fonne fait; put thefe into butter meltel very fmooth. Some only chofp the capers a little, and put them into the butter.

Onion Sauce.

PEEL fome onions, boil them in milk and water, put a turnip with them into the pot (it draws out the ftrength;), change the water twice; pulp them through a cullender, or chop them; then put them in a fauce-pan, with fome cream, a piece of butter, a little flower, fome pepper, and fait. They muft be very fmooth.

Egg Sauce.

BOIL two or three eggs hard, or more, if a grpat deal is wanted; chop the whites firft, then the yolks with them 5 put this into melted butter.

yipple Sauce.

PARE, core, and flice fome apples, put a h'ttle water into the fauce-pan to keep them from burning, a bit of lemon-peel; when they are enough take out the peel, bruife the apples, add a lump of butter, and a little fugar.

Goofeberry Sauce.

PUT fome coddled goofeberries, and a little juice of forrel, with a little fugar, into fome melted butter.

Fennel Sauce.

BOlL a bunch of fennel and parfley, chopit finall; ftir it into fome melted butter.

Bread Sauce.

PUT a good piece of crumb of bread (not new) into a full half pint of water, with an onion, a blade of mace, a few pepper-corns, in a bit of cloth; boil thefe a few minutes; tuke out the onion and fpice, mafh the bread very fmooth, add a piece of butter, and a little fait.

Bread Sauce for a Pig. t

SOME like it made as above, or with a few curraffis picket!, wafhed, and boiled in it.

Sweet

204 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

Sweet Sauce of white Wine.

EAK a ftick of cinnamon, fet it over the fire in a fauce pn, with as much water as will corer it; boil it up two ot ilkee times, put in two fpoonfuls of fine fugar beat to a powder, a quarter of a pint of white wine; break in two bay leaves: boil them all together, and ftrain it through a fieve: put it in a fauce-boatl

Sweet Sauce of red Wine for Venifon or

roafiei Tongue.

Take a gUl of water, with a little bit of cinnamon, the crumb of a French roll, add to it half a pint of red wine or claret; fweeten it; let it boil till it is pretty thick, then run it through a fieve.

Sweet Sauce for Hare or Fenijin, .

MELTYome currant-jelly in a little water and red wine s or fend in currant-jelly only: or iimmer xed wine and (iigar for bout twenty minutes.

To crifp Parjley.

PICK and wafii it; put it into a Dutch oven, or on a fiieet of paper; do not fet it too nigh the fire; turn it till quite priip, laying little bits of butter on it, but not to be greafy: it is a much better method than frying it.

Mint Sauce.

CHOP fome mint, put to it vinegar and fugar

Plain Sour Sauce.

TAKE fome forrel leaves, let them be quite frefli; jHck oflT the flalks, bruife the leaves, and put them in a plate with their juice, ftrew on fome pepper and fait, ftir it all together, and ferve it cold.

Sauce for cold Chicken Partridge or Veal

AN anchovy ot two boned and chopped, parfley, and a, finall onion chopped, pepper, oil, vinegar, muftard, either 'Vnut or mufhroom catchup: mix them together.

Liver Sauce for boiled Chickens.

BOIL the livers till they will bruife with the back of a . fpooo, mix them in a little of the liquor they were boiled in i

melt

THE LADrs ASSISTANT. 305

melt fome butter very fmooth and put to them, with a littl? grated lemon-peel, then boil them all up together.

Another;.

BOIL two eggs hard, take, the yolks and flired them as fine as poilible, with the livers of the chickens parboiled; mix them with fome gravy and the juice of a lemon; ihake them up together in a fauce-pan. Some like parfley cut fmall and put in.

A Sauce for Hajbes Fifh 6?r.

TAKE a little white wine and gravy, an efchalot, fome nutmeg, beaten mace, and an anchovy; a little grated lemonpeel; ftew thefe together, and thicken them with butter, mixed up with flower, x

Sauce Robert.

TAKE fome large onions, cut them into fquare pieced; cut fome fat bacon in the fame manner, put them together into a fauce- pan over the fire, ihake them round to prevent their burning: when they are brown, put in fome good veal gravy with a little pepper and fait; let them ftew gently till the onions are tender, then put in a little faltj fome muftard, and vinegar, and ferve it hot.

This fauce is proper for porkorgoofe.

Caper Sauce a-la-Frarifoije.

TAKE fome capers, cut them fmall; put fome cflence of ham into a fmall fauce-pan, with a little pepper, let it boil, then put in the capers; let them boil up two or three times and pour it into a'boat.

Sauce de Ravigoite.

TAKE fome mint, balm, bafil, thyme, parfley, and fage, pick them from the ftalks, cut them very fine; flice two large ' onions very thin; then put all the ingredients into a marble mortar, and beat them till they are quite mixed; add fome pepper and fait, fome rocambole and two blades of mace cut fine; beat thefe well together, and mix them by degrees with fome gravy, till it is of the thicknefs of butter; put them in a ftew-pan, boil them up; ftrain the gravy from the herbs, preffing it from them very hard with the back of a fpoon; add to the gravy half a glafs of wine, and a fpoonful of oil; beat them well all together, and then pour it into a fauce-boat.- Thi$ Xauce is proper for roafted veal and many other things.

X Sauc$

I

305 THE LADrs ASSISTANT.

Sauce Ravif&tte dla-Bourgepife.

TAKE Tome fage, parfley a little xnhit, thymc and bafil; tfe them up in a bunch, and put them into a fauce-pan of boiling water; let them boil a minute, then take them out and fqueeze the water from them; then chop them very fine, and add ty thefe a clove of garlic and two large onions minced fine; put them ifHo a ftew-pan, with half a pint of broth,, fomc pepper and h little fait; boil them up, and put in a fpoonful of vinegar.

Sauce au Poivre.

TAKE half a pftit of veal gravy, half the quantity of vinegar, with ten young onions whole, a large one flioed, and half an anchovy; kt them boil fome time, and then ftrain it off, preffing it very hard; add to the liquor a little fait, and asmuch pepper as will make it agreeable to the tafte.

Ramotade Sauce.

CUT fine two large fpoonfuls of capers, as mfuch- parfley, couple of anchovies walhed and boned, two cloves of garlic, and a little efchalot; let them be cut feparately, and then mixed together: put a Uttfe rich gravy into a ftcw-pan, with twofpoonfuls of oily a fpoonful of muflard and the juice of a large lemon: make it quke hot,, end then pert in the dther ingre dients, with fome ptpper, a little fait, and the leavesof a few 'fw:eet herbs picked from the ftalks &x it well toother, and let it ftand four minutes over a briflc fire.

This is good with boiled fowh, boiled veal, and inan3 otbeF things which are boiled.

Sauce for boiled Beefj a-hRuJfes.

TAKE a large fiick of horfeadi£h, fcrape it, tie it up iti "a cloth, and boil it in the pot with the' beef; when it -has boiled a Uttle, put it in fome melted butter, and let k boil fome time in that r fend it up in the butter: fome fend it up in vi negar inftead of butter.,

Sicilian Sauee.

TAKE half a fpoonful of coriander-feed, with fourlovesy bruife them in a mortar j put three quarters of a pint of good gravy, nd a quarter of a pint of eflence of ham, into a ftewpan; peel half a lemon, and cut it into very thin iflices, and put in with the coriander-feeds and cloves; let them boil up, then put in three cloves of garlic whole, a head of celeiy fliced, two

bay

tktit's AsSISTAt. 367

iijiy-ieaves, and a little bafil; let thefe boil tiH there is but half itbe quantity left; put in a glafs cf white wtne;' itram it off, jni if noi thick enough fut in a piece of 4)4ttet rolled iti iower. It IS very good with roafted fowt and foe Kke ft tnth butchers ineat.

Itam Satice

WHEN a ham is almoft done wUh pick all the meat cleafli from the bone, and beat it well with a rolling-pin o ft ma(h j put it into a fauce-pn, with three fpoonfuls of gravy 5 fet f.

f)ver aiiow fire, but keep ftirring it all the yirbile, for it yf'xf.

ftick to the bottom; when it has been on fome time, add tt fmall bundle of fwect herb's id fomief. peppery with half At of beef-gnivy s cover it i, Aod lec at Aew over a gentle are; when it is quite done' ftradn off th(b gravy

This is a ves'y good fauce for veid;

Sauce for (tnjf Kind cf foafidmdi. .

TAKE an anchovy, wafb It, pt to it a laf? of red winev fbme gravy, an efchalot cut imall, and a little iujce of lemon; ftew thefe a little together, and pour it to the gravy ibat runs from the meat.

, Sauce for 4 ShpuUet of Mutton.

. WHEN the flioulder .of mutton is more thab hatf-done

mt a plate unde it, with fome fpring- Water in it, two or three poonfuls of red wine, a fliced. onion, a Jittle grated nutmtg, In anchovy wa&ed and minced and a jix. of butter; let the meat- drop into it; when it is taken up, put to it a fpoonful of vinegar; put the fauce into a faucepan, give it a boil up jftrain it through a fieve and pOt it under the muttoa

SaUce for Steaks.

TAKE a glafs of fmall -Reer, two anchovies a Htfle thyme, fome favory, a Ifttlc parfley, an onion, and (bme nutmeg, with a little lemon-peel j cut thefe ail together; when the ftejeiks are ready, pocrr the fat out of thfc pan, and put in the fmall-beer, with the other ing;redient, and a piece of butter rolled in flower %

let it ftmmer, and thn ftrain it over the fteaks.

Dicb Sauce for Meat or Fifh.

PUT fome water and vinegar into a fauce-pan, with a piece tf butter, Sicken it with the yolks of a couple of es, fqueeze .

into it the juice of a lemon, and ftrain it through aeve.

X 3 Gran

3o8 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.;

Green Sauce for Green Geefe or Ducklings.

TAKE half z pint of juice of forrel, with a little grated nutmeg, fome crumbs of bread, and a little white wine; let it boil a quarter of an hour fweeten it with fugar and add to k fome fcalded goofeberries, and a pice of butter.

Sauce for''Wild Ducks Tealj Eafierlings or any 1 fort of Wild Fowl.

TAKE fome veal-gravy, with fome pepper and fait j fqueeze in the juice of two Seville oranges, and a little red wine let the red wine boil fome time in the gravy .

A Sauce for Hare.

BASTE the hare with a pint of fmall beer; when the liquor is three parts wafted, and the blood of the hare mixed with ir then take up the dripping-pan and pour it into a falice-pan, and fet it by; flower the hare, and bafte it well with butter; put into the pan fome gravy; fcrape all the brown round the pan and put it to fome ale, run it through a fieve, and thicken it with butter rolled in flower.

White Sauce.

BOIL any bones or bits of veal, with a fmall bunch of fweet herbs, an onion, a ilice of lemon, a few white pepper, corns, and a littlie celery; ftrainit; there fhould be near half a pint $ put to it fome good cream, with a little flower mixed fmooth in it, a good piece of butter, a little pounded mace,' and fome fait; keep it ftirring; add muiOirooms, or little lemon-juice.

Anchovy Sauce.

SCALE and fplit one or two anchovies, put t;iem into a £auce-pan, with a little water, a fpoonful of vinegar, and a fmall, round onion: when th anchovy is quite diflblved, ftrain ofF the liquor; and put as much of it into fome nice melted butter as is agreeable to (he palate.

A little gravy may be added, or a little catchup.

An excellent White-fijh Sauce.

AN anchovy, a glafs of white wine, a bit of horfe-radifh two or three blades of mace, an onion ftuck with cloves, a piece of lemon-peel, a quarter of a pint of water or more.; fiminer thefe till reduced to the quantity wanted; ftrain it; put ii two fpoonfuls of cream, a large piece of butter, with fome flower mixed well in it; keep ftirring it till it boils; add a little

9 ' catchup.

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 309

catchup, fqueeze in fome lemon-juice when off the fire. More wine may be added, if agreeable.

Oyjler Sauce

WHEN the oyfters are opened wah them out of the liquor, then flrain it; put that and the oyfters into a little boiled gravy, juft fcald them; add fome cream, a piece of batter mixed with flower, fome catchup j ihake all up; let it boil, but not much, left the oyfters grow hard and fhrink; yet take care they are enough, as nothing is more difagreeable than if the oyiter tafte raw- Or, melted butter only with the oyfters and their liquor.

Shrimp Sauce.

MIX a good piece of butter with fome flower; boil it up in fome rich gravy put in the ihrimpss give them a boil.

Lobfter Sauce

TAKE a lobfter which iias a good deal of fpawn, pull the meat to pieces with a fprk; do not chop it; bruife he body and the (pawn with the back of a fpoon; break the fliell, boil it in a little water to give it a colour; ftrain it ofFj melt fome butter in it very fmooth, with a little horfe-radifh. and a very Ifttle chyan; take out the horfe-radifh, mix the oody of the lobfter well with the butter, then add the meat, and give it a boil, with a fpoonful of catchup or gravy, if agreeable. Some like it only with plain butter

GRAVIES.

Brown Gravy without Meat

TAKE a piece of butter as big as a walnut, and melt it in fauce-pan, ftir it round, and when the froth flnk duft fome, ijower in it then take half a pit of fmall bee: that is not bitter, and half a pint of water, a fpoonful of wi)nut-liquor or catchup (and of muftiroom liquor the fame quantity) one anchovy, a little blade of piace, fome whole pepper, a bit of carrot $ )et it fimmer for a quarter of an hour, and then ftrain f offi life 1% for fifl pr fowl.

Beef Gravy.

TAKE lean beef according to the quantity of gravy that is wanted, cut it into pieces put it into a ftewpan, with an onion or two fliced, a little carrot; cove it clofe, fet it over a gentle fire s pour off the gravy as it draws from it then let the X 3 meat

3f0 THE LADY! ASSISTANT;

l€at brQwtt, CMffiing ft that it may not burn; pour ovtfr i loiling water, add a few doves,, pepper com, a bit of leimmpeel, a bunch of fweet herbs j let tbi fimmcr gently, ftrain it wiih the gravy that was drawn from the meat, add a fpoonful of catchup, Cmt faft. '

A pound of, meat will Imake i pint of gravy.

Crovy for a Fowl nuhbout Meat.

VBOIL the neck, Kvef ami gi.aard in half a pin of water 5 toaft a cruft of bh ad hard and hrown, a fmall hunch of fweet Jierbs, a little re4. wirtv with fome pepper awid felt: when it has boiled to a quarter of a pint, bruife the liver, and firaan it j.

thicken it wich a piece of butter rolled in flower.

Aik ox's kidney &r (beep's milt make good gjravy,

Mutton Gravy

MAY be made the famie way,

. • Another Graty fir White SdUce.

CUT fome veal and mutton to pieces, boil it with a bunch of fweet herbs, an onibn ftuck withxioves, a bit of Iemon-peI% a few ptpfjer-corris, tiH it U as rich as is required.

Boiled beef gravy will do, if vf;al is not to be had convc Hiemly, ' ' w ' .' ' ' .

Veal Gravy

TAKE what quantity of meat is. wanted, cut it in thin.

flices, lay a (lice of tt in the . ottom of a ftew-pan (if a little is Wanted a faUce'-pah will do) Uy fome carrot on the meat, and cover it clce fo two or three minutes, but the meat muft noi be brown s pouf in to a pound of meat a pint of boiling water with a bunch 0" fweet herbs, let it fimmer till it is of a propeif thicKneis: this is for vihite gravy. If it is to Be brown, the meat muff be ft jed ks the beef, with fome thin flices of bacoa laid under the veal in the ilevi-pan. '" i

spur Sauce with Gravy.

PUT fortie rich eal g'ravy, with a little eflencc of ham, and a little pepper; take fome for re! -leaves, pound them if! a marble mortar, and put them into the gravy; give them a boil or two, afid then pour it into a fauce-boat

A Fih Gravy.

;"- CUT two or three little fifh of any kJnd iiito fiiiaU pifeccs, put thtm into a Emce-pai), and diore than cover- them witiv

watery

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 311

witer; a bit of toafted bread, a blade of mace, (bme letnonpeel, whole pepper, and a bunch of fweet herbs; fimmer it gently till it is rich and good; take a little bit of butter, anck brown h in a ftewpan, flower it, and when it is brown, ftraiA tike gravy into it and let it boil a few minutes.

To make EJJence of Ham.

TAKE, three or fix pounds of good ham; take off all the ikin and fat, and cut the Jean into flices about an inch thick; lay thcra in the bottom of a Aew-pan, with flices of carrots, parfnips, three or fix onions cut in flices; cover it down very dofe, and fet it over a ftove, or on a very gentle fire; let them ftew till they ftick to the pan, take care it does not burn then pour on fome ftrong veal gravy by degrees, fome frefli mufhrooms cut in pieces, if to be had, if not, muihroom powder, fome truffles, and morlls, fome cloves, fome bafil,

Erfle, a cruft of bread, and a leek; cover it dowli clofe, and; it fimmer till it is of a good thicknefs and flavour.

When a ham is boiled, if it is not too falt make ufe of the gravy, and it will do without tfacT ham, only it will not be quite fo high-flavoured.

CULLISSES

AKE jibr thickening all forts of ragouts, and foups, and to giye them an agreeable flavour

yf Cutttffor Rggoufs and almoft all rich Sauces.

TWO pounds of veal, two ounces of ham, two or three ploves, a little nutmeg, a blade of mace, fome parfley-roots, two carrots cut to pieces, fome efcbalot, two bay-leaves; fet thcfe oVer a ftove in an earthen veflil j let them do very gently for half an hour clofe covered, obferving they do not burn; put beef-broth to it, let it ftew (ill it is as rich as is wanted, ftrain it.

A'Turk Culiis.

ROAST a large Turkey till it is near enough, and quite brown; then .cut' it to pieces, put it into a marble mortar, and beat it to pieces, with fome crufts bread, and fome fat bacon cut into pieces; when they are quite maflied put themjnto.a deep fteW'pan, with fome veal gravy, and make them uifie hot; cut fome fweet bafil fmall, fome parfley, fome chives, and fome mufhrooms minced; put thefe into the ftew -pari, and "ftir it all well together then cover it, and fee it oiver a ftove

X4 to

3ia THE lady's assistant

to beat; take ofF the covatr, and turn it tvro or three times at it heats then pour in a quart of good veal gravy; mix it wdi together, and pour it through a hair fieve, and keep it for ufe.

Tile different ciillifies are generaily named by the meats which are put into them, as they give it its. name and tafte: if it is for fowl, the fame bould be made ufe of for tbe cullis; pheafants or partridges) for pheafants or partridges, and io on

Cullis . a lItalienne.

Take blf pint of cuUis, as much eflence of ham, and a pint of gravy, a little coriander- feed bruifed, two or three onions cut into flices, three or four cloves of garlic, with a lemon pared and cut into .flices, two fpoorfuls of oil) lome fweet bafil, and a few muflxrooms; let theie ftew together a quarter of an hour $ take oft the fat, and it is lit fo,r ufe. '

Cullis a-la-Reine.

CUT feme veal into thin flices, beat them, and lay them into a ftew-pan, with fome flices of ham; cut a couple of onions fmall, Ad putythem in; cut to pieces half a dozen muihrooms, and add them to the reft, wich a bunch of parfley, and three cloves; pour over thefe a little broth, and fet them over a very gentle fire to ftew; when they are quite done and the liquor is rich and high-tafted, then out all the meat with a fcummer, and put in fome crumbs of bread; let them boil up once, ftirring them well, then put them over a vpry flow fire to ftew gently; take the flcfli of a fine fowl from the bones, beat them in a marble mortar, add this to the cullis in the ftew-pan; flir it well together, but take care it does not boil; blanch three dozen of fweet almonds, pound them to a thin pafte in a marble mortar, with a little boiled milk; add the cullis, and ftif it all well in; it is good for white made-difties and white foups,

• • • '

German Cullis.

TAKE four pounds of a fillet of veal, three pounds of a Weftphalia ham; Jay fome of this in a ftew-pan, and ftrew over it a little pepper, and a very little fak, fome powder of gingcf, and a grated nutmeg, (our fliirret-rcots fliced, a dozen jroot of falfafy fplit, two onions, a bunch of fweet herbs, and half a dozen cloves; lay on more flices of the veal and ham, and upon thefe grate a quarter of a pound of gingerbread; cover the ftew-pan, and let it ftand over a very gentle fire a confiderable time; then put into a fauce-pan a quart -of veal gravy, put in a bunch of tarragons and fome cifchalots; lee

thefe

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 313

thefe boil a few moments; fet the ftewpan on a brilk firc the neat will then ftick to the bottom, ftir it a little, and then pour in the boiling gravy, with the ingredients, a little at "a time; let it boil 1 together rather more than an hour, then put in fome frefli muibrooms chopped fmall, and a quarter of a pint of old hock; let it ftew a little longer, and then ftrain it out, and prefs it hard. It is ufed to heighten foups an( ragouts.

A CulKs for Fijb.

TAKE a large pike, gut it, and lay it whole upon the gridiron, turn it often; when it is quite done, take it off; take oS the Ikin, and take the meat from the bones; boil half a dozen hard eggs, and take out the yolks; blanch a few al' monds, beat them to a pafte in a marble mortar, and then add the yolks of the eggs; mix thefe well together, and put in the fi(h, beat them all to malh; then take half a dozen onions and cut them into flices, two parfnips, three carrots; fet on a fiew-pan, put in a piece of butter to brown, and when it boita put in the roots, turn them till they are brown, d then pour in a little pea-broth to moiftenthem: when they have boiled a few minutes, ftrain it into another ftew-pan s put in a whole leek, fome parfley, and fweet bafil, half a dozen cloves, fome mufhroonis and truffles, and a few crumbs of bread; let it fiew gently a quarter of an hour, and thenput in the fifh from the mortar; let it ftew fome time longer; it muft not boil up, as that would make it brown; when it is done, ftrain it through a coarfe fieye.

It ferves to thicken all made-di(hes and foups for Lent.

A CrayFiJh Cullis.

TAKE fome middling cray-fi(h, boil them in water, with an onion cut in dices, pepper, fait, and a little thyme and

parfley; when they are done, pick them, lay away the tails, but pound the reft very line m a mortar with the fliells; when

' it boils, put in fome flices of onion, a carrot in flices, and a parfnip; hake them round the pan, and then pour in fome boiling water, fifli-broth, and a bit of toafted bread; put into it a fprig of fweet bafil, half a lemon peeled and cut into pieces, and fome fiih cullis; when it has ftewed fome time, take out the roots, and put in the pounded crayfifh; let it ftew gently, and then ftrain it off. This may be ufed to all forts of diihea where cullis is wanted, in Lent.

AmtbiT

31+ THE LAPr$ ASSISTANT.

WHEN thccrajr-fifli is pouaded, put a piece of butter into M flew-pan and when it boils pm with the onion, &ۥ half a pound of vealy and a bit of ham $ let it do gentty,' and when it fticks cut it fmall; then put Tome fifli-hroth into the flewpan; put in fome clove lemon pared, fome mu&rooms cut in flices: when it ha ftewed fome ttme fcum ofF the fat; then take the meat out of the ftewpan, and put in a very little eilence of hzm; then put in the cray-fifli let it ftew a Uttk then pour it off. This is ftronger than the other, and will .ferve for every thiiig for which cray-fi0i cullf is Yante4

Green CulUs fir Soups.

TAKE fome green peafe, put them into a final! flewingiettle,with fome good broth; take a piece of veal, a piece of ham, and an onion; cut them into pieces, put them into a fiewan, and fet thm over a gentle fire; when they begin to flick, mofilen tbem with a little broth, and let them ftpvf gently; then take parfley, chervil, the tops of gren onion3 amd fpinach, of each a handful; wafh and fcald them in boiling water j fqueeze and pound them, then pound the peafe i ana when the meat is ftewed take it out of the cullis with a fcum mer; take off the fat: let it be well-flavoured, and mix the peafe and herbs with them ilrain it off. This cullis is fit for all forts of grpen fiups

yi Cullis of Roots.

TAKE carrots, parfnips, pariley-roots and onions; cut them in flices, put them into a flew-pan over the fire, ancL (hake them round; take dozen and a half of blanched almonds and 4he crumb of two French rolls foaked firfl in good fiih-broth V pound them with the roots in a mortar, then boil all together; feafen them wtthpepper and falt and ftrain it off, and ufe. it for herb or fifh-foups

Strong Jelly to keep.

TAKE a leg of beef, and two (bins, cut in pieces,. a knuckle of ved I chop it all to pieces one or two old cocks or hens (kinned, and two calf's feet to ten quarts of water; boil it down to a itrong jelly, fcum it well; add to it fome iak, aisd run it through a jelly-bag till U is clear.

FORCED

THE LABT's ASSlStAHTi i

F O R C E D - M E A T.

TAKE air equd quantity of lean veal fcraped, and beef-fuet fhred; beat thefe (together in a marble mortar; add pepper fair, cloves pounded, lemon-peel and nutmeg grated, parfley smd favoury herbs chopped, a little efchalot and young onioiH if agreeable, a few fine crumb of bread, and yolk of eg?, (accordfng ta the quanthy wanted) to work it light; r this into baits with a little flower: boil them Yor Mfite fiiuce.

fry them for browat

Forced-meat of EA .

TAKE two fine filver eel, broil them till tbey are near fsnough, then throw them into cdd water: broil a perch; when it is near enough, lay it to cool $ take the meat frpii the boiiee of both the fifh, and mince it; mince the liver of a cod, and add to them, then feafon them with pepper and fait; put to them fome fweet herbs picked from the'ftaiks, fome (mall oniona minced, fome fcraped bacon, a Utde veal fuet, a few crumbs of bread, and a piece of butter; put all into a mortar, and beat it to a pafte; it is proper for fifli pies, and adds a fine relifli to all made-difhes of hfli, of whatever kiiid It is likewUc rolled up in. balls, and fried or fiewed.

Forced-meat of Pigeons.

ROAST four pigeons; when they are half-done, take them up, and fet them to cool; when diey are quite cold, take the meat of the breaft and rump, cut it in pieces, and put it intaa marble moitar; peel half a dozen middling muibfooms, cut them in pieces, and put them to the pigeons; put fome veJil fuet into boiling water a few minutes then take it out; lay it to cool, pick out the (kins, cut it very fine, and put it to the other ingredients; fcrape in fome bacbn, fcald and mince the livers of four fowls put them lo due rtfl-; tkeR add pepper, (alt, chopped paHley, mineed onion and one Spoonful o fweet bafd; beat them all well together in a mortar, and take care hey are properly mixed ajld are Wdl lieat; put in a large piece of butter, and work it up to a pafte.

This is an excellent forcedmeat for made-diihes, rolled losg or PMitd ia proper to Uj hi pigeon or other pies.

VEGETABLES.

VEGETABLES.

TV r Vegetables. '

£ particularly careful in wafhirig all groSy as dirt ancf iAfeds are apt to lodge among the leaves

Qabhage

QUARTER it, boil it in plenty of water, with a handful of fidt; when it is tender, drain it on a fieve, but never prefs it It may be chopped, and heatd with a piece of butter, pepper and ialt Sayoys and greens are boiled in the me way.,

Colliflower.

BOIL it in plenty o milk and water, no fait It is very ibon boiled 3 if the flower is foft, it is good for nothing.

Broccoli.

LEAVE the head, cut ofF all the hard part about the ftalks; tlirow it into. water, boil it till tender,- Or, ftrip the leaver, from the iide-(hoots, and pare the ftalks of them; tie them in bunches; boil them in flt and W9te;r Serve theoi aid ii bunches, melted butter over tiem

Afparaguf.

SCRAPE them, and tie them in fmall bundles, cit then) even, boil them quick in fait and water; lav them on a toaft whidi has been dipped in the water the aiparagus was' boiled in; pour over them melted butter,

Peafe

SHOULD not be boiled too much, nor in much water; melted butter in a boat or a piece of butter put to them, then ihaken up with pepper and fait. . Lay boiled chopped min( round the difli They are befl with the thickened butter

Beans.

BOIL them till tender, but never boil them with the faacom Serve them with bacon, or pickled pork, and par&ey and butter.

turnips.

PARE them thick i when boiled fqueeze them 3 mafh them

fmooth;

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 317

fmoothj heat them with a little cream, a piece of butter and flower, pepper, and fait,

Carrots

REQIHRE a good deal of boiling: when they are youngs wipe them after they are boiled when old, fcape them befofC you boil them.

Artichokes.

' TWIST off the ftalks 5 boil them an hour and a half, or two hours. Serve them with melted butter in little cups

Parfnips

MUST be boiled very tender; may cither be texv whofe with melted butter, or beat fmooth in a bowl heated with m 4itde cream, butter, and flower, and a little fait.

French Beans.

IF not very fmall, fplit and quarter them; throw them into fait and water; boil them in a quantity of water, with fome falt r N. B. Make all greens boil as quick a poffible, for it prefer ves their colour.

Spinach

MAY be boiled, but it is beft flewed; put a very little water at the bottom of the ftew-pan; when the fpinach is tender, fqiieeze it very dry 5 put to it a piece of butter, fome pepper, fait, a fpoonfiu of cream; ftir it about in the pan till tolerably dry,

SorreU

STEW it as fpinach.

Another way to ftew Spinach

TAKE three large hiandfuls of fpinach, when boiled, fling it into cold water; wa(h it very clean, and fqueeze it in a cloti very dry; then chop it fmall, and put it in a ftew-pan, with a piece of butter, and half a pint of crean; ftir it well over the fire, that it does not oil; fliake it in a very little flower, a little fait, and a little more cream; let it be quite hot, and fend it up.

., Potatoes.

BOIL them in water juft enough to cover them; when they boil, take them ofi, and put a little cold water to them, and fet them on again; To do two or three times; when the peel cracks they are enough. The taking them ofl:' prevents their breaking, as they are very apt to do.

VEGETABLES

-rV

i THE LAOrs ASSISTANf.

VEGETABLES im a SAVOtJRY WaIT.

A Ragout of Celety.

CUT the white part into lengths hoU it till tender i fry ni Smn It, flovrer k, put intp it fortie rich gravy a very Itttle red mitkCf tj pepper, nutmeg, an catchup; boil it up.

Celefy fted white.

BOIL it till teiider, the very wjske pgrt otdja Cut inf pieces i llir fome cream aver the Axt wirii two yolk$ of -'gsi put in the celery, fome falt pepper mace pounded, grated lemon peel a little; ihake all together, but do not let it boil.

Celery fte$f;ed brown

CUT it to piecefi as before direaqd, half-ioil it, diamif Aen ftew it in fome good gravy, pepper,. fait, nutmeg, catchups then mix a little flower fmoodk m a little gravy s boil it all

Celery fried.

WHEN boiledy dip it in batter, fry it of a liht irown and 4rj I pour over melted butter.

