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The Lady's Companion, 1753

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TITLE: The Lady's Companion: Containing upwards of three thousand different receipts in every kind of cookery: and those the best and most fashionable; being four times the quantity of any book of this sort ... To which is added, bills of fare for every month in the year. Also, directions for brewing beers, ales, &c., making all sorts of English wines, cyder, mum, metheglin, vinegar, verjuice, catchup, &c.
AUTHOR: ---
PUBLISHER: Hodges of London Bridge, and Baldwin at the Rose in Paternoster Row
DATE: 1753
THIS VERSION: This transcript is based on the online version at archive.org, digitized from a copy in the Boston Public Library with thanks to Kate at the Office of Niagara County Historian. This is an Optical Character Recognition scan, it has been partly edited, but still contains very significant errors.



THE
Ladys Companion,
CONTAINING
Upwards of Three Thousand different Receipts in every Kind of
COOKERY
AND
Thofe the beft and mofl fafhionable;
BEING
Four Times the Quantity of any Book of this Sort,

I. Making near two Hundred different Sorts of Soop, Pottages, Broths, Sauce, Culiifes, fc. af- ter the French, Italian, Dutch, and Englip Way j &o making Cake Soop ior the Pocket.
II. Drefling Flefh, Fih, and Fowl j this laft illuftrated with Cuts, ftewing how every Fowl is to be trufsd.
IIII. Directions for making Ragoos and Fricafeys.
IV. Diredtions for Drefiing all Manner of Kitchen Garden StufF, &c.
V Making two Hundred different Sorts of Puddings, Florendines, Tanzeys, &c, which are four with in any other Book of this Kind.
VI. The whole Art of Pafiry, in naking upwards of two Hundred Pies, with the Shapes of vhcm engraven on Copper- Plates Tarts, Parties, Cuftards, Cheefc-Cakes, Terkpre Muffins, £ff.
VII. Receipts fcr all Man.ier of Pick.ing, Potting, Collaring, Gfr.
VIII. For Preferving, making Creams, Jellies, and all Manner of Confectionary, with particular Receipts for making Orgeat and Blanc Manger.
IX. Rules and Direftions for fetting out Dinners, Suppers, and grand Entertainments. Times the Number to be met

To which is added,

B I L L s of F A R E for every Month in the Year,

ALSO

D I R c T I o N s for Brewing Beers, Ales, lc. making all Sor of Engljjh Wines, Cyder, Mum, Metheglin, Vinegar, Verjuice, Catchup, c .,    ;

WITH

The Receipts of Mrs. Stephens for the Stone-, Dr. Mead for the Bite of a Mad Dog; the Recipe, fent from Ireland, for the G ut. Sir Hans Sloanes Receipt for Sore Eyef; and the Receipt for making Txr if«r.

The SIXTH EDITION, with large Additions.

VOL. 1

LONDON:

Printed for J. HODGES

L U JM U U J:

HODGES, en Lndon-Bndze -, and R. BALDWIN, at the Roje, jn Pater-mfier Row. 1753.

THE Lady s Companion.

A R L

C H

Of Gravies, S o o p s, B r o t h 5, Pottages, WCullises.

To make a jrong V,XQ.i for Soops, ,y Sauces.

A K E a Leg of £eef, or a large Quantltv

of an- other Part, and fet it over the Fire

in four Gallons of Water; ikim it clean

Seafon it with Salt, whole Pepper, both

Black and Ja7naica, fix or eight Onions.

fome whole Cloves and Mace, a good Lun

die of Thyme and ParJlev. Boil it four

Hours, till ]t has boiled half away j then itrain it oiE and

keep It for Ufe.

Toinake a Brown Gravy cr Soops at. Sauces.

TAKE three or four Pounds of coarfe lean Beef an I put It into a Frying-pan, with fome fat Bits of Bacon at the Bottom, and cut five or fix Onions in Slices • cut a

.rf7VrO;    0 brown Bread, and a Bundle of Thyme, cover up clofe, and put all over a gentle Fire, and let it fry very brown on both Sides, but not feurn; then put into it two or three Qiiarts of the ftronp- roth, mentioned in the Receipt above. Sealbn it with repper, and let it ftew an Hour, and then ftrain it throuaii

2 he Ladys Companion.

a Hair Sieve; fidm oft the Fat, and keep it for Ufe. If it is for Soops, you mull make a larger Quantity.

Gravy jr Brown Sces.

TAKE fome Neck of Beef, cut it in thin Slices, then flour it well, and put it in a Sauce-pan, with a Slice of fat Bacon, an Onion fiiced, fome Powder of fweet Mar- joram, fome Pepper and Salt, cover it clofe, and put it over a flow Fire; ftir it three or four Times, and when the Gravy is brown, put fome Water to it; llir it altogether, and let it boil about half an Hour; then Itrain it off, and take the Fat oiFtlie Top, adding a little Lemon- Juice.

Gvy for White Sauces.

TA K E Part of a Knuckle or the vorf!: Part of a Neck of Veal, boil about a Pound of it in a Quart of Water, an Onion, fome whole Pepper, fix Cloves, a little Salt, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, half a Nutmeg fliced; let it boil an Hour, then ih-ain it oit, and keep it for Ufe.

J chep Gvdixy .

TAKE a Glafs of Small Beer, a Glafs of Water, an Onion cut fmall,- fome Pepper and Salt, a little Lem- mon-peel grated, a Clove or two, a Spoonful of Muflirooin Liquor, or pickled Walnut Liquor; put this in a Bafon i then take a Piece of Butter, and put it in a Sauce-pan on the Fire, and let it melt; then drudge in fom.3 Flour, and ftir it vell till the Froth flnks, and it will be brown j then put in Ibme fliced Onion, and your Mixture, to the brown Butter, -nd give it a boil up.

0 make Gravy in Urjle.

CUT an Ox-Kidney into Slices, feafon it high with Salt and Pepper, put it into a Stew-pan, with juil Wa- ter enough to cover it, a Shalot or two cut, and a fliced Onion, a Bit of Butter, and a Bunch of Sweet- Herbs, and let it lew gently.

Or thus.

CU T a Pound or two of lean Beef into Slices, beat it Avcil, and:ut into it a Frying-pan till it be brown; add to it a Pint of flrong Broth, and an Onion, boil it a little, rtjid firain it for Ule.

Or

The L A D ys Companion, 3

Or thus.

PUT two Ounces of Bacon into a Frying-pan, with a Pound of lean Beef cut in Slices, fry it a little, then put in a Pint of Red Wine, and a Pint of Water, one An- chovy, a Sprig of Sweet-Herbs; fry this a Quarter of an Hour, then put out what Gravy you find, and fry it till you have all the reft out; then ftrain it, and it will be fit for Ufe.

A Gravy to keep.

TA K E a lean Piece of Beef, one Quarter roafted, and cut it in Pieces; put it into a Stew-pan, with half a Pint of ftrong Broth, and a Pint of Red Wine; cover it up elofe, and ftew it an Hour, often turning it; feafon it with Pepper and Salt, then llrain it off, and put it into a Stone Bottle, and when you ufe it, warm the Bottle.

To make Mutton-Gravy.

ROAST your Mutton a little more than half, then cut it with a Knife, and fqueeze out the Gravy with a Prefs, then wet your Mutton with a little good Broth, and prefs it the fecond Time; put it with a little Salt into an Earthen Veflel, and keep it for Ufe.

AOiher Gravy io keep.

GE T coarfe Beef, or Mutton, put it into as miich W.- ter as will cover it; when it has boiled a while take- out the Meat, beat it very well, and cut it into Pieces to let: out the Gravy; then put it in again with fome Salt, whole Pepper, an Onion, and a Bunch of Sweet-Herbs; let it ilew, but do not let it boil; when it comes to be of a good brow:: Colour, take it up, and put it into an Earthen Fan; when ir is cold, fkim off the Fat, and keep it one Week under an other; if it begins to change, boii it up again.

If it be for a white Fricaiey, meit fome Butter, with;7.
Spoonful or two of Cream, and the Yolks of Egg: and White Wine.

To make Veal- Gravy.

CU T Steaks oil of a Fillet of Veal, beat, thein -velh lay them in a little Stew-pan, flice Carrot, Pa.rihips and Onions, and lay over them: Cover your Pan, and fet it over a gentle Fire, augmenting the Fire by Degrees; and

is 2 ube.-

4 he Lad ys Companion.

when the Gravy is almoft wafted, and the Veal begins to ftick to the Pan, and is become brown, put in fome ftrong Broth, a whole Leek, a little Parfley, and a few Cloves; then cover the Stew-pan, and let it fiminer three Quarters of an Hour, then ftrain it into an Eartheyi Pi, and fet it by for Ufe in Soops and Ragoos,

Another Gravy.

F you are in the Country where you cannot always have Gravy Meat, when your Meat comes from the Butcher, take a Piece of Beef, a Piece of Veal, and a Piece ef Mutton; cut them into as fmall Pieces as you can; and take a large deep Sauce-pan with a Cover, lay your Beef at Bottom, then your Mutton, then a very Ijttle Piece of Ba- con, a Slice or two of Carrot, fome Mace, Cloves, wule Pepper, Black and White, a large Onion cut in Slices, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, and then lay in your Veal: Cover it cloie over a very flow Fire for fix or ftven Minutes, Ihaking the Sauce-pan now and then; hake fome Flour in, and have fome boiling Water ready, pour it in till you cover the Meat, and fomething more: Cover it clofe, and let it fi:ew till it is rich and good, then feafon it to yourTalle with Salt, and ftrain it off. This will do for moft Things.

A good Gravy for avy Uft

URN two Ounces of Butter in a Frying-pan, that it _ be brown, but not black; put in two Pound of coarfe lean Beef, two Quarts of Water, and half a Pint of Wine, either Red or White, as you would have the Colour; put in three or four Shalots, half a Dozen Mufhrooms, Cloves, Ma,cs, whole Pepper, and four or five Anchovies; let it ftew for an Hour over a gentle Fire, and then ftrain it oiF for Ule.

A Fijh Gravy for Soop.

TAKE Tench, or Eels, cleanfed from Mud, and fcopr their Outfides well with Salt, then having pulled out their Gills, put them into a Kettle with Water, Salt, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and an Onion ftuck with Cloves; Jet all thefe boil an Hour and a Half, and then ftrain off the Liquor through a Cioth; add to this the Peelings of Mufti- rooms, well wafhed, or Muftirooms themfelves cut fmall; boil thefe together, and ftrain the Liquor through a Sieve into a Stew-pan, upon fome burnt, or fryd. Flour, and a

little

ne L A D ys C O M P A N I N. 5

Hide Lemon, which will foon Render it of a good Colour, and of a fine Flavour, fit for Soops, which may be varied according to the Palate, by putting Pot-herbs and Spices into the Soop a little before you ferve it.

A Mitonage, or Soakijg Broth.

FO R all Sorts of Soop, take a Leg of Beef, and a Piece of the Buttock, or any other Part, it matters not much; but the Buttock and Leg are the propereft for Mitonage; ufe what Quantity you think lit, according to the Eigncfs of your Pot, and the Quantity of Socp you intend to make.
Suppole you would make two Soops out of one Mitonage: Take a Piece of a Buttock of Beef, about eight or ten Pounds, and a Piece of a Leg, about feven or eight Pounds: Put all into your Pot, fill it half full of Broth, if you have any, and then fill it up with Water; fkim it well, and fcafori it with Salt, a few Onions fluck with Cloves, Carrots, Tur- nips, and a good Bunch of Sellery j fometime after put in a Fowl, and a Knuckle of Veal tied round with Pack thread; do not let them boil too much: This will ferve to put in your Soops; you may alfo put in all the Garniture of your Soops, as Sellery, Endive, Leeks, Lettuces andFowls.

Notey This Broth is very good to foak the Bread for aW Sorts of Soops, except Cabbage, Turnip, or Onion Soops, which are diftinguifhed by their different Garnitures.

J good Stock for Filh Soops.

PREPARE Scate, Flounders, Eels, and Whiteings, lay them in a broad Gravy- pan, put in a Faggot of 7 hyme, Parfley and Onions, feafon them with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, and Mace; then pour in as much Water as will cover your Fifh; put in a Head of Sellery, and fome Parfiey Roots.
Boil it very tender about an Hour, then itrain it off for any Ufe, for Fifh or Meagre Pottages, This Stock will not keep above a Day. If you would make a Brown Stock you muin pafs your Fifh off in browned Butter, and flove it, then put in your Liquor and Seafoning.

A Stock for an Herb-Soop.

GET Chervil, Beets, Chards, Spinach, Sellery, Leeks, and fuch like Herbs, with two or three large Cruits of Bread, fome Butter, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and a little Salt; put thefe, with a moderate Quantity of Water, into a Kettle, and boil them for an Hour and an Half, and llrain

B 3 out

The Ladys Companion.

oux. the Liquor througha Sieve, and it will be a good Stock ioi Scops, either of Afparagus Buds, Lettuce, or any other kind fit for Lent or Fait- Days.

Broth « Roots.

BOIL about two Quarts of Seed Peas; when they are vty tender, bruife them to a iVIaih; put them into a Lot th.1t holds two Gallons of Water, and hang it over the Fire for an Hour and an Half; then take it olf, and let it fettle. Take next a middle-fized Kettle, and llrain into it, thro a Sieve, the clear Puree, into which put a Bunch of Carrots, a Bundle of Parfnips, and a Bunch ofParfley Roots, with a Dozen Onions; feafon it with Salt, a Bunch of Pot- Herbs, and an Onion lluck with Cloves: Boil all together, and put in a Bunch of Sorrel, and another of Chervil, with two or three Spoonfuls of the Juice of Onions; fee that the Broth be well tafted, and make jq of it to fimmer all Sorts of Soops made of Legumes.

J Green Peas Soop nithout Meat,

WFI IL E you are fhelling the Peas, feparate the youftg from the old, and boil the old ones till they are fo foft that you can pafs tliem thro a Colander j then put the Liquor and the pulped Peas together; put in the young Peas whole, adding fome Pepper, two or three Blades of Mace, and fome Cloves.

Vhen the young Peas are boiled enough, put a Faggot of Thyme and Sweet Marjoram, a little Mint, Spinach, and green Onion flired, but not too fmall, with half or three Quarters of a Pound of Butter, into a Sauce-pan; and as ti.cfe boil up, ihake in fome Flour to boil with it, to the Quantity of a good Handful, or more; put alfo a Loaf of . French Bread into the Broth to boil, then mingle the Broth and Herbs, c. together; feaibn it with Salt to your Pa- late; and garnifh with fome fmall white Toalls, neatly cut, and ibme of the young Peas.

A Young Green Peas Soop.

PU T fome young Peas into a Stev-pan, with a Piece of good frefh Butter, and a Faggot of iweet Herbs; fea- fon them with Pepper and Salt, and, after you have tolled them three or four Times on the Stove, put fome Veal Gravy to chem, and let them boil gently: Then take two round I„oaves of French Bread, of bout a. Pound Weight each, cut

theiii

7he LadysCompanion. 7

them in Halves, and takeout all the Crumb; if the four Cruils will go into your Difh, ufe them all, or as many as it will contain. Put your Criifts into a Stew-pan, widi a Finch of half-beaten Pepper, and a little Salt dafhd over them; then take a Spoonful of good Broth, and ibain it over your Cruils; let them take a Boil or two, till they ar tender, and immediately put them into your Soop-Dilh, and put them over the Stove, and let them jull llick to the Diih, but not burn; your Peas being well tailed, put them upoii your Cruils, and ferve them hot.

Another Green Peas Soop.

WIPE your Peafecod Shells, and fcald them, flrain and pound them in a Mortar, with fcalded ParHcy, young Onions, and a little Mint; then foak a white French Roll boil thefe together in clean Mutton Broth,, a Faggot of fweet Herbs; feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, then llraiu it through a Colander; put the Pottage in a Dilh, in rhe Middle place a Piece of larded Veal, Chickens, or lardc-d Rabbits. Garnifh with fcalded Parfley, Cabbage Lettuce, and young Peas.

Amther Green Peas Soop.

TA K E a Peck of the youngell Peas you tan get, put them in a Stev-pan, cover the Peas with Water; then put in a Bunch of Thyme, Parfley, and young Onions, fome Pepper and Salt, a Quarter of a Pound of Bacon, and a Lump of Bu:ter, then cover down your Stew-pan, and let thciii flew a little while then take half a Dozen Cabbage Let- tuces, or more, according to the Size, cut them in Quar- ters, and put them into the Soop, with about eight or nine Cucumbers, and a Handful or two of Purilane; then add fome more Seafoning, a Lump of Butter, and fill your Stew-pan with boiling Water: The Soop will take Hew- ing about two Hours; if the Liquor be too much wailed away in that Time, add a little more boiling Water and Butter.

Some People fluff a Chicken, or two or three Pigeons, and flew in it.

A dryd Peas Soop.

YO U may make this of Beef, but a Leg of Pork is much better; or the Bones of Pork, or of the Skin and Hock of a Leg of Pork. Strain the Broth through

B 4 a Sieve,

S ne Ladys Companion.

Sieve, and to every Quart of Liquor put half a Pint of fplitPeas, or to three Quarts of Liquor a Quart of whole Peas.

The whole Peas mufl be pafTed thro a Colander, but the fplit Peas do not need it; put in Sellery accordingly as you like it, cut fmall; dryd Mint and fvveet Marjoram in Pow- der; feafon alfo with Salt and Pepper, boil all till the Sellery is tender ..,

If you boil a Leg of Pork, this is to be done when the Meat is taken out of the Pot j but if you make Soop from the Bones, boil thefe Ingredients afterwards in the Liquor.

When you ferve it up, lay a French Roll in the Middle of the Difh, and garnifh the Border of the Difli with rafped Bread fifted.

Some put in AU-fpice powdered, which is agreeable enough: Others, ferving it up, put toalled Bread cut into Dice; and others, in the Boiling, add the Leaves of White Beets.

A very good Peas Soop.

BOIL three or four Pounds of lean coarfe Beef in tw® Gallons of Water, with three Pints of Peas, till the Meat is all in Rags, and ftrain it from the Meat and Hufks; but half an Hour before you ftrain it, put in two or three Anchovies; then put into a Sauce-pan as much as you would have for that Meal, with an Onion ftuck with Cloves, a S.ace of Ginger bruifed, a Faggot of Thyme, Savoury, and Parfley, and a little Pepper; boil it for near half an Hour, then flir in a Piece of Butter, and having fried fome Forcd- Meat Balls, Bacon, and Trench Bread, cut into Dice, with Spinach boiled green j put thefe to the Soop in the Difti.

A Peas Soop for Lent, or any Fajiing Days.

BO I L a Quart of good Peas in fix Quarts of Water, tiH they are foft j then take out fome of the clear Liquor, and flrain the Peas from the Husks, as clean as may be; then boil fome Butter, and when it breaks in the Middle, put in an Onion and fome Mint, cut very fmall. Spinach, Sorrel, and a little Sellery cut grofly; let thefe boil for a Quarter of an Hour, llirring them often; then with one Hand fhake in fome Flour, while with the other Hand you y:our in the thin Liquor; then put into the llrained Liquor ibme Pepper, Mace, and Salt, and boil it for an Hour longer: Put a Pint ©f fweet thick Cream to as much of it as will

make

The L AD ys Companion 9

make a large Dilli, laying a French Roll, crifped, and dipped in Milk, in the Middle of the Dilli.

Another Peas Soop.
O I L a Quart of good Seed Peas tender and thick,

llrain and walh them thro a Sieve with a Pint of Milk;.

then put therein a Pint of ftrong Broth, boiled with Balls, a little Spear Mint, and a dryd French Roll; feafon it with Pepper and Salt; cut a Turnip in Dice, fry it, and put into it.

A good Spring Soop.

GE T twelve Cabbage Lettuces, fix green Cucumbers pare them, and cut out the Cores; then cut them iii little Bits, and fcald them in boiling Water, and put t-iem.
into ftrong Broth; let them boil till very tender, with a Handful of Green Peas, and fome French Roll. Garnifh with Lettuce and green Cucumbers cut in Slices.

A Soop de Sante the French Way.

PU T over the Fire twelve Pounds of Beef, feafoned mo- derately with Spices and Salt, boil it till your Broth is rtrong, llrain it to a good Knuckle of Veal blanched, fhea boil It up a fecond Time, putting your Pullet to it that you defign to ferve in the Middle of yoir Soop j let it boil till it comes to the Strength of a Jelly, put to it, in the Boilirtg, a Bit of Bacon that is not rufty, fluck with fix Cloves: Your Broth being thus ready, at the fame Time make a Pan of good Gravy thus: Take a Stew-pan or iBrafs Dilh, place in the Bottom of it a Quarter of a Pound:=of Bacon cut in Slices, clean from Rurt, like wife the Bignefs of half an Egg of Butter; take five or fix Pounds of a Fiilet of V-eal, and cut it in Slices as thick as you do for Scotch Col lops, and place it on your Bacon in your Stew-pan, covering all the Bottom over. If you have no Veal ufe Buttock of zt, fet it over a clear Fire, not very hot, and let it colour: When it begins to crack, put a little of the Fat of our boil- ing Broth to it, ftir it as little as poflible, becawfe it makes it thick, and throw in three or four fliced Onions, one Car- rot, two Turnips, a little Parfley, a Sprig of Thyme, a little whole Pepper and Cloves: All thefe Ingredients being fryU together, till you think it comes to a good Colour, if in Summer, a few Mulhrooms will give it a goodTalK. When it is of a good Colour, add to it your boiling Broth from

B 5 your

lo he La d ys C o m p a n i- o w.

your Knuckle of Veal, leaving fonie to keep your Veal and Pullet white, to foak your Bread with for the Soop, and other Ufes in the Kitchen. Your Broth and Gravy being in Readinefs, take fuch Herbs as the Country where you are will aiFord, fuch as Sellery, Endive, Sorrel, a little Chervil, or Cabbage Lettuce, well picked and vvaflied, mince them down with your Mincing-knife, and fqueeze the Water from them, place them in a little Pot, or deep Sauce pan, put to them fo much of your Broth and Gravy as will juft cover them; let them boil tender, then take the Cruils of two French Rolls, and boil them up with three Pints of Gravy,, and ftrain it through a Strainer, or Sieve, and put it to your Herbs; if you have no French Bread to thicken it with, take the Bignefs of an Egg of Butter, a fmall Handful of Flour, and brown it over the Fire, and a little minced Onion, if the Eaters be Lovers of it, if not, let the Onion that was in the Gravy ferve. Add to your Brown fome Gravy, and boil it. and ftrain it thro a Sieve to your Kerbs, inftead of French Bread; let your Herbs be pretty tender before you put your Thickening in; boil ail together half an Hour, and fxim off the Fat; place in the Bottom of your Diih, that you intejnd to ferve your Soop in, fome French Bread in Slices, or the Cruft dried before the Fire, or in an: Oven, boil it up with fome of your Broth, fo put your Fowl an Heibs on the Top of it; let your Garnifhing be a Rim, on the Outfide of it Sellery, of Endive, tender boiled in good Broth, and cut in Pieces about three Inches longj if youcanr.ot ipare Herbs, take a Bit of Forced-Meat, and boiled Carrot, to garnifh it: Sere it hot, and take Care there is no Fat on it.

A Soop de Sante the Englifh Way.

YOUR Gravy and Broth being ready, as in the above Receipt, inilead of Herbs take Carrots and Turnips, and cut them in fquare Slices an Inch long, and the Bignefs of a Qiiill, blanch them off in boiling Water, but blanch the Carrots more than the Turnips, and ftrain them out in a Colander, from the Water .where they are blanched in; then talce two Charts of Gravy, the Cruft of two Fre7ich Rolls, and boil them as before dire«ed, ftrain it thro a Strainer or Sieve, and put it to the Carrots and Turnips; let them boil gently in it over the Fire, till they are tender; your Bread being foakcd in your Diih, put in the Middle of it a Knuckle of Veal, or a Pullet, or Chicken,- Let your Garnifhing be

Carrot,

;& L A D ys C O M P A N I O N.; H

Carrot, or Turnip, cut in fmall Dice, and boikd tender; ikim off the Fat, ib ferve it.

Soop Lorraine, TAVING very good Broth made of Veal and Fowl, ard

t

1 Itrained clean, take a Pound of Almonds, and blanch them, pound them in a Mortar very fine, putting to them;i little Water to keep them fiom oiling as you pound them, and the Yolks of four Eggs tender boiled, and the Lean of the Legs and Breafl of a roafted Pullet or two; pound all to- gether very fine; then take three Quarts of very good Veal Broth, and the Cruft oi French Rolls cut in Slices, let them boil up together over a cLar Fii e, then put to it your beaten Almonds; let them juil boil up together; .llrain it through a fine Strainer to the Thicknefs of Cream, as much as will ferve the Bignefs of your Diili i haih or mince the Ereail: of tv6 roafted Pullets, and put them into a Ioaf as big as two henchKolh, the Top cut off, and the Crum taken out, fea- fon your Halh with a little Pepper and Salt, a fcraped Nut- meg, and the Bignefs of an Egg of Butter, together ix five or fix Spoonfuls of your llrained Almonds; let theBread that you put in the Bottom of your Soop be French Bread, dryd before the Fire, or in an Oven; ibak it with cleaii Broth, and a little of your flrained Soop, place your Loaf in the Middle; put in your Hafli warm; you may put four Sweetbreads, tender boiled, about your Loaf, if you pleale.
Let your Garnilhing be a Rim and a fliced Lemon, fo ier e it up.

A Verraicelly Soop.

GE T two Quarts of good Broth made of Veal and Fowl, put to it about two Ounces of Vcrmicelly, and a Bit of Bacon ftuck with Cloves; rub a Piece of Butter, about the Bignefs of half an Egg, in half a Spoonful of Flour, and diffolve it in a little Broth, to thicken your Soop: Boil a Pullet, or a Couple of Chickens, for the Middle. Let your Garnilhing be a Rim, on the Outfide of it cut Lemon; ibak your Bread in the Diih with fome of the fame Broth; take the Fat off, and put your Vermicelly in yourJDilh, fo lerve it.

You may make Pace-Soop the fame Way, only your Rice being firft boiled tender in Water, mull be boiled ar. Hour after in Ibrong Broth j but half an Hour will boil tiie Ver- micelly.

12 he L A D y s C O M P A N I O xV.

Soop au Bourgeois.

HAVING good Broth and Gravy in Readinefs, take four Bunches of Sellery, and ten Heads of Endive, wafh them clean, and take off the Outfide; cut them in Pieces an Inch long, and fwing them well from the Water.
This Soop may be made brown or white: If you intend it broyn, put the Herbs into two Quarts of boiling Gravy having firft blanched them in boiling Water five or fix Mi- nutes; then take the Crufts of two French Rolls, boil them up in three Pints of Gravy, flrain them through a Strainer or Sieve, and put them to the Herbs, when they are almoft ready; for that is to be minded in all Soops, that your Thickening is not to be put in till your Herbs are almoll tender: You may put in the Middle of your Soop a Pullet or Chickens. Let your Garnifhing be a Rim, and on the Outfide fome of your Sellery cut in Pieces three Inches long, your Bread being foaked in fome good Broth or Gravy, and your Herbs boiling hot; fo ferve it.

Pottage cf Chervil the Dutch Way.

GE T ready a fufficient Quantity of good Broth, and put in it a Knuckle of Veal, cut in Pieces, the Bignefs of an Egg; fkim it, and take care it does not boil too much.
Half an Hour before you ferve it to Table, throw in fome Forcd-Meat Balls, rot too fat, but of a good Confidence; droll them before-hand in Rafpings of Bread; they muft be no bigger than fmall Nuts. A Quarter of an Hour before you ferve, put in a pretty deal of Chervil mixd and chopped very fine, together with an Handful of Flour, there mull be a great deal; for a large Soop a good Plate full is requifit®.
When your Chervil is in, keep it always ftirring till you aie ready to ferve, which mud be without Bread.

An Artichoke Soop.

WASH the Bottom of your Artichokes, and boil them in blanchd Water, putting in a large Piece of Butter, kneaded up with a little Flour and Salt: When they are boiled mke them out, malh them, and Ibain them through, a Sieve, as you do Peas, then let them fimmer in a Stew- pan over a gentle Fire, putting in Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg and Cloves, pounded in a Mortar, alfo a Bunch of young Onions, Thyme, and a Bay Leaf: When it is almoll • • adv, pound in a Moitar fome blanchd Sweet-Almonds, Yolks

7he La D ys Com p A N I ON. 13

Yolks of hard Eggs, Sugar, and a little Orange- Flower Water; put this to your Soop, fet it a little over the Fire, and then lerve it.

A Savoy Soop.

LE T your Savoys be cut in four Pieces, and three Parts boiled in Watery then fqueeze them,when cold, with your Hand, clean from the Water -, place in a large Sauce- pan, or little Brafs Difh, fuch a Quantity as your Difh will hold; there muft be Room between each Bit of Savoy to take up Soop with a large Spoon] put them a boiling with as much Broth or Gravy as will cover them; fet them a ftewing over the Fire two Hours before Dinner; at the fame Time, take a Sauce-pan, with a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, put it over the Fire with a Handful of Flour, keep it flirring till it is brown; put to it two minced Onions, and ftir it a little afterwards, then put to it a Quart of Veal Gravy, boil it a little, and pour it all over your Savoys. You force Pigeons between the Skin and the Body, with good Forcd-Meat made of Veal; or you take a Duck, or Duck- lings, being truffed up for boiling, then fry them off, and put them a ftewing with your Savoys; let a little Bacon, lluck with Cloves, be put in with them to ftew. Let your Garnifhing be a Pvim, and on the Outfide of it Slices of Ba- con, a little Heart of Savoy betveen each Slice, taking the Fat clean off; foak your Bread in your Difli, with fome good Broth or Gravy, place your Savoys at a due Diftance, and your Duck in the Middle; fo ferve it up.

You may make a Cabbage Soop according to the above Dire
A Kervel Maes Pottage.

GE T a Knuckle of Veal, chop it all in little Pieces, ex- cept the Marrow-bone, feafon the Fleih with a little Salt, Nutmeg, pounded Bifcuit, and Yolks of Eggs, and make little Forcd-Meat Balls, of the Bignefs of a Pigeons Egg; which being boiled in a Broth pot for the Space of a full Hour, then take three or four Handfnls of Chervil pick- ed clean, two or three Leeks, and a good Handful of Beet Leaves, mince them together, and add two or three Spoon- fuls of Flour, well mixed with two or three Spoonfuls of Broth, that it may not be lumpy, and do it over the Stove as you would do Milk Pottage. This Pottage niuft appear green. On Filh Days cut fome Eels in Pieces, with which

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i4 he Ladys Companion.

make the Broth, inftead of the Veal, and you may put in a Handful of Sorrel among the other Herbs.

A Sorrel So op -tviih Eggs.

BO I L a Neck of Mutton, and a Knuckle of Veal; fkim them cl-ean, and put in a Faggot of Herbs; fea- fon with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, and Mace, and when it is boiled enough, ftrain it olf, let it fettle, and kirn the Fat off, then take ycur Sorrel, and chop it, but not fmall; pafs it in brown Butter, put in our Broth, and feme Slices of French Bread, and flow in the Middle a Fowl, or a Bit of a Neck of Mutton; then garniih your Difh with Slices of fry d Bread, and ftewd Sorrel, with fix poachd Eggs, laid round the Difh, or in the Soop.