Cucumbers dreffed raw called Mandrang.

tJNLESS they are bitter, they need not be pared; icore thew at the end m they ate cut, that they 0iay be in ftaall fait$ as if flightly chopped sr a gopd deal of fmv% Qlfiton$, fome chyaof and fait, a glafs of Madeira, the juice of half a good leoioiiy' and fome vinegar. This is on exceeding good way of dreflin Ihem and will agree with the mofi delicate iloaiab.

Cucumteu fiewed.

PARE them; ffice them about the thiclbnefs of a o-bWn tece; flice fome onion; fry them both, drain aM flnike sf ittle flower over them, put them into a ilewan, with fome ood gravy, chyan, ftk; flew them till tender.- Or, they may ftewed in their own liquor, without beiixg fried; chyan 9tA falt-T-Or, take out the feeds, quarter the cucumbers, ftew them till clear, in fome boiled gravy; mix a little flower witk fome cream, a very little white wine, white pepper pounded; boil it up

Forced Cucumbers.

MAKE a flit down the fide, take out the feeds i .fill the au cumbers with forced-meat that hasp been boiled % tie them up with packthread, fry them ftew them ia rich gi:avy ohyan

fait.

E

tHE LADYs AS$ISTAMT. fig

(alt, a tittle jxunded cloves $ k t little flower ia a UcUe gravy to thicken with; boil all togetkue? '

Frmcb Besmftewed.

BOIL thenH4ut to dtem a littfe cream kriled grflrvy if diere any, pefr, fait, a bet •of bittter imxed with ibme flower; boil it up.

A Ragout of French Beans.

DO flot fpUt them, but cut them in two;• fry aiMl Araia them, Ibakc over a little flower; put to them ftnnc good gtvj an onfon, a little pounded cloves, chyan, and falt fome catchup; bofl thts ap, Ibaking tt; take out the onion.

Mujbrooms Jfewed white.

WIPE (bme .large bitJDtofisboil t!hem up quick in a Kttle water; put "to them feme cream, a pieee of buttet mixed with a little ilower, fome pounded macc aiittle an adiak boil this up, fhaking them

Mufhri€ms ftwed irown.

CLEAN dMm, flew them m 4bme good gravy thickened with a litde flower, add a little yan, felt, and nutmeg

A Ragout of Mufhrooms.

PEEL hrge muihroemsj and fcrapethe infide;, broil them $ wiien a little brown, put them into (bme gravy thickened with a little flower, a very little Madeira, fait, and diyan a litde juice of lemon: boil thefe together.

Mujbroom Loaves

WASH fompe fmafl buttons, boil them a feW nMnutea &i a little water; put tathem a little crean, a bit of butter rolled in flower, fait, and pepper; boil this up, and fill fome fmall, Dutch loaves; if they are not to be had, fmall French rolls will dOfrtbe crumb taken eut, but not near fo weU m the 'loaves,

Peafe and Lettuce Jiewed.

BOIL the peafe, drain them; flice and fry the lettuce; put tbem into fome good gravy % fhake in a little flower, add chyan and fait, a very little dired mint; boil this up, flaking it.

r

Dried Artichoke Bottoms fricaffkd.

PUT them into warm water for two or three houts, changing the waters put a piece of butter into fome cream, ftir it ever 2 the

Sto THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

the fire till melted i put in the bottoms, with a little fait, and white pepper; give them a boil or two.

Fried Artichoke Bottoms.

IF dried, lay them in water as above, flower and fry them; pour over melted butter. - Or, put the yolk of ah 'egg, boiled hard, in the middle of each bottom.

Another way.

CUT the artichokes in pieces, take off the chokes, let them boil a littles then take them ofF, and foak them in vinegar; fhake fome pepper and fait over them; beat up an egg, and dip them in; flower, and fry them in boiling lard. Serve them with rifped parfley

Artichokes with white Sauce.

BOIL the artichokes, take off the leaves and choke, put them into a ftew-pan, with butter and parfley, feafoned with fait and pepper i thicken it with the yolk of an egg.

A Ragout of Ar(ichoke Bottoms.

JJET them lie in water as before diredd; put to them fome gopd gravy, mufhroom catchup or powder, chyan, fait i thicken with a little flower: boil thefe together.

Chardoons fried.

BOIL them in fait and water, dip them in batter, fry them $ ferve them with melted butter.

Chardoons Jiewed.

BOIL them as above; tofs them up in a little gravy, fome catchup, chyan, and fait; thicken with a bit of butter, mixed with a little flower; a little juice of lemon.

Fricajfee of Skirrets.

BOIL the roots till tender, blanch them, cut them in pieces; put fome cream, a bit of butter rolled in flower, a little chyan, fait, and nutmeg, into a ftew-pan; boil it up$ put in the ikirretsj let them juft heat through.

Afparagus Loaves.

BOIL fome afparagus; referve a few whole, cut fhort; chop the remainder, but not too fmall; put to them fome cream a bit of butter mixed with a little flower, chyan, fait, and nutmeg; boil this up i fill the loaves, ftick in the afparagus that were left

A Ragout

callis or good gravy, pepper, and is thick enough. - Garnim with a fi

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 321

J Ragout of JJparagus.

WHEN they are fcraped and cleaned, out the prime part; waib • )a head or two of endive, and a lettuce, cut them rather fmall; fry them till almoft dry in good butter, with a little efchalot chopped fine; (hake in fome flower, ftir them about; put in fome fait; flew at) till the fauce few of the heads of afparagus boiled.

Potatoes fcolhped.

WHEN boiled (the mealy fort are beft) beat them fine, put to them cream, the yolk of an egg, pepper, fait, a piece of butter i do not make them too moift fill fonie fcollop-lbells, fmooth the tops with the back of a fpoon; rub them over with a little yolk of egg, fet them in a Dutch oven to brown; they ivill rife before the fin?, and if nicely done, re a pretty fupper dlfh.

Potatoes in Balls.

DO them as above; roll them in balls with a little flower brown them in a common or Dutch oven, or fry them. - Or, ivhen wafbed, &c. prefs them into a pint bafon, then turn this cut I brown it before a fire.

Savoys fenced.

SCOOP a little of the heart from a favoy at the ftalk end.

fill it with forcedmeat; cut another in two; flew thefe till tender, in good gravy thickened with a bit of butter and flower, •-The forced-meat muft be firft boiled.

Cabbage forced '

TAKE a couple of fine young cabbages, cut o(F the outfide leaves of one, and fave the heart for boiling; let thp, leaves of the other remain whole, but cut out the heart;'!row the leaves into boiling water, and let it fcald till they .re pliably then take it out, and lay it on a fieve to drain; boll the two hearts of the cabbages very well; boil four eggs hard, take out the yolks, and lay tbdkn by themfelves then chop the hearts of the cabbages, and fet them by; cut half a pound of veal, a quar-p ter of a pound of fine fat bacon, mix them with the choppe;d cabbage, and then cut to pieces the yolks of the eggs;, mix them with pepper, fait, and fome grted bread, and ftrew them over Ithe veal, cabbage, and bacon, and put it all into the cabbage eavS;i and tie it up 3 take a large fauce-pan with a gallon of

Y ftrong

322 tHE LADYs ASSISTANT.

ftrong broth; put in the cabbage and let it boil till it is quit€ onc. Sauce- good gravy. '

Red Cahhage ftewed.

TAKE a fine red cabbage, cut it into thin flices crois-ways and then into fmall bits; put them into a ftew-pan, with a pint of rich gravy, a pound of faufages, and three or four Aices of ham or bacon; cover the ftew-pan down clofe; fet it on a moderate fire, let it Aand half an hour, then uncover it; fcunt off the fat, ihake in fome flower, put in two fpponfuls of vinegar, and cover it up; itt it on again, and let it ftew four or five minutes longer i take out the faufages, and pour the reft over it.

e make Sour CnM

TAitE fome fine hard white cabbages, cut them very fmtii; have ready a tub, according to the quantity wfaiick is to be done; put the cabbages intp the tub: to every four or five cabbages, throw in a handful of fait when they are all put in. Jay on them a very heavy weighty to prefs them down as flat as poffible; throw a cloth on them, and lay on the cover let them ftand a month when they may be ufed, but they will keep twelvemonths it muft be always kept ciofe covered: a few carra way 'feeds pounded fine, and thrown in, make it eat welL The way to drefs it, is with a fine piece of fat bee ftewed.

Colliflowdr-fialks, and cabbage-ftalks, peeled and cut down and done in the fame maimer, are very good.

To keep Cabbage Lettuce.

AT the latter end of the feafon, take fome very dry fand and cover the bottom of a barrel made on purpofe then put in the lettuces fo as not to touch each other there muft not be above two rows laid one upon another; cover them well widi fand, and fet them in a dry place; be very careful the froft docs not come at them: the lettuce mufl not be cut, butalled at the root. - 41

m

I

-...i- A,AA A AA ftiihilt ifiiti AA Aft AAAJtiAfA JhAitr -'--- 'i-'"'-------W WWW VWWrW •"• '?"' W W? V W - •- V ' • " WW W? 'r%' H

PICKLES.

ALWAYS ufe ftone jars for hot pickles, as vinegar will penetrate through all earthen vcfTcls, ftene and glafs exceptcfd. Never let theliand touch the pickle, but tie a pickle fpoori to every jar,

3 ' n

THE LADYs ASSISTANT, 323

To pickle Cucumhers.

THE Tmall long fort arc the beft; let them be frefh gather ed. Pull oif the blofibmS) do not rub them; pour over them a ftrong brine of fait and water, boiling hot; cover them clofe, let them ftand all night the next day flir them getitly, to take diFthe fand; drain them on teve, and dry them with a cloth: make a pickle with the beft white wine vinegar, ginger, pepper long and rounds garlic, if not difliked; when the pickle boils throw in the cucumbers, cover them, make them boil up as quick as poffible for three or four minutes; put them into a jar with the pickle, and cover them very clofe; whea cold, put in a fprig of dill, the feed downward. They will b exceedingly crifp and green done in this manner but if they do not look quite fo green as they (bould, boil up the pickle again the ne:!t day, and pour it on the cucumbers immediately,

Anothir way.

PUT them in a ftone jar; take as much fpring-water as will cover them: to every gallon of water, put as much fait as will bear an egg; make it boiling hot, and pour it upon the cucumbers; cover them with a woollen cloth, and over that a pewter difii; tie them down clofe, and let them ftand twenty- four hours, then take them out lay them upon a cloth -t and dry them; wipe the jar clean, put in the cucumbers, with a little dill and fennel; then take fome vinegar; to every three quarts, put In one quart of fpring- water, till there is enough to cover them; pyt in a little bay fait, and a little white fait; to every gallon of pickle, put one nutmeg, cut in quarters, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, and the fame of mace, a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper, and a large race of ginger diced: boil thefe all up together; pour the pickle boiling hot upon the cucumbers, and coyer them as before. Let thend ' ftand two days, then cover them again; if they are not green,-boil them again, and when cold cover them with a bladder and leather: keep pickles always clofe covered, and under the pickle; a wooden fpoon, withholea in it, is the beft thing to take them out with.

N 6 Obferve not tQ boil the fpice but to pour the jboiling vinegar over it.

Sliced Cueamhers

PARE them, and ftice them a little thicker than for th6 table; put them into a cullender, with a handful of fait; the iiext day dry them, put them into a jar with.iliced onion, and

y 2 jiorfc

3S4 THE L-ADY's ASSISTAKt.

borferadifh in layers Make a pickle with white-wine vmeg mace, clovess nutmeg fliced) and whole pepper; boil this hsdf an hour, and pour it on the cucumbers immediately: if they arc to look as if freib cut, ufe double dlftilled vinegary but they cat quite as well with white-wine vinegar.

Onions.

PEEL fmall o'nions into fait and water; fhTft them oncfe 4 day for three days, then fet them over the fire in milk and water till ready to boil; dry them; pour over them the following pickle when boiled, tmd cold-- Double diftilled vinegar, fait, mace, a bay-leaf xf two they will not, took white with 2sf other viiiegan

Mujbratims.

PUT fbme buttons into milk and water, wipe thm from Tt with a pifce of flannel, and throw them into fpring-'water and fait; boil fome fait and water, put in the buttons, boil them up four or £f e minutes; drain them quick; cover them clofe between two cloths, and dry them well $ boil a pickle of double diftilled vineg-ar and mace; when cold, put in the buttons s po oil on the top: they ihould be put into fmall glades as they do not' keep well after they are opened. I always have .them look as white as poffible done in this manier and keep, the year round.

N. £• Some boil them in milk, which is a very good way.

Walnuts.

PUT a hundred of Wge double nuts into a ftone jar; take four ounces of black pcplper, one ounce of Jamaica pepper, two .ounces of ginger, •one ounce of cloves, one pint of muflardfeed, a head or two of garlic four handfuls of (ah; bruife th fpice and the muftard-feed, and boil them in vinegar fufficnt to cover the nuts; when cold put it to them: two days after boil up the pickle; pour it to the nuts immediately covet them clofe: repeat it three days.

Amtherway.

TO a hundred of walnuts put half a pound of whole b)adk pepper, a quarter of a pound of race ginger fiiced thin, half a pound of flower of muflard, a handful of the tops of garlic; fill the jar with vinegar; cover it clofe with a bladder: as the vinegar waftes fill up the jar.

N. B. According to the firft receipt, they are not fit to cat under fix or eight months: to the latter (which is the befl)

twelve

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 325

twelve months: but they are then exceedingly good and never turn either black or foft which they always do when done firft in fait and water.

French Beans

POUR over thena a boiUng hot brine cover them olofe 5 the . next day drain and dry them; pour over them a boiling hot pickle of white-wine vinegar Jamaica pepper, and black pepper, a little mace and ginger repeat tjls for two or three days, or till they look green.

Mangoes of Melons or Cucumhers.

' FOUR over them fait and water boiling hpt; the next day dry them; cut a piece out of the fide, Icxt outthe fee4 very, clean; fill them with garlic, fcraped horfe-raclii, and muf-' tard-feed; pqt in the piece, and tie it in clofpi then pour over them boiling-hot vinegar; in two or three days b:aHg, negar, with ptpper, cloves, and ginger throw in ffiWlngoes $ boil them up quick for a few minutes; put them into a jar; cover them clofe: the melons ihould beimall; the cucumr bers larger If they p not green poiigh bp.U the vinegar gain.

Garlic ckled.

PICK it very cleah; put it over a bjlBc fire in fait and water, and boil it up quick; drain and dry it: make a pickle of double diftilled vinegar and fa!t, which poiir. on boiling hot; repeat it the next day

Nafturtium Buds.

AS foon as the bloflons are off gather the little knobs; put them into cold fait and water $ (hift them once a day for three days: make a cold pickle of white- wine vinegar, a little white wine, efchalot, pepper, cloves, mace, nutmeg quartered, and jborfe-radifh: put in the buds

Barberries.

PUT maiden barberries into a jar, with si good quantity of fait and water i tie on a blad4er: when the liiqHor fcums pver ihift it.

Codlins.

THEY flioilld- be the fizc of a large walnut; or if they are much larger, they are not the worfe: put vine-leavps in the hot tom of a brafs pan; lay in the codlins; cover them with leaves, then with water: fet them over a gentle fire till they will pl; pepl them and put them into the e water, lyith vinelcves

Y 3 at

''v.-(4

J26 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

at top and bottom; covrr them clofe ovef a flo fire till they become green: when they are cold take 6fF the end whole cutting it round with a little knife; fcoop out the eore fill th apple with garlic and muftard-feed, put on the bit, and fet that end upprmoft in the pickle; which is dotibte diftilled vinegar cokl with a little mace aad cloves: httewine vinegar Will do

Radijb Pods,

AS French beanf.

Colltflower%

PULL it into burtcheiS) throw it fot 6tt mtnute into Tpring vater and fait boiling, then into cold fpring- water; dry it j cover it with double diftilled vinegar: in a week put fretih vinegar, with a little mace and nutmeg: keep it clofe coiered

MMng df Spanijh Omens.

PEEL thfc omtttts, aftd tut a fmall round piece otcf the bottom and fcoop out little of the infides $ put thetti in fait dnd water three days, changing them twice a dayi then drdii Uiem And ftuff them t Btft piat in fiowi of muftard-feed thh fome ginger cut fmall, a little mace, and fome efchalot cat fmall; then fome more muftaftl, and fill them up with fome Scraped horfe-radift ) then put .on the bottom-piece, tie it on t:Iofe: make a ftrong pf ckle of whitewine vinegar, mace, giifger, nutmegs fiiced horfe-riOi, and fome fait: put in the mangoes, and let them boil up two or three times. Care muft be taken they.are not boiled too jmuch, for they will then lofe their firmnefs and will not keep: put them with the pickle ' into ajar. The next morning boil up the pickle again, and pour over them.

Mango of Peaches.

Take fome peaches of the laigcft kind, when they arc fullgrown and are juft beginning to ripen; throw them into fait and water with a little bay- fait; kt them lie two or three days, hovered with a boafd) then take ditfm out, wipe them dry and with a ftiarp p-kttrfe cut thm open $ take oftt the ftone; cut fome garlic very fine, fcrape a great deal of horferadifh, mix a great deal of bruifed muftardfeed, a few bruifed cloves, and fome ginger iliced very thin, and fill the hollow of the peaches with tins; then tie them round with a thread, .and lay them in a jar; throw in feme cloves, mace broken cnamon, and a fmall quantity of cochineal .3 pour ovmr theai ' as eiucfa vinegar zs will fiU the j i to'evry iquart pot la qaris ter

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 327

ter of a pint of the beft well-made muftard, two or three heads of garliC) fbme fliped gingv, fpine cloves, mace, and nutmeg mix the pickle well together, and pour it over the peaches; tie them clofe with a bladder and leather. They will foon be fit to cat.

White plumbs may be done in the fanae manner.

0 pickle Grapes

LET the grapes be at their full growth, but not ripe, cut them in fmall bunches; put them in a ftone jar, with vine leaves between every layer of grapes, till the jar is full; then take as nauch fpring-water as will be enough to cover the grapes and leaves; as it heats, put in as much fait as will make it a brine ftrong eppugh to bear an egg, let it be half bay-falt and )ialf common, fait: when it boils, fcum it; run it through a flannel bag, and let it iland to fettle; by the time it is cold it "will be quite fettled; flrain it again through the bag, and then pour it into the jar to the grapes, which muft be well covered fill the jar with vine-leaves, then tie it over with a dou- • ble cloth, and fet a plate upon it i let it ftand two days, then tajce off the cloth, pour away fhe brine, and take out the leaves and the fruit, and lay them between two cloths to dry j then take two quarts of vinegar, one quart of fpring-water, and one pound of coarfe fugar; let it boil a little while, fcum it very clean as it boils; let it ftand till it is quite cold; wipi the jar very clean and dry, put foOie frefh vinerleaves at the bottom, between every bunch of grapes, and on the top then pour and ftrain the pickle on the grapes; fill the jar; let the pickle be above the grapes; tie on a thin piece of board in 2( bit of flannel, lay it on the top of the grapes to keep them under the pickle: tie them down with a bladder, and then a leather; always keep them under the pickle.

To fickle Suckers before the Leaves are hard.

TAKE the, fuckers and pare off all the hard ends of the leaves and ftalks; fcald them in fait and water, and when (hey are cold put them into glafs bottles, with two or three blades of large mace, and a nutnieg fliced thin s fill them with diftilled vineg

10 pickle Suckers.

TAKE the young fuckers, peel off the leaves till the white bottom appears; fcrape them as quick as can be, to prevent their turnine black; take out all the choke clean with thjj point of a hlver knife, and throw them as they are dofie into y 4 vinegar;

'"iBIf

jftS tHE LADYs ASSISTANT.

vinegar; boil them in it a quarter of an hour, with fome mace a few cloves, and a little fait: put a few bay-leaves into the jar or glafs they are kept in.

.. The green fort are beft, as they have no choke which need be taken out

Beet' Root.

BOIL it till tender, peel it, and if agreeable, cut it into fliapes; pour over it a hotpickle of white- wine vinegar, H little finger, pepper, and hore-radiib fliced.

Red Cabbage.

SLICE the cabbage; boil a pickle of white-wine vinegar, black and Jamaica pepper fome muftard-feed: when quite cold put it to the cabbage.

Lemons.

THEY fhould be fmall, and thick rind; rub them with a piece of flannel, flit them in four parts, a little above half way down, but not through to the pulp; fill the flits hard with fait, fet them upright in a pan, let them ftand four days, or longer if the fait is not melted; turn them three tirties a day in their own liquor till they are tender: make a pickle of rape vinegar the brine from the lemons, Jamaica pepper and ginger; boil and fcum it; when cold put it to the lemons, with two ounces of mufl:ard-feed, three cloves of garlic: this is fuiEcieql for fix lemons.

Indian Pickle or Peccalillo. 4$

TAKE white cabbage quartered, collitower, cucumbers melons, apples, French beans, plumbs; all or any of thefe: lay them on a hair fieve, ftrew over a large handful of fait, fet them in the fun for three or four days, or till very dry: put them into a flone jar with the following pickle - Put a pddnd of race-ginger into fait and water, the next day fcrape and flice it, fait it, and dry it in the fun; flice fait, and dry a pound of garlic; put thefe into a gallon of vinegar, with two ounces of long pepper, half an ounce of turmeric, a quarter of a pound of muftard'feed bruifed; ftop the pickle clofe, then prepare the cabbage, &c. If fruit is put in it muft be green.

N. B. The jar need never he emptied, but put in the things as they come into feafon, adding frejQi vinegar.

Jfparagus.

SCRAPE them, and cat off the prime part at the ends; wipe them, and lay them carefully in a gallipot, pour vinegar

over

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 32

over them, let tbeai lie in this ten days, or a fortnight; boil fome freih vinegar pour it on them hot; repeat this till they are a good colour, covering them clofe: add mace and a little nutmeg. They do very well in a made-di(h, when afparagus is not to be had ) but when they are ufed lay them a little while in warm water.

To pickle inces.

TAKE half a dozen quinces, cut them all to pieces, and put them in an earthen pot, with a gallon of water, and two pounds of honey; mix all thefe together, and then put them into a kettle to boil leifurely half an hour; ftrain the liquor into an earthen pot, and when it is cold wipe the quinces clean, and put them into it: they mufl be covered very tlofe; and they will keep all the year.

To pickle Samphire.

TAKE the famphire that is green, lay it in a clean pan; throw two or three handfuls of fait over it, and cover it with fpring- water: let it lie twenty-four hours; then put it into a large brafs faucepan; throw in a handful of fait; cover it with good vinegar; cover the pan clofe, and fet it over a very flow fire: let it ftand till it is juft green and crifp, then take i( off, for if it is foft it is fpoiled; put it into a jar and cpver it clofe; when it is cold tie it down.

Elder-Jhcots in imitation of Bamboo.

TAKE the largeft and youngeft of the e1der-hoot$, which fprout out in the middle of Ma: the middle ftalks are the moft tender, and likewife are the largeft; but thofe which are fmall are not worth doing. Peel off the outward (kin, and lay them in a ftrong brine of fait and water all night, then dry them in a cloth, every piece by itfelf. Make the pickle half white-wine and half beer vinegar: to each quart of pickle put one ounce of white pepper, an ounce of ginger fliced, a little mace, and a little wfade. Jamaica pepper; boil the fplce in the pickle, and pour it hot upon the (boots; ftop them clofe immediately, and iet the jar before the fire: let it ftand two hours turning it often.

It is a good way to green pickles: if they are not green, boil them two or three times, and pour it on boiling hot.

To pickle green Almonds •

BOIL vinegar according to the quantity which is to be pickled; put mto it fait, mace, ginger, Jamaica and white pepper; put it into a jar and let it ftand till it is cold; then

put

330 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

put the almonds to the liquor, and let it cover them: take care to fcum the vinegar before the fpices are put into it.

fo pickle Elder-buds.

TAKE elder buds when they are the fize of hop-buds, make a ftrong brine of fak and water, and put them in for nine days i ftir it two or three times a day: put them into a brafs pan, cover them with vine-leaves, and pour the water on them that they came out of; fet them over a (low fire till they are quite green; then make a pickle for them of allegar, a little macc a few efchalots, apd fome diced ginger; boil them two or three minutes, and pour them upon the buds; tic them down and keep them in a very dry place.

Capers.

CAPERS are the flower-buds of a fmall (brub, preferved in pickle: the tree which bears them is called the caper Ihrub or bu(h: it is common in the wefiern part$ of Europe: we have them in fome gardens, but the principal place for pickled capers is at Toulon: we have fome from Lyons, but they are flatter, and lefs firm; and fome come from Majorca, but they are fait and difagreeable: the iioeft-flavoured are from Toulon.

They, gather tjie buds from the bloffoms before they open, then fpread them upon the floor in a room where no fun enters then let them lie till they begin to wither i they then throw them into a tub of iharp vinegar; apd after three days they add a quantity of bay-falt: when this is diiTolved, they are fit for packing for fale, and are fent to all parts of Europe.

The finefl: capers are thofe of a moderate fize, firm, and clofe, and fuch as have the pickle highly flavoured: thofe that are foft flabby, and balfopen, are o? little value,

OliviSf

OLIVfiS are the fruits of trees, which grow wild in the warmer parts of Europe: we have them in fome of ourgardensf but with us they will not ripen to any perfeAien.

There are three kinds, the Italian, Spani(h, and French; we have them therefore of various fize and flavours: fome prefer one, and fome the other.

The finefaliad oil, as has been 'before mentioned, is made from this fruit, for which purpofe they are gathered ripe; but for pickling they are gathered when half-ripe at the Utter (nd

Made fxoxn four akt

of

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 331

Cf June: they are put into frefh water to foak for two days; aftei this they throw them into lime-water in which fome pearU afbes have been diflblved: they lie in this Jiquor fix-and-thirty hours; then they are thrown into water which has had bayfait difTdlved in it: this is the laft preparation, and they are fenC over to us in this liquor: they are naturally as they grow bit the tree very bitter, and therefore require all thefe preparations to bring them to their fine flavour. To Tome olives they add a fmall quantity of eilence of fpices, which is an Oil drawn from cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon coriander, ajnd fweet-fennel feed diftilled together for that purpofe: twelve drops are enough for a buChel of olives: fome prefer them flavoured with this eSktice but others like them beft plain,

ir& pickk Capjicum Pods.

GATHER the pods, with theftalks ort, before they turn ted: cut a flit dovtrn the fide with a pen-knife, and take out all the feeds, but as little of the nieat as poffible; lay them in a ilrong brine for three days, changing it every day % then take them out, lay them on a cloth, and lay another over them till they are quite dry; boil vinegar enough to cover them, put into it fome mace and nutmeg beat fmali: put the pods into a

flafs or jar, and when the liquor is cold, pour it over, then tie a ladder and leather over them.

To pickk PurJUin Stalks.

WASH the ftalks, and cut them in pieces fix inches long; put them into water and fait, and let them boil np about a d( zen timibs; then ftrain the liquor from them: make a pickle of ftaie beer, white wine vinegar, and fait: when they are told put them in and cover them lofe

Cruji f raifid Pies.

P17 T four pounds of butter into a kettle of water, with three quarters of a pound of rendered beef fuet; boil it two or three minutes, pour it on twelve pounds of flower, work this into a pretty ftiff pafte, pull it into lumps to cool: raife the

pie.

332 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT,

pie. Ufe the fame proportions for all raifed pies, according to th ilze that is wanted, and bake them in a hot oven

Puff Pajfe.

RUB as much butter into (bme flower as poffiUe, without its feeling at all greafy i i( mufi be rubbed in quite fine; put water to make it a nice light pafte, roll it out, fticic bits of butter all over it, flower it, roll it,up 9gain: do this three limes. This is proper for meat pies.

Short Cruft.

RUB feme butter and flower together, full fix ounces of butter to eight of flower; mix it up with as little water as poffi ble, fo as to have it a ftiffifli pafle; beat it well, roll it thin This is the beft cruft for all tarts that are to be eat cold, and for preferved fruit. A moderate oven.

Sugar Craft.

HALF a pound of flower, half an ounce of fifted fugar 5, work this with. a little cream, and about two ounces of butter, into a ftifi pafte; roll it very thin: when the tarts are made, rub the white of an egg (firft beaten) over tbem with a feather: Jift fugar. A moderate oven.

A Pafte to be baked or fried.

TAKE flower according to the quantity of pafte which is to be made, and mix it with fome powder-fugar, as much figar as flower; melt fome butter very fmooth, with fome grated lemon-peel, and an egg well beat; mix up thefe ingredients till they are a firm pafte: bake it, or fry it.

Beef Dripping darned for Cruft.

BOIL it in water a few minutes j let it ftand till cold; i( will come off in a cake: it makes good ruft for the kitchen.

Beef Steak Pie.

RUMP (leaks are the beft: feafon them with pepper an4 falt moft pepper;, puff pafte top and bottom: wster to fiU the diftu

Beef Olive Pie

MAKE the olives as direfted in the receipt for making beef olives: put them into puff pafte top and bottom j fill e pip with wiiter: when baked pour in fome rich gravy.

A common

"THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. S3t

A common Veal Pie.

As the other two.

A rich Vehl Pie.

CUT fteaks from a ioin a neck, a fillet, or a breaft; feaGfbn %hem with pepper, fait, nutmeg, a very little pounded cloves; flice two fweetbreads, feafon them in the fame manner; lay puflf 'pafle round the difh half an inch thick, then the meat, yolks of eggs boiled hard, and oyfters at the top; Ull it "with water; cover it: when it Is tlken out of the oven, pour in at the top, through a funnel, fome good boiled gravy, thickened with a little cream and flower, and boiled up.

Veal Olive Pie.

MAK the olives as direded in the receipt for making veal olives; put them into a cruft; fill the pie with water: when ' baked, pour in fome boiled gravy, thickened with a tittle creaiA "and flower boiled together. It is a very good pie.

Calf s Heud Pie.

CUT half a calPs head (firft parboiled) into thin flices Teafon with pepper and fdt; lay it into a cruft, with a little;good gravy, fome forced-meat balls, and yolks of eggs boiled hard; bake it about an hour and a half, then cut off the lid $ thicken fome good gravy with a little flower add fome oyfters •: ferve it without a lid.

It may be ferved with the lid on.

A French Pie.

LAY a puiF pafte half an inch thik at the bottofti of a deep difli or a mould; lay forced-meat round the fide of the th; C4Jt fome fweetbreads in pieces, three or four, according to the ajt the pie is intended to foe; lay them in firft, then Tome artichoke bottoms cut into four pieces each, then (bme cocks-combs (or they may be omitted) a few truffles and morells, fome afparagus tops, and frefh mufhrooms if to be had, yolks of eggs boiled hard, and forced-meat balls; feafon with pepper and fait; almofl fill the pie with water, cover it bake it two hours: when it comes from the oven pour in fome rich veai-ravy, thickened with a very little cream an( flower.