J Crawfish Soop.

TAKE half a Dozen Whitings, half a Thornback, and a large Eel, cleanfe them, and boil them in as much Water as will cover them j fkim the Pot well i feafon with a little Salt, whole Pepper, Ginger, Mace, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, Thyme and Parfley, and boil them ail to vIafh; then take the Tails of half a hundred Crawfm, pick out the Bag, and all the woolly Parts that are about them, put them into a Sauce-pan with Water, Vinegar, Salt, Lemon, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs; when thefe have ftevd over a gentle Fire, till they are ready to boil, take out the Crawfiih Tails, and lay them by, and beat all the other Shells in the Liquor they are Hewed in, with a French Roll, till the Shells are beaten very fine; wafh out all the Good- nefs with their own Liquor, then pour the other Fifh- Liquor through the Shells, and flrain all from the Filth and Grit. Then having in the mean Time a Carp Hewed, lay it in the Middle of the Difh; Add the Body of a LobHer to the Soop, with good Gravy and burnt Butter; heat the Crawiifh Tails in the Soop, and pour all over the Carp.
Garnifh with a Rim of Forcd-Meat, or clean Paile, laying fome of your Crawfifh thereon; and fo ferve it up.

Aiiother Crawfifh Soop.

CLeanfe your Crawfifh, and boil them in Water, Salt, and Spice, pull jDfF their Claws and Tails, and fry them; break the reil of them in a Stone Mortar; feafon them with lavoury Spice, and an Onion, hard Eggs, grated Bread, and fweet Herbs, boiled in flrong Broth j Hrain it; then put to

it

The L A D ys CoMP A NiOM. 15

it fcalded chopped Parfley, and Fremh Rolls, with a few dryd Mudirooms; garniili the Difh with diced Lemon, and the Claws and Tails of the Crawfifii.

Lobfler Soop.

TAKE any Sort of Filh, either Carp, Tench, Pike, Trout, Flounders or Whitings, to the Quantity of four or five Pounds, and make a Stock of it according to the Diredions given for making Crawfifh Soop; let your Forcd- Meat be kept as clean from Bones as you can, and make it up about the Size of a double French Roll, hollow in the Middle, and open at the Top; fet it in the Oven for half an Hour, jull before you ufe it; place this Forcd-Meat in the Middle of the Soop; pound the Spawn of the Lobfler, and flrain it vvjth your Cullis: Take the Meat out of your Lobfter, and cut it into fquare Pieces in the Form of large Dice, put it into a Sauce-pan with a little of the Cullis, with Salt and Pepper, give it a Warm, put in a Piece of Butter, and put it into your Forcd-Meat Loaf that you placd in the Middle of your Soop. Having foaked your Bread, and heated your Cullis, fqueeze in lome Lemon. Gajnifh with a Ri. of Pafte, with Slices of Lemon on the Outfide, and ferve it up.

y Brown Pottage Royal.

SE T a Gallon of flrong Broth over the Fire, with two fliivered Palates, Cocks-combs, Lamb-ftones fliced, with favoary Balls; a Pint of Gravy, two Kandfuls of Spinach, and young Lettuce mincd; boil thefe together with a Duck, the Leg and Wing Bones being broke and pulled out, and the Breaft flafhed, and drowned in a Pan of Fat; then put the Pottage in a Difh, and the Duck in the Middle,lay about it a little Vermicelly, boiled up in a liitle flrong Broth, with favoury Balls, and Sweet-breads: Garnifh with fcalded Parf- ley, and Turnips, Beet-Root, and Barberries.

A Mufcle Soop.

GET a Quantity of Mufcles, n.ake them clean, boil them,.
and pick them out of the Shells, then vafh them again,, and put them into a Sauce- pan: Take three or four Pounds of frefh Fiih, and fome Crawiifli Cullis, flrain it thro a Sieve to the Thicknefs of a Cream, put a little of it to your Muf- cles i cut off the Top of a French Roll, take out the Crumb, and fry it in a little Butter, place in the Middle of your Soop

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1 6 The Ladys Companion.

your Bread being foakd with fome of your CuUis. Let your Garnilhing be a Rim of Pafte; lay the Mufcle Shells round the Outfide of it; thicken up your Mufcles with the Yolk of an Egg, as you do a Fr.cafey, and put one or two in a Shell round your Soop, likewife fill up the Loaf in the Middle; the Cullis being boiling hot, fqueeze into that, and.
in the Mufcles, a little Lemon; fo ferve it.
You may make Cockle Soop the fame Way.

A Scate or Thornback Soop.

MAKE your Stock, or Cullis, as you do for a Craw- fifh Soop, only without Shells to colour it: Your Scate or Thornback being Ikinned, take half a Pound of the bell of the Fifii fom the Bones, cut it to Pieces, and throw it into your Cullis, with fome other frefh Fifh, fuch as the Country affords. Your Cullis being ftrained off ready, to the Thicknefs of a Cream, mince the lean Part of the Filh you cut from the Bones, and put it over the Fire in a little Sauce-pan, with a little Butter, Pepper, and Sak, ftirring it till the Raw is off of it; then mince it with your Knife on a clean Table theecond Time, and put it in your Sauce-pan again: If it is good Fifh, it will eat as tender as a Chicken hafhed; put a little Lemon to it, and place it in a French Roll in the Middle of your Soop; your Cullis being hot, and your Bread foaked in the Bottom of your Difh, fqueeze in fome Lemon. Let your Garnilhing be a Rim on the Outfide, fo ferve it.

An Oyfter Soop.

YOUR Stock mull beof Fiili, then take two Quarts of Oyflers, fet them and beard them, take the hard Part of the Oyflers from the other, and beat them in a Mortar, with ten hard Yolks of Eggs, put in fome good Stock, fea- fon it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, the4i thicken up your Soop as Cream; put in the refl of your Oyfters, and garnifh with Oyflers.

Another Oyfler Soop.

TA K £ a Quart of fmall Oyflers, put them Into a Co- lander to drain; llrain the Liquor through a fine Sieve, put to it half a Pint of Water and a Gill of White Wine, with a few Sprigs of Parfley, fome Thyme, a little Shalot or Onion, a Bit of Lemon- peel, a few Cloves, a Blade of Mace, and fome whole Pepper, let them flew gently fome

Time.

The Lad ys Companion. 17

Time. Take a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, and put it into a Pan, but flour it well firft, then fry it till it has done hiffing; then take yourOyftcrs, and dry them in a Cloth and flour them, then put them into the Butter, and fry them till they are plump, then put one Anchovy to them and a little Wine, the Yolks of two Eggs well beaten; then put the Liquor, c. into the Pan, and give all a Scald or two to- gether, keeping it ftirring all the Time; before you put the Soop into the Difh, lay the Cruft of a French Loaf, or Toaft, at the Bottom, foakd in fome of the Liquor over Coals. Before you put in the Whole, you may add ftrong Broth, or fryd Gravy, if not in Lnt. Crawfiili and Shrimps do well in this Soop; if you have Shrimps the fewer Oyfters will do. Take Care your Soop be thick.

Eel Pout Pottage,

CLEAN them well, fry them whole in burnt Butter and a little Flour, then ftew them in an Earthen Pan, in Fifti Broth or Peas Soop, with a little Wine, feafoning with Salt, Pepper, and a Bunch of Herbs, foak fbme Crufts in the Li- quor, lay them in a Difli j put in your Pottage, and garnilh with Maflirooms and Capers.

An Ecl-Soop.

TAKE EfJf, -TCording to the Quantity of Soop you would m.f; Pound of Eels will make a Pint of good Soop, fo to every Pound of Eels put a Quart of Water, a Cruft of Bread, two or three Blades of Mace, a little whole Pepper, an Onion, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs.
Cover them clofe, and let them boil till half the Liquor is wafted; then ftrain it, and toaft fome Bread; being cut fmall, lay it in your Difli, and pour in your Soop. If you have a Stew-hole, fet the Difli over it for a Minute, and fend it to Table: But if you find your Soop not rich enough, you muft let it boil till it is as ftrong as you would have it.
You may make this Soop as rich and good as if it was Meat, Sometimes a Piece of Carrot is added to brown it.

A Pottage of glared Scotch Collops.

TAKE the Knuckle of a Leg of Veal, let it be very white and tender, lard it with fmall Slices of Bacon, and boil it as for a firft Courfe; take another Knuckle of eal, cut it in thin Slices, flat them with the Cleaver, and lard them alfo as the other; then fet thefe a ftewing with

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1 8 he Ladys Companio n.

the firil, and glaze them; make a Cullis in this Manner: Take a Piece of a Fillet of Veal, and cut it in Slices, with fome Slices of Ham; put them in a Stew-pan over the Fire, with an Onion and Carrot fiiced; let it fweat and ftick to the Pan, but take care it do not burn, and put fome very good Broth to it; then take a roailed Partridge, or a Car- cafs come from the Table, and pound it in a Mortar; be- ing pounded, take the Veal and Roots out of your Stew-pan, and put in their Places your pounded Partridge, with a little Ladleful of Cullis, and give it a good Tade; ftrain it thro a Strainer; put it into a little. Pot, and keep it hot. Take a Trench Roll or two, take oft the Crulis, and put them in a Stew-pan; ftrain fome o your Broth, well cleared of the Fat, on the Cruils, let it fnnmer awhile, and put it in your Soop-dilli; cut your Collops in long fmall Slices, and gar- nifh your Soop-difh vith it; put your Cullis upon your foak- cd Bread, and the glazed Veal above all, and ferve it hot.

A good Gravy Soop.

GE T a Leg of Beef, and boil it down with feme Salt, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, an Qnion, a few Cloves, a Bit of Nutmeg; boll three Gallons ftf Water to one; then take two or three Pounds of lean Beef cut in thin Slices; then put into your Pan a Piece of Butter, as big as an Egg, and flour it, and let the Str;v-pan be and fliake it till the Butter be brown; ther; lay your .n your Pan over a pretty quick Fire, cover It clofe, give it a Turn now and then, and ftrain in your flrong Broth, with an Anchovy or two, a Handful of Spinach and Endive boiled green, and drained, and fhred grofs; then have fome Palates ready- boiled, and cut in Pieces, toafted and fryed: Take out the fryd Beef, and put all the rell together with a little Pep- per, and let it boil a Quarter of an Hour, and ferve it up with a Knuckle of Veal, or a Fowl boiled in the Middle.

Another Gravy Soop.

TA K E twelve Pounds of Beef, of the Neck and Stick- ing-piece, a Scrag of Mutton, and a Knuckle of Veal; put your iieef in a Pan, and half fry it, with a Bit of But- ter, then put all in a Pot, with fomewhat more than two Gallons of Water, a good Handful of Salt, and a Piece of Bacon; boil and &im it, then feafon it with three Onions lluck with Cloves, whole Pepper, Jamaica Pepper, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; let it boil five or fix Hours

clofe

fhe Ladys Companion. 19

clofe covered; then flrain it out, and put it in your Difh, with Hewed Herbs, and toafted Bread.

Another Gravy-Soop.

TA K E a Leg of Beef, and a Piece of the Neck, and boil it till you have the Goodnefs out of it; then ftrain it from the Meat; take half a Pound of frefh Butter, and put it in a Stew-pan, and brown it; then put in an Onion iluck with Cloves, fome Endive, Sellery, and Spinach, and your llrong Broth, and feafon it to your. Palate with Salt, Pepper, and Spices, and let it boil together; put in Chips of French Bread, dryd by the Fire, and ferve it up with a Fr£7ich Roll toafted in the Middle.

An Almond-Soop.

OUR Stock muft be of Veal and Fowl, then beat a Pound of Jordan Almonds very fine in a Mortar, with the Yolks of fix hard Eggs, putting in a little cold Broth fometimes; then put in as much Broth as you think will do; ftrain it off, and put in two fmall Chickens, and fome Slices of Frenck Bread; feafon it gently, fo ferve away;.
garnifh with Whites of Eggs beat up.

Rice Soop.

YOUR Stock mufl be of Veal and Fowl; put in half a Pound of Rice, and a Pint of good Gravy, and a Knuckle of Veal, ftove it tender -, feafon with Mace and Salt, then make a Rim round your Difh, and garnifh with Heaps of Rice, fome coloured with Saffron, placing one Heap of White, and one of Yellow all round.

Another Rice Soop,

TA K E a Quarter of a Pound of Rice, pick and wafh it very clean, boil it with Veal Broth till very tender, with a little Mace and a young Fowl, fkim it very clean, and feafon lightly with Salt, then llir in half a Pound of But- ter, then add a Pint of Cream boiled up, and ftir it into the Soop; ferve it up with the Crumb of a French Roll and the Fowl.

An Italian Pottage.

IT is a Sort of Olio, difhed in feparate Compartments, in the Middle of your Difh, for which Purpofe make a Crofs of Pafte, then bake it in the Oven; in the Firft

Axjgle

20 The Lad Ys Companion.

Angle make a Bifque, in the Second a Pottage of fmall Chickens, in the Third a Pottage a la Reine en Profitrolh; and in the Fourth a Pottage of forced Partridges. Qbferve that each Soop is to have its different Broth belonging to it, with different Garniture.

j Soop of Force J Green GeeCc,

MAK.E a Force-Meat of Goofe-Liver, a Piece of Ba- con, a Calfs Udder, or Eeef-Sewet, fome Crumbs of Bread foaked or boiled in Milk, and three or four Eggs; chop all together, and feafon with Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs and Spices; when this is done, put your Force-Meat into your Goofes Belly, then put it into a Pot with fome good Broth, and fet it a doing gradually over the Fire; then take the Crufts of French Rolls as ufual, and put them in a Stew-pan, with fome of the fame Broth your Goofe is boiled in, .and fet your Cruils a fimmering and foaking gently over a Stove; when they are tender, put them in your Soop- Difh, and the Goofe upon them; then put over your Goofe a Cullis of Green Peas, if in Seafon, or elfe Afparagus Tops. Garnifh the Rim of your Difh with middling Bacon, and ferve it hot.

j Turnip Soop.

HAVING good Veal Gravy in Readinefs, take fome Turnips, pare them, and cut them in Dice, one or two Dozen, according to the Size and Bignefs of your Difh; fry them of a brown Colour, in clarified Butter, or Hogs Lard. Take two Quarts of good Gravy, and the Crufts of two French Rolls, boiled up together, and ftrained through a fine Strainer. Your Turnips bein.g ftrained from the Fat they were fried in, put them together, boil them till tender.
You may roaft two Ducks to put in the Middle. Let your Garnih be a Rim, on the Outfide of it fome fmall diced Turnips, boiled white in Broth, and betwixt every Parcel of them a Piece of fryd Turnip, in Shape of a Cocks Comb. Soak your Bread in fome good Fat and Gravy, and then ferve it.

J Pottage of Chefnuts.

TAKE fome large Chefnuts, and p&el them, then put them into a Pafty-pan, with Fire under and over, put them in an Oven, and peel off the under Skin, then fet them a boiling, in good Broth; put in a Stew-pan about

half

The Ladys Companion. 21

half a Pound of Veal, a few Slices of Ham, fome liced Carrot and Onion, fet them in a Stove to fweat till they fticic to the Pan without burning, moiften them with good Broth; you mull have fome Carcafes of Partridges, or Pheafants ready pounded; take the Meat out of your Stew-pan with a Skimmer, and put in your pounded Carcafes; obferve that your Broth be well tailed; put in a little of your Cullis, and ftraia it thro a Strainer, afterwards put it into a little Pot, or Sauce-pan, and keep it hot. Pare off the Crufts of a French Roll, and put them in a Stew-pan; put fome good Broth to your Crufis, and let them fimmer avhile over the Stove, but take care there be no Fat: When enough, put them in your Soop-Dilh, garnilh the Rim with Chefnuts i put in your Pottage two large Pigeons, or two Partridges, with your Cullis over them; and fcrve it hot.