Mutton or Grafs Lamh Pie.

TAKE the fat and (kin from a loin, gut it into fteaks

feafon

534 THE LADYg ASSISTANT,

feafon them weH with pepper and fait i almoft fill the diib with water: puiF pafte top and bottom.

Houfe Lamb Steaks.

MAKE a nice pie with the fame ingredients

Venifcm Pajiy.

BONE a neck and breaft of veniron feafon theai Well with (Kipper and alt, put them into a pan, with part of a neck of mutton diced and laid over theoif a glafs of red wine cover them with a coarfe pafte, bake it an hour or two, bake it in a pufF- pafte; add a little more feafoning and the p;ravy from the meat; let the cruft at the bottom be half an mch thick, the top cruft thicker. Jf the pafty is to be eat hot, pour a rich gravy into it when it comes from the oven; if cold, that is not necenary: ornament the lid as it is liked. The breaft and flioulder makes a good pafty: it may be baked in raifed cruft If the meat is not to be very tender, three bors will bke 91 middle-fized pafty very well, and more of the flavour of the Venifon is retained than if rft baked

A Pork Ph IS mdde 10 the fame manner as beef or miitto;i pie

J Hare Pie.

SEASON a hare (when cut into pieces) with nutmeg, pep fyer, and fait; jug it with half a pound of butter: it muft do above an hour, clofe covered, in a pot of boiling water: make forced-meat, to which ad the liver bruifed, and a glafs of red wine ( let it be high-feafoned, lay it round the infide of a raifed cruft, put in the hare when cool, and 9dd the gravy that comers from it, with fome loore rich gravy $ put oa the lid, bake it two hours.

J RabUt Pie to he eat bet.

TAKE a couple of young rabbits and cut them into quar' ters take a quarter of a pound of bacohand bruife it to pieces in a marble mortar with the livers, fome pepper, (alt, a little Aiace, and (bme parfley cut fmall, fome chives, and a few leaves of iweet bafil: when thefe are all beaten fine, make the pafte, aod covtr the bottom of the pie with the ieafaniAg; then put in the rabbits; pound fome more bacon in a mortar, mix with it fome frefh butter, and cover the rabbits with it, and over that lay focne thin flices of bacon; put on the lid, and iend it to xhe ovens it wiii take two hours badcin;: virhen it is done

take

i

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT 335

take off the lid, take out the bacon, and fcum off the fat: if there is not gravy enough in the pie, pour in fomc rich mutton or veal gravy boiling hot

ji common Goofe Pie

MAKE a raifed ciuft, quarter the goofe, feafon it well, lay it into the cruft, half a pound of butter at the top cut into pieces; lay on the lid; bake it gently.

A . rich Gc€f€ Pie.

BONE a goofe and fowl, feafon them very well; put the fowl into the goofe, and feme forced-meat into the fowl; put tbefe into a raifed cruft, £ll the corners with a iittle forced meat; cut half a pound of butter into pieces which lay on the tops cover it; bake it well. Goofe pie is eat cold.

Gille Pie.

CLEAN the giblets very well; put all but the liver into a fauce-pan, with fome water, a little whole pepper, an onion a little fait, and a bunch of fweet herbs; let tm ftew till tender, clofe covered lay a puff pafte in the difli; then a rump fieak peppered and falted; then the giblets feafoned, With the liver; add the liquor they were ftewed in, clofe the pie; bake it about two hours; when it is drawn pour in the gravy: the fteak may be omitted.

J Dutch Pie

MAY be made as either of the goofe pies, omitting the fowl i or with paif pafte.

A common Chicken Pie.

CUT a chicken or to into pieces; feafon high with pepper and (alt; puff pafte at the bottom of the difti: ftick on the chicken here and there a bit of butter; fill the diih with water covr it; bake it in a moderate oven, It may be made richer by putting in gravy inftead of water.

A rich Chicken Pie.

Lay a puff pafte at the bottom of the di(h, and upon that round the fide a thin layer of forced-meat. Seafon high with pepper and fait two fmall chickens cut into pieces piit fome oi the pieces into the difh then a fweetbread or two cut into pieces, and well feafoned, a few truffles and morells, fom artichoke bottoms cut each into four pieces, then the remainder cf the chickens fome forced -meat balls, yolks of eggs bo

• 33 THE LADrs ASSISTANT.

hard, chopped a little, and ftrewed over the top, a little water coyer the pie: when it comes from the oven pour in a rich gravy, thickened with a little flower and butter If agreeable, add to the pie frelh muihroonis, afparagus tops, and cocks combs.

N. B. The chickens are very excellent larded with bacon, amd ftufied with fweet herbs, pepper, nutmeg, and mace: thejr are only then flit down, and laid into the pie

Pigeon Pie.

SEASON the pigeons extremely well, infide and out, put a bit of butter into each; lay them in the difli on a puflF pafte the breafts downwards, the gizzards and liv€;rs all together ia the middle of tldifli; put in fome water, clofe the pie, bake it well iJr in fome good gravy when it comes from the oven figood rump-fl;eak under the pigeons is a great ad dition.

A rich Pigeon Pie.

LAY p pafte at the bottom of the dilh, feafon the pigeons big ftuiF the craws with forced-meat; lay them in the difli, the breafts downward j All all the fpaces with forced meat balls, yolks of eggs boiled hard, afparagus tops, arti choke bottoms cut into pieces; cover it and bake it well: when it comes from the oven pour in fome rich gravy. tufHng the craws may be omitted, and every other addition but forcedmeat balls and hard eggs

ji Vermicelli Pie.

TAKE four pigeons, feafon them with a little pepper and fait, ftuflF them with a piece of butter, a few crumbs of bread, and a little parfley cut fmall; butter a deep earthen difli well, and then cover the bottom of it with two ounces of vermicelli; make a puff pafte, roll it pretty thick, and lay it on the diih; then lay in the pigeons, the breafts downward: put a thick lid on the pie, and bake it in a moderate oven; when it is enough, take a difli proper for it to be fent to table in, and turn the pie on it. The vermicelli is then on the top, and looks very

A Sbropjhire Pie.

MAKE fome good puff pafte, let the flde cruft be thick; fcut two rabbits into pieces, two pounds of fat pork cut into little pieces; feafon them with pepper and fait, cover the difli with cruil, Uy in the rabbits, and m the pork with them; take

"i

%

TH£ LADY'S ASSISTANT. S3f

take the livers of the rabbits, parboil and bruife them in a mor tar, with a little fat bacon, fome fweet herbs, and a few oyfters; feafon them with pepper, fait, and nutmeg; mix, thefe up with the yolk of an egg into balls, lay them into different parts of the pie, with fome artichoke bottoms cut into pieces, and fome cocks-combS) a fmall nutmeg grated, half a pint of red wine and half a pint of water: bakis it an hour and a half in a quick oven

Ham and Chicken Pie.

CUT fome flices, not too thin, from a ham that has beeft boiled, pepper them, lay them at the bottom of a dilh, on a good pufF pafte about half an inch thick; feafod a fowl (firft cut into four quarters) with a good deal of pepper, but a little fait; lay on the top fome hard yolks of eggs, a fewuiSes and morells, and cover all with fome more fliced ham pPered; fill the difh with gravy ) cover it j let the cruft be pretty thick j bake the pie well, and add to it fome rich gravy when it ia taken out of the oven. If to be eat cold omit thoavy.

0 make a Torkjhire Chriimas Pi

MAKE a good ftanding cruft the wall and bottom mufl be very thick; then take a turkey and bone it, a goofe, a fowl, a partridge, and a pigeon; feafon them well- Take half an ounce of cloves, half art ouncdf of black pepper, beat fine together, two large fpoonfuls of fait; flit the fowls alown the back, and bone them $ put the pigeon into the partridge, the partridge into the fowl, the fowl into the goofe, and the goofe into the turkey, which muft be a very large one; feafon them all well £rft, and lay them in the cruft; cafe a hare, wipe it with a, clean cloth, joint it and cut it to pieces, feafon it and lay it clofe on one fide; on the other fide woodco(iks, or any fort of game: Jet them be well feafoned and laid clofe; put four pounds of butter into the pie, and lay on a very thick lid: it muft have a very hot oven, and will take four hours baking.

The cruft will take a bufhel of flower.

Partridge Pie to be eat hot.

TAKE three brace of full-grown partridges, let them be trufled in the fame manner as a fowl for boiling; put into a marble mortar fome efchalots, and fome parfley cut fmaJl, the livers of the partridges, aiid twice the quantity of bacon; beat thefe together, and feafon them with pepper, fait, and a blad or two of mace: when thefe are all pounded to a paflr, add to them fome freih muihrooms, then raife the crufi for the pie, and

2t cvec

't

s t I

338 TfiE LADVs ASSISTANT;

cover the bottom of it with the feafoning, then lay in tflft jartridges9 but no fluffing in them; put the remainder of the feafoning about the fides and between the partridges; then ftrew over them fome pepper and fait, and a little mace, feme cfchalots, fome freih muflirooms, and a little bacon, beat fine in a mortar; lay a layer of it over the partridges, and fome thin flices of bacon; put on the lid. It will take two hours an4 a half baking: when it is done take off the lid and the flices &f bacon, and fciim off the fat; put in a pint of rich veal-gravy, and fqueeze in the juice of an orange.

Partridge Pie to be eat cold.

TAKE fix or eight young partridges, trufs and beat the breafts very flat, finge and broil them upon a flove over a very clear charcoal fire i when they are cold lard them; beat fome bacon in a mortar, and mix it with the livers, fcalded and bruifed; put fome of this into the partridges;. then make a feafoning' wiykfome fweet herbs, pepper, fait, nutmeg, mace, . and fome Aion-peel ihred very fine: make a raifed cruft for the pie, and lay upon it a little of the fluffing of the livers of the partridges, over that a little of the feafoning, and then lay in the partridges; flrew fome of the feafoning over them, then put among tnem fome bits of butt, and a little bacon cut very fine, with a few leaves of fweet-bafil, two or three bayleaves, and a fewfreih truffles: lay thefe amongft the partridges, aftd over them a few very thin flices of bacon; put on the lid, zhA fend it to the oven: it will take three hours baking, .

after which it muft ftand to be cold This is the right French •partridge pie.

A Woodcock Pie to he eat Cbld.

THIS pie is made very much like the partridge, only the entrails are made ufe of: when the woodcocks are picked put the entrails by, and trufs them as for roafting; make thebreaftbone fiat, and broil them over fome clear charcoal: when they are cold lard them all over, then pound fome bacon in a marble mortar, mix it with the livers of the woodcocks, wkich alfo bruife, with two ortbree leaves of fweet-bafil cut thp entrails very fmall, and mix them with the other feafoning; raife the pie; lay at the bottom fome of the ftuffing, and put the rel into the birds, puttixfg between them fome poujfided bacon and frefli butter mixed together, with a very little mace, pepper, and fait: when the pie is almoft filled take a cute:t,

Q cut

tHE LADTs ASJSISTANT. 339

fcut quite round a fillet of veal, and over that fome flices of bacon, cut very thin; then put on the lid: it (hould ftand three or four hours, according to the quantity pf birds: when it comes out of the oven fet it to gool.

The French are very fond of thefe cold pies; and indeed they are excellent. A pigeon pie made after this manner the pigeons larded and fluffed is very good

FISH PIES.

Turcot Pie.

WHEN the turbot is wafliedj parboil it, and feafon it with little pepper fait, cloves, mace, nutmeg, and fweet herbs cut fine: when the pafte is made lay in the turbot, with fome yolks of eggs boiled hard, a whole onion (which muft be taken out when the pie is baked;) lay a great deal of frelh butter on the top, and clofe it up. It is good cold or hot Salmon Pie &

MAKE a good puff pafte, and lav it at the bottom of a difii; take fome of the middle part of a (almon and cut it into fmall pieces; feafon them with pepper, fait, cloves, and mace; lay fome butter pon the pie, then a layer of ialmon, and thea fome more butter, till it is full: make a forced-meat with aa eel chopt fine, fome hard eggs, two or tTee anchovies, fome marrow, and fweet herbs a little grated bread, and a few oyfters, fome'pepper, fait, and fpice: make, iboie gravy with the liquor the eels were boiled in: put on the lid.

Sole Pie.

TAKE two pounds of eels, boil them tender, pick the fiefh from the bones, put the bones into the liquor the eels were boiled in, with a blade of mace, and fait.; let them boil till there is only a quarter of a pint of liquor, thenftrain it; cut the flefii of the eel very fine, with a little lemon-peel cut fmall a little fait, pepper, and nutmeg, a few crumbs of grated brfad, parfley cut fine, and an anchovy mix a quarter of 9 pound of butter and lay it in the difli; cut the meat from a pair of large foles, and take off the fins; lay it on the forced-meat, then pour in the liquor the eels were boiled in, and clofe the pie A turbot-pie may be marie the fame way. The bones ihould be boiled with' a little fpice, to make gravy to put into it.

Z a Carp

340 lHE LADTs ASSISTANT.

Carp Pie,

SCALE, gut, and waflj a brace cf carp very clean; take a large eel, ikin it, boil it a little, and mince it; tnx it with fweet herbs, and the yolks of hard eggs, ibme anchovies, and a pint of oyfters cut very fmalj; feafon with pepper, fait, mace, clovres, and a little ginger, half a pound of butter, and the yolks of five hard eggs; work all together like a pafte; ftufF the carp with this forced-meat, and put them into the pie; fave the liquor the eel was boiled in, put in the eel bones, a little mace, whole pepper, an onio, fome fweet herbs, and an anchovy; boil it till there is about a pint, ftrain it, and add ' to it a quarter of a pint of white wine, and a lump of butter rolled inr flower; boil it up, and pour fome of it into the pie; if there is any forced-meat left after ftuffing the carp, make it into balls, and put it into the pie. Warm the reft of the liquor and pour into it when it is taken out of the oven.

Jench Pie. .

e bottoni of the difli a laye of butter, then grate In fome nutmeg, with pepper, fait, and mace; lay in the tench, cover them wiA fome butter, and pour in fome red wine and a little water, then put on the lid; when it comes from the oven, pour in melted butter, with fome grany in it.

• Trout Pie.

TAKE a brace of trout, and lard them with eels; raifii the cruft, and lay a layer of fre(h butter at the%ottom; then make a forced meat of trout, muihrooms, truffles, morells, chives and frefli butter; feafon them with fait, pepper, and fpice; mix thefe up with the yolks of two raw- eggs; ftuff the trout with this forced-meat, lay them in the pie, cover them with butter, put on the lid, and fend it to the oven.; have fome good £fl)gravy ready to pour into the pie when it is baked.

Eel Pie.

. CUT the eels into pieces; feafon them with pepper and fait, a very little dried fae; put them into a puiF pafte, fill the bio with water; butter it well

Lobjier Pie.

BOIL a couple of lobfters, take them out of the fhells; icafpn them with ppcr, mace and nutmeg, beat fine; braife the bodies, and mix them "with fome oyfters (if in feafon) cut fine a fmall onion a little parfley, and a little grated bread; feafon

THE LADY8 ASSISTANT. 341

fearon with a little fait pepper, fpice, and the yolks of two raw eggs; make this into balls; then make fome good puflF pafte, butter the difii, lay in the tails, claws, and balls, cover them with buttpr, pour in a little fifh-cullis or gravy, cover the pie; have a little fi(h-gravy to put into it when it Is taJcca cut pf the oven.

PATTIES Meat Patties.

THE tins (hould be about the fize of a fmall teaCup, but not fo deep; lay puiF paft at the bottom, put in fome forced-ineat, and covec it with pufF pafte; bake them a light brown, turn them out; five or feven make a fide di(b.

: Or,

ADD to the forced-meat a littlp veal, or chicken minced, 9Lnd a fpoonful or two of gravy.

Or, MINCE either veal or cold chicken, a little fuet, a few fprigs of parfley feafon with pepper, fait, and nutmeg; (hake this over the fire with fome veal gravy, a 'fpoonful or two of cream, a littk flower: fill the patties, which make in the following manner. - Lay puff pafte into the tins, roiled not too thick, mould them neatly round the edge, with no top cruft bake them; fill this cruft juft as it is going to table.

BJh Patties.

TAKE a male carp which has a milt, a tench, and a filver eel; boil them a little: take half a dozen oyfters, hdf-ftew them, pick the flefli from the bones of the fih, and beat it to

Sther in a mortar, with the milts of the fi(h, fome mace, and ome white wine mix them well together: make fome rich puff pafte, line the tins with it, then put in the forced-meat, with one oyfter and a bit of butter; put on the lid, and bake them.

Oyfter Patties.

TAKE fix large oyfters, and a fine filver eel, pick the meat frppa the bones, beat it in a marble mortar with fome pepper,

Z 3 lltt

342 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

ialt, two cloves, and as much mountain wine as will foften it I make feme good puff pafte, take one of the oyfters wrap it up in the forced-meat, and put to it a piece of butter plofe the patties, and bake them.

Lohjier Patties.

BREAK the lobfters after they are boiled, tale the. meat from the fhells, pull the meat and claws into threads with a fork, bruife their bodies very iine, take a piece of buttef; mix all together, and put them into rich butter, or rich puff pafte, then' fry them.

Fried Patties.

TAKE fome veal, according to the quantity that are to be made, cut it very fmall; take tix oyfters cut fmall, and fome crumbs of bread; mix the oyfter-liquor with the bread, and little fait; when the ingredients are well mixed, put them into a ftew-pan, with a piece of butter,, and ftir them for three of four minutes over the fire; make fome very good puff pafte, roll it out, ajid cut it in little bits, the fizeof naif a crown, fome round, fqure, and three-cornered; put a little of the forcedmeat upon them, and turn them up at the edges, to keep the meat. and gravy in; fet on a frying-pan full of hog's-lard, and fry them j it muft be boiling hot.

P U D P I N G

BOILEDPUDDINGS.

IF the pudding is to be boiled in a cloth, fee that it is very clean, dip It in hot water, and flower it well; if in a bafon, butter it; always mix the flower with a very little milk tirflr, which wiH make the pudding fmooth.

1 ' I "•

Beef Steak Pudding.

CUT a pound of fuct very finct mix it well with half a quartern of flower, add fome fait, and mi it up into a ftifll cruft with cold water, roll .it ut; 'beat fome rump fteaks a little with the rollingpjn, put them into the cruft, tie it up in a cloth; fet oil. a pot of water, and when it boils, put in the pudding. If it is large, one, it will take five hours; the

fmalleft

TH.E LAbYs ASSISTANT- 343

fmalleft requires two hours Mutton cbopa of pigeons may be drefled in the iame manner.

Veal Suet Pudding.

TAKE the crumb of a three-penny-loaf cut into flices two quarts of milk, boiled and poured on the bread, one pound of veal-fuet, melted down and poured in the milk; add to thefe one pound of currants, and (iigar to the tafte, half a nutmeg, fix eggs, well mixed together i if baked butter the dilh well This does for baking or boiling.

Cabbage Pudding,

TAKE two pounds of beef-fuet, as much of the lean part of a leg of veal'; take a little cabbage and fcald 4 then brulfs the fuet, veal, and cabbage together in swmarble mortar; feafon them witl mace, nutmeg, ginger, a little pepper, and fait; fomc green goofeberries, grapes, or barberries - in vrinter, fome verjuice; mix them all well together, with the yolks of four oi; iive eggs well beat; wrs all up together in a green cabbage leaf, tie it in a cloth; sn hour will boil it

Suet Pudding.

A pound of fuet (fared, a quart of milk, four eggs, two tea fpoonfuls of grated ginger, a little fait, and flower enough to make it a thick batter $ toil it two hours: it may be made into dumplings; boil them half an hour.

A light Pudding.

BOIL a little nutmeg and cinnamon in a pint of new milk, take out the fpice; beat eight yolks and four whites of eggs, a glafs of fweet mountain, a little fait and fugar; mix a (poonful of flower, very fmooth in a little of the milk, then put all together, with the crumb of a halfpenny roll grated; tie this in a thick cloth, boil it an hour; ferve it with butter melted, and ine and fugar poured over it.

Batter Pudding.

A pint of milk, four eggs, four fpoonfuls of flower, half a grated nutneg, a little fait; tie the cloth, very clofe, boil it three quarters of an bour.- Melted butter.

N. B. Batter puddings mufl: always be tied clofe bread puddings loofe,

Hafiy Pudding.

TAKE a pint of cream, and the im quantity of milk, a

Z 4 little

344 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Jittle fait, and fwcetcn it with loaf fugar; make it boil; then put in (omc fine flower, keep it conftantly ftirring while the flower is put in, till it is thick enough, and boiled enough; pour it out, and flick the top full of little bits of butter, U may bo cat with fugar or fait.

Another. .

. TAKE an egg, and break it into fome flower, work it up to a ftiff pafle, then mince it very fmall; put on a quart erf milk to boil, put in the minced pafte, with a little fait, fome beaten cinnamon, fugar, and a piece of butter; keep it ftirring ll one way till it is thick.,

. 0 make an Oatmeal Pudding after the New-England

Manner.

TAKE a pint of whole oatmeal, fteep it in a quart of boiled milk over-night; in the morning take half a pound of beeffuet (hred fine, and mix with the oatmeal and milk, fome grated nutmeg, and a little fait, with the yolks and whites of three eggs, a quarter of a pound of currants, a quarter of a pound of raifins, and as much fugar as will fweeten it; ftir t well together, tie it pretty clofe, and boil it two hours.- Sauce melted butter.

Cufiard Pudding.

BOIL a piece of cinnamon in a pint of thin creaqi i a quar-i ter of a pound of fugar j when cpld, add the yolks of five eggs well beaten; ftir this over the fire till pretty thic)c, it muft not ' boil; when quite cold, butter a cloth well, duft it with flower, tie the cuftard in it very clofe, boil it three quarters of an houri when it is taken up, put it into a bafon to cool a little; untie the cloth, lay the difii on the bafon, turn it up; if the cloth is not taken off carefully, the pudding will break; grate over ijt a little fugar. -MUed butter and a little wine in a boat.

faking Pudding.

BOIL a quart of cream; when almoft cold, put to it four eggs that hve been beaten very well, a fpoonful and a. half of flower, fome nutmeg and fugar; tie it clofe in a buttered cloth, boil it an hour, turn it out with care,- Melted butter and little wine and fugar poured over it.

Bread Pudding.

POU a pint of boiling milk upon the crumb of a penny loaf grated and tWQ ounces of butter; a little fugar and nut-.

mcgj

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 345

meg; when cold, add four eggs beaten; mix well all together, boil it an hour; if agreeable, add half a pound of currants picked and wahed.Melted butter, a little fugar, nd white wine.

Common Rice Pudding.

BOIL a quarter of a pound of rice in a clodi, leave it rooni to fwell; when it has boiled an hour, untie it, and ftir in -an quarter of a pound of butter, fome nutmeg and fugar; tie it up, and boil it another hour; pour melted butter over it

Or,

BOIL a quarter of a pound of rice, and half a pound of raifins two hours s throw over it grated nutmeg, fugar, and melted butter.

A fine boiled Rice Pudding.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of flower of rice, put it over the fire in a pint of milk, and keep it conflantiy ftirring, that it may Hot ftick nor burn to the fauce-pan; when it is of 4 proper thicknefs, take it off, put it into sui earthen pan, an4 put to it half a pound of butter while it is hot enough to melt it, but not to oil; put to it half a pint of cream, or milk, the yolks of eight eggs, the whites of two, with fugar to fweeten it, the peel of a lemon grated, (grate it off with the lumps of fugar) then put it into china cups, and boil them; pour ovf them melted butter, with alittle white wine and fugar.

anfey Pudding.

PUT as much boiling cream to four Naples bifcuits grated as will wet them; when cold, idd four yolks of e?gs, fomc juice of fpinach, and a very little tanfey-juice; it muft be co loured a light green j a little fugar; ftir all over' a Aqw fire till it thickens; when cold, tie it clofe in a cloth buttered and flowered; boil it three quarter$ of an hour; put it into a bafon, let it ftand a little, tiu'Q it out with carej pour round it pielted butter and fugar

Almond Puddings

STRAIN two egs well beaten into a quart of cream, penny-loaf grated, one nutmeg, iix fpoonfuls of flower, half a pound of almonds blanched and beaten fine, half a dozen bitter almonds; fweeten with fine fugar; add a little brandy; boil it half an hour; pour round it melted butter and wine i ftick it with almonds blanched and flit

Sago

g46

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Sago Pudding.

BOIL two ounces of fago in one )int of milk) till tender i -when cold add five eggs two Naples bifcuits, a litde brandy fugar to the tafte boil it in a bafon.-Melted butter and a little wine &nd fugar

CaJfS'Foot Pudding. '

TAKE four feet, boil them, tender j pick the niceft of the meat from the bones, and chop it very fine; then add the crumb of a penny-loaf grated, a pound of beef-fuet ihred fmall, half a pint of cream, feven eggs, a pound of currants, four ounces of citron cut fmall, two ounces of candied orangepeel' cut like ftraws, a nutmeg, a large glafs of brandy; butter the cloth and flower it; tie it clofe it fhould boit three hours.

Bifcuit Pudding.

POUR a pint of boiling cream or milk over three penny Naples bifcuits grated; cover it clofe; when cold, add the yolks of four eggs, two whites, nutmeg, a little brandy, half a fpoonful of flower, fome fugar; boil this one hour in a china bafon % rve it with melted butter, wine, and fugar.

4 Prune Puddings

MIX ur fpoonfuls of flower into a quart of milk, fix eggs, pnly three of the whites, a little fait, twp tea-fpoonfuls of beaten ginger, a pound of prunes tie it in a cloth, boil it an hour.- Damfons may be ufed inftead of prunes but then fugar ' inuft be added.

A very good comfton Puddings with Currants.

A POUND of currants, a pound of fuet, five eggs, foiijr fpoonfuls of flower, half a nutmeg, a tea-fpoonful of ganger, little powder fugar, a little fait; boil this thrctf hours.

Jn excellent Plumb Pudding.

ONE pound of fuet, the fame of currants, the fame of rai? ' fins ftoncd, the yolks of eight eggs, the whites of four the crumb of a pennyloaf grated, one pound of flower, half a nutmeg, a tea-fpoonful of gratfcd ginger, a little fait, a fmall glafe of brandy; beat the eggs iirfl:, mi them with fonae milk; by degrees add the flower and other ingredients, and what more milk may be neceflary; it ipuft be yery thick and wfU ftirrcd j boil it five hours.

' Jl Hunting

THE LADY-s ASSISTANT. 34

J Htmthg Pudding.

MIX a pound of flower with a pint of cream, and eight cggt that have been well beaten, a pound of beef-fuet, the fame of currants, half a pound of raifins ftoned and chopped, two ounces of candied citron, two ounces of candied orange cut fmall, a nutmeg, and a glafs of brandy; boil this four hours,

pple Pudding.

MAKE a puff pafte, roll it near half in inch thick; pare -and core the apples, fill the cruft; grate a little lemOn-peel (and a littletiemon-juice in winter, it quickens the apple) put in fbme fugar, clofe the cruft, tie it in a cloth; a fmall pudding will take two hours boiling, a large one three or four.

New College Pudding.

A TWO-PENNY loaf grated, four ounces of beef-fuet ihred, and four ounces of marrow, fix ounces of fcalded currants, four of fine fugar, lialf a nutmeg, a little fait, the yolks of fix eggs, the whites of three, a little brandy; mix all well, and boil the pudding half an hour; melted butter wine, and fugar: fweetmeats may be added.

Duke of Buckingham's Pudding

HALF a pound of fuet chopped fine, a quarter of a pound )f raifins ftoned and chopped, two eggs, a little nutmeg and ginger, two fpoonfuls of flower, a little fugar to the tafie j tie It clofe, boil it four hours at leaft $ ferve it with melted butter, fack, and fugar.

Duke of Cumberland's Pudding,

FLOWER, grated apple, currants, chopped fuet, fugar, of each fix ounces; fix eggs, a little nutmeg and fait; boil it two hours at leaft; melted butter, wine, and fugar.

An Herb Pudding.

TAKE a quart of grotts, fteep them in warm water half an hour; take a pound of hog's-Iard, cut it in little bits; take of fpinacb, beets, parfley, and leeks, a handful of each, three )arge onions chopped fmall, three iage-leaves cut fine; put in a jitde fait, mix all well together, and tie it clofe. It will require to be taken up in boiling, to Ipofen the ftring a little.

A Spinach Pudding.

TAKE a quarter of a peck of fpinach, pick and wafli It clean, put it into a (aucepan with a little fait; cover it clofe and boil it tender, throw it into a fieve to drain, and then cut it

fmall

34 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

iinall I beat up fix eggs, and mix them with half a pint of cream or milk, a ftale roll grated fine, a little nutmeg, and 9, quarter of a pound of melted butter;'ftir all well together, put it into the fauce-pan the fpinach was ftewed in; keep it Ait, ' 'ling till it begins to be thick, then wet the pudding-cloth and flower it well i tie it up, and boil it an hour; turn it into a diih Bnd pour over it melted butter, with a iittlc Seville orange lueezed in it, and fugar.

yf boiled Lemon Pudding.

TAKE two large lemons, pare them thin, and boil them ti Aree waters till they are tender; then beat them in a mortar to a pafle grace a penny loaf into the yolks and whites of four cggtf well beaten, half a pint of milk, and a quarter of a pound of fugar; mix all thefe well together, put it into 9( rooden diih well buttered, and boil it half an hour.

iifHi'Hl? 't4'i " 444H4

..PUMPLINGS.

Suet DumplingSy with Currants.

A PINT of milk, four eggs, a pound of fuet, a pound of currants, a little fait and nutmeg, two tea-fpoonfuls of ginger, what flower will make it into a light pafte; when th water boils, make the pafte into dumplings, rolled with a little flower, the fize of a goofe egg; throw them into the water, move them gently, to prevent their fipking: a little more tbai half an hour will boil them,

Norfolk Dumplings.

MAKE a batter with a pint of milk, two eggs, a little falc,:ind fome flower; drop this in little quantities into a pan of boiling water $ they will be done in three minutes $ throw theqi into a fieve or cullender, to drain

Rajherry Dumplings.

MAKE a good pufF pafl:e; roll it, read over it raberry jam s roll it up, and boil it a good hour; cut it intq.five Aices poiir melted butter in the diih; grated fugar rounds

Pennyroyal Dumplings.

THE crumb pf a penny Ivaf grated, ihree quvtcrs of a pund

t •

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 449

of' becf-fuct, the fame of currants, four eggs, a little brandf, ft littk thyme and pennyroyal, a handful of parfley (hrcdj mix all well, roll them up with flower; put them into cloths: thccc quarter of an h9ur boils thenu

-- • V ' 'Yeafi Dumplings.

A POUND of flower, a fpoonful of ycaft, a little fait; make this into a light pafte, with warm water, let it lie near an hour; make it into balls, put them into little nets; when the water boils, throw them in; twenty minutes will boil them: keep them from the bottom of the pan, or they will be heavy.

Apple Dumplings.

PARE the apples, and core them whole; fill them with marmalade, or fugar; make a hole in a piece of puff paAe lay in an apple, put another piece of pafte at the top, dofe it round the apple; put them into cloths; boil them three quarters of an hour.

Pigeon Dumplings.

SEASON them well; put them fingly into a piece of puff pafle, rolled half an inch thick; tie them in cloths: boil them two hours. •

'? t ''t' tf 444H H'"t '

BAKED P U D D I N G S.

Torkjhire Pudding baked under Meat.

A QUART of milk, three eggs, a little fait, fome grated ginger, and flower enough to make it as a batter pudding; put it into a fmall tin dripping-pan, of a fize for the pUrpofe; put it under beef, mutton, or veal while roafting; when brown, cut it into four or five lengths, and turn it, that it may brown on the other fide.

Bread Pudding.

BOIL one pint of milk, with a bit of lemonpeel; when it 6as boiled, take out the peel, and ftir in a quarter of a pound of butter, fome nutmeg, and fugar; when the butter i% melted pour it over four ounces of grated bread; cover it; when cold, add three eggs well beaten; butter a dihj and pour dils in juft 9 it goes to the oven.

19 Jphnn

iSo . tttE- tADs A'SSlSTANf.

J plain Pudding.

TAKE a pint of milk, boil in it three laurel-leaves, a littld grated lemon-peel, and a bit of mace s then ftrain it oiF, and vith,z little flower make it intcf a pretty thick hafty pudding; then ftir into it a quarter of a pound of butter, two ounces of fugar, half a fmall nutmeg grated, five yolks and three whites f eggs; beat them wU up all together $ pour it into a di(h and bake it

Common Wbok-Rice Pudding.

TO half a pound of whole rice waflied, add three pints of milk, a quarter of a pound of butter cut into bits, fome cinnation, fugar, and grated nutmeg; an hour and a half will bake it

Ground-Rice Pudding.

TO fix ounces of rice, one quart of milk; ftir this over the fire till thick I take it off, put in a piece of butter the fize of a walnut; when juft cold, add eight yolks of eggs, four whites, well beaten; rafp the peel of a lemon, and put to it fome fugar with the juice, then mix all together; puff pafte at the bottooi ef the dim: half an hour bakes it

Or,

FOUR ounces of butter, four of fugar, four yolks of eggs, two whites, thejuice and rind of a lemon, five or fix fpoonfuls of milk, two of rice ftir all over the fire: bake it with or without puff pafte.

Rice Puddings with Currants.

BOIL three quarters of a pound of ground rice in three pints of milk, till thick; then add one pound of beef-fuet fhred, one pound of currants, the crumb of a penny-loaf grated, a quarter of a pound of fugar, one nutmeg, a little fweet mountain or brandy: one hour will bake it

Tanfey Puddings

BEAT twelve yolks, and four whites of eggs; put to them one quart of cream; colour this with the juice of fpinach, and a little tanfey; a little fait, fome nutmeg, a handful of flower i; about half an hour will bake it: a brifk, but not a fcorching oveQ. Ganilh with quartered Seville oranges, and candied peel.

Jlmond Pudding.

PUT one pint of milk fcalding hot to half a pound of beeffuet

THE LADs ASSISTANT. 351

fact flired, almoft a penny loaf grated half a pound of fweet almonds blanched and beaten, and a few bitter i when cold) add four yolks of eggs, two whites, a little fugar, nutmeg, and fait, fome candied orange and lemon-peel jliced; mix all together; put it into a difh when going to the oven: about three quarters of an hour will bake it.

Vermicelli Pudding.

BOIL two ounces- of vennicelli in a pint of new milk, till foft, with a little cinnamon; when cold, add a quarter of a pint of good cream, five, yolks of eggs, a quarter of a pound .

cf butter, a little fugar; bake it.

Cumhtrfand Pudding.

MAKE a pint of milk into a thick hafty pudding; when almoft col3, ftir in a quaiir of a pound of butter, four eggs, fome fugar nutmeg, and gratej ginger, a good fpoonfiil of brandy; butter the uiih: one hour will bake it. A quarter of a pound of currants may be added.

. ' •

French Pudding.

TAKE twelve eggs, beat them well, (leave out half thet whites) one pound of melted butter, one pound of fugar beat very fine, a nutmeg grated, the peel of one Seville orange, the juice of one and a half: the butter and fugar tp be well mixed together, and the nutmeg and peel to be mixed feparate; put them together in a difh, with a thin cruft at the bottom.

Apple Pudding.

SCALD ten or twelve large apples, or codlins, pulp them when peeled, through a fieve; ftir in a quarter of a pound of butter, half a pound, or more, of fugar beaten and fifted, the rind of a lemon or orange grated, and the juice, the yolks of five eggs, a little cream; bake it with a pufF pafte.

Green Codling Pudding.

GREEN fome codlings as for a tart, rub them through a fieve, with as much juice of fpinach or beets as will make the pudding green; four eggs well beaten with near half a pound of butter, half the crumb of a penny loaf, a little brandy, and lemon-juice if the codlings are not inarp puff pafte round the diftx; half an hour will bake it.,

Goofeberry 'Pudding.

RUB a pint of green goofeberries- that are fcalded, tbrougfi

afietej

5 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

a fieve; put to them balf a pound of fugar, the fame of butterf two or three Naples bifcuits, four eggs well beaten; mix ic well: bake it half an hour.

Apricot Pudding.

Pare ten or 'twelve apricots, (cald) ftone, and bmife them; put a pint of boiling cream to the crumb of a penny loaf grated when cold, add the yolks of four eggs fugar to the lafte, a little brandy; bake it half an hour, with pufF pafte.

Atilkt Pudding,

SPREAD a quarter of a pound of butter at the bottom of a difh; lay into it fix ounces of millet, a quarter of a pound of fugar: ' when going to the oven, pour over it three pints of milk.

Carrot Pudding.

SCRAPE three or four carrots very fmall, mix them with th crumb of two penny loaves grated; pour over this a quart of boiling cream; when cold, add feven yolks of eggs, four whites well beaten, a quarter of a pound of fugar a very little fait, feme nutmeg, a little brandy: bake it an hour, with puff pafte

Another.

MAKE a cuftard with a pint of milk and four eggs; mix it with four fpoonfuls of boiled carrots that have been rubbed through a fieve, two ounces of almonds blanched and beat fine in a mortar, a quarter of a glafs of brandy, fome citron, with candied orange and lemon-peel cut into long flips: half an hour will bake it. Boil four laurel-leaves and a bit of lemonpeel in the cuftard.

Sippet Pudding.

CUT a penny loaf exceedingly thin; lay a layer of it in the bottom of a dilh, and a layer of marrow or beef-fuct, a laycf of currants, then bread; fo till the difh is full mix four eggs with a quart of cream, a nutmeg, a quarter of a pound of lugar: bake it half an hour.

Bread and Butter Pudding.

CUT a penny loaf into thin fllces of bread and butter; lay fome of them into a difh buttered, then a few currants, bread and butter, and fo pni in layers j beat four eggs, put them into a pint of milky a little nutmeg, fome fugar: half an hour will hake it

pQtatoi

THE LADrs ASSISTANT.; 353

Potatae Pudding.

Mash a pound of boiled potatoes, the mealy fort; put to them a quarter of a pound of butter, the yolks of four eggs, one white, fiigar to the tafte, a little brandy, fome xtutmeg, a quarter of a pint of cream, a little orange-peel and citron cut thin I bake it half an hour: a puff pafte.

Bean Puddirg.

BOIL the beans, take off the hu(ks, math, them, and add the other ingredients as for the potatoe pudding.

ince Pudding.

TAKE fome quincq and fcald them tilt they are fofc then pare them verv thin; put to them fome fugar, ginger powdered and a little dnnamon; beat up the yoJks of four eggs, and mix them with a pint of cream; put it to the quinces, and beat all up well together; it muft be made pretty thicic with the quinces. A pudding may be made in this manner with apricotSy apples, or white pear-plumbs.

French Barky Pudding.

TO a quart of cream put fix eggs well beaten, but only three of the whites; then feafon it with fugar, nutmeg, a little fait, fome orange-flower water, and a pound of melted butter; mix with it fix handfuls of French barley, boiled tender in milk; butter a difb, put it in and bake it.

Ratafia Pudding.

TAKE five frefh laurel-leaves, and let them boil in a quart of cream take the leaves out when the cream has once boiled, and put in a pound of Naples bifcuit; add to thefe half a poundi of butter, a glafs of fack, fome grated nutmeg, and a very little bafket-falt wheii the ingredients are mixed, take it off and cover it up, and let it cool by degrees; then blanch two ounces of fweet-almonds, beat theni to a pafte, and beat up the yolks of five eggs, and as the cream cools put in the eggs and almonds; mix them all well together, put it into a difh, grate over it fome fiiie fugar, fend it to the oven: half an hour will bake it.

A light baked Pudding.

TAKE eight eggs, beat them well, then mix them with half a pound of butter, half a pound of loaf-fugar, and fomd grated nutmeg; fet thefe on the firt till thick, then put i; into a bafon to cool; roll a good puff pafte very thin round A a a diih.

a difh, put in the pudding, and bake it in a moderate oved i half an hour Will bake it.

Lemon Pudding.

GRATE two Naples bifcuits, and the rind of two lemons: add the juice of one, half a pound of melted butter, half a pound of fugar, the yolks of ten eggs, five whites, half a pint of cream; puff pafte round the diih: bake it about three quarters of an hour.

jih Ciiceeding fine Lemon Pudding.

EIGHT ounces of butter eight ounces of fugar, three middling lemons the lumps of fugar inufi rub off all the rind.; put them into the fauce-pan to the buttery take the juice of the lemons and put it, with a cup of water, to the reft of the ingredients; fet it over the fire to fimmer till it is thick keep it ftirring; then take eight eggs only 'four whites, beat them well; put 'all, Vell mixed, into & difli, with fome puff pafte round it: half an hour will bake it

N. B. The eggs muft not be mixed with the reft of the ingredients till they are cold.

Orange Pudding. s

POUR boiling water on the peel of three Seville oranges, •let it ftand a little, then beat them in a mortar; add fix oances of fifted fugar, half a pound of melted butter, the juice of one orange and one lemon, the yolks of twelve eggs; puff pafte round the diih: bake it half an hour.

0 make an Orange Puddings after the New- England

Manner.

SQUEEZE the juice of three Seville oranges on half apound of lump fugar; take the yolks of teti eggs, well beaten % melt a full half pound of butter thick; mix thefe well together with a quarter of a pound of blanched almonds well beaten, with a little orange-flower water, the peel of one of the oranges grated; put a thin cruft at the bottom of the difti

Marrow -Pudding.

POUR a pint of cream on the crumT of a penny loaf grated, a pound of marrow fliced, four eggs, fugar and nutmeg to the tafte two ounces of fliced citron: three quarters of an hour "will bale k: add currants, if agrccaWc.

Italian

THE LADYs ASSISTANT. 355

' Italian Pudding.

GRATE the crumb of a penny French roll, put to it a pint of cream, ten eggs beaten, a nutmeg, twelve pippins fliced, a little red wine, orange-peel fliced, fugar to the tafte: bake it half an hour

Sago Puddings

BOIL two ounces of fago, with fome cinnamon, and a bit of lmon-peel, till it is foft' and thick; grate the crumB of a halfpenny-roll, put to it a glafs of red wine, four ounces of chopped marrow, the yolks of four eggs well beaten, fugar to the tajfte: when the fago is cold, put thefe ingredients to it; mix all well together; bake it with a puffpafte: When it comes from the oven, ftick over it citron cut into pieces, and almonds ' blanched and cut into flips.

' Sweetmeat Pudding.

SLICE thin of orange, lemon peel, and citron, an ounce each; lay them at the bottom of a difh on pufF pajfte; put to them half a tound of melted butter, feven yolks and two whites of eggs, five ounces of fugar; pour this into the difh when going to the 6ven: a little more than half an hour will bake it

Little Citron Puddings.

THE yolks of three eggs beaten, half a pint of cream, one fpoonful of flower, two ounces of citron cut thin, fugar to the tafle; put this into large cups buttered; bake them in a pretty quick oven 5 turn them out.

New 'College Pudding fried,

ONE penny loaf grated, half a pound of becf-fuet fhred, one pound of currants, haff a nutmeg, a little fait, two fpoonfuls of cream or milk, two or three eggs; it muft be near as AifFas a pafte; make this into rolls in the (hape of an egg; fry them gently over a clear firei in near half a pound of melted butter; let them be of a nice brown all over. For fauce- butter, wine, and fugar; if agreeable, add fweetmeats. This will make about half a dozen.

Lady Sunderland's Puddings.

A PINT of cream, eight eggs, leave out three whites five Ipoonfuls of flower, and half a nutmeg; when' they are going to the oven, butter fmall bafons, fill them half full, bake them half an hour, grate fome fugar over them. For fauce- melted A a 2 tuttcr.

356 THE LADYs ASSISTANT.

butter, wine, and fugar. When they are baked turn them out of the bafons, and pour fome of the fauce over them.

FRITTERS.

y make Water Fritters.

TH E batter mufl be very thick; take five or fix fpoonfuls of flower, a little falti a quart of water, the yolks and whites of eight eggs well beat, with a little brandy; ftrain them tlirough a br it fieve, and mix them with the other ingredients; the long.cr they are made before they are fried the better: juft before they are fried, melt half a pound of butter and beat it well in The beft thing to fry them in is lard: do not turn them

Common Fritters.

THREE quarters of a pint of ale, not bitter, three eggs, a much flower as will make it thicker than ft batter pudding, a little nutmeg, and fugar; let this ftand fix or eight minutes: drdp them with a fpoon into a pan of boiling lard, drain them, grate fbgar over them: eat them with melted cutter, wine, and fugar.

Plain Fritters.

RUT a pint of boiling cream, or milk, to the crumb of a penny loaf grated; mix it very fmooth; when cold, add the yolks of five eggs, near a quarter of a pound of fifted fugar, fome nutmeg grated; fry them in hogs-lard; pour melted butter, wine, and fugar, into the difli. Currants may be added.

Cujiard Fritters a petty Dijh.

BEAT the yolks of eight eggs, with one fpoonful of flower, half a nutmeg, a little fait, and brandy; add a pint of cream i fweeten this, and bake it in a fmall diih; when cold cut it into quartets; dip them in batter made of half a pint of cream, a quarter of a piirt of milk, foiir eggs, a little flower, a little ginger grated; fry them a light brown, in good lard or dripping: ferve them hot; grate fugar over them.

Clary Fritters.

BEAT two eggs very well, with one fpoonful of brandy, the fame of cream, wo fpoonfuls of flower, fome nutmeg, lifted fugar to the tafte walb aiid dry the elary4daves, dip

6 tbeoi

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 357

lbn in the battery fry them iti Urd; eat them with Seville orange and melted butter. .

Vine-Leaf Fritters.

TAKIE (t qjuajrtcr pf a pint of brandy, a little white wine, feme rafped kmonpeeU and a fpoonful of powdered fugar iiu;c thefe well together in a foup-plae, then take feme fmall vfSk viije-leaves, cut the ftalks very clofe, and put the leaves intp this mixture: mix up fome white wine and flower into a ' moderate thick batter; put on a ftew-pn, with a great deal of butter in it; when it is boiling hot drop iii the fritters, take a leaf out of the brandy for every fritter: when they are a fine lirown, ftrew them widi fugar, and glaze them with a fala mander: fend them up hot

Apple Fritters.

PAKE fome fmall applet; core and tlice them; make a bat ter with three eggs, a little grated ginger, near a pint of cream or milk; a glafs of brandy, a little fait, and flower enough to make it thick; put in the apples; fry them in lard.

jjppk Fritters wit bout Milk or Egss.

, LET the apples be quartered, cored, and fliced; mix a gill of brantly, the fame of mountain, forne grated lemon-peel, pounded cinnsimon, and fugar to the taftc mix thefe well fry tbeoi in lard

S'anfy Fritters.

POUR a pint of boiling milk on the crumb of a penny-loaf grated; when cold, add a fpoonful of brandy, fugar to the tafte, the rind of half a lemon, the yolks of four eggs, fpinach and tanfey-juice to colour it; mix this over the fire, with a quarter of a pound of butter, till thick; let it ftand near three hours; drop thisy a fpoonful to a fritter, into boiling lard-.

Rajberty Fritters.

GRATE' two Naples bifcuits, or the crumb of a French roll; put to either a pint of boiling cream; when this is cold, add to it the yolks of four eggs well beaten; beat all well to f;ether with fome ra(berry juice; drop this into a pan of boiling ard, in very fmall quantities; ftick them with blanched al' monds fliced.

Currani Fritiers without Eggs.

flALiF a pint of ale, not bitter; flir into it flower to make it

A a 3 . pretty

358 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

" pretty thick, a few currants; beat this up ()uick 5 have the lard boiling, throw in a large fpoonful at a time

Rice Fritters.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of rice, boil it in milk till it is pretty thick, then mix it with a pint of cream, four eggs, fome fugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg fix ounces of currants waihed and picked, a little alt, and as much flower as will make it a thick batter; fry them in little cakes in boililig lard. The fauce - white fugar and butter.

Carrot Fritters.

TAKE two or three boiled carrots, beat them with a fpoon till .they are a fmooth pulp; put to every carrot two or three eggs, a little nutmeg; to three carrots put a handful of flower y wet them with cream, milk, or fack; add to them as much fugar as will fweeten them; beat them well half an hour, and fry them in boiling lard; fqueeze over them a Seville orange, and fliake f6me fine fugar over them.

Pats de Putain.

CUT fome candied lemon-peel very fine, put a ftew-pan on the fire with fome water' or milk in it, a little fait, a piece of frelh butter as big as a walnut, and a little lemon-peel cut very fmall 5 let this boil fome time over a ftove, then put in two handfuls of flower, ftir it immediately with the utmoft ftrength, and make it into, a good pafte; then take it ofi, and work in a dozen eggs, two and two at a time, then fet it by in a difli; fet on a large ftew-pan, with a good quantity of hogs-lard; when it is melted very hotdip in the handle of the (kimmer, and form the fritters; fry them brown, and put them into a hot di(h; pour on them fome orange-flower water, and fhake over them fome fugar.

Point de jour Fritters.

TAKE a glafs of mountain, and a large fpoonful of brandy; mix two handfuls of flower to fome milk luke-warm, with the brandy and wine, and work it into a pafte; beat up the whites of four eggs to a froth', and mix them with the batter; then add to them half an ounce of candied citron-peel, half ah ounce of frefli lemon-peel grated, fome fait, and fugar; let it be all well beat up together; then fet on a fmall deep ftew-pan with a good quantity of hog's-lard; when it is boiling hot drop in fone of the batter through a tin funnel made on purpofe, with

9 a large

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT: 359

a large body and three pipes; hold the funnel over the boilin lard, and pour the batter through it with a ladle; it is to be kept moving over the pan till all is run out; this from the three ftreams (hapes the fritters: when the batter is all out, turn the fntters, for they are foon brown; then put one at a time .

upon a rollng-pin and they will be the flape of rounddd leaf, which is the proper ihape of thefe fritter: there is great nicety required in making them; they are an elegant diib: when the Aril is made, it fliould he a pattern for the reft; if it is too thick, pour in the lefs batter for the next; if too thin, a little more; but this 19 feldom the tafe. Yhe iew-pan (hould not be broader than a plate: the lard . muft be very fine, and boiling hot.

Chicken FritUrs.

SET on a ftew-pan with • feme new milk, a$ much flower of rice as will be wanted to make it of a tolerable thicknefs; beat three or four eggs, the yolks and whites together, and mix them well with the rice and milk; add tq theip 9 pint of rich cream; fet it over a ftove, ftir it well; put in fome powder fugar, fome candied lempn-peel cut fmall, and fome frefli grated lemon- peel cut very fmall; tlven take all the white meat from a roafted chicken pull it;nto fmall flireds, put it to the reft of the ingredient, and ftir it all together; en take it off; Jt will be a very rich pafte; roll it qut gpd C(c t into fmall fritters; fry them ii boiling lard: ftre'wtWe bottom of the di(h with fine fugar powdered; put in the ffitters, find ihake fome fugar over theni.

BflboHet Fritters.

BREA ve egg$ into two handfuls of fine flower, pyt milk enpugli to mke it work well together; ttien put in Tone fait, and work it a!n; when it is yjell ma4e, put in a te;fpoonful of powder of cinnaiQon, the fame quantity pf lemonpeel grated, and half an ounce of candied citron ciit very fn)all Vvith a pen-knife; put on a ftew-pan, . rub it over with butter, and put n the pafte fet it over a very gentle fire on a ftovey and let it be done very genfljf, without fticking to the bottom or jfides of the pan y when it if iq a 'mapner baked, take it out nd.lav it on a difti: fet pn a ftewpan with large quantity or lard; when it boils cut out the pafte the fize of a finger, and then cut it scrofs at each end, which will rife and be hollow and have a very good ffeAi put them into the foiling Igrd; erfi muft be great pate taken ini frying them,

A a 4 ' ' %

36o THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

as they rife fo much. Wlien tiley are done, (tft feme filgaf ftiM warm difli, lay on the Aktcre mni fift fame ttolip iugar eiHtr them. • .

German Frklers.

TAKE feme well-tafted cril apples, fare, uart€r, od jcore them; take the core quke out, and cut them ki voiid pieces; put into ''a flew-pajo a oyrter of a pint of French brandy, a .table fpsMuifui jof fine Tugar powdered, and a little cinnamon; put the apples iato thts iuuor, and fet them over a ycry gende ftove, Aki'mg them often, but not to break them; iet on a ftewpan with fecne lard, when it bofk, drain le ap-r pies dip tb in fosie fine jower, and put them into the pan, they will be brown and very good; ftrew feme fugar over a di(h and fet it on the fire lay in the fritters, fir ew a little fugar ovf r them, and glaz theon over withT a red-bot fala? inander.

PANCAKES,

Common Pancakes

THREE eggs, pound of fiowex, and a pint of milk, or cream; put the milk to the flower by degrees; a Uttl fatt and grated ginger: fi'y hem ip larid; grate fugar over them.

fVorceJUrfi)ire Pancakes.

THE yolks, of twelve eggs, four white, beat them vwell j add one quart of cream, fix fpoonfuls of fldwer, two of brandy, one nutmeg, a quarter of a pound of melted butter 5 a little felt: for the firft pancake rub the pan with a bit of cold butter J fry them without any thing elfe in the pan: they muft be very thin, clapt hot one upon another for about a dossen, and (Cut through when eaten.

If they are made with milk, double the quantity 9f butter,

To make Scotch Pancakes.

TO a pint of cream, take the yolks of eight gs, the tvhites of fix, a quarter of a pound of butter, thr fpoqnfuU of flower, a little white- wine, fugar, and nutmeg; put the butter into the cream, and fet it over the fire till it boih, then take it oiFj beat up the eggs vrell with fhe white winf tben

vm

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 3i

mac it and beat it up wdl with the cream, and the other ui gredients, till it is a fine batiier; put fomfi butter into a fmall frying-pan, when it is melt put in a little batter, fry it till it is juft brawn next the pan; then turn it into a difh, with a Httl fugar ftrewed on it; put feme more batter into the pan, frj it s before, and then ftrew fome more fugar over it.

Rice Pancakes.

TAKE half a pound of rice, clean picked and wafhed, boil It till it is tender, and aHiiie water boiled, away; put it into a tin cullender, cover it clofe, and let it ftand all night $ then break it very fmall; take fourteen eggs, beat, ftrain them, d put them to the rice, with a quart Of cream, a nutmeg grated, and a little fait, beat it all well together -, then (hake in as much flower as will hold them together, and fiir in as inuch butter as will fry thorn

-Clary Pancakes.

FOUR eggs, four fpoonfuls of flower, a litde fait, above a 4int of milk; mtxthefe exceedingly well make fome lard vry net, with a fpooti pour in fome batter very t-hin; lay in me clary-leaves ws&ed and dried, t'hen a little more batter; et them be a nice brown

Paper Pancakes.

TAKE fix new -laid eggs, beat up the yolks, and half the whites; mix them by degrees into a pint of rich cream, three fpoonfids of Mhite-wine, oie .fpoctnful pf oraiige-llower water, a little nutmeg, and a fpoonful of loaf-fugar powdered: melt half a pound of butter, and let it ftand till it is near cold; mix by degrees three fpoonfuls of flower in the batter, and then in the butter; fet on the pan and fry them lite other pancakes;

they muft be very thin,

• •

New- England Pancakes.

A PINT of cpeam, five fpoopfMls of flower, feven egg? (leave out three whites) a little fait; fry them thin in freu butter; lay feven pr eight in a difli; ftrew fugar and cinna mon between.

u4 Baott fraze.

TAKE eight ggs anu beat theoi well together, with a little cream and a little flower, like other batter fry fome very thin ilices of bacon, and dip them in this batter, lay them in the fryinpaO) pour a Ittle ippre pf the batter over them; when one lide

3(J2 THE LABTs ASSISTANT.

£de is fried turn them and pour more of. the bather oyer tbem and when both fides are fried lay them in the difh,

jlpple Fraze.

FRY fome thick flices of apple, drain them; make' a batt with the yolks of three eggs, the whites of two, a pint of thilk, a little brandy, grated ginger or nutmeg, a Jittle fait, fome fugar, flower enough to make it of a proper thicknefs; drop this in fritters into a pan of boiling lard; lay on every one:a dice of apple, then a little more batter: grate fugar ovtr them.

Almond Fraze.

BLANCIJ and beat half a pound of Jordan almonds, about a dozen bitter; put to them a pint of cream, eight yoJks and four whites of eggs, a little grated bread fry this as pancakes, in good lard; grate fugar over them,

German Puffs.

PtFT a pint of milk into a ftew-pan, dredge it with flbwer till very thick, and ftir it over a flow fire till like a pafte; whon cold beat it well, with the yolks of eight eggs, four ounces of fugar, a little brandy, fome nutmeg, the rind of a fmall lemon grated till very light; drop this with a large tea-fpoon into a pan of boiling lard; if well bpat they will rife exceedingly rain them. Serve melted butter, wine, and fugar, in a boat

$ W E E 'I' P I E 3,

Minced Pies without. Meat.

TAKE fix eggs, boil them hard, and cut them fine, a pound of raifins of the fun ftoned and cut fine, a pound ofcur rants picked, waflied and rubbed clean, a large fpoonful of fine fugar powdered, an ounce of citron, an ounce of candied orangei both cut fine, a quarter of an ounce of mace and cloves, and a large nutmeg, beat fine; mix it all together with a gill of braftdy and a gill of mountain; make the cruft very good.

when the pies are made, fqueeze In thp juice of 4 eVill orange and a glafs pf red wine.

tHE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 363

Minced Pies with Meat.

' BOIL a large frefli tongue till it will peel 5 or four pounds of the infide of a firloin of beef: to four pounds of tongue even pounds of fuet; chop thefe together; add nine pounds of currants waihed and dried; three pounds of raifins ftoned and chopped; twelve pippins, and a pound of eggs boikd hard and chopped; a little faU; cloves, macet and cinnamon pounded, each half an ounce; two ounces of, nutmegs grated; half a pound or more of candied orange, citron) and lemon-peel all together, but moft citvea; the juice of eight lemons, a pint of fack, half a pint of brandy, a pound of powder fugar: mix thpfe ingredients thoroughly, put tbeqi ipto a pan. and fiir them often; do not cover the pan clofe: thefe ingredients will keep fome months. If the high flavour goes oif, add a little more fpice, lemon-juice, and brandy; flir the minced-meat often.

Sweet Patties.

THE meat of a calPs foot which has been boiled tender, three apples, fome candied oranges and citron; chop thefe fmall; add a little grated nutmeg and pounded cinnamon, the yolk of an egg, a good fpoonful of brandy, a few currants % puiF paile top and bottom.

Jpple Pie.,

PARE, core, and quarter the apples; lay fome fugar af the bottom of the difh, then the apples; grate a little lemon-peel, fome more fugar, then more apples,' cover the diih with puffpafte; when it comes from the oven take the cruft neatly ofi leaving the edge; put in a piece of butter; cut the cruft in eight pieces, which ftick into the pie.

Another way.

LET the pie ftand' to be cold, and make the following cuftard, which pour over, and ftick the cruft as before direfled: - The yolks of two eggs, half a pint of cream, a. little nutmeg and fugar; ftir this over the fire till it thickens a little, but do not let it boil; add a little lemon-peel cut like ftraws.

If the apples are to look green, take fmall codliris, put them into a pan with fome water, lay on the top vine-leaves, and-a cloth round the cover of the pan to keep in "the fteam; when they are fcalded, peel them; put them again into the water in the fame manner; hang them at a great diftance from the fire till green. They are a good while about.

N. B. In winter, when apples Ibfe their harpnefs, always

add

ji THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

add a little lemon-juioe. A quince or two, or a little manna lade is ao ildition.

4 fort Vetnoy

MA1CE foiie good puflF pafte, and lay it rpund a difii, put fome biftuits t the bottom, then fome marrow, and a little butter; then cover it over with diiFerent kinds of wjet fweetmeats, bifcuits, maccaroons, marrow and fo.on till the difli is full; thep pour on fome thick boiled cream feetened; put in a ontul of or;uige'flo:wer water. Half an hour will bake it.

TARTS IN GENERAL.

F to be cat cold, make the ihort cruft.

Jpple Tart

IS made as the pie; but if to eat cold, make, the ihort cruft

Anotbir way.

PARE two oranges very thin, aad boil them in water till they are tender, then cut iheni very fmall; nre eighteen or twenty pippins, quarter and core them, ftew them very gently (ill they are quite enough, the water muft but juft cover them i 94lben put in half a pound of white fugac; take the orange-peel cut very £ne, and the juice of the oranges, let them IkuI till they are thick,, then (et them to cool; make open tajts to put the fruit in, and fet them in a moderate oven.

Currants Cherries c.

CURRANTS and rafberries make an exceeding good tact and do not require much baking

Cherries require but little baking. '

Goofebcrries, to look red, muft ftand a good while in the oven.

Apricots, if green, require more baking than when ripe.

Quarter or halve ripe apricots, and put in fome of the kernels.