A Pottage cf Lentik.

PU T a Quart of Lentils into a Gallon of Water, with two Pounds of good Ham, or pickled Pork, two Pounds of Mutton, two Pounds of Pork; feafon with All-fpice and Salt; put in a Faggot of Herbs, and ilove all very tender; faye a few whole to put into a French Roll for the Middle; the rell pulp off as thick as Cream; fo ferve away. Gar- nilh with Bacon and Lentils.

To make Peas Pottage.

TAKE two Quarts of Peas, put them into three Quarts of Water, feafon it pretty high, put in an Onion, boil them till they are enough; then add a Spoonful of Flour, mixd with Water, a little Mint, a Leek, and a Couple of Handfuls cf Spinach; put in half a Pound of -freih Butter, and fome Forcd-Mcat Balls, ftill it all till the Butter is melt- ed; then diih it, and ferve it up to Table.

Another Way.

TAKE four Quarts of Peas, boil them in as little Water as will fuffice, till they are foft, and thickened; in the mean Time boil a Leg of Mutton, and two or three Umbles of Veal, in another Pot, pricking them with a Knife to let out the Gravy; boil them in juft fo much Wa- ter as is fufhcient to cover them: When you have boild all the Goodnefs out of the Meat, flrain the Liquor, put it into the Pulp of the Peas, let them boil together, put in a good deal of Mint, fome Thyme, and alfo a Piece of Bacon: When

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22 he Ladys Companion.

it is enough, diHi it, lay Rafhers of fryd Bacon round the Difli; pour in a good deal of Butter, and ferve it up.

0 make Spinach Pottage.

TAKE the beft Part of the Spinach, mince it fine, and Hew k in a Pipkin with Peas-Soop. an Onion fluck with Cloes, a Carrot, and ether feafoning Ingredients.
Set your Crufts a ioaking; you may, if you like it, fcrape in feme Parmelan, and drefs your Pottage. Garnifli it with Sticks of Cinnamon round about, and lay one in the Middle, or fryd Bread, or an Onion.

To tnake Pottage j.iih Succory.

BO I L a young Turkey, Capon, Pullet, or other Fowl, after the ufual Manner, with good Broth, Salt, Spice, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs; fcald the Succory with Wa- ter, then boil it in your Broth; drefs your Pottage, and lay it a foaking. Garnifh with Succory, and ferve it up with fome Broth, Mutton, Gravy, and MufJtirooms.

To tnake Barley Pottage.

LA Y a Pound of hulld, or Pearl Barley, to fleep in two Quarts of Milk, boil it a lictle, then put in a Quart of Cream, fome Salt, Mace, and a Stick of Cinnamon, broken into fmall Pieces; when it is thick enough, fcrape in fme Sugar, and ferve it up.

A Millet Soop.

ST E E P a Pound of Millet an Hour in good ftrong Broth; then fet it on a gentle Fire to fimmer; feafon with Salt and Mace, then put in two Pigeons, and a Quart of good Gravy; ftove it two Plours, make a Rim of Pafte round the Edges, and lay fome Millet ftoved round, with fome Slices oi French Bread.

A Veal Soop.

CU T a Knuckle of Veal in Pieces, boil it with a Pal- let, and half a Pound of Jordan Almonds beat fmall, ftove it well, and very tender: You may boil a Chicken to lay in the Middle; then iJ:im it clean, and feafon it wi:h Salt, and a blade of Mace, then take the Yolks of four Eggs, and beat them in a little good Broth; o draw it up as thick as Cream, and ferve it away hot.

A Veal

The Ladys Companion

23

A Veal Soop lith Barhy.

YOUR Stock mull be with a Fowl, a Knuckle of Veal, and fome Mutton, feafoned only with Mace; then ftrain all off; put in half a Pound of French or Pearl Barley; boil it one Hour, feafon it well, and boilin the Middle a Fowl, or two Chickens, and juft as you ferve it up put in chopped Parlley.

Sicotch Barley-Broth.

GE T a Neck, a Loin, or a Bread of Mutton, cut it to Pieces, waih it. put as much Water as will cover it; then when it boils fkim it clean, and feafon it with Pepper and Salt, fome diced Carrots, Turnips, Ibme Onions, a Fag- got of Thyme andPaifley, and fome Barley; ftove all this wel together J then l-cim it well: You may put in a Knuckle of Veal, or a Sheeps Head fmged, with the Wool on, foak- ed and fcraped, and it will be white; fo ferve away with the Meat in your Broth.

To make this green, inftead of Turnip and Carrot, take a Handful of red Beet Leaves or Broccolli, a Handful of the Blades of Onions, and a Handful of Spinach, walhed and hred fmall.

A Hodge-rodge.

TAKE about fix Pounds of the Sticklng-piece, or Brif- cuit of Beef; a Knuckle of Veal, a Cow-heel, and a Pigs Ear; let them be a little more than covered with Water, put them on the Fire, keep fkimming them, and let them boil about an Hour; then feafon them with Pepper and Salt j put in Carrots and Turnips, cut in handfome Pieces, not fliced, fome Onions, Beet Leaves, Sellery, Thyme, and Vinter-Savory in a Faggot, to be taken out again, then let them all llew over a moderate Fire above two Hours more.

Another Way to make a Hcdge-Podge.

TAKE fome of the lower End of a E: ilcuit of Beef, cut it into Pieces two Inches long and broad, put them into cold Water, then blanch them, afterwards put them into a Po!:, with a great many Carrots, Paifnips, and a few Turnips; tlv. n feafon with Pepper, Salt, a Bunch of fweet Pleibs, half a Dozen Onions, a Piece of Ham, and, if ycu think proper, a Piece of Cervelas; then cover it with Slices

of

24 Ladys Companion,

of Beef, moiften it with Broth, cover the Pot, and put Fire nnder and over it, when done, take out the Meat and the Carrots; then put the Brifcuit-piece, with other Meat, into a Stew-pan, and drefs your Carrots as neatly as you can, put them to your Meat, then ftrain off the Broth the Brifcuit- pieces were boiled in, with the reft of the Meat, fkim it well, and let it be well feafoned; if there is too much Li- quor boil it to a fmaller Quantity j put fome Butter in a Stew-pan, with a Handful of Flour, flir it with a wooden Ladle till it is pretty brown, then moiflen it with the Broth of the Hodge-podge; fkim it well, let it be well tailed; put to it Parfley cut fmall, and put over your Griftles of Qf, and your Carrots; keep it hot: Being ready to ferve up, place it in a Terrine, and ferve it for Entry.
1 You may ferve it up in a Diih, as well as a Terrine; you Aiay alfo add to it Mutton Griftles.

To tiiake Pottage v:ith Ducks artd Turnips.

TA K E a Duck, draw and trufs it very neatly j blanch it, andput a Piece of Beef in a Stew-pan, with a Piece of Nhitton, and your Duck; fet all a doing flowly over the Sve .; When your Pottage begins to flick to the Stew-pan, put fome good Broth into it, then take out your Meat, drain your Broth, and put it in a Pot with fome Tur- nips, Carrots, and Onions; then put your Pot on the Fire, and make it boil gently; in the mean Time cut fome Tur- nips in the Form of Dice, or in any other Form you pleafe, to be thrown upon your Pottage, then blanch them, and put them in a fmall Pot of very good Broth, let them boil till they are enough: As foon as you are ready to ferve, take off the Crufls of a French Roll, and put them in a Stew- pan, ilrain fome good Broth upon them, without Fat, then let them fmimer over the Stove till they are tender; when they are enough, put them in your Soop-Difh, garniHi the Rim of it with Turnips ready for that Purpofe; then put in your Duck and the remaining Turnips, cut into fmall Dice j fill up your Soop-Dilh, and ferve it hot, but be fure it be well tafted.

Young Geefe, Teals, Knuckles of Roe-bucks and wild Boars, at very grand Tables, may be fcrved in thclke Pot- tages of Turnips; as likewife Wood-pigeons and other Pigeons.

A Pot-

ne li A D ys Companion-. 25

A Pottage a la yacobir.e, iRepare a Brace of Partridges with a Chicken, and roail them, take ofF all the FlelTi, and chop it very fmall, then put it in a Stew-pan with a little CuUiSj then take all the Crumb out of a French Roll, and fill it with this minced Meat; but obfcrve to keep fome to put upon your Pottage; pouiid all your Partridge-bones, and put them in a Stew-pan, with a Spoonful or two of Broth, let them have only two Boils, and let them be well reliihed; then ilrain them thro a Strainer, and put the Liquor into a little Pot, with the reft of your minced Meat; cut a FreKch Roll into very thin Slices at the Bottom of your Diui, and a Layer of glaced Par me fan Cheefe, and put a Row of Bread, continu- ing them alternately, till you have enough for the Pottage; then put your Dilli on a Stove, -and put to it fome Broth let it fimmer gently; being ready to ferve up, put lii yoxxxFrencPj Rolls, fluffed with the minced Meat, and fill it up very gently with good Broth: Garnilli the Pvim of your Dilh with Pieces of PufF-pafte, cut in Triangles, throwing your CuUis over all; ferve it hot.

A Cow-Heel Pottage.

PU T in your Pot fevcn or eight Pounds of Buttock of Beef, a Lt of Mutton cut in two, three or four Pounds of a Leg of VeaJ, and the Knuckle of a Ham j put your Pot over the Stove till the Meat fticks a little to it, then pour out fome Broth without Fat; put in alfo a Fowl, and an old Partridge, fome Carrots, Parfnips, Turnips, and a Bunch of Sellery, and let it boil flowly: Then boil your Cow-Heel, and finifh the doing of it in a litde Braze, that is, in a good Seafoning; vhen all is ready take the Cruils ot French Rolls, and put them into a Stew-pan, • ftrain fome clear Broth upon them, take off all the Fat, and let them foak and fimmer awhile over the Stove; then put it into the Soop-Dilh, with, your Cow-Heel upon it. Laftly, fill it up with Broth, and ferve it very hot. Let it be well tailed.

A Pottage o Forced Pigeons ivith brovjn Oniois.

HAVING got fome large Pigeons, you mufl: pick, draw, and trnfs them well, loofen the Skin of the Breaft with your Finger, and force them with aForce-Meat thus: Get fome white Flefh of Fowls, or elfe a Piece of VeaK with a little Bacon and Calfs Udder, blanched and feafonVi, with Pepper, Salt; fweet Herbs and Spices; a few Mufn- VoL, L C rooms.

26 he Ladys Compan ion.

rooms, Truffes, Parfley, and young Onions, three or four Yolks of raw Eggs, and a few Crunbs of Bread boiled in Cream; mince all well together, and pound them in a Mor- tar; force your Pigeons with this Forced-Meat, flop the Vent of your Pigeons with a Skewer, and blanch them, leaving them but a Moment in the boiling Water, and pick them clean over again, and fet them a boiling in a Pot of good Broth. Take fome fmall round Onions, cut off the Ends, and blanch them in Water -, then peel them, and put them into a Pot with good Broth, and Veal Gravy, and fet them a boiling; when boiPd, take them out very care- fully for fear of breaking them, and put them into a Sieve to drain: Take a French Roll, cut off the Cruil, and put it into a Stew-pan, and put to your Cruft the Broth your Onions were boiled in, and fet them to foak and fimmer; when tender, put them in your Soop-Difh with your forcd Pigeons epon them, and garnifh your Dilh with Onions, fill up your Soop-Difli wiih Veal Gravy, and fee that it is well tailed; ferve it hot.

If you would have a Binding inllead of Veal Gravy, bind jtwith clear Cullis of Veal and Ham.

Pottage of Turkies with Onions is made the fame Way.

Pottage of Partridges.

YOUR Partridges being picked, drawn, trufTed, and fcalded, lard them with middling Lards of Bacon well fealbned, and half roall them; then take them off, and put them into a Pot with a Bundle of Roots, fome Onions, and fome good Broth; fet them a boiling. Make a Cullis after this manner: Take a Pound or two of a Fillet of Veal, and a Piece of iHam, cut them in Slices to garnifh the Bottom of a Stew-pan, flice an Onion, Carrot, and Parfnip, and put the Whole coverd up over a flow Fire; when the Li- quor fticks to the Pan without burning, put in a little But- ter, and a Duil of Flour; tcfs that feven or eight Times over the Stove; then wet it with half Gravy, half Broth and put in fome Crulls of Bread, a little Parfley, a Chibbol, Mufhrooms, Truii.es, and a very little fweet Bafil, and let all fmmier together j pound a roalied Partridge; the Cullis be- ing enough, take cut the Slices of Veal, and put in the Par- tridge; flialn it thro a Strainer, and pu: it into the Pot, and keep it hot; boil fome Crufts of French Rolls in the Soop- Difh you intend to ferve it in, or in a Stew-pan, with the Liquor that your Partridges were boild in j when tender,

lay

ne Ladys Companion. 27

lay them in your Soop-Difh, and lay your Partridges hand- fomely upon them; fee that your Cullis be well tailed, pour it upon your Pottage, and ferve it hot.

A Pottage of Partridges a la Reine.

HAVING picked, drawn, and trufled your Par- tridges, lard them with large Lardoons of Bacon, and half roaft them, then take them off the Spit, and put them into a Pot, with fome good Broth of a Piece of Beef and Veal; fet them a boiling over a flow Fire, then take a Pound or two of a Fillet of Veal, and a Piece of Ham, cut both into Pieces or Slices, and garnifh the Bottom of a Stew.pan, and add an Onion or two, a few Carrots and Parfnips; fet them a fweating on a Stove flowly; and vhen they begin to flick to the Pan, and appear brown, pour in fome good Broth, and feafon the Whole with two or three Cloves, fome«Iufh- rooms cut in Slices, Parfley, Cives, and Crumbs of Bread; let them all Hew together very flowly, and when they are well foaked, and the Veal and Ham enough, take them out of the Pan, and mix one of your Partridges, being pounded, in it. Then ftrain your Cullis over it, and put to it the Cruft of a French Roll, or two, foaked in fome of the Broth the Partridges were boiPd in; put a Brace of roafted Partridges m the Middle, and ferve away hot.

A Pottage a la Houzarde.

TAKE two Chickens, pick them very clean, trufs them, and put them in the Broth- pot for half an Hour, then take them out, and cut them in Pieces as for a Fricafey, and put them into a Stew-pan with fome melted Butter, fea- foned with Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs, and fine Spices, and rafped Bread, and Partnefan Cheefe, upon them, one after another, as you do Smelts, or fried Gudgeons; then put them handfomely in a Pafty-pan, and let them take a fine Colour in the Oven. Take a French Roll, cut it in Slices, make a Layer of Bread in your Soop-Difh, and another of Parmt- fan Cheefe, another of Cabbage, and one of Bread over all, that the Cabbage may not appear; put your Difli on the Stove, with fome good Broth in it; let it flmmer till the Bread be almofl dry; then drudge it vith Parn:efan Cheefe, and brown it with the Cover of a Pafly-pan; then fliove a thin Skimmer under your Bread in the Diih, and put in foine Broth till your Bread fwims in it. When it is ready to ferve, lay your Chickens on handfomely, and ferve it hot,

C 2 Pottac-e

.8 The Lad ys Com pan ion.

Pcttge of Rice, the Polilh IVay called Rouflble.
I C K and wafh your Rice very clean, put it in a- Pot with a Knuckle of Veal, and a Fowl cut in Quarters; moillen them with hot Water, and let them boil very fiowlyf pat in a Handful of Pariley-Ieaves and Roots, a good Pinch oi Mace pounded, a Pinch of Pepper, and a Piece of Butter fcoii it gently, and keep it from thickening; give it a good Taftc, and juft before you ferve, put in a Handnil of Parf- ley, and difli up your Pottage in the Dilh you ferve it up in; put;v0ur quartered Fowl upon it, and ferve it up hot.

A Rice Olio, wjith a Cuilis a la Reiiie.

X O I L a Fowl with your Rice, in a Pot of good Broth, O nd make a white Culiis thus: Take a Piece of Veal 2nd Ham, and cut them like fmall Dice, add an Onion, vith feme good Bioth; take the White of a roalled Fowl, and pound it in a Mortar; when pounded, take the Meat out of your Cuilis, and put in the White of your pounded Fowl; Strain it all through a Strainer, and put it to your P.ice, and put your Fovvl inthe Difh that you itrve. your Pottage in: Let it be well taficd, and ferve it hot.

A Pottage of Spanilh Cardoons.

rX A K E a Fievch Roll or two, and having cut off the JI Crulls, put them into a Stew-pan, with fome good Broth, let them take a Boil or two; when your Crufts are tender, pit them in your Soop-Diili, and garnifh your Difli with Cardoons; then Jay on your Crufts two Partridges, or two Pigeons, which you muft have ready, or elfe a little Loaf of Ficfitrolle and feme Hearts of Cardoons in thin Slices over it: Pour over it fome good VeaL Gravy half thickened, let it be well tafted, and ferve it hot. Vhen the Veal Gravy is thus prepared, then take a Pound and a half of a Fillet of Veal, and a little Piece of Ham, cut both in Slices, and garnifh the Bottom of a large Stew-pan with 3t, and an Onion, a Carrot, and a Parfnip j cover it, and let It Hew gently on a Stove: When the Liquor ilicks to the Pan, and has taken a fine Colour, put in a Piece of Butter, and drudge it lightly over with Flour, then tofs it round about feven or eight Times over the Stove, and put to it half good Broth, and half Gravy; feafon it with a white Chibbol, a little Pariley, a little fweet Bafil, a few M ufhrooms, .nd Tiufflcs, if you have any, and with tvo or three

Cloves:

- he L A D ys C o M p A N 1 o N V 29

Cloves; let it all boil gently, tlien take out the Slices of Veal, and drain the reft through a Strainer; let it be of a good Colour, and ufe it to throw on your Pottage.

Jn Onion Soop.

TVKE thirty Onions, face them thin, and fry them brown, but takeCiirc not to let them burn to the Pan;- drain them well from the Fat, then put them into a clean Stew pan with fome Innll Broth, and let them flew till tender, then put in Pepper and Salt, to your Tafte, with more Broth, and llir in half a Pound of Butter. Serve it up with fome Slices of Bread toafted, or dried before the Fire.

Another Onion Soop.

TAKE half a Pound of Butter, put it in a Stew-pan, on the Fire, let it all melt, and boil till it has done making any Noife; then have ready ten or a Dozen mid- dling Onions peeled, and cut fmall, throw them into the Butter, and let them fry a Quarter of an Hour; then fnake in a little Flour, and llr them round; fhake your ran, and let them do a i Minutes longer, then pour in a Quart or three Pints of boiling Water, ilir them round, take a good Piece of upper Cruil, of the ftaleft Bread you have, about &s big as the Top of a Penny Loaf, cut fmall, and throw it in; feafon with Salt to your Palate, let it boil ten Minute, ftirring it often; then take it off the Fire, and have ready th:3- Yolks of two Eggs beat fine, vith half a Spoonful of Vine- gar; mix fome of the Soop with them, then ftir it into your Soop, mix it well, and pour it into your Diih.

Jn Egg Soop.

E A T the Yolks of two Eggs in your Difh, with a Piece: of Butter as big as a Hens Egg, take a Tea-kettle o- boiling Water in one Hand, and a Spoon in the other, poiu in about a Quart by Degrees, and keep ftirring it all tLe Time well, till the Eggs are well mixd, and the Butter melted .; then pour it into a Sauce-pan, and keep ibrring it all the Time, till it begins to fimn::er; take it oft tl-eiire, and pour it between two Veilels, out of one into the other, till ir, is quite fmooth, and has a great Froth; fet it on the Firj again, keep iKrring it till it is quite hot, then pour it into the Soop-Difn, and ferve it.

C 3 A Ter.

so Tbe Ladys Companion.

ji Terrine a la Bavaroie,

TAKE half a Dozen Quails all ready truffed, four middling Pigeons, two young Rabbits; cut off the Hind-Legs, and lard them with Eacon, and the Backs with fmall Bacon, cutofF the Heads and Flanks, and lard them alfo. Take an Eel cut in Pieces the Length of your Rab- bits; put in your Stew-pan fome Slices of Veal and Ham, then put in your Quails and Legs of Rabbits, together with Champignons and Truffles j feafon it with Pepper, Salt, fweet Bafil, Onions, fome Slices of Lemons, and a Couple of GlafTes of White Wine -, cover them Top and Bottom alike, cover the Stew-pan, fet it a ftewing with Fire under and over; it being half done, put in your Pigeons, with Veal Sweet- breads, and let it flew till done: Your Eels and Rabbits being larded, put a Stew-pan over the Fire, with half a Bottle of White Wine, feafoned with Salt, Cloves, fweet Ba- iil, and Onions cut into Slices; as foon as your Wine boils, put in your Eels, let them boil a little; after that take them out, and put your Rabbits in a Stew-pan, with fome Slices of Ham and Veal; moiften them with Broth, adding to it a Couple of Onions, and fo let them flew: When they are ilewed, take them out, flrain the Broth thro a Silk Strainer, and put them again into your Stew-pan j then put them over the Fire, and let them ftew till they turn to CarameL This done, pot in your Rabbits and your Eels; cover your Stew-pan, and put it upon hot Allies, that they may glaze, and your Eels niay be quite done: Take out your Quails, Pigeons, and Rabbits Legs, place them neatly in a Stew- pan; put the Stew-pan wherein they have been doing over the Fire, and moiften with a Ladleful of Gravy, and as much Cullis; Ikim it well, then ftrain olF this Cullis; let it have a good Tafle; place your Quails, and Pigeons, c, in your Terrine, and pour your Cullis over them, with the Juice of a Lemon, and then your Rabbits and Eels glazed, crofs-ways, laid upon them, and ferve them up hot.

A Spanifh Olio.

TAKE fome Griflle of Beef from the lower Part of the Brifcuit, cut in Pieces, the Bignefs of two Fingers, and put them in Water; take alfo fome Griftle of a Breaft of Mutton, and fome Griftle of a Breaft of Veal, and Sheeps Rumps, and cut them into handfome Pieces; then garnifh a

Broth-

T Lad ys Co MP A N I ON. 31

Broth-pot all round with Slices of Beef, an Inch thick, and put in your Griftle of Beef, with a good Quantity of Roots, a Bunch of Sellery very neat, becaufe it muft be ufed in ferving up, a Bunch of Leeks, moiften the Whole with Broth; and when the Beef is fomewhat forward, put in your Griftle of Veal and Mutton, and Sheeps Rumps, two Hogs Feet and Ears, two Partridges, two Pigeons, the Knuckle of a Ham, half a White Cabbage, being well blanched, drained, and tied up with Packthread; feafon the Whole with Onions, and put in a Mignonette, and then cover it with Slices of Beef; take two Founds of Veal, cut them in Slices, and fet them to fweat gently over the Stove, till they flick to the Stew-pan, but dont let fhem burn; put fome good Broth into it, and put it in your Olio. You muft put to fteep over Night fomc Gravance, that is, Spanih Peas, in lukewarm Water, in the Morning pick them clean one after another, then wafh them in hot Water, and boil them in a Sauce-pau with good Broth. Your Olio being done, give it the befl Tafte yon can; then take out all your Meat and Roots, and put them in a large Diih; range handfomely in the Diih or Olio-pot you ferve up in, your Grillles of Beef, Veal, Mut- ton, and Roots, which muil be well cleaned: When every Thing is in good Order in your Difii, then put in your Hogs Fe€t and Ears, Cabbage, Sellery, and Leeks, in the fame Form; add laftly your Gravance, with a litde Olio Broth, and ferve it hot. You maft ferve it in covered China Cups, with Slices of toafied Bread as big as your two Fingers; fcl! each Cup with Broth, and put a Toail at their Sides, lake care yourBroth be well reliihed, and ferve it as hot as youi can.

Another Way to make an Olio.

FI L L a Pot that will hold three Gallons, with Waters put in a Rump of Beef, two Neats Tongues, green boiPd and larded, alfo a Couple of dryd Neats Tongues, and Bolognia Saufages; boil them together, fkim the Pot well; and when they have boild two Hours, put in Mutton, Pork, Venifon, and Bacon, cut in Bits as big as a Ducks Egg; put likewife Turnips, Carrots, Onions, and Cabbage, cut in Pieces, the Bignefs of your Meat; fome Borage, En- dive, Marigolds, Sorrel, and other fvveet Herbs, grofiy Ihred, and fome Spinach whole; and you may alfo add French Ear- ley, or Limes, dry or green. A little before you difh your Olio out, put in fome Saffron, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, c. Then

C 4 put

3 2 The L A D Y s C o m p a n i o ic.

put into another Pot a Goofe or Turkey; Capons, Pheafants, Widgeons, and Ducks, two of each; Partridges, Teals, and Stock-Doves, four of each -, Snipes, naif a Dozen; Quaib, two Dozen; and Larks four Dozen; boil them in Water and Salt. Alfo fet on in a Pipkin, with a little White Wine, ilrong Broth, and fweet Butter, Bottoms of Articho.ks, and Chefnuts boiPd, andblanchd, with a Couple of Cauliflowers, ibme Bread, Marrow, Yolks ofhardEo;gs, large Mace, and Saffron: Vhen thefe are ready, difli your Olio thus: Firft, your Veal, Beef, or Pork; then your Venifon, Mutton, Tongues, Saufages, and Roots over them all: Then next lay your largell Fowls: As firft a Gcofe or Turkey, a Couple of Capons, a Couple of Pheafants, four Ducks, four Wid- geons, four Stock-Doves, four Partridges, eight Teals, twelve Snipes, twenty -four Quails, and forty-eight Larks.
Then pour in your Broth, and y ut on your Pipkin of Cauli- iiowers, Artichoaks, Cheinuts, fonie Sweetbreads fryd. Yolks of hard Eggs, Marrow boiled in Ilrong Broth, Pilachoes, Mace and Saffron, all being finely ftewed i over all, fome red Beets, Slices of Lemon, Lemon-peel whole, and run it over with beaten Butter.

Another Way.

TAKE any Sort of good Meat, Part of a Buttock of I. Beef, a Leg of Mutton, a Fillet of Veal, fonie raw Gamnrion, Chickens, Pigeons, Partridges, and Quails, and fome Saufages, and a Cervelas, all roafted or fryd brown: Put all thefe into a Pot, one after another, according to the Time that each will require for boiling it, and make a thickening Liquor of brown Sauce to be mingled together.
Vhen it boils, ikim it well, feafon your Meat with Salt, Pepper Ginger, Nutmeg, Cioes, and Coriander Seed, pounded together; then add fome fweet Bafil and Thyme, tied up in a Linnen Cloth, then fcald Turnips, Carrots, Parfnips, Leeks, Onions and Parfley Roots; alfo Cabbage, and other Herbs in Bunches. Vvhen your Pottage is boiled, break fome Crufts in Pieces, and lay a foaking in the Broth, haiing taken oittbe Fat, and feafoned it v.ell. Before you ferve it up, put in a good deal more of the Broth, having taken off the Fat; then drefs your Meats and Fowls garnifh them with Roots.

in

The L A dys Companion... 33

An Olio for Dayj tf Ahfiinence.

GET Fiih Broth, and good Peas Soop. pat them Into a Pot, Vvith the Herbs and Ps.oots mentioned in the.
other Receipt for Olios, and let them boil together as long, as is requifite j then drefs your Olio, with a Loaf of vhit& Bread-in the Midft of it, and garnifn with Roots.

Rice Olio, nj:ith a Cullis TCrawfilh.

WASH fome Rice very clean, and put it in a Pot of good Broth; make it boil very flowly, and add half a- Dozen live Crawiilli: When your Rice is done enough, and well tailed, pour upon it a good Cullis of CrawHlli, vith the Tails J take the Crawfiih out of your Pottage, and ferve it hot.

A Pottage o Wood-Pigeons, hy ivoy ofan Olio.

AFTER your Wood-Pigeons are trufTed, blanch them in Water, and put them in the Pot with fome good Gravy, a Bunch of Roots, fuch as Carrots, Turnips, Parf- nips, C5. fome young Onions, a Faggot of Seliery, and a- Bunch of fweet Herbs; when all are boiled, prepare the Cruils of Rolls as ufual, in the fame Broth your Wood- Pigeons are done in; then put the Bread in your Soop-Difii, and over it your Wood-Pigeons. Garnifh the Rim of yoor Difli with the Roots, pouring in good Veal Gravy over all; then ferve it hot: The Garniture fliould only jull cover the Rim of the Difh, in order to have Room for the Soop.

You may make Ufe of Quails, or any other Fowl, and Wood-Pigeons may ferve for Cabbage Soop, as you think, fit.

A Pottage of Teals, or other Birds, ivith Muihrooms.

GET fome Teals, or fuch like Birds, drav and trufs them; lard them with large Lardoons of Bacon Vvdi feafoned, then half roall: them, and take them off, and fet them a doing in a Pet, with fome good Broth, Pepper, and Salt, and a Bun-.h of fweet Herbs; wh:-n they arc half done, have fome picked Muihrooms in Readinefs, cut thein in fmall Dice, and tofs them in melted Bacon, putting two good Pinches of Flour to them; your Mufnrooms being enough, put them inco the Pot where your Teals are boiU ing, let them all boil well together j when the Both is C 5 enough

34 LaD-vS CoftPANION.

enough, order the Crufts of French Rolls as ufual, and put them in your Soop-Difli, and put your Teals on the Crufts; and before you fervc up, put fome good Gravy to them, with the Juice of a Lemon. Garnifh the Rim of your Difh with Muflirooms prepared in the following manner: Take as many fmall Mufhrooms as will ferve to garnilh your Dilh, pick and walh them, and put them in a Stew-pan, with the Juice of a Lemon, a little Salt, and fome Broth; when they are done, garnifh the Rim of your Difh with them; but let them be very white: Another Time you may force them for the fame Garniture.

A Bain-Marie.

GE T three Pounds of Beef, three Pounds of Fillet of Veal, and a Pound of a Leg of Mutton, the whole without its Fat, with a Capon and a Partridge; take an- carthen Pot big enough to hold all this Meat -, fcald the Pot before you ufe it, then put into it the Meat aforefaid, and ieafon it with an Onion ftuck with two Cloves, and a little Salt, pour into it three Pints of Water, cover the Pot, and flop it round clofe with Parte and Paper, to keep in the Steam, Put on the Fire a large Kettle of Water, and fet it a boiling; then put your earthen Pot into this Kettle, and keep fo much Water always boiling, ready to put into the Kettle, as the other waftes, keep always filling fo for the Space of five Hours; after which, take it off, and open it, and flrain the Broth thro a Sieve or Napkin, let it fettle.
This is ufed for fick People, or to foak Crufts in for Pot- tages; and when you have a Mind to do it with Rice, yoa need only to fill the Belly of the Capon with Rice, picked, very clean, and do it the fame Way as above-mentioned.

Plumb-Pottageyor Chriftmas.