Preferved fruity as damfons and bullace, require but little baking; fruit at is prefixed high, ihould not be baked at aB; but the cruft uld fivA be baked upon -i tin the fize the tart is to be; cut it with a rmrking iron or not, and .when cold, take it off aad y it.on the firuitf

f Jiq6frrjf

THE LADrs ASSISTANT. 365

A Rajberty Tart with Cream.

ROLL out fome thin pufF-pafte, lay it in a pattyan; lay in fome rafberries, and ftrew over them fome very fine fugar; put on the lid and bake it; cut it open, and put in half a pint of creahi, the yolks of two or three egs well beat, and a little fugar. Let it ftahd to be cold, before it is fent to bake

7o make Rhubarb Tarts.

TAKE the ftalks of the rhubarb that grows in the garden peel it, and cut it the flze of a goofeberry and make it at a goofeberry-tart.

Gtten Almond Tafts.

TAKE fome almonds off. the tree before they bgin x 0ieil; fcrape off the down with a knife; have ready a pan wit fome cold fpring-water, put them into it as faft as they are done; then put them Into a ikillet, with more fpring- water, over a very flow fire till it mft finimers; change the water twice, let them be in the laft till they begin to be tender; then take them out, and put them upon a clean cloth, with another over them, and prefs them gently to make them quite dry then make a fyrup with double-refined fugar, put them into It, and let therh fimmer a little; do the fame the next day; put them into a ilone jir, and cover them very jclofe, for if the leaft ai comes to them, they will turn black; the yellower they are before they are taken out of the ater, the greener they will be after they re done; put them into the fugar cruft, put ttos lid down clofe; let them be covered with fyrup: bake tbem in a modf rate oven.

Orahge Tarts.

GRATE a little of the outfide rind off fome Sevilleermges, fqueeze the juice into a difh, throw the peels into water, change it often for two days; then fet a fauce-pan of water on the fire; Vhen it boils, put in the oranges; change the water twice to take out the bittemefs: when they are tender, wipe them very well, and beat them in a mortar till they are fine; then take their weight in doublerefined fugar, boil it to a fyrup, and fcum it very clean; then put in the pulp, and boil it all together till it Is clear; let it ftand to be cold, then put ft into the tarts, and fqueeze iii the juice: bake theov jh a quick oven.

Cpnferve of oranges makes good tarts

366 THE LAnrs ASSISTANT- i

Ltmpn Tarts

ARE made in the fame way.

Atk Almond Tart. .

BLANCH fome almonds, beat them very fine in a mortir With a little white wine and fome fugar (a pound of fugar to a pound of almonds) fome grated bread, a little nutmeg, fonAe cream, the juice of fpinach to colour the almonds green; bake it in a gentle oven s when it is done, thicken it with candied.

. wange. or citipn., .

Another way.

BLANCH a poun'd of fweet almonds, beat them in a marble mortar, moiften them while beating with the whites of eggs; 'take four yolks of eggs, and mix them with Savoy-bifcuits, fome frefli-grated lemon-peel,, fome preferved Jemon-peel,. and a little orange-flower water take the almonds, and mix them with the other ingredients; put in fome fugar; whip up the whites of eight eggs to a fnow 5 make a pufF-pafte, lay it at the bottom of the tin, pour in the almonds, and lay the whites of the eggs at the top j put it into the oven; when it is done, fift fome fugar over the top, glaze it with a red'hot falamander.

A Chocolate Tart.

TAKE aquarter of a pound of rafped chocolate, a ftick of ciinamon, fome frefh lemon-peel grated, a little fait, and fome fugar; take two fpoonfuls of fine flower, the yolks of fix eggs well beat and mixed with fome milk; put all thefe into a ftew-pan, and let them be a little while over the fire; then put in a little preferved lemon-peel cut fmall, and let it ftand to be cold; beat up the whites of eggs, enough to cover it, put it in pufFpafte:;wben it is baked, fift fome fugar oVer ii and glaze it with a falamander.

A Spinach Tart.

TAKE fome fpinach, fcald it in fome boiling water, drain it very dry; chop it, and ftcw it in butter and cream, with a very little fait, fome fugar, fome bits of citron, and a very little orange-flower water j put it in very fine puff-jpafte.

Angelica Tart.

PARE and core fome golden pippins or nonpareils, and take the fialks of angelica, peel them, and cut them into fmall pieces, apples and angelica of each an equal quantity; then boil the apples! in juft water enough to cover them, with lemonoeel

tHfi LAtY;s ASSISTANT. 67

peel and fine fugar; do them very gently till they are a thim fyrup, then ftrain it off, and put it on the fire, with the angelica in it; let it boil ten minutes; make a puff-pafte, lay it at the bottom of the tin, then lay a layer of apples and a layer of angelica till it is full; bake them, but firft fill them up with fyrup.

TO PRESERVE FRUIT FOR TARTS.

• Red G(wfeberries.

TO one pound and a half of goofeberries, one pound of l)imp-fugar, boil this to a thin im j when cold, put over ic -brandy paper and miitton-fuet melted i when the tarts are made put in a little rafberry jam.

Damfons.

PKICJL them, throw them into fcalding water for a minutey .

take them clear from the water, ftrew over them lump-fugar pounded j the next day pour off the fyrup, boil and fcum it, pour it cvet the damfon, let them ftand a day or two j boil up the fyrup again, put in the damfons; boil them a few minutes (but take care they do not mafh) put them into jars; when cold, put on fome brandy-paper, and pour on mutton-fuet.- To a pound of fruit allow half a pound of fugar. - Put them in fuch iized jars as to bake all the fruit when they are opened for they will not keep when the air is admitted

Bullace.

DO them s the damfons.

Currants

PUT as much juice, of currants to the fugar as will melt it, boil and fcum it; let the currants be picked, put them into the fyrup, boil them a little boil them again the next day till clear; put over brandy-paper i allow one pound of fugar to, a pound and a quarter of fruit.

Oranges.

PUT them into water at night, the next day boil them in three different waters, in each a quarter of an hour; then (lice them, pick out the feeds; take the weight of the oranges in fugar, juft wet it, boil and fcum it boil up the oranges in it, and repeat it for two or three days when the tarts are made, but do not bake the fruit, unlefs it is neceflary; bake the cruft; when cold lay in the oranges.

TariUfs.

368 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT tartUis.

HAVE very fmall and ihallow tin pans butter tbcm, and lay in a bit of puff-pafte, marking it neady rottad the edges and leaving a bole in tbe middle, bake them; when they at cool, fill them with cuftard, or put into each half an apricot, rafberry-jam, or any preferved fruit, a little prcfervcd apple, or marmalade; pour over it cuftard, with very little fugar iitit.

Crocants

ARE pafte cut out from a large nxmld, or fmall ones when baked, put fweetmeats under them. They are ufuaUy ad at a paftry'lfhop, as few fdrrairts can cut pafte.

Iceing for 7 arts

BEAT the white of an egg; rub it on tbe tarts with a feer, fift over double-refined fugar.

Another way.

MELT a little butter; rub the tarts with it with a feather, and fift double-refined fugar.

A Jt. ... A.,f, jfa,f,, A A.,t A A A tti if I iti - •- - A A,f, A A A A A A A J. M A A . it:fc . '

cpE SEC A K E S.

' "'.- ' f' Pftfor Cbeefecakes.

Titinniuch flower as butter, rub them well togetherp it&a little fine fugar llfti it up with warm milk

Cofftmon Cheeecakes.

PUT a quart of milk on the fire j beat eight eggs weU; when the milk boils, ftir them upon the fire till it comes to a curd, then pour it out i when it is cold, put in a little falty two fpoonfuls of rofe-water, three quarters of a pound of currants; put it into pufF-pafte, and. bake it.

Almond Cheeecakes.

BLANCH a quarter of a pound of almonds; beat them with a little orange flower- water; add tbe yolks of eight eggs, the rind of a large lemon grated, half a pound of melted butter, fugar to the tafte; lay a thin pufF-pafte at the bottom of the tins, and little flips acrofs, if agreeable. Add about half a dozen bitter almonds.

Bread

THE LADTs ASSISTANT- 369

Bread Cheefecakes.

SLICE a large French roll, or penny loaf very thin; pour bn, it Tome boiling cream; when cold, add fix or eight eggs, half a pound oif butter melted, fome nutmeg, a fpoonful of brandy, a little fujgar, half a pound of currants y pufF-pafte.

Curd Cbeefecakes.

BEAT half a pint of good curd with four eggs, four fpoonfuls of cream, fome nutmeg, a little brandy, half a pound of currants 3 fugar to the tafte; puff-pafte.

Cbeefecakes without Curd.

A PINT of cream, half a pond of butter, fix eggs, two fpoonfuls of grated bread, as much cinnamon and mace pounded as will lie upon a (hilling, three fpoonfuls of fugar, fie of currants, near two of brandy; beat the eggs well, then mix all together in a deep pewter-dilh, fet it on a ftove. Air it one way till it becomes a foft curd; when cold, put it into tins witli puff-pafte.

Rice Cbeefecakes.

BOIL four ounces of rice either whole or ground, when enough, drain it; add four eggs well beaten, half a pound of

butter melted, fome nutmeg, a fmall glafs of brandy; fugar to the tafte; puff-pafte.

Citron Cbeefecakes.

BOIL near a quart of cream; when cold, add the yolks of four eggs well beaten; b6il this to a curd; blanch and beat two ounces of almonds, about half a dozen bitter; beat them with a little rofe- water; put all together, with thref or four Naples bifcuits, fome citron fhred fine; fugar to the tafte; pufFpafte.

Lemon Cbeefecakes

BOIL two lemon-peels, pound them well in a mortar, with a quarter of a pound or more of loaf-fugar, the yolks of fiK eggs, and half a pound of fiefh butter; pound and mix them all well together, and fill the patty-pans but half full.

Orange Chefecakes ARE done in the fame manner; only boil the peel in two or three waters.

Lemon Cbeefecakes after tbe New-England Manner.

TAKE half a pound of blanched almonds beat very, fi'

B b with

v

370 THE LADY'S A.SSISTANT.

with orange-flower water, the yolks of eight eggs, and four tihites, the peels of three lemons boiled tender in water; dry them in a cloth, and beat them weH in a mortar; take a pound of fine fugar, half a pound of melted butter j mix all wdl together, bake it lightly in pufF-pafte.

N, 6. This will keep near a fortnight.

'j4 Cheefe-enrd Florendine,

TAKE two pounds of cheefe-curd; break it to pieces; take a pound of blanched almonds finely pounded, with a little rofe-water, half a pound of currants clean waihed and picked, feme ftewed fpinach cut foll; fweeten it wkh fome fugar mix it all well together; lay a puiF-pafte in the difh, put in the ingredients, cover it with a thin cruft rolled and laid acrofs; bake it in a moderate oven: it takes half an hour: the top crufi may be cut in any fhapc.

A Florendmtf Oranges and Mles.

TAKE half a dozen oranges, fave the MKre, and take out the pulp, lay the rinds in water twentyfour hours but diange the water three or fbur times then boil them in three or four different waters, then ftraii the water off, put them and their juice with a pound of fugar, and fet them by'for ufc; Wfaea they are ufed, lay a puff-pafte over the difh, boil ten pipphis in a little fugar and water, pare, quarter, and core them, and mix them with fome of the oranges; lay a puff-pafte in the difh, and then put in the fruit; bake it In a flow oven; the cruft like the other florendine.

CUSTARDS.

Boiled Cuftards.

SET one pint of cream over a flow fire, with a bit of mace, two laurel leaves, the yolks of fix eggs, and one white; flir it over a gentle fire, till it is near boiling, 'take care it does Dot curdle; ftrain it into Cups.

Lemon.

BEAT the yolks of ten eggs, firain them, beat them, with a I int of cream j fweeten the juice of two lemons, boil it with

• the

I

i

tHE LAbYs ASSiSTANt. 371

the ped of one, ftrain it t when cold ftir it to the creslm and ggs; ftir It tiU it hear boils.

"" Another way.

PUT it into a difh grate over the rind of a lemony brdwn with a falamsmder

Oirange.

BEAT the yolks 6f five eggs, ftifin tUam, then pit to them one fpoOnful of brandy the peel of an orange boiled and beat to -a pafte, fiigai to the taiie, beat thefe together; ftir this into a fuU pint of crsm that hs been boiled, and is cold j ibald all together, over lh fife, ftirrihg k tl il.ofF, ftir it till cold, piA it into cufM, ftt tMn into an eartten difli; pour kot water into it when they aie fet ftick citron into them

: Almondf

, PUT a bof tinnamon into a pint of cream, fweeteh and boil it; wheflloldy put to it one Dunce of fweet almonds (five 6r fix bitter Iblcfaed and beaten, with a little bandy; ftir this over the fTre till aoar fackiKng, ftxain it into cdps.

Rice.

BOIL oiie quart of cresim with a blade of mace, a quartered hiitmeg 1 ftrain it, put to it fome vrhole rice boiled, a little brandy j fweeten ity ftir it over the fire till it thickens i ferve it in cups or a difll It may be eat eithcir hot dr cold;

Baked Cuftard.

BOIL one pint of cream, with a bit of ckmaiQoii; when cold, put to it four eggs beaten and ftrained, only two whitesy a little brandy, nutmeg, and fugar.

Cuftard in preferred OtaHges.

FILL three or five preferved oranges with cuftard; garnifli with a little fweetmeat either wet or dry they ar a very gen teel difli;

Bb 2 . CONl-ECTlONARY.

in THE LAbrj ASSISTAlT.

C O N F E C T i O N A R y.

C A iC £ 5 . .

A good Common Cake.

SIX ounces of rice-flbwer, fix ounces of pudding-flower, nine eggs (yolks and whites) half a.fiouDd of lump fugar, pounded and fifted half an oifbce of cacraway-fecds; -beat this for an hour, and bake it an faouc ina quick oven. This is ai very good cake for childen, and delicate machs; as there ia no butter in it and it is very light. .,

A plain Cake. '

TWO pounds and a half of flower, fifteen eggs, two pounds and a half of butter, beat to a cream, three quarters of 9 pound of pounded fugar i bake it ia a hot, but not a fcorchipg oven.

An ordinary Kgbi Cake.

Mile half a pound of currants, fome nutmeg, and an ounce f fugar, in one pound of flower; a little fait, ftir a quarter of a pound of butter into a quarter of a pint of milk over the fire, till the butter is melted ftram to it a quarter of a pint of ale-yeaft, two eggs only one white; ftir dl together with fiick, fet it before the fire to rife, in the pan it is to be baked in The oven muft be as hot as for bread.,

An ordinary Breakfafi Cake.

RUB a pound and a half of butter into half a peek of fiowr xthree pounds of currants, half a pound of fugar, a- quarts of an ounce of mace, cinnamon, and nutmeg together, - a iittl fait, a pint and a half of warmed .ci'eam, ipr njjik, a quarter af a pint of brandy, five eggs, a pint of good ale-yeaft; mix it • well together, hpJe it in.a moderate oven. This cake will kec good a quarter of a year.

A Common Seed Cake. i •

ONE pound arid k quarter of flower, bare weight, three quarters of a pounitf of lump fugar pounded, ten eggy 0M7 four whites, one pound of. butter beat to a cream with

hand i

THE LADY'S ASSISl'ANT. 373

hand; mix thefe well; add near an ounce of carraway feeds bruifed; butter the pan or hoop; iift fugar on the top.

- ..... ' i . • ., A hMr SeeiLCfikf. '.. . .

WORK two pounds of butter to a cream with the hand; put to it the wkit$ of twenty eggs, beat toz ftrong froth, the yolks of eight, a pound and a quarter of loaf fugar fifted, a little mace pounded, and nutmeg; beat thefe well; add two pounds of drid flower, two ounces of carraway feeds, and in the beating, a quarter of a pint of brandy; if it is to be enriched, fliced almonds, orange-peel, and citron.

A Seed Cake with Tiofti

FOUBf pounds of flower, two potsnds and a half of butter, half a pint of cream, twenty eggs, half a found of fugar fiftedy a pound of almonds blanched and ieat about a dozen' of them bitter, a pound of fmooth carraways, a quarter of a pint of brandy, a pint of good ale-yeaft; rub fome of the butter into the flower and fugar, beat the eggs and (train them beat them again with the yeaft; melt the remainder of the butter in the cream; mvK all the other ingredients; let it rife ))alf an hour: bake it an hour and aiialf.

A PamdCake.

BEAT a pound of butter to a cream beat well twelve yolks of eggs fix whites, beat them in the cream, then put in.

a pound of flower dried; beat thefe all together for one hour, .

with one pound of fugar, a few carraways; butter the pan continue. 10 beat the cake till it goes to the oven

A common Plumb Cake.

FIVE pounds of currants, half a peck of flower; a quarter of an ounce of mace poundedt rather lefs of cloves, one pound of lump fugar fifedy twelve eggs, a pint of good ale-eaft, three pipunds Qi- butter melted in three pints of new milk, Aad pine of brandy $ inix all well together

• - A good Plumb Cake.

THREE pounds of flower, three pounds of currants, three quarters of a pound df almonds blanched anciP beat grofsly, about half an ounce of them bitter, four ounces of fugsir, feven yolks and fix whites of eggs, one pint of cream, two pounds of butter, half a pint of good ale-yeafl:; mix the eggs and the yeaft together, ftrain them; fet the cream oo the fire, melt the Efltfier in it s ftir in the almonds, and half a pipt of jfack, pare

B b 3 of

f

S74 tH£ LADY ASSISTANT.

6f which fliould be put to the almonds iite beatt og i mix together the Aower, currants, and fugar, what nimnegs, dovtSi and mace are liked; flat ttiefe to the cit put n the yeaft.

Jfidtlerood PhmSb Cnkt.

BEAT four pounds of butter to a cream, with a firong lard % fnix with it two pounds of loaf-fug beaten ind fifted very dry I add to that four pounds of flower, dfiedhd fifted, a pint of brandy, and to each ppund of flower eight eggs, the yolki and whites well belit (kparatey; niix in the whites, then Ac yolks, three pounds of cufranis waflied and dried, in three pmt of new milk, half a ptftt iaf brandy; mix all well together.

• A fine plumb Cnie witbout Cream or Teaft.

ONE pound of flower, dryland warm, one pound of fine fugar fifred, four pounds f currants, fixteen eggs, half an ounce of pounded mace, and cinnamon together, one nutmeg, two pounds of butter wclhbeat; mix the flower ind fugar, a iiandful of one, then of the other; whilk up the eggs with a gill of warm brandy, as the froth rifes put it to the flower; add fweetmeats and almonds; put the currants in warm, iuf as the cake is going to the oven: bake it two hours and ai

half Amiher very fine Plmh Cah,

WASH Ave pounds of butter in ipring water, then in toQ water, till k be(iomes almoft a cream; to every pound of butter Jeighf eggs; beat the yolks and whites feparately, half an hour five pounds of flower warm and dry, three pounds of fugar lifted and dried, two ounces together of beaten cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and mace, a pint of brandy; mix the eggs and the brandy in the butter, then the fugar, flower, and fptce; fix pounds of currants dried, a pound of raifins ftoned, and a little chopped, a pound of almonds blanched and fliced, about two ounces of them bitter i butter the hoop'well, add the fruit warm juft as it is going to be filled i put iirft cake, then almonds and fweetmeats, then cake, and ip on till the hoop is full: bak; It three hours.

Half the qiMintity makes a middle- fized. cake.

Almond Cake.

TWO ounces of bitter, one pound of fweet almonds blanched and beat, with a Httle rofe or orangc-flowa- water, and the white of one egg; half a pound of fifted loaf-fugar, eight yolks, and three whites of eggs, the juice of half a lemon.

1

THE LADY'S ASSJSTANt. 075

the rind" grated; bake it either in one large pan or in fmall pans,

Lif(le Cakes for Tea.

MIX one pound of dried flqwer, half a pound of fine fugar nfted, one ounce of carraway feeds, a little nutmeg and pounded mace; beat the yolks of twq eggs with three fpoonfuls of fack; put thefe to the reft, widi half a pound of butter melted in a little thin cream, or new milk; work all together, roU it out thin cut it into cakes .with a tin or glaffi; bake theoi on tans: a little baking does in a flack oven

Heart Cakes.

WORK one pound of butter to a cream with the hand, put ' to It twelve yolks of eggs and fix whites, well beaten, one pound of fifted fugar, one pound of flower dried, four fpoonfuls of the bed brandy, one pound of currants waflied and dried before the lire as the pans are filled, put in two ounces of candied orange and citron; beat the cakes till they go into the oven: this quantity will fill threedozen of middling pans.

Spunge Bifcuits.

-BEAT well the yplks of fix eggs, and the whites of four, to St ftrong froth; mix them and beat them together; put to them one pound of fifted fugar; have ready a Quarter of a pint 6f water boiling hot, with one gdpd fpooiim! of rofe or orangcflovver water in it; as the eggs and fugar are .beat, add the watr by degrees, then fet it over the fire till fcalding hSt'; take it ofF and beat it till Imotft cold (a filver or brafs pan is thebeftj)' dd thre quarters of a pQud of flower, well dried and fifted, the peel of one lemon, pard very thin, and cut fmall; bake this little long pans 2, quick pven but not too hot, as they arc apt to burn: fift fugar over before they are fet it.

Liille bMow BifcuiiM.

BEAT fix egg? with oe fpoonful of rofe or orange-flower water; add a full pound of loaffugr ififted; mix thefe well; put flower to it that has been dried, till it is of a thicknefs to drop upon fheets of white papery drop them jufl: as they are going -to be baked; Yift fugar over through a lawn fieve the oven muft be flack; as (bon as they are baked, take them . whilftiiat off the paper; dry tjiem in tii& oven oo a fieve; keep (ben in bosces wUh paper between.

B b 4 Shrenvfiury

376 THE lady's ASSISTANT

Sbrewjbury Cakes.

BEAT half % pound of butter to a citam tii&A( znpiefnd of dried flower, one egg, fix ouilcest)f fifted fugar a;fifrircar9 raway feeds mix thefe well; roll it out thin cut itofkt . wicl a glafs or tin prick them i bake them on tins'in a Sack oveA

Ratafia Cakes.

A QUARTER of a pound of bitter almonds, a quarter of a pound of fweet almonds, half a pound of loaf-fugar, and the whites of three eggs: a quarte; of an hour wUl bake them.

Su9ar Cakes.

TAKE three pounds of fine flower, ried weI atud fift two pounds of loaf fugar, beaten and fif(ed, the yojcs of fovf eggs, a little mace, a quarter of a pint of rofewater (a little mufk or ambergreafe may be diflfolved in the fugar, if agceeal)Ie) mix it all well together; .make it up to roll out: fift fome fugar over them, and bake them in a quick oven.

J Turk4 Gate.

EIGHT ggx jiweigkt of them In fifie fugar fifted, and the veight pf fix in nower; beat the whites to a fnow, till a halfpenny will lie upon it, then beat the yolks; mix thefe with the fugar, and whifk it well $ grate the rind of a lemon to the flower; beat all well together: bake it an hour and a half.

Portugal Cakes.

TWO pounds of flower, the fame of butter, fugar, and cur rants, nine yolks of eggs, four whites; mix thefe with' a little brandy; butter the pans: a pretty hot oven.

Jing Cakes.

' ONE pound of flowed, three quarters of a pound of cur-P rants, the fame of fifted fugar, one nutmeg, a little mace; rub the butter M'ell into the flower, mix thefe together; add' four eggs well beat; butter the pans; fift fugar on the cakes: a quick oven.

MarHoroujrb Cakes.

BEAT eight eggs very well, ftrain them, put them to a pound of fugar fifted; beat thefe three quarters of an hour, add three quarters of a pound of flower dried, two ounces of carraway-feeds; beat the cake well: liake it in a quick oven.

ttn

THE LADY'9 ASSISTANT, 377

een Cakes.

BEAT pne pound of butter to a cream, with feme rofe-ws tcr, one pound of flower dried, one pound of fifted fugar, twelve eggs 'f beat all we! together; add a few currants wafted and dried j butter faiali pans of a fize for the purpofe, grate fugar pver them: they are foon baked. Tiey may be done in % Dutch oven.

Utile Seed Cakes.

ONE pound of flower well dried, one pound of fugar fifted; wafh one pound of butter to a cream with rofe-water; put the flower in y degrees; add ten yolks and four whites of eggs, vone ounce of carraway-feeds; keep beating till the oven is ready; butter the pans well; grate over fine fugar heat the jcakes till juft as tjiey are fet into the oven. .

Dry Cakes.

RUB one pound ofbutter into one pound of flower, one pound of fifted fugar (the tmttec ibould be foaked all night in orange-flower or rofe-water;). whip to fnow the whites of ight eggs -f beat the yolks of "fix witha little brandy; mix his very well 5 butter the pans, only half fill themj they arbajced in half an lour; a briflc, not a fcorching oven; they will keep half a year. If agfeeabic make them with currants; put three quarters of a pound y .

0 make Macaroons New-England Manner.

TAKE half a pound of almonds, and as much double-refined fugar, beat and fifted; lay the almonds in water all night, blanch and dry theni well in a cloth, beat them in a mortar with a little rofe-water; take the whites of two eggs, beat to a froth, and fift the fugar into the eggs; put in the almonds, 4ind drop them upon wafer j duft them oyer with fugar.

• TV make Utile Plumb Cakes,

TAKE two pounds of flower dried, and half a pound of fugar finely powdered, four eggs, two whites, half a pound of butter waflied with rofe-water, fix fpoonfujs of cream warmed, a pound and a half of currants waflied and well dried j mix all together, and make them vr in little cakes, bake them in an Oven almoft as hot as for manchet; let them ftand half an hotir, till ey are coloured on hoth fides; take down the ovenlid, and let Chem ftand a little to foak

•

378 THE LADY'S ASSIST AljTX

To make CMtefibam Cakei.

. T'AKE four pounds of flower, half a pound of bufeer.tnelt X7 j'-tjfit in a unt of milk, two cegs well beat in half a pint of j

yeaft, " .little fait; mix it well together, and fct it brforc the l !. ' 6"jftre to rife three quarters of an hour; make them up, and fet I .--thcm again before the fire to- rife, before they are fet into, the L j f oven. .Three quarters of an hoiir mW bake thorn in a quick,

7 make Both Bms.

TAKE a little more than a pound f flower, fix eggs, fix oonfuls of ale-yeaft; mix it with half d)e flower;'tl it rife by the "fire an hour i take three quarter of a pound of butter 4Hm1 riih in the other flower; mix all together, ftir in it a pound of carrawaycom6ts,i ftrew fome on e tops, ef them l. bake thm on tin plates.

Banhury Cakes.

TAKE half a peck of fine flower, three pounds of currants, •a pound and a half of butter, a quarter of a pound of fugar, m quarter of an ounce of dores and mace, three quarters of a 'pint of ale-yeaft, and a little rofe-water boil as itiuch milk as will ierve to knead it, and when it is almoft col(f put in as nany carrawayfeeds as will thicken it; work all together at the fire, puUing it to pieces two or Uiree times before it is made up

Wifione Cakes.

TAKE half a pound pf fine flower, and the fame quantity pf loaf fugar fifted, a pound of carraway-feeds dried, the yotk .of one •egg, the wliites of three, a little rofe water, withaivbergreafeoiflToIved in it; mix it all well together, and roll it out as thin as a wafer; cut them wkh a glafs, lay them on flowered paper, and then bake them in a flow ovep.

SV makefFigs.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of flower, and a.pound of butter, rub half in tb flower, the other half in the milk, four eggs, one oiince of arraway-feeds, and fome yeafi iQake it

up ftiiF, let it ftand by the fire to xife, work one pound of

fugar in the pafte; butter the 4ins, and Jlay them e

' ' ' -i

To make Ginger head; .

TAK a pound of flower, a poucl aid sbalf of butter,

r

THE. LADYs ASSISTANT, 379

two poands of fugar, four fpoonfuh of rdewater ten eggs, dfid z quarter of a pound of ginger.

31 make Ginger Sprigs after the Wefi-Tndian Manner, TAKE tbree pggs, a poud of fogaf, a pound of flower, 4 Httie ginger, two fpoimfuis pf roTe-nratter; mx them to a pafte.,

To make Butter Jrcps after the We-Indian Manner.

TAKE threes eggs, leav€ out baf t' whites, half a pound of flower, . half a pound of fugar a quarter of a poun4 of butter, two fgponfuU of roferwtej, a little Qiace and feeijs

Lfinmt Cakes.

TAKE the beft-coloured lemons, fcrape out the blacks, and

i prate off the peel clean i put the peel Into a ftrainer, wet fomo ugaf, boil it to a candy height then take it off, and put in the lenxn-peel; fet it on agin, and let it boil up, fqueeze in a Jittle lemon-juijce, and drop them on buttered plates or papery

Savoy Bifcuits.

TAE eight eggs, beat the whites till thpy are a ftrong froth, then put in the yolks, with a pound of itigar; beat them all together for quarter of an hour; wlen the oven h readyi put in one pound of fine flower to the other jngfedients, .

ftir it til it is wiell mixed lay the bifcuits upon the par, and ice them take care the oven is hot enough to bake tfaeo guick

Naples Bifaut.

SIFT a pound of fine fugar, and put to it three quarteri pf the finipft flower which can be got, it muft be fifted three times 5 then add fix eggs well beat, and a fpoonfu) of fofewater; when the oven is almoft hot, make, them, but take care they are not made up too wet.

Nnms Bifiuii

TAKE tiie whites of fix eggs, and beat fthem to a froth then take half a pound af almandfi bdanched, beat them finf.

iththe froth of the eggs as they want mdftenii.; then ukQ J

e yolks, wkh three 4uait£rs f a poundof ioaf-iiigar, beat J thefe well together, and mix the almoods with he eggs and fugar; then put in a quarter of a pound of flower with the j

peel of two lemons grated, and ckron finely ihred; add a little •

orange- flower wafter, or ratafia; %aike ilhem4n little pans in a .

QoicI oven 3 when they aie f olfMiped, turn them n fins to; ' ' ' ' harden

38o THE LADr ASSISTAN.T harden the bottoms i but before tbey are put in tbc oveA.agaio,.

flrew foinc double- refined Aigiu finely fifted on them tstk care to bgtter the pans well, and £11 tbem but half fuU

Sugar Bifcuits.

ONE pound of flower one pound pf powderrfugar, a few almonds blanched .and ppunded, mixed wih ii, fpoonfuis of rofc- water, and the yolks and whites of eight egs that have been beat a full hour; when well mixed put it in Imall tins of various fabions, and bake tbem only with the heat of an ovea after the bread is drawn ftop the oven very cloik.,.

Sugar Puffs.