TO ten Gallons of Water take a Leg and Shin of Beef, boil it very tender, and when the Broth is ftrong enough, ftrain it out, wipe your Pot, and put the Broth in again; flice fix Frerich Rolls, the Crumb only, and mittony it, that is, foak it in fome of the Fat of the Broth over a Stove a Quarter of an Hour, then put in five Pounds of Currants well wafhed, five Pounds of Raifms, and two Pounds of Prunes; let them boil till they fwell; then put in three Quarters of an Ounce of Mace, half an Ounce of Cloves, two Nutmegs, all of them beat fine, and mix it with a little Liquor cold, and put them in a very little while.

Take

T

The Ladys Companion. 35

Take ofFthe Pot, and put in three Pounds of Sugar, a little Salt, a Quart of Sack, and a Quart of Claret, the Juice of two or three Lemons. You may put in a little Sagoe if you like it. Pour this into earthen Pans to keep it for Ufe.

jinother.

A K E two Gallons of flrong Broth, put to it two Pounds of Currans, two Pounds of Raifins of the Sun, half an Ounce of fweet Spice, a Pound of Sugar, a Quart of Claret, a Pint of Sack, the Juice of three Oranges and three Lemons; thicken it with grated Bifcuits, or Rice Flour, with a Pound of Prunes.

Plumb Pottage another Way.

TA K E a Leg of Beef, and four Gallons of Water, boil it till the Beef is tender, then ftrain it off, and put the Liquor in the Pot again, then put in a Pound of Prunes, a Quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, half an Ounce of Mace, two Nutmegs beat and put in a Bag; let it boil half an Hour, then put in five Pounds of Currans, and three Pounds of Raifms, and let it boil half an Hour longer j then put in a Quart of llrong Beer, and let it boil up, then take it off, and put in two Pounds of Sugar, the Juice of two Lemons; put it in an earthen Pan, and keep it for Ufe. Serve it hot in as you want it.

I0 make a Veal Glue, or Cake Scop, to he carried in tht

Pocket,

TA K E a Leg of Veal, ftrip it of the Skin and the Fat, then take all the mufcular or flefhy Parts from the Bones; boil this Flelh gently in fuch a Quantity of Water, and fo long a Time, till the Liquor will make a flrong Jelly when it is cold: This you may try by taking out a fmall Spoonful now and then, and letting it cool. Here it is to be fuppofed, that though it will jelly prefently in fmall Quantities, yet all the Juice of the Meat may not be extrad- ed; however, when you find it very ftrong, ftrain the Li- quor through a Sieve, and let it fettle; then provide a large Stew-pan, with Water, and fome China Cups, or glazed earthen Ware; fill thefe Cups with Jelly taken clear from the Settling, and fet them in a Stew-pan of Water, and let the Vater boil gently till the. Jelly becomes as thick as Glue; after which, let them Hand to cool, and then turn out

the

36

he Ladys Companion,

the Glue upon a Piece of new Flannel, which will draw out the Moillure; turn them once in fix or eight Hours, and put them upon a frefh Flannel, and fo continue to do till they are quite dry, a:d keep it in a dry warm Place: This will harden fo much, that it will be iblit and hard as Glue in a little Time, and may be carried in the Pocket with- out Inconvenience. You are to ufe this by boiling about a Pint of Water, and pouring it upon a Piece of the Glus or Cake, about the Bignefs of a fmall Walnut, and fiirring it with a Spoon till the Cake difiblves, which will make very ftrong good Broth, As for the feafoning Part, every one may add Pepper and Salt as they like it, for there rauft be nothing of that Kind put am.ong the Veal v. hen you make the Glue, for any Thing of that Sort would make it mouldy.
As we haveobferved above, that there is nothing of Seafon- ing in this Soop, o there may be always added what you defire, -either of Spices or Herbs, to make it iavoury to the Palate; but it mull be noted, that all the Herbs that are ufed oh this Occafion, muft bs boiled tender in plain Vvater, and that Water muft be ufed to pour upon the Cake Gravy in- ilead of fimple Water: So may a Dilh of good Soop be made without Trouble, only allowing the Proportion of Cake Gravy anfwering to the abovefaid Diredion: Or if Gravy be wanted for Sauce, double the Quantity may be ufed that is prefcribcd for Broth or Soop. There has been made a, Cake Gravy of Beef, vhich, for high Sauces and fbong Stomachs, is ftill of good Ufe; and, therefore, we fliali here give the Method of it.

To wake Cake Soop of Beef, lc

GET a Leg, or what they call, in fome Places, a Shin of Beef, prepare it as prefcribed above for the Leg of Veal, and ufe the mufcular Parts only, as direded in the foregoing Receipt, doing every Thing as above-mentioned, and you will have a Beef Glue, which, for Sauces, may be more defirable in a Country Houfe, as Beef is of the ftrongeft Nature of any Flelh: Some prefcribe to add to the Flelh of the Leg of Beef, the Flefh of two old Hares, and of old Cocks, to ftrengthen it the more; this may be done at Pleafure, but the Stock of all thefe Cakes, Gravies, or Glues, is the Firft. Thefe, indeed, are good for Soops and Sauces, and may be enriched by Sellery, Chervil, Bef, Chards, Leeks, or other Soop Herbs. A little of this is

alfQ

The L A D ys C O M P A N I O N, f

alfo good to put into Sauces, either of Flefh, Fifli or Fowl, and will make a fine Mixture with travelling Sauce.

To make Broth J- Breakfaft.

TAKE the Chine of a Rump of Beef, the Crag End of a Neck of Mutton, a Neck of Veal, a Knuckle.
of Veal, and a Couple of Chickens: Found the White, or Breafts of the Chickens in a Mortar, with fome Crumb- Bread foaked in Broth. Then all being well feafoned, ftraiti it through a Sieve, and pour it on Crufts of Bread, laid fmim.ering in the fa:ne Broth.

0 make White Broth.

PARBOIL a Capon or Pullet; take the Flefh from the Bones; put it into a Stew-pan over a Chaf.ng-Difh of Coals, add to it as much boiid Cream as you think will be fufhcient; thicken it with Eggs, Flour and Rice, and add the Marrow of one Bone, and lome of the Broth the Fowl wasboiPd in, a Gill of Mountain, or Sack; feafon with Salt, and, when fufhciently thickend, ferve it up.

make Calves -Feet-Broth.
OIL the Feet in juft fo much Water as will make a good Jelly, then train it, and fet the Liquor on the Fire againj putting in two or three Blades of Mace; put about half a Pint of Sack to two Quarts of Brodi,; add half a Pound of Currants pickd and vaihd, and when rhey are plurapd, beat up the Yolks of two Eggs, and mix thvni with a little of the cold Liquor, and thicken it carefully over a gentle Fire i then feafon it with Salt, and fweeten it with Su- gar to your Palate; then ftir in a Bit of Butter, then put in .the Ji-ice and Peel of a freOi Lem.on, jull before you take it oiF.

Mutton Broth.

TAKE a Neck of Mutton about fix Founds, cut it in two, boil the Crag in a Gallon of Water, Ikim it well, then put in fweet Herbs, an Onion, and a Cruft of Bread.
When it has boiled an Hour, put in the other Part of the Mutton, a Turnep or two, a few Cives, and a little Pariley chopped fmall; feafon it with Salt; you may put in a Quar- ter of a Pound of Barley or Rice, but fome like it thickened with Oatmeal, fome with Bread, arthey fancy. If you boil Turneps for Sauce, dont boil them all with. the Brotli, they will make it too llrong.

A good.

38 The Ladys Companiok,

jf good favoury BrOth for Mornings.

MAKE very good Broth with fome Lean of Veal, Beef, and Mutton, and with a brawny Hen, or young Cock; after it is fkimmd, put in an Onion quartered, and, if you like it, a Clove of Garlick, a little Parfley, a Sprig of Thyme, as much Mint, a little Balm, fome Coriander Seed bruifed, and a very little Saffron, a little Salt, Pepper, and a Clove, when all the Subftance is boiled out of the Meat, and the Broth very good, you may drink it fo, or pour a little of it upon toailed diced Bread, and flew it till the Bread has foakd up all that Broth, then add a little more, and ftew; fo adding Broth by little and little, that the Bread may imbibe it and fwell; whereas, if you drown it at once, the Bread will not fwell, and grow like a Jelly j and thus you will have a good Pottage: You may add Cabbage, or Leeks, or Endive, or Parfiey-Roots, in the due Time, be- fore the Broth has ended boiling, and Time enough for them to become tender. In the Summer you may put in Lettuce, Sorrel, Purflane, Borrage, and Euglofs, or what other Pot- Herbs you like; but green Herbs take away the Strength and Cream of the Pottage.

To make an Afparagus Scop.

TAKE twelve Pounds of lean Beef, cut in Slices, then put a Quarter of a Pound of Butter in a Stew-pan over the Fire, and put your Beef in; let it boil up quick till it begins to brown, then put in a Pint of brown Ale, and a Gallon of Water, cover it clofe, and let it ftew gently for an Hour and half; put in what Spice you like in the Stew- ing, and ftrain out the Liquor, and fkim off all the Fat; then put in fome Vermicelli, and fome Sellery, wafhed and cut fmall, half an Hundred of Afparagus cut fmall, and Pa- lates boiled tender, and cut; put all thefe in, and let them boil gently till tender; juft as it is going up, fry a Handful of Spinach in Butter, and throw in a French Roll.

Another Way.

HAVING got fom.e ftrong Beef Broth, or Mutton, or both, boil in it a large brown Toaft, a little Flour fift- ed from Oatmeal, and three or four Handfuls of Afparagus cut fmall, fo far as they are green, fome Spinach, white Beets, and what Herbs you like, a little Sellery, and a few Sprigs of Parfley; bake fome fmall white Toafls, butter   them.

Jhe Ladys Companion. 39

them, and pour your Soop upon them; the brown Bread muft be ftrained ofF before your Afparagus is put in; then feafon it to yourTafte.

J Cucumber Soop.

TAKE a Houghil of Beef break it fmall, and put it into a Stew-pan, with Part of a Neck of Mutton, a little whole Pepper, an Onion, and a little Salt j cover it withWater, and let it land all Night, then flrain it, and take off the Fat; pare fix or eight middle-fizd Cucumbers, and nice them, not very thin, flew them in a little Butter, and a little whole Pepper J take them out of the Butter, and put them into the Gravy. Garnifh your Difh with Rafpings of Bread, and ferve it up with Toafts of Bread, or French RolL

An Onion Soop, callecf, The K i n gs Soop.

TAKE fome Onions cut in very thin Slices, flew them till tender, in a fmall Quantity of Water, then acid Milk, let it all boil together, at half leafl an Hour, with a pretty many Blades of Mace, and a Quarter of a Pound of frefti Butter J a little before it is taken up, thicken it. with the Yolks of two Eggs well beaten, and fome Parfley, pickd and choppd very fmall; fait to your Tafte: Serve it up with Toails cut in Dice.

About four large Onions will do to two Quarts of Milk.

A Purflane Soop.

WHEN your Purflane is young you need only cut the Sprigs off, but keep their whole Length j boil them in a fmall Kettle, with fome Peas Soop and Onion-juice, both of the fame Quantity; when your Purflane is boiled enough, foak fome Crumbs in Broth, then difh and garnifh it with the faid Purflane; let thei Broth be relifhd, pour it over, and ferve it up hot.

To make Pottage nuiihout Water.

TA K E a good Piece of Beef, a Piece of Mutton, and fome Fillet of Veal, a Capon, a Couple of Partridges, and four Pigeons; let your Meat be well beaten, and your Fowls well trufsd, then put them into a Pot with Parfnips and Onions fhred, and Parfley Roots, feafon them with Salt, and all manner of fvveet Herbs; flop up the Edges of your Pot with Paper and Pafle, fo as all the Steam may be kept yi, and that no Air may come out or get in i fet this Pot in- to

40 2b.e L A D V s G o m p a n jo n ..

to a Kettle of hot Water, the void Places ftuff d with Hay, to keep the Pot upright and ileady. Keep the Kettle conti- nually boiling for fix or eight Hours; then uncover it, pour ofF all the Gravy of the Meat, and clear it fi-om the Fat j then take out your Fowls and mince them, and farce a Loaf with them, with good Garnitures; then foak both the Loaf and Soop in good Gravy, and make a Ragoo of all Sorts of Garnitures fryd in Lard, pour thefe upon them; then drefs.
the whole Mefs with farcd Cocks-Combs, Veal Sweetbreads, or fomething elie of the like Nature, and ferve it uo to Table.

7o make Pottage the French Way.

TA K E hard Lettuce, Sorrel anJ Chervil, of each a like Quantity, or any other Herbs you like, as much as a half Peck will hold prefsd down; pick, Walh them, and drain them, put them into a Pot with a Pound of frefh Butter, and fet them over the Fire, and as the Butter melts, fiir them down in it, till they are all as low as the Butter; then put in fome Water, a little Salt, fome whole Cloves, and a Cruft of Bread, and when it is boiPd, take out the Cruft cf Bread, and put in the Yolks of a Couple of Eggs wdl beaten, and llir them together over the Fire; lay into a deep Dilh fome thin Slices of white Bread 3 pour it in, ferve iup.

Another French Pottage.

TAKE about eight or ten Pounds of Beef, and two or three Knuckles of Veal, and a few fweet Herbs tied up together, and half a Dozen Anchovies; boil them in three Quarts of Water, until tis boiled away to threr Piws; then ftrain through a thin Cloth, and when you are ready to ufe, take as much as will ferve your Turn, and fet it over a Charcoal Fire; then talte a Duck or Pullet, and take off the Skin; then take a few fweet Herbs, and hred them fmall; then take two or three Eggs, and a little Nutmeg and Salt, and beat them all together; then roll the Duck or Pullet in them, and roaft it yellow, and lay it in the Middle of the Difh; then take fome frr Bread, cut Sippets thin, take.a little Spinach and Parlley and cut it together, but not very fmall, and put them a-top of the Pottage, and ferve them up.

he L A D Y S C O M- P-A N I N. 4I

0 make Pottage the Italian Way.

BOIL green Feas in fome ftrong Broth, with interlarded Bacon cut into Slices j when the Peas are boiled, put to them Pepper, Annifeeds, and choppd Parfley, and ftrain feme of the Peas to thicken the Broth; let it have a Walm or two, and ferve it on Sippets with boiPd Chickens, Pigeons, Lambs Head, Duck, or any Fowl you may, if you pleafe, thicken the Broth with Eggs.

A Pottage a la Reive.

BEAT Almonds, and boil them in good Broth, a few Crumbs of Bread, the Infide of a Lemon, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, ftir them often, ftrain them, then foak Bread in the bed Broth, vhich is to be thus made; bone a Capon or Partridge, pound the Bones in a Mortar, then boil m them in ftrong Broth, with IVlufhrooms, then ftrain themJli through a Linen Cloth, with this Broth foak your Bread .: as it foaks, fprinkle it with the Almond-broth: Then put a lit- tle minced Meat to it, either oCPartridge or Capon, and Hill as it is foaking, put in more Almond-brorh, until it be full, then hold a red-hot fron over it j garnilli the Dilh with.
Pomegranates, PiUachoes, and Cocks-combs.

0 make Pottage de Sante.
T U T into a Pot good Broth, made of Buttock of Beef, X Knuckle of Veal and Mutton, together with Capons or fat Pullets; feafon the Broth very well, then foak in fome Cruftf, while you are boiling Sorrel, Purflane, Chervil, r.
in another Pot, all cut very fmall -, with thefe Herbs you may garnifn your Pottage and Fowls, or you m.ay ftrain them, fo that you may put nothing in it but the Broth and good Gravy when you ferve it up to Table,

To -make Pottage Profitrolle.

TA-K E a French Loaf, farce it, and foak it in good Veal Gravy, and good Broth; drefs it upon other foaked Cruils, with a little of Partridge or Capon Hafh; then having a good Cullis ready, with the Meats of which the Gravy was made, flrain it, and pour it upon the Pot- tage; when you ferve it up, lay a handfome Artichoke Bot- tom upon the Loaf, with fome Mufhrooms on the Infide j garnifh with Fricandoes or Veal Sweetbreads.

Summet

42 ne Ladys Companion.

Summer Pottage.

TA K E a Shin of Beef, Scrags of Mutton or Veal, chop the Meat in Pieces, and boil them gently in a fufficient Quantity of Water for fix or eight Hours, being covered clofe; when they have boiled three or four Hours, put in two or three Onions, and half an Ounce of white whole Pep- per, tied up in a Linen Rag j when the Meat is boiPd to Rags, drain all through a coarfe Hair Sieve, fqueeze it hard, then put in fome Nutmeg, Cloves, and Mace, put in a fmall Faggot of fweet Herbs, of Sorrel, Beets or Endive, and Spinach, of each a Handful, Ihred groily; boil thefe for a while, then difh up your Pottage with roailed Pigeons or Ducks in the Middle of it, and fmall Slices of Bacon fryd, toafted white Bread in fquare Slices, Saufages cut into little Bits, and fryd Balls; you may a]fo add Gravy and Palates, and Cocks-combs boiled in Water tender, and peeld, cut into long Bits; in Afparagus Time, add Afparagus cut into Bits, with long green Peas put in before the Herbs j before you ferve it up, while you are difhingofit, fet it over a Chafing-difli, and make it boil; and boil the Palates and Cocks-combs in a tittle Broth, before you put them into the Pottage; you may alfo add Lamb-ftones and Sweetbreads, if you pleafc.

To make Pottage ivitbtut the Sight of Herbs

MINCE feveral Sorts af fweet Herbs very fine, Spi nach. Scallions, Parfley, Marygold Flowers, Suc- cory, Strawberry, and Violet Leaves, Itamp them with Oat- meal in a Bowl or Mortar j then ftrain them with fome of your Broth, boil your Oatmeal and Herbs, with Mutton, feafon with Salt, c. when all is enough, ferve it up on Sippets.

7o mah Broth iJoUh Flefh.

TAKE Slices of Beef, of a Fillet of Veal, and of a Leg of Mutton roafted, without any Fat; put thefe into the Pot when the Water is cold, let it boil over a gentle Fire, Ikim it well; then add your Fowls, according to what Soop you would have. If it be for Bifques, boil in this Broth, Chickens, Quails, or Pigeons, each of them by themfelves, with Slices of fat Bacon and Lemon to keep them very white; and you muft likewife add to your Stock of Broth fome Fowls to flrengthen it. Let it be feafond with Salt,

ne Ladys Companion. 43

Salt, Roots, Onions, and Cloves, and boil it as long as you think fit.

This is a general Broth to be ufed to moiflen all Sorts of Cullifes made of Flefh and Legumes. It ferves for alf Sorts of Soops; it is nothing but the different Meats we put to them and the Garnilhing, whether they be Cullifes or Le- gumes, that diftinguifti the different Soops from one an- other.

Fat Broth.

BOIL Fart of a Buttock and Leg of Beef with other Meat, and take out the Grav and Broth, and flrain it thro a Linen Cloth; then boil them a fecond Time, and take out the Broth again, keeping both thefe Sorts hot a- part. The firit will be goodto be put to Capons, young Turkeys,Veal, and other farced Meats, that are to be fervd up in white Pottage.

Capon or Veal Broth ought to be ufed to foak young Pigeons for Bifques; and with the Broth of the Bifques a CuUis may be made for Pottages a la Reine and a la Royale, And the Broth of farced Meats will ferve to make a CuUis for the fame Sorts of Meat, viz, youag Turkeys and Pul- lets, Knuckles and Breads of Veal, and other Joints of Meat, that ought to be farcd and parboiled.

The fecond Sort of Broth is to put into brown Pottages, nfiz. Ducks, Teals, Rabbits, Ringdoves, Larks, Pheafants, Thruflies, Cabbage, Turnips, and other Roots; and the brown Ingredients, which ferve to thicken them, are to be mixed with the fame Broth.

To make Fifh Broth.

TAKE Tenches, Carps, Pikes, and Eels, prepare them for boiling; then cut them in Pieces, and put them into a Kettle with Water, Salt, Butter, an Onion ftuck with.
Cloves, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs. Let it boil an Hour and half, then flrain it through a Napkin, and divide it into three lefTer Kettles: Into one of them put the Pickings or CuUings of Mufhrooms, and flrain them through a Sieve with a CuUis, a flicd Lemon, and fome fryd wheaten Flour.

Auaihtf

44 T Lad ys Co m p a n i n--. .

Another Fifh Broth.

CU T Onions, Carrots, and Parfnips into Slices, then put them into a Stew-pan with a Lump of Batter, and fet them a ftevving with Juice of Onions: When thefe are be- come brown, put them into the Stew-pan, and give them two or three Turns: Let the whole be moiftened with a clear Puree; then put in a Bunch of Parfiey, Gives, fweet Herbs, Salt, and Cloves, and fome Mulhrooms: Let all thefe boil together for an Hour; then ftrain it thro a Sieve into another Kettle, anu ufe it to fimmer Fifh 5oops.

ifff. That Carp is the beft Fifh to make Filh Broth.

Another Fiih Broth.

SE T fome Water over the Fire in a Kettle proportioned to the Quantity of Broih you would make; put in the Roots of Parfiey, Parfnips, and whole Onions, all Sorts of Pot Kerbs, a Handful of ParHey, and Sorr 1 end Butter; let the whole be well feafoned; then put in the Bones and Car- cafes of the Fih, the Flelh of which you have ufed for Farces, and alfo the Tripes of theni, being well cleand, feme Tails of Crawfifh pounded in a Morrar, and four or five Spoonfuls of the Juice of Onions; let this be all well feafoned and boiled, then ftrain it throagh a Sieve; put it back into the Kettle, and keep it hot to fimmer your Soops, to boil your Fifh and other Things.

0 make Meagre Broth for Scop ivith Herbs.

SE T on a Kettle of Water, put in two or three Crufls of Bread, and all Sorts of Kerbs, feafon it with Salt; put in Butter, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; boil it for an Hour and a Half, then ftrain it through a Sieve or Napkin. This will ferve to make Lettuce Soop, Artichoak Soop, Afparagus Soop, Succory Soop, and Soop defante with Herbs.

Jelly Broth for Ccnfumpije Perfons.

G£ T a Joint of Mutton, a Capon, a Fillet of Veal, and three Quarts of Water, put thefe in an earthen Pet, and boil them over a gentle Fire till one Half be confumed; then fqueeze all together, and f:rain the Liquor thro a Lin- nen Cloth.

J Pot-

ne L A D yS C O M P A N I O N. 45

Pottage o Goofe-Gibblets.

WHEN you have fcalded and cleaned your Goofe Gibblets, boil them in foir.e good Broth, feafoned with a Bunch of fvveet Herbs and Salt; when they are boild cut them into Pieces, and put them in a Stew-pan • then put a white Cullis, or a green or Lentil Cuilis, and keeping them hot, take the Crulls of a French P.Oil, and put them in a Stew-pan with fome good Broth; let them fimmer till they are well foaked and tender; put them in your Soop- Dilh, covered with your Goofe-CSibblets; then caft your Cullis upon them, and ierve them hot. Obferve the fame .Method with the Gibblets of other Fowl.

A Calfs Head Soop

TA K E a Calfs Head, ftew it tender, then ftrain olt the Liquor, and put into it a Bunch of fweet Herbs, Onion, Mace, fome Pearl Barley, Salt and Pepper, boil all a liriall TKiie. Serve up with the Head in the Middle boned.

Garnifli with Bread toaded brown, and grated round the Rims.

. A Pottage of a To-ivl.

DRAW and trufs your Fowl neatly, blanch it in boiling Water, and lard the Breaft with fat Bacon; boil it in fome good Broth, with an Onion iluck with Cloves; let it be boiled enough, and fe;: it on hot Afhes; take fome frsnch Rolls, cut the Cruft all off, and put them a ftmmering in Broth as ufual; then difh it up, putting your Fowl with a Cullis over it; garnifh the Pvim of your Difh with Cocks- combs, or Sweetbreads, cut in long thin Slices, and ferve it hot. Another Time you may put on a good clear Veal Gravy, or a Cullis of Veal and Ham.

A Pottage cf Parmefan Cheefe.

TAKE fmall rafped Loves of the Bignefs of a mid- dling Onion, dip them in a little melted Butter, and drudge them with Parmefan Cheefe; put them in the Ovea to take a fine Colour; boil forne Crulls of French P.oUs, as ufual, in a Stew-pan, with good Broth; when tender, put them into your Soop Dilli, and over your Cruft • put fome minced Partridge, and over that rafped Parmefan Cheefe, .and put this likevvife into the Oven to take a fine Gold Co- lour:

4 The Ladys Companion,

lour; take all out, and garnifh the Difh with the little Loaves j you mufl have a large one prepared after the fame Manner, and forced with minced Partridge, to put in the Middle of the Difh. Serve it hot.

J Pottage 0 a Lambs Head.

SCALD your Lambs Head and Feet, boil them, with the Livers and fome middling Bacon, in a Pot of good Broth i then foak your Crufts as ufual, and place the Head upon them in the Soop-Difh; garnifh it handlomely with the Livers and Feet; fry the Brains with the Yolk of an Egg and fome Crumbs of Bread, and let them take a fine Co- lour; then put them in their Place, and, upon the Whole, throw a white Cullis well tailed, made of Veal, Slices of Ham, Onions, Mufhrooms, Parfley, Cloves, Crumbs of Bread, c. pounded in a Mortar, with a Moiflening of Broth; let it be well tailed, and ferve it hot.

In the Room of a white Cullis you may ufe a good Cullis of Peas, and garnilh as above, or make ufe of greenPeas, and a Cullis of the fame, according to the Seafon.

j4 Hare Soop.

LE T your Hare be cut in fmall Pieces, wafh it, and put it into a Stew-pan, with a Knuckle of Veal j put in a Gallon of Water, a little Salt, and a Handful of fweet Herbs j let it Hew till the Gravy be good; fry a little of the Hare to brown the Soop; put may put in fome Crufts of white Bread among the Meat to thicken the Soop; put it into a Difh with a little llewd Spinach, crifpd Bread, and a few Forcd-Meat Balls. Garnifh with boild Spinach and Turnips, cut in thin fquare Slices.

To make a good Pottage.

TA K E a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, and put it into the Stew-pan, and let it Hand over the Stove till it is brown, then fhred an Onion fmall and put into it; then fhake in fome Flour whilll tis pretty thick, then put in two Slices of Lemon, a little Mace, beaten Pepper, and a little Bunch of Thyme; then take Ox-palates, and Sweetbreads, cut them in thin Slices, and put in the Pottage with fome Forcd-Meat Balls; then let them Hand over the Stove, and as the Fat rifeth Ikim it off, then take three Heads of white Endive, and boil it a little, then Ihred it, and put it in the Broth, with fryd Saufages, cut in Pieces, and let it boil a

little

The L A D Ys C M p A N I o K. 47

little while; then take a French Roll, and cut it in thin Slicw, and toafl it very brown, and put it in; or you nray put a roafted Fowl in the Middle of it, and fo ferve it up, gar- nifhing the Difli with green Endive fcalded, and fliced Le- mon.

To make Barley Broth.

BO I L a Pound oi French Barley In three Quarts of Wa- ter, with fome whole Spice, when it has boiPd a pretty while, put in Raifins of the Sun and Currans, what Quantity you pleafe, when it is boiPd put in fome Butter, Rofe-water, and Sugar, and fo eat it.

Another Way.

TA K E a Pound of Barley, and boil it in four Quarts of Water, with a Knuckle of Veal and a Scrag of Mut- ton, put in fome Salt, whole Spice, let them boil fomeTime, then put to it fome Raifms and Currans, as you think fit; when it is near enough, put in fome Cream, and boil it awhile, then put in plumped Prunes, Rofe-water, and Su-

far. Garnilh with fome of the Raifms and Prunes, and fine ugar.

China Broth.

CH I P a Quarter of a Pound of China Root thin, put it into three Quarts of Water, fet it all Night covered over with warm Embers; the next Morning fluff the Belly of a Chicken full with Parfley, Mint, fome Raifms of the Sun flond, Onions fliced thin, and French Barley: Boil it in a Pipkin clofe covered for fix or feven Hours ov er a gentle Fire; flrain it for Ufe.

To make Gravy Broth.

TA K E a flefhy Piece of Beef, not fat, fpit it, and roafl it, and when it begins to roafl, flafh it with a Knife to make the Gravy run out, and keep it continually bafl- ing with what comes from it, mixd with Claret; cut it often, and bafle it till all the Gravy be come out, put this Gravy in a Sauce-pan over a few Coals, put in fome Salt, whole Spice, and Lemon-peel, and let it fimmer: Put fome Sippets in aDifh with Oranges and Lemons, and ferve it up.
If you pleafe, you may put in poachd Eggs inflead of Sip- pets.

Furmityl

4B The Lad y s Companion.

Furmity.

TAKE two Quarts of hulFd, boiled Wheat, a Gallon of Milk, two Quarts of Cream, and boil them till they are pretty thick, then put in Sugar, the Yolks of eight or ten Eggs well beaten, three Pounds of Currants, plumpd by being gently boild in Water: Put thcie into the Furmity, give them a few Walms, and it will be dore.

Another Way to make an ordhary Furmity.

TA KE a Quart of ready boiled Wlieat, two Quarts of Milk, a Quarter of a Pound of Currants, clean picki and waflid, ilir thefe together, and boil them beat up the Y. Iks of three or four Eggs, a little Nutmeg, with two or three Spoonfuls of liilk to the Wheat; Irir altogether for a few ivlinutes, then fweeten to your Palate, and ferve away.

Plum! Gruel.

TAKE two Quarts of Water, two large Spoonfuls of Oatmeal, ilir it together, with a Blade or two of Mace, a little Piece of Lemon-Peel, boil it for nve or fix Minutes, take Care it does not boil over; then llrain it oiF, and put it into the Sauce pan again, with half a Pound of Currants, clean vvadied and picked: Let them boil about ten Minutes, add a Glafs of White Wine, a little grated Nutmeg, and fweeten to your Palate.

Alkmaafe Gutte, a Dutch Dijh.

TAKE fome Barley or Oatmeal hulPd, boil it about two or three Flours in Water with a Utile Salt, add to it fome Raifms or Currants, and ferve it up wiih frel melted Butter.

J general CuUis for Fifh.

SCALE and walh fome Carps, gut and flit them in two, and cut them in Bits; put fome Butter in a Stew-pan, and place in it, firrr, feveral Slices of Onions, and then your Bits of Carp, put fome few Slices of Roots over them, cover you Pan, and put it over a flow Fire; v;hen the Onions itick to the Bottom, put in fome Peas Scop. Sca- fon with fweet Herbs, Parlley, Chibbols, and two or three Cloves of Garlick. Put a Lump of Butter into another Stew -pan, as large as that you are now ufmg, and qi it over he Fire, with a fufficient Quantity of fine Flour; ftir it with

a wooden

The Ladys Companion. 4:9

a wooden Ladle till it is a little brownifh; then ftrain off fome of the Liquor of your Carps into it, in order to mix the Flour thoroughly, and pour the Whole in your Cullis put in a peeld Lemon cut in Slices, with fome Garlick, fweet Bafil, Parfley, Chibbols, Mufhrooms, Truffles, if you have any, and a Bottle of Champaign, or White Wine, more or lefs, according to the Quantity of your Cullis. Let it be reliihing, and pleafmg to the Eye; if it is not well co- loured, put in it as much Gravy of Onions as you think fit; let it flew llowly, and make ufe of this Cullis with ail Soiits of Fiih Courfes.

NotCy Inftead of Carp you may ufe any other Fifli.