TAKE the wfiites of ten eggs, beat them till they rife to a high froth put them into a ftone mortar, or a wooden bow, add as much double-reiined fugar as will make them thick; put in a little ambergreafe to give them a flavour, rub them round the ihortar for half an hour; put in a few carrawayfeeds; take a fleet of wafers, lay them pn as broad as afixpence, and as high as they can be laid, put tbem in a papdet oyeii half a quarter of an hour and they wiU look white af foow.

To make Wafers

TO a pint of cream put the yolks of two eggs wfeU beat; ipix it with flower well dried (as thick as a pudding) fugar and orange-flower water to the tafte; put in warm water, enough to make it as thin as fine pancakes; mix them very fmooth, anj bake them oyer a (love; butter the irons whn they ftick To clarify Sugar.

PUT four quarts of water into a preferving-pan, put into it the white of an egg, whiik it well with a whifk till it is a ftrong froth; put in twelve pounds of fugar, fet it over a ftove when it boils put in a little cold water; let it boil, up three or . four times, and continue each time to put in a little cokl water till the fcum rifes very thick; take it from tbe fire, let it fettle, then take oflF th fcum, run it through a wet napkjn, and keep it for ufe.

If it is not fine when the firum is taken pff, it mui be loile4 gain before it is drained. . .

To boil Sugar to thefirft Degree called, mpotb

TAKE the clarified fugar and put it in a preferviig-pan; whn it boil, dip in the fcummer tale om qi tl)e fugar g

the

THCe; LADts' 'AS6tSTAli;₯. 0t

thi fcummei iWth'a fingei', pirf tlie finger'to tfte tiumb 'when it is feparated from the thymh, ff it draws out a fine thferfd'and remains in a drojf) bri the fi'ngeY, it is a little ffti6othi% bailing it more, it becomes quite fmootb.

TbefecGnd Deree called Slcpon ugdr.

FOR blown fugar it muft boll longer, "and muft silfo fie tried, by flipping in the fcummer, and when it is taken out, by (baking off the fugar into the pan, blowing it with the mouth ftrongly through the holes; and if bubbles or bladders blow through it, it is boiled to the degree called blown.

The third Degree ealled leathered Sugar;

WHICH is to be proved by dipping in the rcummer; when it has boiled longer, fliake it- over the pan, then give it a fud 4en jerk j if it is enough, the fugar will fly off like feathers.

The fourth Degree of boilings called Crdckled Sugar;

WHICH muft boil ftill longer; it muft be proved by dipping a ftick into the fugar, and then into cold water, which ihould ftand near for tat purpofe: draw off the fugar from the ftick; if it is hard, and fnaps in the water, it is enough, if not, it muft boil till it will.

The watr muft be very cold or it will not do,

The fifth Degree or 'hat is called carmel Sugar.

IT muft boil ftill longer, "and is proved by dipping a jiclc firft in ithe fugar, and then in the water; when, it is boiie r.

to the carmel, it will fnap like glafs the moment the ftick' touches the cold water. This is the higheft degree of boiling fugar; the fire muft not be very fierce at this laftrboilihgb for fear the fugar ftiould burn and be difcoloured. x; ' To preferve Green Ahnonds.

TAKE the almonds when they ar-e well grown, and make ' a lye with wood, charcoal, and water; boil the lye till it; fee(s very fmooth, ftrain it throifgh a fieve, arid let it fettle till clear; then pour off the clear into another pan, and fet it on the fire,, in order to blanch off the down that is on the almonds," yrhich muft be done in this manner:• - When the lye is fcalding.

hot, throw in two or three almonds, and try, when they have been in fome time if they will blanch; if thqy will, put in the reft, and the moment their flcins will com off, remove them from the fire, put them into cold water and blanch them, rubbing them with fait; thVafli them ' in feveral waters till the laft

•ppcar

82 TH£ LAiJYs ASSiStANti

apprtrt ckan; then direct tkeia into boiling wilcir:ind Imt them boil till a pin maypafs through them with eafe; inin and put them into clarified Aigalr without ater they being green enough do not require a thin fugar to bring them to at colour but on the contrary, if too much heated) they will turn to too dark a green; the next day boil the fyrtip sind put it upon them; the day after, bo9 it till h is very fmooch; the day following give all a boil together, fcum them, and fet them lie four or five days i if they are to be dried, put them into jellies, and follow the direAions for green apricots

If for a compote, it is but ferving them td table when they are firft entered, by boiling the fugar a little more.

Almond Loq.'bes.

TAKE a pound of almonds, blanch and beat them very finri in a marble mortar, with fine fugar fifted, and the rind of a lemon grated; fet them over the fire, and keep them ftinring till they are ftifF; make them into little loavies: beat fome whites of eggs to a ftiif froth, dip them into it; put them in a pan, with a pound of fifted fugar, part them if they flick togedier; put more fugar to them till they begin to be fmooth and dry; put them on papers, fliake them in a pan which is - wet with the white of eggs, to give them a glofs bake ihera oii the papers

. 31p preferve Almonds dry.

. TAlCE a pound of Jordan almonds, half a pound of double refined fugar (one alf of the almonds blaiiched, the other unblaiicbed) boat the white of an egg very well, pour it on the almonds, and wet them well with it then boil the fugar dip in the almonds ftir them all together, that the fugar may hang well on them; then lay them on plates, put them in the oven after the bread is drawn; let them ftay all night, and they will keep the year.round

To parch Almonds

TAKE a pound of fugar, make it a fyrup; boil it candy llgh; put in three quarters of a pound of Jordan almonds blanched, keep them ftirring all the while, till they are dry then crifp them, put them in a box atid keep them dry.

r

r;' Chocolate Almonds,

. TAKE a. pound of chocolate finely grated, and a poiind and a half of the beft fugar finely fifted foak gum-dragon in orange

flower

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 383

flower vfnttt; work them inm the fermr of ftliMiidt, (the ptAe muft be Ittff) then dry them in a fltrre.

.idfj5 dried.

BOIL tbem in new wort on a flow fire for a quarter of an hopr, thfHi take them out sul prefs ihefn flat; dry tfaicm in this oven or ftove f ut them in paa in a boXgi aod they, will ke all the year

Black Off K

CUT a flice froaa tho bottom end. of Come apfiesi fet ihcm into a quick oven till they are brown, on a tiir; wet them with a little oraiige-iower wattr or brandy grate fugar over them; fet them again into the oven till they look black; ferve them with fugar grated over them, or with cuftard or cream in a difli.

Green Caps.

GREEN fome codlins as for preferving; rub them over with a little butter, or fweet oil, grate (bme fine Aigar over; fet them in a flack oven till they look bright.

Pippins ftewed

MAKE a thin fyrup witn water, lemon-juice, fugar, a little cinnamon; there muft be fufficient to cover the pippins; pare fome golden pippins, core fome with a fcoop, halve the reft; put the laft into the fyrup, the round fide downward; lay in the whole ones, with the rind of a lemon nicely pared, jnd a. piece of paper upon them; boil them gently; when the apple inclines to part, fet them off; put them on again, thei fyrup muft cover them in boiling; as they are near done, boit them quieker; do not leave them till finiflbed; they muft look clear: linrve them lA a di(b with the fyrup and lemon-peel.

Stewed Pippins with Cuftard.

STEW them as above; cut fome citron into flips, ftick them into the ends of the pippins, pour a rich cuftard into a di(h, fet in the pippins.

Or, STICK in the citron; kxvQ them with good jelly broke knd laid amongft them

I'd ftew Golden Pippins to look like Apricots PARE the pippins, and fcoop out as- much the core as can be done without fpoiling the ftiape df them; cut a little oitch round, to give it the appearance of an apricot; put the

parings

384 Tfife LADY'S ASSISTANT.

parings into fome water, with fugar enough to make it a fyrup a little juice of lemon, and Ibme lemon-peel $ when the fynip is made, ftrain it off, and put in the pippins, they fhould be covered with the fyrup, which (hould be but thin f let them ftew very gently; they muft be taken off, and fet on again three or four times, to prevent their breaking; when they are half dpne, tie up fome cochineal bruifed in a rag, and touch one fide of each pippin, to make it look like the red fide of an apricot, and by ftewing them fo gently, the fyrup will penetrate into themt and give them a yellow caft, which will have a good effect in wintertime, when there are no apricots to be had; cut fome lemon-peel like ftraws, and ftew with them.

To preferve Angelica in Sticks.

CUT fome angelica into ihort pieces three inches long (let it be older than that which was dried) fcald it a little, then drain it; put it into a thin fugar as before; boil it a little, the next day turn it in the pan the bottom upwards, and boil it, then finifli it as the other for knots

To dry it.

. TAKE what quantity is wanted from the fyrup, boil as much fugar as will cover it till it blows; put in the angelica and let it boil till it blows gain; when cold, drain it, tie it in knot, and put it into a warm ftove to dry, firft dufting it a little; when dry on one fide, turn it to dry on the other, and it will be fit for ufe.

To freferoe Angelica in Knots.

TAKE young and thick ftalks of angelica, cut them into lengths of about a quarter of a yard and fcald them; put them into water, ftrip off the fidns, and cut them into narrow flips; Jay them upon a preferving-pan, and put to them a thin fy rup of clarified fugar; let them boil, and fet them by till next day; then turn them in the pan, give them another boil, and the day after drain them, and boil the fugar till it is a little fmooth, pour it upon the angelica, and if it is a good green boil it no more, if not, heat it again, and the next day boil the fugar till it is very fmooth, and pour it upon the angelica; the day after boil the fyrup till it rifes to the top of the pan, put in the angelica, give them a warm, put them into pots, pour the fyrup upon them, and they will be fit for ufe.

7

THE LADYs ASSISTANT, 385

0 preferw Pippm for prefent ettting.

PARE them very thin, ahd put them into a clean ffew or preferving pan j fcoopf out the cores, and into every pippin put two or- three long narrow bits- ()f lethod-peel; boil the parings in watdr enough tor cqvr the pippins, iftrain it and make it as wcet as fyrup; ftew theiii till they dre quite tender.

A littfe 'lemon-juice 1$ an idditiori.

To preferv£i Golden Pippins in Jelly.

PARJC the pipptiiSy ttiGt our all the fpots niake a bole quite through tbem, en boil tbem im- water a quarter of ah hour; drain theoH and take aa much iugar as will cover thern boil it till it blows very ftrong; then put in half a pint of pippin jelly, ind the juice of three or four lemons; boiJ all together, and put the golden pippins to thein, then let them alt boil t6gether.

Snow-balls.

PARE and core with a fcoop five large apples, fill them with marmalade; roll the apples ina cruft, bake them in a tin pan; when they are taken out of the oven, ice them well, in the fame fnanner as a cake; fet them to harden at a good diftance from Jthe fire, or in the oven, ifit id very ffack.

' For the cruft, put a quarter of,a pe)und' of butter into ibme water j when it boils, pouf it on one pound of flower, with what hot water will make it into a go6d pafte; work it well;

Golden Pippins preferved.

BOIL fome' pippins in fomc water to a ma(h, firft pared and fliced j run the liquor through' a jelly-bag; put two pounds of loaf-fugar into a pan, with near one pint of water, boil and fcum it, put in twelve pippins pared, arid cored with a fcoop, he peel of an orange cut thin; let them boil faft, till the fyrup is thick, taking them off when they appear to part, putting them on the fire again when they have ftood a little time; then put in a pint of the pippin juice, boil them faft till they are clear, then take them out; boil the -fyrup as much more as is neceflary, with the juice of a lemon. The oiangc-peet muft be firft put into wte for a day, then boiled, to take out thie bitternefs.

Pippins fliced.

PARE and flice them, make a fyrup, give the pippiins a boil with lemon-peel cut in lengths; the next day boil them till lear; if the fy tup is not thick enough boi it'till it is; put them by in glaiTes Or fmall gallipots 5 brandy-paper.

1 C c Green

V

386 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Green Codlins.

GATHER them the fize of a large walnut, with a leaf or twa on; put vine leaves and codlins in layers into a preferving paa till the pan isll, then pour in fpring- water; cover the pan clofe, fet them over a flow fire till they will peel; when peeled, put them into the fame water, when cold, with more vine-leaves j green them gently over a flow fire, then drain them on a fieve; boil them gently in a good fyrup once a day for three or four days s fet them by in glafies; brandy-paper.

To make. Pippin Knots.

TAKE fome pippins and weigh them, then put them into a prcferving-pan; to every pound, put four ounces of fugar,;aid fcarce water enough to cover them; boil them foft, and pulp them through a fieve; for every pound of apples put one pound of clarified fugar; boil it till it almoft cracks, then put in the pafte, and mix it well over a flow fire; then take it off and pour it on flat pewterplates, or the bottoms of difhes, to the thicknefs of two crowns; fet them in the ftove for three or four hours, then cut them into narrow flips, and turn them up into knots to what fhape or fize is agreeable; put them into the ftove to dry, duflring them a little; turn them and dry them on the other ude, and when thoroughly dry, put them into a box

Pippin Jelly.

TAKE the fineft pippins which can be got, put them into as much water as will cover them; fet them over a quick fire and boil them to maih; prefs out all the liquor through a fieve, and then ftrain it through a flannel bag, keep it for ufe; when the apples are all to pieces, put in a quart of water more, and let it boil at Jeaft half an hour % run it through a jelly-bag, and keep it for ufe.

In the fummer codlins are befl:; in September and winter golden runnets.

If it is to be very ftrong, put to every pint and a half, a quarter of a pound of ifinglafs.

Marmalade of Apples.

TAKE fomc apples and fcald them in water; when they are tender, take and drain them through a fieve; boil fome fugar to the feathered degree, three quarters of a pound of fugar to a pound of apples; - put them into the preferving-pan, and let them fimmer over a 'gentle fire, fcum them all the time i when they are a proper thicknefs put them into pots or glaflfes.

JpricQts

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. Zy

Apricots freferved Ripe.

THEY muft not be too ripe; pare them very thin, thruff: out the flones with a (kewer; to a pound of 'fruit, a pound of fugar; juft wet it, make a fyrup; when cold, pour it over the aprkots; the next day boil the fyrup again, put in the apricots, give them a boil or two; repeat this till they look clear, letting them grow cold between every boiling; boil and fcum the fyrup till of a proper thicknefs, but not to be difcoloured, powr it over the apricots 3 when cold, put brandy-paper.

Green Apricots.

GATHER them before the ftones are hard, put them into fpring- water, lay vine-leaves on the top, then ax:ovcr; fet the preferving-pan over a gentle fire; let them coddle gently till yellow, then rub them with flannel, throw them into cold fpringwater; put them again into the firft water, with more vineleaves J cover them very clofe; let them green gently till of a good colour, at a great height from the fire, then change them into a thin fyrup, boil them gently a little; repeat this till they are plump and clear, (always let them be cold between each boiling) then add more fugar to the fyrup; boil it well; juft throw in the fruit, boil it up; when cold, put brandy-paper.

Apricots preferred Whole.

TAKE five dozen of large apricots, ftone and lay them in a china difli, cover them with three pounds of double-refined fugar pounded and fifted; let them (land five or fix hours, thea boil them on a flow fire till they are clear and tender; if fome are clear before the refl: are ready, take them out, and put them in again when the reft are done; let them ftand clofe covered till next day, then make the codlin jelly very ftrong - To two pounds of jelly, put two pounds of fugar, boil it till it jellies; when it is boiling, make the apricots fcalding hot, and put the jelly to them, boil them gently; when the apricots rife and jelly very well, put them into pots or glaflies, and cover them clofe

Apricots in Brandy.

GIVE them a little flit at the end (not where the ftalk grows) do them as the peaches; but put no kernels.

Apricots in Jelly.

PARE and ftone the apricots, then fcdd them a little, and lay them in a preferving-pan, put in as mich clarffid fugar as will cover them and let them juft fimmer; the nlxf dy drain

iC c 2 tb

388 THE LADY ASSISTANT:

the fynip and boil it finooth, put in the apricots; let them boil, and then take them off; take fome jelly of codlins, with fomc apricots boiled in it; when the jelly is of a proper thicknefs, put in the apricots with their fyrupj boil them all together 5 when enougl fcum them and )ut them into glafTes.

Apricot Cakes

SCALD fome apricots, peel, ftone, and bruife them j wetr the fugar with a little water, boil and um it, put in the apricots; Ilmmer it gently till it is thickiih, keep it fiirring; pour it into flat glafTes; when cold, take out the cakes, dry them in a ftove to, one pound of apricots half a pound of fugar.

Apricot Giam.

TAKE two pounds of apricots pared, and a pint of codlin jelly, boil them together very faft till the jelly is almoft wafted j then put to it one pound and a half of fine fugar, boil it .very faft till it jellies, then put it into pots or gliafles; froth clear cakes may be made of this, and jelly of pippins in the winter.

Marmalade of Apricots.

PEEL the apricots, cut them very fmall, pound and fifV fome loaf-fugar y. put them into a preferving-pan; the fame quantity of fugar as fruit; let them fimmer over a flow fire till they are enough, ftir them all the time; when they begin to thicken, try the liquor in a fpoon, if it jellies it is done 5 put it in pots, and cover it with white paper dipt in brandy; then tie over it another )aper: this is the proper method of covering, all wet fweetmcats.

To dry Apricots.

WHEN pared and ftoncd, ftrew over them fifted fugar in layers, the next day boil the fyrup, put in the apricots, and boil them up quick j repeat this the following day, boiling them till they look clear, and the fyrup thick; take them out.

ry them in a ftov-e or flow oven, turning them as there is occafion.

Apricot CbipSi

PARE and part the apricots, flic them the thicknefs of a crown, put them into a bafon, ftrew fugar between them; the next day fimmer them gently, repeat it two or three days; lay them on a fieve, fift fugar over j fet them into a moder.ate ftove r oven, turning them till dry.

3 CompoUi

THE LADYs ASSISTA3;T. 389

Composes of Apricots SPLIT the apricots, take out the ftones, put them into a )referving-pan of water over the fire let them boil very genrty; when they are foft, put them into cbld water, for fear tbey fhould be broke 5 clarify fome fugar, put in the apricots, let them iimmer in the Aigar then take thena off, and put them into plates.

0 candy Apricots.

CUT the fruit in half, put fugar upon thena; bake them in a gentle oven clofe ftopt up, let them ftand half an hourj lay xhem one by one on glais plates to dry.

To preferve Barberries.

TO a pound of maiden bjrberries, a pound of fine fugar; xnake it into a fyrup, with half a pint of water; boil and fcum it, with a bit of cochineal tied in a bit of muflin; figimer the barberries, let them ftand till the next day, boil them till ten4er; when cold, put brandy-paper.

To dry Barberries.

TAKE fome maiden barberries, weigh them, and to every pound of fruit clarify two pounds of fygar; put the barberries in bunches into the fyrup when it is fcalding hot, let them boil a little, nd then fet them by covered down clofe with a paper;tli(B next day make them fcalding hot 5 repeat this for two days, but dp not let them boil after the firft time: when they are cold, lay them on earthen plates, ftrew fugar well over them; the next day turn them on a fieve, and fift them again with fugar; turn them eycry day till they are dry:, take care the ilove is not too hpt.

Jelly of Barberries.

STRIP them, put them in a preferving-pan, with a very little water; boil and pulp them through a fieve; boil fugar candy high, equal quantities of fyrup, and of juice, boil them pgether till they will jelly.

Bullace Cheefe

IS made in the fame manner as damfon cheefe.

To candy Fruit.

IT muft be f5rft preferved, then dipped in warm water, dried with a cloth, fugar fifted on it very thick, and dried in a ftovd . m oyen, turning it as there is occauon.

Cc 1 Or,

390 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Or,

WHEN the fruit is prcfcrved, dry it in a ftove till the fyrup is quite out, dip it into fyrup boiled candy high, dry it again..

All dried and candied fruit muft be kept in a very dry placie.

Black Butter.

THREE pounds of fruit, (viz. currants, goofeberries, rafberries, and cherries) to one pound of iixpenny fugar boiled till it is quite thick: it muft wafte half the quantity. It'is a very pleafant fweetmeat, and keeps well.

Cheries preferved.,

STONE them; to one pound of cherries allow dne-poundf fugar, and half a pint of water, with which make a fyrup well boiled and fcummed; put in the cherries, give them, a fcald; the next day boil them on a flow fire till they look clear; when cold, lay a paper on them; let them ftand all night, then boil and fcum half a pint of currant-juice (half red, half white and a pound of fugar; warm the cherries, put them into this, with more than a quarter of a pint of the firft fyrup, in proportion to each pound of cherries; juft.boil them in this, ftir them gently till cool; put brandy-paper.

To preferve Cherries the French way.

TAKE morella cherries, hang them fingly by the ftalks where the fun may come to dry them,and no duft can get to them; then cut ofF the ftalks, place them one by one in glafies; fcrape as much fugar as will cover them, then fill them up with wine fet them in a ftove to fwell and they are fit for ufe.

Another way

TAKE fix pounds of cherries, ilone them; put to them half a pound of the beft powder fugar, and boil them together; when they are enough, lay them one by one on the back-fide of a fievc, fet them to dry in an oven after the bread is drawn; when dry, put them in a ftove to keep; if any liquor is left, do more cherries. They will keep their colour all the year.

To preferve Cherries in Jelly.

TAKE green goofeberries, flit them on the fide, that part of the liquor may run out;, put them into pots, and put in with them two or three fpoonfuls of water; flop the pots very clofe, and put them in a (killet of water over the fire, till the goofeberries

THE LADrs ASSISTANT. 391

goofeberries have a liquor as e)ear a water: half a pound of goofeberries will make this liquor: - Take a pound of cherries uoned, one pound of double-refined fugar beat fmall; ftrew fome at the bottom of a bafon, then a layer of cherries, coyer them over with fugar, keep fome to throw over them as they boil; put to the cherries five or fix fpoonfuls of goofeberry liquor, fet them over the fire, boil them very foftly att firft, till the fugar is melted, and afterwards very faft; fcum them very well; when it jellies oh the fpoon, it is enough. Half a pound is snoygh to do at a time.

Cherry Pafte.

TAKE two pounds of morell cherries, ftone them, prefs out the juice, dry them in a pan, and mafli them before the fire; then weigh them, and take their weight in fugar beat very fine; heat them over a flow fire till the fugar is well mixed, then fliape them on plates or glailes; duft them when cold and put them into a ftove to dry.

To dry Cherries.

TO five pounds of morella cherries ftoned, put one poun of double-refined fugar pounded, a very little water; put all together over the fire, making it fcalding hot; take the cherries immediately out of the liquor; dry them on t cloth; put them again irito the pan, ftrewing fugar between evecy layer; when the fbgar is melted, make the cherries again fcalding hot; repeat this twice, fifting fugar between; then take them from the •iyrup, dry them in the fun, or a very flow oven, laid fingly; when dry, dip them as quick as poffible into a bafon of cold water, dry them with a cloth then as before, keep them in a ry place.

Cherry Marmalade.

STONE feme cherries; to four pounds one quart of red furrant-juice; fimmer thefe together till great part of the liquor is wafted; ma(h it, put to it three pounds of fugar made into a fyrup, and boiled candy high; boil all together till it hecpoies hick when cold, put on brandy-paper.

Cherry Giam.

STONE fome cherries, boil them well and break them, take them off the fire, let the juice rUn from them; to three pounds of cherries, boil together half a pint of red currantjuice, and half s pound of loaf-fugar; put in the cherries as tiey tioili fife in thret quarters of a pound of fugar boil the cherries very faft for more than half an hour i when cold, pit pn brandy-paper.

Morella Cherries in Brandy.

THEY muft be ripe and quite found; clip off the end of the ftalks, put to them cold brandy well fwetened.

Over all fruit in brandy, tie over a bladder dipped in brandy.

To preferve white Citrons.

CUT fome white citrons into pieces, put them into faljt and water for four or five hours; take them out and wah theni 1 clear water, boil them tender, drain them, and put them into as much clarified fugar as will cover them; let them ftan4 twenty- four hours, then drain the fyrup and boil it fmooth; when pold'putin the citrons; let them Aand till next day, then boil the fyrup quite fmooth, and pour on the citrons; the day after, boil all together nd put them into a pot to be candied or into jellies. ...

To make Citrons of zeen Melons.

CUT them long ways into quarters, fcrape out the feed$ and infide, preferve and candy them as abo9e, only with this difference, boil them three times in the fyrup. Care muft be taken of all fruit kept jn fyrup; if there ijs any froth on theni they muft be boiled up, and if they are very frothy and four, the fyrup muft be -firft boiled, and then put in the fruit, anc) boil all togeth'er.

Cucumbers.

TAKp large cucumbers that will quarter like citron, anc) fmall ones to be whole, let them be very green, and as free from feed as poffible; put them into a wide-moiithed pot) pour over them a ftrong brine j lay a cabbage-leaf to keep them down, tie over a paper, fet them into the chimney-corner till they become yellow; fet them over the fire in other fait and water, with a frefti cabbage- leaf, and clofe covered, let them heat gently to green them, but they muft not boil; if they j(houl4 pot be green fnough fo foon as may beexpeied, change the fait and water; (in order to jdo it, take out the cucumbers, fcowcr the pan, and let the frefli fait and water be warm before they are put in again; cover them as before diredled.) When they are of a good Colour fet them off the fire, let them ftand in the water till cJ, then put them into cold water, Shifting the water twice a day to take out the fait. - The large one inuft b.e quartered, and the feeds taken out, before they are put into the cold water; then make a fyrup according to the quantity of fruit, rather more than half a pint of water to one pound of fin fugar; when boiled and fcummed, put in above an ounce of ginger, the outfide fcraped, fome very thin lemon-peel; when the fyrup is boiled thick, fet it by till cold, then put in the cucumbers; boil up the fyrup oncejn two days, or as there is occafion, for three weeks, but never put it to the cucumbers till cold; if it is neceiTary, add more fqgar to the fyrup.

Melons do rather better than cucumbers, having more fub ftance; but either melons or large cucumbers look very like citron, and do very well in cakes or pies.

Currants preferved in Bunches.

STONE them; tie the bunches to bits of fticks, fix of feven together; allow the weight of the currants in fugar, which make into a fyrup; boil it high, put in the currants, give them a boil,fet them by, the next dy take them out; when the fyrup boils, put them in again, give them a boil or two, take them out; boil the fyrup as much as is neceflary when cold, put it to the currants in glafies: brandy-paper

Currants preferved in Jelly.

STONE the currants, clip off the black top, and clip them from the ftalks; to every pound of fruit boil two pounds of fugar till it blows very ftrong; put in the currants, and let them boil; take them from the fire, let them ftand to fettle, thei let them boil again; put in a pint of currant jelly, let it all fimmer a little, then take it from the fire; let it fettle a little, fcum it; when cold, put it into glafies; take care to difperfe the currants equally.

To ice Currants.

TAKE the fineft and largcft bunches of curraits which can be got, beat the white of an egg to a froth, dip them into it, lay them not to touch upon a fieve; fift double-refined fugs over them very thick, and let them dry in a ftove or oven.

Red or white Currant Jely.

BOIL the currants in a preferving-pan, till the juice will eafily mafh through a fieve or a cloth; put an equal quantity f clarified fugar and juice, boil and fcum it till it will jelly; lhen cold, put on paper dipped in braiidy.

Currant Cakes.'

PICK and wafh the currants, cither white or red; to two quarts., one pint of water; when boiled, run the juice through a jelly-bag, do not prefs theb; to one quart of juice, three 4)ounds of fugar; boil up the juice, ftrew in the fugar, ftir it well, fimmer it up to melt the fugar; poiir it into glafles, dry it in a iloye till it will turn out, then Ary the cakes on plates.

Black Currant Jelly.

TO two quarts of currants picked from the ilalks, a quarter of a pint of water; put them into ajar, tie over a paper, bak them; or boil the currants with the fame quantity of water; fqueeze out the juice; to every quart, a pound and an half of fugar, boil it quick for about half an hour; when cold, put brandy paper.

Black Currant Rob.

MAKE it in the fame manner as elden

Black Currant Giam

LET the currants be very ripe, pick them clean, bruife them; to one pound of fruit, three quarters of a pound of loaffugar i ftir it together, and boil it half an hour.

Cuffants dried. '

STONE the currants, tie them in bunches; make a good fyrup, put the currants into it, boil them up, fet them by in the fyrup, take care to keep them under it, and cover what they are fet by in; boil them again, repeat it the next day; then jet them ftand in the fyrup CQvered for a few days; if there 18 occafion give thein another fcald; when cold take them out fift fugar over, and dry thqm; yhen the upper fide is don turn them, flft more fugar, fet them again to dry.

Damon Cbeefe.

, SCALD ripe damfons in as much water as will cover them; pulp them quick through a cullender whilft they are hot, fcald them as they are pulped; to one pound of pulp, a quarter of a pound of fugar; wet it juft enough to melt it, before it is put to the pulp; it muft boil a long time; have a quick fire, wafte about half, and let it be conftantly ftirred ox it will burn; put it into pots it is to cut out in ilices.

Elder Rob.

WHEN the elder-berries are ripe pick them clean, put 9 them hem into a jar; bake them in a flow oven near two hours, queeze out the Juice through a coarfe cloth; boi( it over a flow re till very thick, keep it ftirring; three quarts (hould bo ireduced to near a pint; put it into pots; fet it in the fun for Cwo or three days; Jay over it a paper dipped in fweet oil.

To preferve Eringo-roots.

TAKE fome eringo-roots, and parboil them till tender, peel ind wafh them very clean, dry them with a cloth, put them into as much clarified fugar as will cover them; boil them genty over a ftove till they look clear, and the fyrup is a little thick put them up when half cold ' . A filver fauce-panis beft to boil them in.

To preferve green Figs.

TAKE the fmall green figs when ripe, flit them on the top, jut them into water for ten days; put into the water as much fait as will make it bear an egg; take oflF the fcum,- and put the clear brine to the figs, keep them in this for ten days, then put them into frefh water, and boil them till a pin will go through them; then drain them and put them to other frefh water, fhifting them every day for four days; then drain them and put them into clarified fugar; give them a little warm, and let them ftand till the day following; warm them again, and when they become green give theni a good boil; then boil fome fugar to blow, put it to them, give them another boil drain and dry them.

Goofeherries

TO every pound of goofeberries allow one pound of fugar, which make into a fyriip boil and fcum it well; throw in the goofeberries, give them a little fcalding, in a day or two, boil them till clear; brandy-paper. The red rough fort are the beft.

To preferve Goofeberries green.

TAKE the longeft fort of goofeberries, the latter end of May or the beginning of June, before they have turned colour; fet fome water over the fire, when it is ready to boil, throw in the goofeberries; let them juft fcald, then take them out and put them carefully into cold water; fet them over a very flow fire to green; cover them very clofe that non$ of the (team may get out; when they are quite green, which may take four or fiv hours, drain them gently into clarified fugar, and give them a beat i fee them by till next day, and then give them another another heat (they muft not fimmer, as that will break them ') jthis muft beVepcatcd every day for four or five days j wlien jtbey are of a good colour, put them in pots or glafTes,

If they are to be dried, or in jelly, they muft be done as the green apricots

Green Goofeberry Giam.

TAKE foffje of the largeft green goofebcrries full grown, but not too ripe; cut them in half, take out the feeds; put thenn in a pan of cold fpring- water, lay feme vine-leaves at the bottom then fome goofeberries, then vine-leaves, till all the fruit is in the pan; cover it very clofe that nt) fteam can evaporate, and fet them on a very flow fire; when they are fcalding hot take them off then fet them on again and take them off; they muft be done fo till they are of a good green; lay them on a lieve to drain, beat them in a marble mortar, with their weight in fugar; then take a quart of water, and a quart of goofeberries, boil them to a mafh, fqaeeze them; to every pint of this liquor put a pound of fine loaf-fugar, boil and fcum it; then put in the green goofeberries, let them boii till they ate thick and clear, and of a good green.

Goofeberry Cakes.

BREAK the goofeberries, preCs oiit the juice, which ftraia through a muflin; to one pint of juice, a pound of fugar; finilli it as the currant cake.

To preferve green Grapes.

TAKE the largeft and bcft grapes before they are thorough tipe, ftone and fcald them; let them lie two days in the water they werefcalded in, then drain them, and put them into a thfn fyrup; heat them over a flow fire; the next day turn the grape? in the pan, sind heat them the day after, then drain them; put them into clarified fugar, give them a good boil, fcum them, and fet them by; the next day boil more fugar to blow, put it to the grapes, give all a good boil, fcum them, and fet them in a warm ftove all night; the day after drain the grapes, and lay them out to dry, firft dufting them very well.

To preferve Bell Grapes in Jelly.

TAKE the long large bell or roufon grapes,pick off the fialks, ftone them, and put them into boiling water; fcald them thoroughly, take them from the fire and cover them clofe, to prevent the fteam from evaporating; then fet them oyer a very gentle fire but not to boil) for tw% or threHjours; take tJxpwoiif;, put them into clarified fugar th& has boiled tifl it bio.ty.s etj%c6ngf T5Ofe tianwill cover them, and .give theip-agqrf boil, fcudij them; boil V.limQDefugar tff blows very ffrong; take aa i litut'ptotab-JeigBtltf it 1" boil 5 then put the grapes tfe.it;Jetjmebiall boiPtogether, fcup them wellj ahdX' pu! th?ni rntb'.potsoigla0e.-: V

-' 'preferve GtesJn Clufiers wi4b one Leafy when they '

ah gathered.

TAKE the largeGflfcoigpe. gragps before they are too ripe and prick every oieto every pound of grapes fut a pound and a quarter of fugai:; make.afyr.yp'ith the verjuice of the,, grapes ftrained; when the fugar is quiteleSr; put the grapes (after they are ftrained into fyrup) into a deep jajj cover them clofe, and fet them in a pot of fcalding water over ""v the fire to boil j when the grapes are tender, take them" up, and boil the fyrup a little more; when they are half cold put them, into broad glailes or ftraight jars % lay one clufler over the other cover them with brandy-paper, and tie them up

'Lemons preferved.

PARE them very thin, make a round hole at the top, pulp them, rub them with fait, throw them into fpring-water as they are done, let them lie fix days 5 boil them in other fait and water for ten minutes, dry them; give fhem a few minutes boiling in a thin fyrup, repeat it for five days; let them ftand fix weeks, (looking at the fyrup, which if it appears to change boil up; put them into freih fyrup, boit them in it till clears when cold put brandy-paper,

Lemon Drops

WET fome fugar, boil it in a filver ladle till it is a little flifF, grate in fome lemon-peel; boil this up, drop it on a paper,which fet nigh the fire; the next day the drops will come off.

Lemon Chips.

VIDE oranges.

0 green Leaves.

TAKE fome fmall leaves of a pear-tree, keep them clofe ftopped in a pan of verjuice and water; give them a boil in fome fyrup of apricots; lay them between two pieces of glafs to dry; fmooth and cut them in fhape of apricot-leaves; let them be got with ftalks 3 ftick them in and atbout the apricots or any any other preferved fruit, but they muft be cut in the fhape of the leaf which belongs to that fruit.

To preferve Mulberries dry.

THE mulberries muft not be too ripe, but rather a reddifh green, and tart: having prepared the fame quantity of blown fugar as of fruit, put in the mulberries and let them boil; the fugar fhould be iirft clarified with the juice of mulberries inftead of water: when they have boiled take the pan from the fire, fcum it, and fet it in a ftove till next day; then take them cue, drain them from the fyrup, and put them up in boxes for ufe.

Mulberry Syrup.

PUT the mulberries into a jug, tie a paper over it, fet it up to the. neck in a kettle of water, let it boil; as the liquor rifes from the mulberries pour it ofF, ftrain it; to one pint of liquor, one pound of lump fugar; put it over a flow fire, boil it gently i when the thicknefs of treacle, bottle it.

' To preferve Ne Sarins.

' SPLIT the ne£larins, and take out the ftones, then put them into' clarified fugar; boil them round till they have well taken the fugar j take off the fcum, cover them with a paper, and fet them by; the next day boil a little more fugar till it blows very ftrong; put it to. the nedarins, and give them a good boil; take off the fcum, cover them, and put them into the ftove; the next day drain them, and lay them out to dry, firft dufting them a little, then put them into the ftove again.

Green Oranges.

SCRAPE the -inflde clean out, let them lie in cold water three or four days, changing the water each day, then boil them very flowly till the water is bitter; then put them into other boiling-hot water, fet them by; repeat this every day till the bitternefs is quite off: make a rich fyrup of the laft liquor, with Lifbon fugar; when cold put them in; rtie next day boil them in the fyrup; repeat it till they are green and tender: brandy-paper.

Whole Oranges carved.

CUT the rinds into any fliape with a penknife, put them into fait and water for two days, changing the water; boil them an hour or more in frefli water and fait; drain and dry them, put them into a thin fyrup; let them ftand all night; the next day boil them in it for a few minutes j do this for four days;

THE LADY's assistant, sgg

days; let them ftand in a jar for fix or feven weeks (look at them in the time, to fee if they will keep fo long; if it is neceffary boil up the fyrup) then put them into a thick fyrup, juft boil the oranges in it: when cold put oh brandy-paper, and tie over a bladder.

Oranges without carving are done in the fame manner; only boil them up at the firft, and make the firft fyrup very thin.

Oranges pulped.

PARE them very thin, or rafp them, cut a hole at the ftalk, pulp them very clean, put them into a pot, more than cover them with fpring-watcr and a little faltj lay a cloth upon the top three double, then a' trencher or cover; let themcald gently $ fhift the water five or fix times in the fcalding (put fait into the firft water;) they muft be fo tender that a ftraw will pafs through them; keep them in the laft water till they can be taken out with the hands; put them on cloths, the mouth downward, changing them to dry places; when dry, piit them into milk-warm fyrup, let them lie hajf an hour, juft fcald them; take them out into a deep china difli, pour the fy rup over, cover them with another difli, fcald them once in two or three days for a fortnight; the lafi: time boil thenai up quick till they look clear, turning them about as often as there is occafion yif any part looks white and thick, ftrew fugar over it in the boiling; when they are tranfparent put them into pots, pour the fyrup over fcalding-hot; put brandypaper, tie on a bladder: - for fyrup, a pound of fugar to a pint of water.

N. 6. February is the beft time to do them in, and to make marmalade at the fame time.

To preferve Oranges Lemons and Citrons.

TAKE fome good clear- oranges, and fcrape ofF a little of the outfide-rind; take out the feeds and the juice, lay them in fpring-water two days, change the water twice a day; boil them till they are tender, with a pound and a quarter of doublerefined fugar, a pint and three quarters of fpring-water; take ofF the fcum and put in the oranges; have ready a pint of pippin-water, that has been boiled with half a pound of fugar, and put it to them; then boil it to a jelly, and put in the juice of the oranges; let them boil a little, and then put them intft glafies with fyrup enough to covar them

Orange Rings and Faggots.

' PARE fomc oranges as thin and as narrow as poffiblc, put the parings into water whilft the rings arc preparing, (which is done, by cutting the oranges, after they are pared, into as many rings as agreeable) then cut out the pulp from the infide, and put the rings and faggots into boiling water; boil them till tender, then put them into as much clarified fugar as will cover them, fet them by. till next day, then boil all together, and fet them by -till the day after; then drain the fyrup, and boil it very fmooth, put in the oranges, and give them a boil; the next day boil the fyrup till it rifes almoft up to the top of the pan; then put the oranges into it, and give them a boil put them into pots to be candied as wanted.

Zefi of China Oranges.

PARE off the outfide-rind of the oranges very thin, and only ftrew it with fine powder-fugar as much as their own moifture will take, and dry them in a hot ftove.

0 butter Oranges

TAKE fix oranges, chip them very thin, inake a hole in' the top, fcoop out the feeds and meat, boil them in two or three waters, till they are tender; then make a thick fyrup, and boil them in it; take the chippings of two of the oranges, and mince them very fmall, the juice of the fix oranges, and of one lemon, the yolks of three or four eggs, with fugar to fweeten it, beat it together; fill the oranges with it, and fet them upright in an earthen-pan; put the fyrup to them, theiv put them into a hot oven till the infide is as thick as cuftard; then take them out, and put them into a difh, with fome melted butter and fugar over them; if there is not an oven conve-.

nierU, put them into a ftew-pan, fet them over the fire, andthey will do as well; the fyrup will ferve twice, if the oranges arc foaked in water for two or three days, as they will not be fo bitter.

Orange Martnakde.

WHEN oranges are preferved as in the receipt to preferve theiti, put the peels into water for three days, fhifting the water, then boil them till tender; allow to each pound of pulp, (which" 'muft be free from Ikin and feed) one pound of fugar, and half a pint of water; make it into a fyrup, boiled and fcummed well s put in the pulp, boil it half an hour, or more,' then put in the peel, giv it a boil or two; ftir it or it will burn: when cold, brandy-paper.

Conferve of Oranges.

, TAKE fix Seville oranges, pare them very thin, lay thenl in water three days, fhtfting the water every day; then boil them till they are tender, changing them with warm water two or three times; then take them out and weigh them; to every pound of oranges put two pounds of.fugarbeat and fifced; take ofF the rinds and beat them in a mortar; pick out the kernels and beat the pulp, fugar, and rinds together, and keep it for ufe. When it is ufed, take a fpoonful of the conferve, and the jfoVfis of five eggs well beat, two ounces of fine fugar lifted, two ounces of melted butter, one Naples bifquit grated; beat them all well together) adding the juice of one lemon y lay % thin pafte round th difh, and bake it.

This conferve is good for tarts or puddings.

. Orange Cakes.

TAKE out the infide, picking out the feeds andflcins; boil the rind till tender, changing the water; dry and chop it, put it to the infide; to one pound of this, one pound of fugar boil it candy high, firft well wetted; talce it off the fire, ftir in, the orange, fcald it: when almoft cold drop it on plates. Dry the cakes in a ftove.

Another.

TAKE fix Seville oranges, grate the rinds of two of them; the(T cut off the rinds of all fix to the juicd, and boil them iti vater till they are very tender; then fqueeze out all the water, and beat them to a pafte in a marole mortar, rub it through a hair fieve, and what will not eafily rub through, muft be beat again till it will; cut the inftdes of the oranges into pieces, and rub as much of them through as poflible; then boil fix or eight pippins in almofl water enough to cover them, boil them to a pafte, and rub it through a' fieve, and put it to the reft; put all. together into a pan, and heat them thoroughly till it fe well mixed; to every pound of this pafte, put one pound and a quarter of loaf-fugar j clarify the fugar, and hoi it till it cracks, put in the pafte and the grated peel, ftir all together over a flow fire, till it is well mixed, and the fugar all melted; then fill fome round tin niodds with a fpoon, and fet them in a warm ftove to dry; when the top's are dry, turn them on fisves to dry the othfer fide: when quite dry keep them in a box.

402 THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

0 make Orange Clear-cakes.

TAKE the beft pippins, pare them into as much water as will cover them, and boil them to a ma(h j then prefs out the jelly upon a fieve, and ftrain it through a bag adding juice of oranges to give it an agreeable tafte; to every pound .of jelly, take one pound and a quarter of loaffugar, boilit till it cracks, then put in the jelly and the rind of a gratjed orange or two; ftir it gently over a flow fire till it is well mixed together, take .it ofF and put it into cake glaflfes (what fcum irifes on the top take carefully off before they are cold) then put them into a ftpve, and when they begin toruft upon the upper fide, turn them out upon fquares of glafies, and put them to dry again: when they begin to have a tender candy, cut them into quarters, 4 any other fliape as is moft agreeable, and let them dry till bard 5 then tarn them on fieves, and when thoroughly dry, put them into boxes; as they grow moift in the boxes, fhifl them from time to time, and it will be requifite to put no mor than one row in a box at the beginning, till they are quite dry.

Lemon-colour Cakes

ARE made with lemons as thefe.

Orange Chips.

LET the parings be as whole as pofilble, about a quarter of an inch broad; put them into fait and water for two days, boil them in a quantity of fpring-water till tender, drain them s boil them (a few at a time) in a thin fyrup till they are clear; then boll them in a thick fyrup till candy high; lay them on fieves, clear from fyrup; fift fugar over them; dry them in a moderate oven or ftove.

To make Orange or .Lemon Marmalade.

TAKE fix oranges, grate off two of the rinds, then cut them all, and pick out the infide from the (kin and feeds, put to it the grated rind, and about half a pint of pippin-jelly; take the fame weight of fugar as of the infide; boil the fugar till it blows very itroug, then put to it the infide, and boil all very quick till it becomes a jelly, which may be known by dipping the fcummer and holding it up to drain; if it be a jelly, it will break from the fcummer in flakes; and if iKt, it will run off in little itieams: when it is a good jelly put it into glaflfes or pots.

Orange Jelfy after the Wejt'tndia manner.

An ounce of ifinglafs boiled in a Jittle water, the juice of twelve China-orafigei fix Seville-oranges; rub the peel of the branges with lump-fugar to colour it; T'weeten ft to the palate, and boil it up together; itrain it through a fieve into tbQ inotild.

fo prefirve Orangi-Flowers:

Take tie brange-flowers juft as they begin to open J put theni into boiliiig-water; let them boil very quick till they are tender, putting in i little juice of lenion, as they boil,' Co keep them white then dfairi them,and dry them carefully between two napkins; put them Jta clariiied fugar, (as n!luch as will cover them) the next day drain the fyrup, and boil it a little fmooth; when almoft cold pour it on the flowers; the next .ay drain them and lay th6oi odt to dry, dufting them a tery little;

0 put them . in Jelly.

AFTER they are preferved, as before directed, clarify a little more fugar with orange-flower water, and make a jelly of codlins: when it is redy put in tKe flowers, fyrup, and all together, give them a boil, fcum them, nd piit thetii into glaflfe brots.

To make Oratigi'fioijoer Cakes.

. TAKE four ounces of- the leaves of orange- flowers, jjut thm into fair water for above an hour, then drain them,. an4 put them betwfeen two napkins, and vvith a. rolling-piri roll them till they are bruifed; then have ready boiled one pound of double refined fiigarto the blown degree; put in the flowers, and boll it till it conies to the faniie degree again; then remove t from the fire, and let it cool a little; then with a fpoofi grind the fugr to the bottom or fides of the pari, aind when it turn whjte pour it iilto little papers or cards.

Peaches in Brandy.

, GATHER them three parts ripe; prick them with a penknife; loofen them from the ftone at the end; fcald them gently in a fyrup, turning them; fweeten fome brandy, make it boiling hot,' put it into A 'jar; and as the peaches grow a littlq tender, drain and dy, and put thm into the briihdy: put in 4 few apricot kernels.

Peach Mafnialdde.

PARE and flice the peaches very thin; to a pound of jieachcs,' put three quarters of a pound of fugar wet the fugaf with a very little water, and ftir it over the fire till it is diffolved; then put in the peaches, and let them boii gently over a flow fire till they are d(e eQough;. then fill the pots: whenf cold, paper them up.

Peach Chips.

PARE the peaches, take out the ftones, cut them into flices" not thicker than the felade of a knife; to every pound of chips, one pund and a half of fugar boiled to blou very ftrong put in the chips, let them boil, fcum them; take them oiF th& fire, let them fland to fettle a quarter of an hour, and then give them another quick boil, fcum them again, cover and fet them by till next day; then drain them ' and lay them out every bit fingly j dull them, and dry them in a warm ftove; when dry on one fide, take them from the plate with a. knife, and turn them on a fie ve, and then again if they are not very dry, whicfe they generally are.

To put them in Jelly.

TAKE fome jelly of codlins, as much jelly as fugar, boil the fugar to blow very ftrong, then put in the jelly, give it aboil put in thb chips, give all a boil fcum them and put them in glafTes.

Baked Pears.

PARE, hialve, and core them; put them into an eartfjen pan with- a few cloves, a little water and red wine; to fix large pears, about half a pound of fugar; bake them in art oven, not too hot, then fet them over a flow fire, let them flew gently, (they will be a very good colour;) cut in a little lemon-peel in fmall flireds. If the fyrup is not richenough add more fugar,

A Compote of Pears.

- TAKE a dozen pears, coddle them; when they are foft,take them out .and put them into cold water; pare, cut them in half, and tale out the core; put them into a fyrup made of loaf- fugar; to every pound of fugar, a pint of warer; cover them clofe in a prefer ving- pan, and boil them quick with a little cochineal powdered and tied up in a linen-rag i when

Pears Candied.

when they are tender, and of a good colour quite through, fqueeze in the juice of three or four lemons, put in a bit of lemoii-pcel cut very thin, and boil it with the pears.

A Compote of baked Wardens.

BAKE fome wardens in an earthenpot, with a little claret, fome fpice, lemonpeel, and fugar when they are ufed, peel off the fkin, and drefs them on plates, either whole or in halves; then make a jelly of pippins, fharpened well with the juice of lemons, pour it upon them; when cold, brealc the jelly with a fpooti, and it will have an agreeable efFe£): upon the pears.

0 ftew Pears Purple.

PARE fome pears, cut them into two, or let them remain whole J put them into a flew-pan, and boil the parings in water, jufi fuiHcient to coyer them; ftrain off the liquor, and make it as fweet as fyrup; pour it over the pears, and lay a pewterplate upon them, put on the cover of the ftew-pan clofe, and let them ftew over a flow fire for half an hour, r till they are quite tender, and. they will be a fine purple.

Green Pine-apple Preferved.

LET it lie in fait and water fix days; put it into a faucepan, with fome vine-leaves top and bottom, fill up the pan with the fait and water, fet it over a flow fire till it becomes green then put it into a thin cool fyrup in ajar, fo that it may be covercd 5 the next day boil the fyrup, pour it carefully on, left the top of the apple fhould break; let it ftand two months, (obferve if the fyrupchanges in that time, boil it up again two or three times, letting it be cool before it is put to the apple) then boil a rich fyrup, with two or three pounds of fugar, according to the fize $f the apple; boil and fcum it, with a little ginger, the outfide fcraped; when alnoft cold, put it to the apple well drained; tie it clofe down.

ine-apple Chips.

PARE the apple, pick out the thiftle-part; take half the weight in treble-refined fugar; part the apple in half flice it the thieknefs of a crown, put them into a bafon with fifted fugar between; (in about twelve hours the fugar will be melted) fet this over the fire, fimmer the chips till clear, (the lefs they boil the better) the next day heat them, fcrape off the fyrup y Iy.them on glaiTcs: dry them in a moderate oven or ftove.

To make Pomegranate Qlear-cakef.

DRAW the jelly as for orange clear-cakes, then f)oil it in the juice of two or three pomegranate-feeds, with the juice of an orange and lemon, the rind of each grated; then itrain i through a bag; and to every pound of jelly put one pound aupdl a quarter of fugar boiled till it cracks; to make it a line red put in a fpoonful of cochineal, prepared as dircfled y then fiB the glaffes, and order them as oranges,

PLUMBS.

Greengages Preferved.

GATHER them before quite ripe, put them into a pan with vine-leaves between every row,' and at the bottom j 'fill the pari with water, ifcald the plumbs over a very 'flow fire till they wili peel; peel them with care 5 when done, put them into the fame water with more vine-leaves, cover the pan very clofe, let them green a great height from the fire; then drain them, pour over them a good fyrup; the next day boil it up; put in the plumbsL give them a boil, repeat this twice a day till they look very clear then boil up the fyrup, more if neceflary, or put thea into a fre fyrup when cold: brandy- paper.

Greengages in Brandy AS the apricots.

Compote of Gfeengages

SET on the fire a preferving-pan of cold water, prick thq greengages with a pin, and put them into the water; let thepri ftand over the fire till they are a little foftened; then takp the pan ofF the fire, and let them cool in te water; take fome fugar boiled to the feathered degree j put in the pMubs, an4 cpver them clofe

UV dry Greengages.

SLIT jthcm down the feam, jufl fcald ikcm in a thin, fyrup, with vine-leaves at the top; put thpm ff till the next day, keeping them under the fyrup; then put them into a thick fyrup cold, fcald them gently in this, fet them by, repeat it the next day, till they look clear 5 fet them by for a few days; if there is occafion, boil them once more; take them from the fyriip, dry them. When they are fet by in the fyrup, let it be in fomething rather narrow at the top, as they muft be covered, or they will be difcoloured, Magntem

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT. 407

Magnunhhonum Plumbs. '

SET them over a flow fire in fpring- water till they will peel 5 keep them under the water; peel them, put them into a i

thin iVlgP in a jar, keep them under the fyrup, that they may .

noif liPdRcoloured; the next day boil the fyrup, put them in, give them a gentle boil, let them ftand to be cold, then repeat it, turn them in the fyrup till near cold; take out the plumbs, ilrain the fyrup; put to it more fugar, boil and fcum it, put in the plumbs, boil them till clear when cold, put brandypaper.

fVine Scurs.

RUN them down the feam with a pin, fcald thf:m a few at a time in a very thin fyrup; take them out, ftrew fugar over them in layers, half a pound of fugar to a pound of plumbs; the next day pour off the fyrup, boil it, flut it to the plumbs; repeat this feveral days till they look clear; the laft day, when the fyrup is boiled, put in the plumbs, juft give them a boil; when cold, put brandy-paper, tie over a bladder. If there is not quite fyrup enough, make a little to put to it.,

To dry Damfons.

GATHER the damfons when full ripe, lay them on ar coarfe cloth, fet them in a very cool oven, let them ftand a day Of two, they muft be as dry as a frefli prune; if they are not, put them in another cool oven for a day or twd longer; then take them out: they will eat like frefh damfons in the winter.

To preferve the Green AdmiraUe Plumb.

THIS is a fmall plumb, inclining to the yellow, about the Cze of a damfon; they hould be full grown, juft turning colour; p4k them with a pen-knife, fcald them by degrees till the water is very hot; continue therr in the water till they are green, drain them, and put them into clarified fugar; boil them well in it, and let them fettle a little, then give them another .boil; if they (brink, and do not take the fugar well, prick them with a fork all over as they lie in the pan, and give them ' another boil; fcum them, and fet them by; the next day boil fome more fugar till it blows, apd put it to them, give thei another boil; fet them in the ftove all night, and the next day drain them and lay them in the ftove, firft dufting fugar over (hem.

P 4 4 Plnmbs

4o8 THE LAPYfs ASSISTANT.

Plumbs in Jelly.

WHEN the plumbs arc prefervcd in their firfl: fugar, drain A m, %nd drain the fugar through a bag; make a jelly o% (P. fome ripe plumbs and codlins, by boiling them in juft jM&ch vater as will cover them; prefs out the juice, and ftroHVto cvey pint of juice boil one pound of fugar to blow very irog; put in the juice boil it a little, put in the fyrup and plumbs, give them a good boil all together j take them off, let theoi fettle a little, take off tbe.fcum, and fill the pots and glailes; fcrape fome ginger, and lay it in foak for two or three days,.

then boil it in fome fyrup, with the greengages or the plumbs in jelly. It is a great addition to them, and makes them eat very line. '

To make Clear-cakes of White Pear Plumbs.

' LET 'the plumbs be very clear, put them in a gallipot, and boii them in a pot of boiling water till' they are enough; then let the clear part run from them, and to every pint of liquor add as much fugar boiled to a candy height; then take it off, pat the liquor to it, ftir it all together till it be thoroughly hot, but pt boiled; then put it in glafles j and dry them in a ftove with a conilant warm heat..

Quinces White in Jelly.,

, SCALD, pare,- and core them, cut them into large pieces; allow half a pound of quinces to half a pound of fugar, and half a pint of water; vhen the fugar is melted, fet thenn over the fire, boil them quick tilf they are dar remake a jelly with a pint of codlin-juice anda pound of fugar; flrain the quinces from the fyrup, put rhem into the jelly, boil them one minute, flir thern gently till near cold; put them into glaffes; brandypaper on the top. •

,, fVhole inces Preferved Red.

" PARE them, put them into a fauce-pan, with the parings at the top, fill it vvith' hard water, cover it clofe, Tet it . over a gentle fire'till they turn reddifh; let them fiand till cold, put

ihem into a clear thick fyrup, boil them a few minutes; fet

them off till quitr cold, boil them again in the fame manner j the next day boil them till they look clear; if the fyrup is not thick enough, boil it more; whentoJdi put brandy-paper. The quices may be quartered.

P LADY'S ASSISTANT. 4P9

jiaite.' 0i& d" Marmakde

TO a pound and a half of quinces, one pound of double-, refined fugar, which mate into a fyrup, boil it high; pare jb flice the fruit, and boil it ck; when it begins to look cleF pour. in half a pint of juice of quince, or, if quinces are dear; fjippins; boil it till thicic, tak% off the fcum with a paper. - To make the juice - pare the quinces or pippins, cut them from the core, beat them in a ftone mortar, ftrain the juice through a thin cloth; to every half 'pint, pv more than a pound of fugar let it ftand at leaft four hours before it is iifed. • • •

Red Quince Marmalade.

LET them be quite ripe; quarter ana them, put them into a fauce-pan, lay the parings on t4H; almolt fill the fauce-pan with water, cover it clofe, let INfT do gentfy till of a reddifli colour; takj out the quinces, beat them fine;" make a fyrup with the weight of the fruit in fugar juft wettedboil and fcum it; put in the quince, mix it with the fyrup; boil it gently till of a proper thicknefs.

jinotber i. •

BARE the quinces and cut them into quartos, take out the cores clean; put the cores into a iauce-pan with fonie of the •ikins, a good many barberries, and as much water as wilt cover them; let them boil very well; then ftrain it from the flcins, cores, and barberrhs; toix pounds of quinces put threj quarts of the liquor, and four pounds and a half of fugar, then boil them all together, ftirring it all the while well; tie up a little cochineal in a rag, and boil it in the marmalade.

Compote of inces.

PARE the quince?, cut them into four quarters, and core them; put thehi in a preferving-pan, with fome water, on the fire; when they are quite foft, take them off and lay 'them on a cloth; take another preferving-pan, with fome clarified fugar in it; put in the quinces, and let them do very gently upon a flow fire till they are quite done. Cover them, if they are to be red.

Jelly of inces. •

PARE, flice, and core the quinces, and put them intp fpripgwyer, boil them till they are tender, ih, a large handful of )iarlihorn s let thenf boil very faft, fcUtfffitlg them all the time; ifrbcn it uftcs ftrong, run them through a jelly-bag; it fliould look very white and clear. This is very good put into the jrup with preferved quinces.

'" Rajherries Preferved

TO a pound of the largeft rafberries make a pound aiid a quarter of fine fugar into a Tyrup, boiled candy high; put in the rafterries, fhaking them as they boil; when the fyrup boils over them, take them oiF, fcum them, fet them by a little; fet hem on again, have half a pint of currant-juice, put in a little, by degrees, fliake them often as they grow near enough, (which may be known by putting a little into a fpopn; if it jellies they are enough) put the raiberries into glaffes, pick the feeds from the jelly 5 when a little cool, fill the glaflcs j when cold, put on Wandy-paper.

White curranijuice to white rafterries j red to red rafberries.

Red or White Rajberry Giant.

TAKE the weight of the rafterriea in fugar, wet it welj yrii water, boil aiid fcum it till it is very high; ma(h the raflerries and put them to the fyrup, boil it well and fcum it; eep it ftirring: let it boil about a quarter of an hour

Re jherry Cakes.

Mash the rafterries, boil them till tender; wet foroc fugar, boil it candy high, put in the rafterries, give them a fcald JFor a few minutes; pour it into glafies; dry it in aove till it will tMxn out, then dry the cakes again, turning them; to one quart of rafterries one pound and a half of fugar

Rajhivry Jelly,

MAKE it the fame as currant-jelly j pnly put one half cupr rants, the other rafterries,

Rajberry Clear- cakes.

PICK out all the fpotted and grubby rafterries; take two quarts of ripe goofeberries, or white currants, and one quart of rafterries, put them into a done jug, and ftop them clofe; put it into a pot of cold water, as much as will cover the neck of the juj, boil them in the water till the fruit comes to a pafte, then turn them out on a hair-fieve placed over a pan; prefs out all the jelly, and drain it through a jelly-bag; take one pound and a quarter of double-refined fugar, boil it till it i$ the crackling height, take it from the nre, put in tle jcHy jipd ftir it oyer a clear fire, till the fugai: is all incorporated; ake it from the fire, (cum it well, and fill the cakeglafTes, and dry them as before directed.

The clear-cakes and paftes muft be ftlled pt a;; qifick as pofliblej for iif they cool, tKey will jelly before they are put into the glafies.

JVhite Rajberry Ckar-cake

ARE made after the fame manner, only mixing white raf )eifrie$ with the infMfion.

0 preferve or dry Samphire.

TAKE jt in bunches as it grows; pxit oh the fire a large,;jeep ftew-pan fuljpf water, when it boils, throw in a little fait, put in the famphire; when it looks of a fine green, take off the pan directly, and take but. the famphire with a fork; lay it on fieves to drain; and when cojd, either preferve it, or dry it, as direfted for the barberries'. They look very well candied,

Strawberries Prefirvtd.

BRUI$E fome white goofeberries j to a pint and a half of juice, two pounds of fugar, boil and fcum it when a thicic fyrup, put in the ilrawberries, three quartern of a pound boil them up faft till they jelly and look cleaK;'Ylefs than a quarter of an hour will do them) flir them gentlVll near cool;- put brandy- paper.

m Strawberry Giant.

TAE fome fcarlet ftrawberries very ripe, bruife them very fine;, put to them fome ftrawberry-juice, take their weight in fine fugar fifted, put them into a preferving-pan and fet them over a flow fire; keep fcumming them, and let them boil twenty minutes, then put them in pots or glaffes.

Strawberry Marmalade.

SQUEEZE the ftrawberries through a fieve, weigh them, and put to them an equal quantity of loaf-fugar beat fmali j put the ftrawberries into a preferving-pan, and the fugar to them by degrees, let it fimmer j when it jellies in th0 fpoon, it is enough.

To candy Violets Whole.

TAKE fome double violets, and pick off the green ftalks; boil fome fugar till it blows very ftrong, put in the violets and let them boil till the fugar blows again, then rub the fugar againft the fides of the pan with a fpoon till It is white; itir ' • 6 all all together till the Tugar leaves them, and then fift and dry them.

0 tpck'candy Violets.

PICK the leaves off the violets; then boil fome of the fineft fugar till it blows very ftrong; pour it into a candying-pan made of tin, in the form of a dripping-pan, about three inches deep; then ftrew the leayes of the flowers as thick on the top aS poi&bic, and put it into a hot ftove for eight o ten days; when it is hard candied, break a hole in one corner of it, and drain off all the fyrup that will run from it break it out, an lay it in heaps on plates to dry in a ftove.

Walnuts Preferved.

GATHER them before the fliells are hard, pare them to the white; as faft as they are pared, lay them in warm water; boil them in a good deal of water (changing it) till they are tender; take care the water does hot turn colour before it is changed, (it is beft to have two pans upon the fire, that the walnuts may be changed from the one to the other;) draiii them well, lard them with citron; pour on a hot fyrup, lef them ftnd two days; repeat this till they are tender enough.

One pound and an half of I'oaf-fugar to one pound pf nuts.

To freferve Fruit Green.

TAKE pippins, apricots pears, plumbs, or pe;acbes, while they are green; put them in a preferving-pan, cover them with vine-leaves, and then with fine clear fpring-water put on the gover of the pan, fet them over a very clear fire; when they begin to fimmer, take them off the fire, and carefully with the flice take themtoutj peel and preferve them as other fruit.

To preferve Cochineal.

TAKE one ounce of cochineal, and beat it to a fine powder; then boil it in three quarters of a pint of water, till half is confumed; then beat half an ounce of roach-alum, and the fame quantity of cream of tartar Very fine, put them to the cochineal; boil them all together a little while, and ftrain it through a fine fieve; put it into a phial and keep it for ufe.

If it is not to be ufed immediately, boil an ounce of loaffugar with it, and it will prevent its moulding.

Rofe Drops.

TAKE of powder of rofes dried, beaten, and fifte, one ounce; mix with it one pound of fifted fugar, wet it with a little Jtt'tle water, put to this as muck uice of lemon; fet it over a' flow fire in a diver ladle; when fcald ing hot quite through, drop it on a paper, which fet nigh the ii're.,

• •

CREAMS.

WHEN creams are made, ftrain the eggs, or they will be very apt to curdle.

Cream Curd.

TAKE a pint of cream, boil it with a little mace, cinnamon, and rofe-water j fweeten it: when it is as cold as new milk, put in half a fpoonful of good runneth and when it turns ferve it in a cream-difli.

Smw Cream.

SWEETEN the whites of four eggs, put to thema pint of thick fweet cream, a large fpoonful of bran-dy; whifk this together; take ofF the froth, lay it upon a fieve; when all the' froth that will rife is taken ofF, pour what has run through, the ficve to the remainder; ftir it over a flow fire, let it juflf boil i fill the glaffes three parts full, lay on the froth.

Lemon Cream without Cream.

SQUEEZE three lemons, put the parings into the juice,' Cover it, let it ftand three hours; beat the yolks of two ggsthe whites of four; fweeten this, put it to the lemon-juice, with a little orange-flower water 5 fet it over a flow fire till it becomes as thick as cream; do not let it boil.

Lemon Cream with Creamr

PARE two lenioris, fqueeze to them the juice of one large one, or two fmall ones, let it ftand fome time, then ftrain the juice to a pint of cream; add the yolks of four eggs beaten y and ftraind; fweeten it'ftir it over there tilt thick if agreey able, add a' little brandy.

Or,

PUT to a pint of cream that has beerv boiled, the yolS4 of three eggs, the rind of a large lemon grated, fweeten it add a little brandy fcald it till it thickens, keep it ftirring.

Eithiar

Either of the two laft may be ferved in d difh, with ratafei caks at the top.

Orange Criam

.SQUEEZE the juice of three or four Seville oranges to the rind of one, put it over the fire with near a pint faf tbin crejtm y take out the peel before the cream become bittet; when the cream has been boiled, an4 is cold, put to it the yolks of four eggs, the whites of three beaten and ftrained, fugar to the tafte fcald this, ftirring it all the time, till of a proper thicknefs.

Lemon Creapt Frothed

MAKE a pint of cream very fwect, add the paring of one lemon; put it over the fire, let it juft boil put the juice of a large lemon into a fmall deep glafs, or china difh; when the cream is almoft cold, put it out of a tea-pot upon the Juicej hold it as high as peifible; fend it to table in tbe.(ame dim.

Orange Cream Frothed

MAY be done in the fam manner; only do n6t put any peel into the cream', but fteep a bit for a little while in the juice.

Pijlachia Cream.

BLANCH a quart.er of a pound of piftachia nuts, beat tlieni fine with a little rofe-water; put them into a pint of creamy fweeten it, let it juft boil, put it into glafles

Almond Cream.

MAKE it in the fame manner; only add half a dozen bittei almonds to the fweet

'Ratafia Cream.

BOIL threq or four laurel-leaves in 6ne full pint of cream ftrain it; when cold, add the yolks of three eggs beatetl and ftrained; fweeten it; put iri a very little brandy; fcald it till thick, ftirring it all the timei

Chocolate Cream.

BOIL one quart of thick creamy fcrape into it ohe ounce of chocolate, boil it, put to it a quarter of a pound of fuear; when cold, add nine whites of eggs, whiCk it; as the froth rifesj put it into glafles.

Coffee Cream.

ROAST one ounce of eoiFee, put it hot intb a pint and ait half of boiling cream; boil thefe together a little take it ofF put in two dried gizzards; cover this clofe, let it ftand one hour, fwecten with double- refined fugar j pafs it two or three times through a fieve, with a wooden fpoon 5 put it into a difli with a tin on the top, fet the diih on a gentle ftove, put £re on the top upon the tin $ when it has taken, fet it by; ferve it cold.

Tea cream is made in the fame manner.

Sago Cream.

BOIL fago in water till very tender and thick, with one clov, one blade of mace, a bit of lemon-peel; put it through a hairiieve; when cool, ftir cream to it till it looks white, then fweeten it; mix with it the white of an egg, a little brandy; froth it with a chocohte-mill; put it into glafles.

Rajbtrry Cream.

PUT fix ounces of giam to one pint of cream, pulp it through a fieve; add to it juice of lemon, whiflc it faft at the edge of the difli, lay the froth on a fieve, add a little more juice of lemon; when no more froth will fife, put the cream into a di(h, or into cups or glafies heap on the froth well drained.

Strawberry Cream

IS done in th fame manner.

Goofeberry Cream, .

BOIL one quart of goofeberries very quiclr, with as much water as will cpver them, ftir in about half anioun(e of good butter; when they are foft, pulp them through a fieve; fweeten the pulp, while hot, with good fugar, then beat it up with the yolks of four eggs; ferve it in a difh, cups, or glafies.

Bumf Cream:

MAKE a rich cuftard without fugar; boil it in fome lemon pel; when cold, 'fift fugar over it i burn the top with a fa amander.

Clouted Cream.

TURN a quart of cream with a tea-fpoonful of runneth break it gently, lay it upon a fieve; put it into a plate, pour over it fome fweetened cream.

Pompadour Cream.

BEAT the whites of fix eggs to a froth, with one fpoonful

of

41 THE LAtiH ASSIStAkT.

of brandy, fweeten it; fiir it over the fire for three or four rtii nutes; pour it into a difli: melted butter, or boiling creani 6ver it;

Spanijh Cream.

TAKE three fpoohfuls of flower of rice fifted very fane, the yolks of three eggs, three (pobnfuls of water, two of orange-, flower water, mix them well together; then put to them one pint of cream, then fet it upon a good fire, ftirring it till of a )roper thicknefs, and pour it into cups.

Imperial Cream.,

TAKE a quart of water, fix ounces of hartfliorn, put them into a ftone bottle, flop it up and tie down the cork, do not fiU the bottle too full, fet it into a pot of boiling water, or into an oven to bake; let it ftand three or four hours, ftrain it through a jelly-bag,, and fet it to cool; have ready, beat very fine, fix: ounces of almonds;,put into it as much cream as jelly, mix them well together; then ftrain the almonds and cream, and fet all together over the fire till it is fcalding fiot, ftrain it into narroy- bottom glafles; let them ftand a day, then turn them; out; ftick blanched almonds all over them, or pine-apple feeds laid in water a day or two before they are peeled, and they will come out like a flower, then ftick them on the cream.

Sugar-loaf Cream. .. " .

TAKfi a pint of hartfhorn jelly; put into it a little ifinglafs, make it thick wirh almonds or cream, whichever is moft agreeable; fweeten it very Well, and put it into tin pats, let it ftand till cold; when it is ufed, dip the pan into warm water, and take it out whole.

Cold Cream.

TAKE a pint of Rhenifli wine, and i good deal of fine fugar beat fine, -a quart of good cream, a lemon cut round, a little nutmeg and cinnamon, and a fprig of rofemafy; mix them all together, let them ftand fome time, and beat them 'up with a rod till there is a froth; take it off with a fpoon as it rifes, and put it into glafles.

Ccdlin Cream.

TAKE twenty clear codlins, core and beat them in a mortar, with a pint of cream; ftrain it into a difli, and piitieto it fome bread-crumbs, with a little white wine j fend tt to table. •

Goofeberries may be done in the fame manner.

Sweetmeat

THE LADY'S ASSISTANT- 417

Sweetmeat Cream.

TAKE fome good cream, and flicc fomfe preferved peaches into it, apricots or plumbs; fweeten the cream with finefugar, or with the fyrup the firft was preferved in j mix all well together, and put it into glaiTes.

Stone Cream. .

TAKE a pint and a half of thick cream, boil in it a blade of mace, and a ftick of cinnamon, with fix fpoonfuls of Orange-flower water; fweeten it and boil it till thick, pour it out and keep it ftirrihg till almofl cold, then put in a mall fpoonful of runnet; put it into cups or glafTes: make it three or four hours before it is wanted.

Blanched Creani.

TAKE a quirt of the thickefl cream that cn be got, fweeten it with fine fugar and orange-flower water; boil it, and beat the whites of twenty eggs with a little cold cream; ftrain it, and when the cream is upon the boil, pour in the eggs, flirring it very well till it comes to a thick curd; then take it up, and ftrain it again through a haiNfive, beat it well with a fpoon till it is cold, then put it into a di(h.

Ice Cream.

SWEETEN the cream, put it into a tin made for the purpofe, with a clofe cover; fet it into a tub'of ice that is broken to pieces, with a good quantity of fait; when the cream thidcens round the edge, flir it; let it fiand a% befor3, till of a proper thicknefs; turn it out, firft dipping the tin in warm water; it mufl ftand in the ice four or five hours. If for apricot-cream, mix apricot with it (firft pared, ftoned, and beaten) and work it through a fieve. If rafberry or any other fruit, do it in the fame manner.

JELLIES.

Hartjborn Jelly.

TO two &11 quarts of water, half a pound of hartihornfhavings; let it fimmer till reduced to one quart, or thereabouts; ftrain. it, whiik up the whiter of two eggs, which put to it, with a quarter of a pound of fugar, half a pint of white wine, the fame of lemon-juice, the peel of one lembn; boil this together, pafs it through a jelly-bag till clear.

Three or fpur fpoonfuls of orange-flower water may be added.

Calfs Feet.

TO two calPs feet, put three quarts of water, bojl it to one quart; when cold, take oflFthe fat, and take the jelly from the iediment; put to it one pint of white wine, half a pound of fugar, the juice of three lemons, the peel of one: whifk the whites of two eggs; put all into a fauce-pan, boil it a few minutes, put it through a jelly-bag till it is fine.

elly to turn out of Mould.

BOIL the calfs-feet, with the addition of twa ounces of ifinglafs, or more, according to the quantity that is wanted; fiaim It as before diredled.

Ifinglafs Jelly,

.TAKE an ounce of ifinglafs, a quarter of an ounce of cloves,' and a quart of water; boil it to a pint, and ftrain it over fome fugar.

SYLLABUBS.

Whipt Syllabubs.

GRATE fome lemon-peel into a pint of cream, a quarter of a pint of wine, or thereabouts, juice of orange or lemon, and fugar to the tafte; whip it or tpiU it, lay the froth on a fieve, put a little red or white wine into the glaflcs, when the froth is well drained; lay it on the wine.

Another way.

TAKE the whites, of two eggs, a pint of cream, a pint of white wine, the juice and rind of a lemon, grate the rind into the wine,' then put in the cream; fweeten Win aadwhiilc them up with a clean whiik.

THE tADYs ASSISTANT. 419

Lemon Syllabubs.

A PINT of tfeam, a pint of white wine, the rind of tiro lemons grated, and the juice, fugar to the tafte; let it ftand fometime; mill or whip it, lay the froth on a fieve j put the remainder into glafles, lay on the froth make them the day before they are wanted.

If they are to tafte very ftrong of the lemon, put the juioe of fix lemons, and near a pound of fugar they will keep four or five days.

BLANC MANGE, C?.

7 various Shapes.

TO one ounce of picked ifinglafs, one pint of water boil it till the idnglafs is melted, with a bit of cinnamon; put to it three quarters of a pint of cream, two ounces of fwett almonds, fix bitter ones, blanched and beaten, a bit of leition-peel; fweeten it, ftir it over the fire, let it boil; ftrain it, ftir it till cool, fqueeze in thejuice of a lemon, put it into what mould or moulds are agreeable; turn it out; garnifli with currant-jelly, any giam, or marmalade, ftewed pears, or quinces, &c.

To make it like poached Eggs.

POUR it into a, middle-fized tea cup, three parts full; when cold tur;i it out take a bit from the middle, lay in half a preferved apricot.

There alfe Ihallow moulds on purpbfc

fitb a preferved Orange.

FIJiL the orange with blanc-mange; when cold ftick in long flips of citron, like leaves, pour blanc-mange into the difh; when cold fet the orange in the middle: gariiifh with preferved or dried fruits.

Like Melon.

MAKE fome blanc-mange, colour it with fpilnach juice, fill a melon mould; pour the calf 's-foot jelly, with ifingbfe boiled in it; into a bafon wbeyi cold lay in the melons jBU the bafon with more jelly that is near cold, the next day turn it but, fet'tiog'tfae bafon a minute or two in hot Water.

Or from a Mould.

POUR blanc-mange into a mould like a Turk$cap; lay round it jelly a little broke i put a fprig of myrtle or foiall preferved orange on the top.

Tfl colour Blanc Mange Green.

USE juice of fpinach.

Red.

PUT a bit of cochineal into a little brandy, let it ftand half ail hour, ftrain a little through a bit of cloth.

Telhw.

DISSOLVE a little fafFron.

Always wet the mould before the blanc-mange is put in; it may be ornamented when turned out, by flicking about it blanched almonds fliced, or citron, according to fancy

Jaune Mange. .

BOlL one ounce of ifinglafs in three quarters of a pint of ' water, till melted, ftrain it; add the juice of two Seville oranges, a quarter of a pint of white wine, the yolks, of four eggs teaten and flrained, fugar to the tafte; ftir it over a gentle fire till it juft boils up when cold put it into a mould or moulds: if there fhould be any fedlment, take care not to pour it in.

A Dijh of Snow.

PUT a dozen large apples into, cold water; ftew them till foft,x pulp them through a fieve j beat the whites of twelve eggs to a ftrong froth, put to them half a pound of loaf-fugar beaten and fifted beat the pulp of the applet well, then beat all together with a little grated lemon-peel; heap it on a difh: it muft be beat till ftifF.

Cufiard with Snow.

BEAT the whites of eight or nine eggs to a ftrong froth, with orange- flower water, and a little fugr; boil fome milk and water in a broad pan, lay on the froth, juft boil it up, take it off with a fcummer with care, lay it on a rich cold cuftard.

Trifle.

SWEETEN three pints of cream; put to it half a pint of fack or mountain; grate in the rind of a Imon, fqueese m the the juice, and half s nutmeg grated; whilk this up, lay the froth on a large fieve, fct it over a difli that has ratafia cakes, macaroons, bifcuits, &c. in it, that the liquor may run upon them; when they are foaked, lay them in a proper difli; put on the froth as high as poffible, well drained; ftrew over pinTc nonpareils, and iick on little flices of citron, orange, or lemon-peel.

This will make a very large trifle.

Floating IJland of Chocolate.

WHIP up the whites of two eggs, with two ounces of cho-colate fcraped: pile it on a thin cuftard or jelly.

Floating IJland of Apples.

BAKE or fcald eight or nine large apples; when cold pare and pulp thm through a fieve; beat this up with fine fugar, put it to the whites of four or five eggs that have been beaten, with a little rofe-water mix it a little at a time, beat it till light; heap it on a righ cold cuftard, or on jelly.

Blanc Mange of Calfs-Feet; a pretty Bifi.

TAKE two boiled feet, pick out all the black fpots flice them into a ftew-pan, with a quarter of a pint of mountain, rather more water j let them ftew gently j add the yolks of three eggs, beaten and ftrained, with a quarter of a pint of cream, and a very little flower j fweeten with fine fugar;. add a little lemon-peel and juice; ftrain it into a difli; whenjuft cold, ftick o.n,the top jar raifins fcalded to make them plump, almonds blanched and cut into flips, citron, lemon and orangepeel fliced. It may be put into a bafon; when cold turn it out; garnifh it in the fame manner; lay round it a little broken jelly, or any other ornament.

Flummery.

BOIL one ounce of ifinglafs in a little water, till melted; pour to it a pint of cream, a ht of lemon-peel, a little brandy, and fugar to the tafte; boil and ftrain it; put it into a mould; turn it out. .

PFelcb Flummery.

ONE quart of ftiff hartfliorn jelly, with a little ifinglafs, pne pint of cream, fome lemon juice and fugar, a little brandy; boil this till thick, ftrain it. If agreeable add three ouncei pf almonds blanched and beaten, about ten bitter nes,

Ee3 Otftmeal

Oatmeal Fhimmtty

BOIL four quarts of water when it i rather warmer than milk from the cow, put it to two quarts bf oatmeal juft cracked; when it has ftood till four, pour off the water, wztk the flower out well, through a fieve, with three quarts of frefh water; let this ftand twenty-four hoars, then pour the water clear off, leaving the thick; to one cup of which, meafurc three of milk: fet it over the fire, ftirrinq: it; when it begins to curdle. put it through a fieve, fet the liquor again on the fire: repeat this, paffing it through the fieve fo long as it curdles, then boil it for twenty minutes j put it into cups, firft dipped in water.

If the water ftands upon the oatmeal fourteen or twenty days, according to the weather, fo that it only turns four, not mouldy, the better the flummery will be, To make Govfeberty-FobL

TAJCE two quarts of gopfeberfies, fcald thfem; when thy begin to plump and turn yellow, take them off the fire, put them in a cullender, let all the Water run from them, and then with the back of a fpoon carefully run the pulp through a coarfe fieve into a diih make them very fwect, and let theflai ftand to cool; then take two quarts of itiilk and the yolkS of four eggs, beat them up with a little grated nutmeg; ftir it foftly over a flow fire 3 when it begins to fimnref take it off, and by degrees ftir into it the goofeberries; Ifet it .ftand to be cold be fore it goes to table, If it is made of cream it does not rc% tjuireeggs.

Orange Pojfti.

SQUEEZE the juice of two Seville otangfes into a china bowl, or fmail deep difti that will hold a quart, fweeten it lilc fyrup, add a little brandy; boil one pint of cream with a bit of orange-peel, take out the peel; when cold put the cream into a tea-pot, pour it to the lyrup, holding it high j ihak6 it a day before it is wanted.

Lemon Pojfet

IS made in the fam6 manner.

Sack Pojfet.

GRAT£ three Naples bifcuits to one uart of creatfl or tiewmilk; let it boil a little, fweeten it, grate feme nutineg; when a little cool, pout it high, from a tea-pot, to a pint of fack a little warmed, and put it into a bafon or deep diih.

Bevonjhire White-Pet.

TO a pint of cream put four eggs, beat with a little fait, (bme fliced nutmeg, a good deal of Tugar j then flice very thin almoft the crumb of a penny white loaf;' put it into a difli, pour the cream and eggs to it a handful of fun raifins boiled, a little fweet butter: bake it.

10 make Rice Milk.

TAKE half a pound of rice, boil it in a quart of water, with a little cinnamon; let it boil till the water is wafted, but take care it does not burn; then add hree pints of milk, and the yolk of an egg beat up; keep it ftirring: wheil it bojls take it up and f wee ten it.

A Rice White Pot.

TAKE a pound of rice, and boil it in two quarts of milk, till it is tender and thick, beat it in a mortar with a quarter of a pound of fweet almonds blanched, then boil it in two quarts of cream, with crumbs of bread, two or three blades of mace, mixed all'together, with eight eggs well beat, a little rofe water, and fome fugar; cut fome candied orange and citron thin and lay over it; it muft be put into a flow oven.

To make Firmity.

TO a quart of ready-boiled wheat, put two quarts of milk, end a quarter of a pound of currants, clean picked and waihed, fiir them together and boil them; beat well the yolks of three eggs, and a little nutmeg, with two or three fpoonfuls of milk; add this to tjie wheat, ftir them together, fweeten it, and pour it into a deep di(h.

Panada.

TAKE a large piece of crumb of bread, put it into a faucepan, with a pint and a half of water, and a blade of mace; boil it till the-bread is quite foft, then pour oflF the water, and beat the bread very fmooth; add to it a little white wine and fugar to make it agreeable to the tafte. Some put in a bit of butter nd no wine.

Whitfi Caudle

MIX two fpoonfuls of oatmeal, in a quart of water, put in a blade or two of mace, and a piece of lemon-peel; ftir it often, and let it boil full twenty minutes; ftrain it through a fieve, fweeten it i add a little white wine, nutmeg, and a little juice qI lemojit . .

Ee4 Oatmeal

4H THE LADY'S ASSISTANT.

Oatmeal once cut is beft, but tben it requires more boiling.

0 make brown Caudl0.

MAKE the gruel as above, but with more (picf, a pint of ale that is not bitter well boiled in and a glais of white wine or brandy, (the latter is better) fweeten it.

Saloupj

IS fold at the chymifts at one billing per ounce: tale a large tea fpopnful, and flir it, till it is like a nne jelly, into a pint of boiling water; fweeten it, and put in a little wine d fugar.

THE powder of fago is the beft to ufe, which is fold in tin cannifters, with direSions how to make it.

Orgeat.

BLANCH two pounds of almonds, thirty bitter, beat them to a parte; mix it with thre quarts of water, ftraip it througl a fine cloth 3 add oran8:e and lemon juice, with fotpe of the peel; fweeten to th.e tafte.

Another way.

TAKE melon-feed, waterrmelon feed, pumpkin cucum? bcr, and gourd feed, one ounce each; blanch half a pound of fwect almonds, half an ounce of bitter •; beat them with the feeds till they are a parte, with a f(?w drops of water, left they pil; beat with them three ounces of fugar, then add twQ quarts of water; mix this well • ftrain it; add a little orangeflower water, and a pint of milk, juft before it is wanted.

0 make Capillaire

TAKE fourteen pounds of eight-penny fugar, three pounds of coarfe fugar, fix eggs beat in with the Ihells, three quarts of water; boil it up twice, fcum it well, then add to it a quarter of a pint df orange-flower water; ftrain it through ja jelly bag, gnd put it into bottles; when cold, mix a fpoonful or two of this fyrup, as it is liked for fweetnefs, in a draught of warm or cold water.

Ratafia.

TAKE two quarts of the beft brandy, twohutjdred aprjcot- -I ftorres, a dram of cinnamon, and a quarter Of a pound of white fuo:ar candy; (lice two or three apricots, and break the ftopes without bruifing the "kernels; put all the ingredients and brandy into a large glafs bottle, and let it ftand five or fix weeks in the the fun, or aay warm place; then pour it into a large botte, fid iet it ftand five or fix months.

Syr ftp of Orange PeeL

Take two uhces of Seville orange peel, cut it very fmall, infujfe it in a pint and a quarter of white wine; ftrain it off, and boil it up with two pounds of double-refined fugar.

Lemonade

PARE two oranges and fix lemons very thin, fteep the parings in two quarts of water, four hours; put the juice of twelve lemons and fix oranges upon twelve ounces of fine fuar I when the fugar is melted put the water to it; add more uear if neceffary, a little orange-flower watpr: pfs it throUgh a bag till fine,

Another way.

HALF a pint of lemon juice, the juice of two oranges; pare the rind of the lemons as thin as pofBble, into One quart of fpring-water j let them ftand all night, ftrain it, fweeten it J Doii the peels in another quart of water; ipjx the lemonjuice with a pint of milk, put to it the water that is fweetened add the other while it is hot; when cold pafs it through bag, into which put a fprig of rofemary.

Milk Punch.

PARE fifteen Seville oranges very thin, infufe the parings twelve hours in ten quarts of brandy; have ready boiled knd cold, fifteen quarts of water, put to this feven pounds and A half of loaf fugar, niix the water and brandy together; add the juice of the orange, and of twelve lemons, ftrain it, put to it one pint of hew milk j barrel it, flop it clofe, let it ftand a month of fix weeks. It will keep for years, the older the; better

1 Shrub.

TO one quart of Seville orange juice, one gallon of rum, two pounds and a half of loaf fugar beaten; barrel it; pare half a dozen of the oranges very thin, let them lie in a fmall quaptity of roW all night, the next day ftrain it into the vefTel: this quaptity of paring is for ten gallons.

N. B. Take particular care to make the veflel twice a day for a fortnight, or the fhrub will be fpoiled: it may then be bottled.

Currant Shrub

TO five pints of currant juice, either red or white, one pound and an half of loaf fugar; when diflblved put to it one gallon of rum or brandy j clear it through' a flannel bag,

Ferde.

INFUSE the rind of three lemons and four oranges in two quarts of rum or brandy, for twenty- fpur hours,clofc ftopped; fqueese the juice through a ftrainer j if the fruit be good there will be half a pint, if there is not, make it that; put to it one pound and a quarter of fugar, pour to it three quarts of water, ftir it till the fugar is diflolved, after which ftir in the peel and fpirics, and to that one pint of cold new milk; pafs it through a bag till clear; bottle it. It will keep twelve months.

Imperial IVater.

PUT four ounces and a half of fugar, the rnd of three lemons, into a large earthen pan boil one ounce of cream of tartar in three quarts of water till dkflblid, pour it to the lemon-peel, let ic ftand all night; cleat it through a bag; bottle it.

Cherry Brandy.

TO a gallon of brandy, fix pounds of morella cherries picked, one pound of fugar; it may ftand five or fix weeks, or longer, before it is bottled. The fmall black cherry does very well; fill a large bottle with them picked, pour in what brandy it will hold J fweeten it.

Fine Cherry Brandy.

STONE morella cherries, put them into any fized jar till full; break the ftones, put them in, with fome apricot-kernels j pour in as much brandy as poilible; tie over a bladder: let it ftand two or three months or longer, then prefsoutall the juice j fweeten it with white fugar candy, or fine fugar, pafs it through a bag; bottle it.

Pine- Apple Brandy.

SLICE one large pine-apple, or two fmall ones, into a gallon of brandy, with one pound of fifted fugar; cpver it, not • tooclofe, for about a week, ftirring it every day; then ftop it clofe, tie over a bladder; in fix or eight weeks bottle it. If there is any of the fyrup the chips were done in, add half a pint or more, nd lefs fugar,

Td make Muffins.

TAKE two quarts of warm water, two fpoonfulft of yt%% three pounds of flower; beat it Well half an hour, and let it fiand an hour or to; bake them On an iron bake-ftove (rub it well over with miitton-fuct, as often as they are to be Uid on) as foon as they begirt to colour, turn them; when cokre4 on both fides they are baked enough,

French Rolls.

WARM three fpoonfuls of milk, and three of water, with about the quantity of a walnut of butter, put it to two fpoonfuls of thick yeaft; put this into thseede middle of a full quart or jather more flower, ftir enough with it to make it of the thickSefs of a batter pudding; ftrew a little flower over it from the fides, and if the weather is cold fet it at a little diftance from the fire; do this three hours before it is put into the oven 5 when it breaks a good deal through the flower and rifes, work it into a light pafte With more warm milk and water; let it lie till within a quarter of an hour of fetting into the oven, then work them lightly into rolls, drop them on a tin, fi:rft flowered; handle them as little as poflible; fet them before a fire to rife; twenty minutes or thereabouts will bake them; put a little fait into the fiowen Ra the rolls.

A Ramakiv.

BEAT a quarter of a pound of Gloucefter, the fame of Chefliire cheefe; then put to it two ouices of butter, half the crumb of a penny-loaf foaked in creani, four eggs, but one white; put it into a china diih: bake it a quarter of an hour in i moderate oven.

Potted Cheefe.

BEAT three pounds of the beft Chefhire cheefe in a mortar, with half a pound of the beft butter, a large glafs of fack, near half an ounce of mace beaten and fifted; mix it well, pot it pour over clarified butter.

Snndwichs.

PUT fome very thin flices of beef, between thin flices of bread and butter; cut the ends off neatly, lay them in a difh.

Veal and ham cut thin may be ferved in the fame manner

Salmagundi,

CHOP feparately the white part of a roafl:ed chicken or fome rOfifted veal, the yolks of four of five eggs boiled hard, the whites whites of the fame, a large handful of parfley, a Britifli herring, px half a dopwi anchpvics, fomc bcct-root, fomc red cabbage: put a faucer or a china bafon into a round diih, or a fmaller difii ifito a long one, bottom upwards; lay all thefe ingredients In rows, according to the tafte, making them broad at bottom, and jea4aig in a point at the top; or they may be laid round in rows; fpun butter at the top; or butter worked into what form is liked: pickles round, with a little chopped onion or efchalot.




Sitemap - This page updated 02/10/2016 - Copyright © Glyn Hughes 2016


  BUILT WITH WHIMBERRY  

matrixstats