Cullis of Crawfifh.

WASH and boil fome fmall Crawfifh in d little Wa- ter, with Onions cut in Slices, a Sprig of fweet Bafil, a little Thyme and Parfley, feafoned with Salt and Pepper; when your Crawfifh is enough, take them out, pick them, keep their Tails for any other Ufe you think lit, and pouncl the Remainder with the Shells: Put a Bit of Butter into a Stew-pan, vith three or four Slices of Onion, a Carrot cut •into Slices, and a Parfnip, tofs them up in your Pan twice or thrice, and moiflen them with Fifh-Broth, or foakins; Broth.

Then put a Crtmb of Bread in it, feafon it with Parfle-, •Chibbol, a Sprig of fweet Bafil, half a Lemon peeled and cut into Slices. You may alfo put into it fome of your gene- ral Cullis with Fifh. Let this Cullis be relilffNpg, take out •the Roots with the Skimmer, mix the Cullis with yOurpound- •ed Crawfifh, and fl:rain it direcflly through a Strainer.

This Cullis is to be ufed with all Scrtsof Difhes where a Crawfifh Cullis is proper.

Cullis of Crawflfii for Soops.

OUND fome Crawfifh Shells well, and put a Bit of Butter into a Stew-pan, with fome Slices of Onions, Carrots, and Parfnipb; tofs them up well over the Fire, and moiften them well with fome good Fifh-Broth; ieafon theia with Parfley, Chibbol, fweet Bafil, half a Lemon peePd and cut into Slices, and fome Crumb of white Bread, and let your Cullis be rclifhing; take out aii the Roots, mix it witH the pounded Shells of Crawfiili, flrain it immediately througli- .
a Strainer, and keep it warm in a fmall Kettle. You may Vol. L D make.

p

50 The Ladys Companion.

make Ufe of it with all Sorts of Soop, in which CuUis of Crawfilh is ufed, but thicken a little more for Courfes.

The moft ufual Cullis.

THIS Cullis is made feveral Ways, but this firll is reckoned the beft, and moil in Vogue with thofe bell fcijied in Cookery: Take Meat according to the Quantity of Cullis you would make; As for Example, if you enter- tain ten or twelve Perfons, you can take no lefs than a whole Leg of Vealto make your Cullis with, and the Nut of a Ham to make it good: Cut your Leg of Veal in Pieces the Bignefs of your till, place thefe in a Stew-pan, then put in your Slices of Ham, with a Couple of Carrots and Onions cut in two, and put over your Cullis covered; let it itew ibftly at iiril, and, as it begins to be brown, take ofr the Cover, and turn it, to colour it on all Sides the Iair.e, but take Care not to burn the Meat; when it has a pretty brown Colour, moiilen your Cullis with the Broth, made of Beef, or any other Meat; fealbn it with a little fweet Bafil, fome Cloves and Garlick. Pare a Lemon cut in Slices, and put it into your Cullis with fome Mulhrooms. Put into a Stew- pan a good Lump of Butter, and fet it over a flow Fire j put in in two or three Handfuls of Flour, ftir it wich a wooden Ladle, apd let it take a Colour: If your Cullis is pretty brown, you fhould take fome Flour, and when it is brownd, moiften it with your Cullis, then pour it foftly into the reft, keeping it flirring with your wooden Ladle, let it ilew gently, and Ikim off the Fat; put in a Couple of Glafles of Cham- faign or other White Wine, but take Care to keep it very thin, fo that you may take the Fat well off, and :larify it: To clarify it, you m.uft put it upon a Stove that draws well, cover it cloie, and let it boil without uncovering till it boils over; then uncover it, and take off all the Fat that is round the Stew-pan, then wipe it off the Cover aifo, and cover it again, and by that Means you will have an exceeding fine Cullis. If your Cullis ihould happen to be too pale, you may put a Bit of Sugar in a Silver Difh, or Stew-pan, with a Drop of Water, fet it over a Stove, and let it turn to a Ca- ramel, moiflening it with a little Broth, and then put it into your Cullis, and with a Spoon take off the Fat, till you fee your Cullis s of a good Coloiir; but if it is of a good Co- lour, Caramel needs not be put in it. When your Cullis is done take out the Meat, and llrain off your Cullis in a Sieve, cr a Silk Strainer, which is much better. This Cullis is

proper

The . L A D ys C o M p A N I o N. 51

proper for all Sorts of Ragoos, and to be over Fowls, or to be put into Pies and Terrines.

Cull is another Way.

CUT fome Veal in Pieces, and place them in your Stew- pan with Slices of Ham, a Couple of Carrots cut in two, and a Cqple of Onions; cover your Stew-pan over a gentle Fire; when the Meat begins to flick to the Bottom of your Pan, uncover it, and colour it all over, but let it not be burnt: If it is done as it lliould be moiflen it with Broth, and feafon it with fweet Herbs, Slices of Lemon, fome Cloves of Garlick and Cloves; take as much Flour as you think fit, according to the Quantity of Cullis you are to make, and mix it thin with cold Broth, or Water j then flrain off your Flour into your Cullis, and put by De- grees more to it; let the Cullis Hew foftly, and be well, done; if the Colour is not deep enough, put Gravy in it; then, the Fat being well taken off, and it having a good Tafle, take out the Meat, firain oiF yeur Cullis, and ou may make Uie of it on all Occafion.

Cullis another Way.

PU T into your Stew-pan fome Veal cut in Pieces,- with fome Slices of Ham, a Couple of Roots, Carrots, or Turnips, cut in two, and a Couple of Onions cut in Slices; cover your Stew-pan, and let it Hew foftly, your Meat being of a good Colour, take it out, put a good Lump of Butter into your Stew-pan, put it over the Fire, take a vooden Ladle, and fcrape the Brown well off that Hicks to your Stew-pan, put in it as much Flour as you think fit, according to the Quantity of Cullis you would make; let it ftew till it be of a good Colour, then moiften it with Broth, put the Pvieat in again, and feafon it v,ith a few fweet Herbs, Cloves of Garlick, and Lemon Slices, with two or three Glafies of Champaign, or other White Wine; let it ftew well, and take the Fat clean off: Being well done, and of a good Reliih, flrain it off in a Sieve, or elfe in a Silk Strainer, and you may ufe it with all Sorts of Entries.

Cullis another Way.

THIS is to be ordered like the other, till it has taken its Colour; the Difference in this Cullis is. that be- fore you m.oiflen it, you mull put into it a good Lump of Butter, flir it with a wooden Ladle, and puc in as much P 2 Flour

52 La DYS COMPANI ON.

Floor as you think fit, for the Quantity of Cullis you are to


fon the fame Way as thofe before -mentioned, which being

done, fl -ain it off, and ufe it like the other, as you think

proper.

At another Tyjxe, .when yo,ur Meat begins to flick, and your Caramel is pretty deep coloured, take out your Meat, and put in a good Lump of Butter, then put your Stew-pan over a flow Fire, to take off the Brown in the Fan; put in it fome Flour, and when you fee a Froth, moillen it with Broth, and put your Meat in again, moiflening at laft the fame with Veal Gravy.

Cullis rf Ham.

THIS is likewife made divers Ways, we •fhali begin with that which is eileemed the bell by many good Cook.

Put into a Stew-pan three Pounds of Veal cut in Dice; take a good Ham, with the Svverd oif, and the Fat, cut it ino Slices well Ihaped, and put them into the Stew-pan w th your Veal, a Couple of Carrots cut in two, and a Couple of Orions; cover your Stew-pan, and do it very gently over a flow Fire at firil, and when you fee OurJMeat iegin to flick to the Pan, uncover it, and turn your Slices of Ham, that they may take a Colour; then take out your Slices of Ham and your Veal: Put a Lump of Butter, with a little Flour, in your Stew-pan, and liir it well together with a wooden Ladle, moiften it with good Broth, not fait; put your Meat and your Ham in again, and feafon it with Le- mon Slices, fome Cloves of Garlick, and a few Glaffes of Champaign, or other White Wine. Go on to thicken with the mofl: ufual Cullis, Ikim oft the Fat; when done, take out all your Meat with the Ham, llrain off your Eflence in a Silk Strainer, and ufe the fame with all Sorts of Meat, and hot Paftry made with Meat, or Fifh drefled with Gravy.
Put your Slices of Ham into your EfTence again, to make IJfe of on feveral Occahons; as, being cut into Dice, to put over a Piece of Beef, or Artichoke Bottoms, and, when cut into Slices, for Chickens, young Fowls, or what elfe you jivige proper.

Another

The L A D ys C cm p a n I o n. 53..

Another CuUis of Ham.

CU T fonie Slices of Ham very thin, and order tlieni very neatly in a Stew-pan, putting fome Onions into it: Cover your Stew-pan, and put it over a flow Fire, and take Care they are not burnt: When your Slices of Ham have a Colour on one Side, turn them, then take them out of the Stew-pan, into which you muft put a Bit of Butter, and a Dull of Flour, ftirring it a Moment with a wooden Ladle, and moiftening it with good Broth and Gravy; put your Slices of Ham in again, fome Cloves of Garlick, a Glafs of Champaign, or other White Wine, with a few Mufh- rooms. Take a Lemon, pare it, cut it in Slices, and put it into your Cullis. Thicken with the ufual CuUis, and flcim the Fat well off: Take out your Slices of Ham, and ilrain oiF your Cullis in a Silk Strainer, then put your Slices of Ham. in again. You may make Ufe of them on feveral Oc- caiions, viz. in putting them upon Artichokes, or upoa Chickens for Side Dilhes, or putting in a Crufl: of Bread xi- the Bottom of the Diih, and your Slices of Ham over it.

Cullis the Italian Way,

PUT half a Ladleful of Cullis in a Stew-pan, and half a Ladleful of Gravy, and as much of Broth three or four Onions cut in Slices, four or five Cloves of Garlick, a.
little beaten Coriander-feed, with a Lemon pared and cut in Slices, a little fweet Bafil, Mufhrooms, and good Oil: Put al over the Fire, let it itew a Quarter of an Hour, take the Far.
well off, let it be of a good Tafte, and you may ufe it with all Sorts of Meat and Filh, particularly with larded and glazed- Fifli, with Chickens, Fowls, Pigeons, Quails, Ducklings; and, in fliort, with all Sorts of Tame and Wild Fowl.

White Cullis, the teens Way,

TA KE a Piece of Veal and cut it into fmall Bits, with fome thin Slices of Ham, and two Onions cut in four Pieces; moiften it with Broth, feafoned with Muflirooms, a Bunch of Parfley, green Onions, three Cloves, and fo let it ftew; when ftewed fome Time, take out all the Meat and Roots with a Skimmer; put in a few Crumbs of Bread, and let it ftew foftly; take the White of a Fowl, or of a Couple of Chickens, and pound it in a Mortar, mix it in your white Cullis, but it muft not boil, and your Cullis muft be very white j but, if it is not white enough, pound one or

D 3 two

54 Ladys Com pa n i o n.

two Dozen of Jordan Almonds blanchd, and put them into it, with a Glafs of Milk boild: Let it be of a good Tafte, and flrain it off; then put it inafmall Kettle, and keep it warm; and you may ufe it for all Sorts of white Soops, for Crufts of Bread, and white Pottages.

Green Cullis n.vith Green Peas.

E T fome Green Peas be done without Liquor, then take a Handful of Parfley, as much Spinach, with a Handful of green Onion -tops, blanch all thefe in boiling Water, then put them into frefh Water, and take them out,, fqueeze them well, and pound them: Put in a Piece of Veal cut in Dice, fome Slices of Ham, and an Onion cut fmall, into a Stew-pan, put it over a Stove, and let it flew gently; being a little clammy, moiften it with your foaking Broth, and let it flew foftly; put a Handful of green Parfley, green Onions, Cloves, and a Bunch of Savoury into it; being ftewed, and of a good Tafle, take out your Meat and Greens, then pound your Feas, and mix them with your Cullis, and with the Tops of green Onions, and Ilrain it olF with a La- dleful of Cullis. This Cullis may be ufed with all Sorts of Terrines, with Green Peas, Ducklings, with Green Peas Soop, and with all Sorts of Difhes that are made with green Sauce; when you ftew your Green Peas or Cucumbers, cut ir. v.; Dice, in their Seafon-, put fome of this Cullis over them.

Green Cullis yr Soops.

BOIL Peas in a fmall Kettle, with good Broth; take a Piece of Veal, a Bit of Ham, with an Onion, cut all together into fmall Dice, and put them a fweatmg very gently over a Fire; being a little clammy, moiilen them with your foaking Broth, feafon them, and let them flew gently; take Parfley, theTops of green Onions and Spinach, of each a Handful; and after they are picked, waflied, and blanched in boiling Water, fqueeze them well, and pound them, then ta:e them out of the Mortar, and pound your Peas. Your Meat being flwed, take it out of the Cullis with a Skimmer, take off the Fat, let it be of a good Taile, and mix your Peas and the Tops of green Onions with it, and fo ftrain it off: This Cullis may be ufed with all Sorts of green Soops and Soop Crufls.

Cullis

The L A D ys Com p A N ION, i

Cullis of Partridges.

POUND roafted Partridges, take a Piece of Veal cut into Slices, with a Bit of Ham; put it together into o Stew -pan with Onions, and a Carrot cut into Bits, and Ic it fweat upon the Fire, till it fticks; then moiften it vi::i good Broth and Gravy: Seafon it with a Slice of Lemon, c.
little fweet Bafil and Mufhrooms; let your Meat ftew very iony; this done, lake it out with the Skimmer, and flcini the Fat well ofi: Let it be of a good Tafte, and mix ou.r Partridges with it, together with a Ladleful of other CiilliS;.
ftrain it oiF, put it in a fmall Kettle.

Cullis of Lentils.

TAKE Lentils, pick and waih them, then put then into a fmall Kettle with good Broth, an Onion, a Pieci of middling Bacon, cut fafhionably to garniih your Soop with, and fet it a boiling fbftly; take a Piece of Veal and a Piece of Ham cut into fmall Bits; put them into a Stew-pan with an Onion, and let it fweat gently over the Fire, till it grovs clammy, then moiften it with yoiw foaking Broth and Gravy; feafon it with Parfley, fweet Herbs, green Onions, and two or three Cloves of Garlick, and let it flew foftly; your Meat being ftewed, and your Cullis of a good Tafte, pound your Lentils, and take out your Meat, then ftir up your Lentils with your Cullis, and ftrain it off: You mullh keep fome whole Lentils by you, to put in your Cullis, fo that it may look like a Cullis of Lentils: This Cullis majr be ufed with all Sorts of foaked Crufts with Lentils, in making them a little thicker.

J Capon Cullis.

TA K E a roafted Capon, and pound it very well in a Mortar, put it in a Stew-pan, tofs up fome Crufts of Bread in melted Bacon; and when they are become very brovn, put to them fomc Mufhrooms, Cives, Parfiey, and Baf 1, all fhred very fmall; mix all thefe with your pounded Capon, and make an End of dreffmg them over the Stove; put in ftrong Broth, and ftrain it.

It is only the Meats you put into a Cullis that gives it the Name and Talte; if it be for Pheafants or Partridges, make ufe of Pheafants or Partridges inftead of Capon; do the like for Woodcocks, Pigeons, Ducks, Teal, Quails, Rabbics, .feV.

B 4 and:

6 The Ladys Com.panion.

and whatfoevcr Meat you ufe muft be more than half roafted before you pound it to put in aCullis.

Cullifes are for thickening all Sorts of Ragoos and Scops, and to give them an agreeable Talle.

j White Cullis meagre.

BR O I L a Pike, or a Brace of Perch, kin them, take out the Bones, and pound their Fleih in a Mortar, with a Handful of blanchd Almonds, and the Yolks of four or five Eggs boird hard; flice a Couple of Parfnips, a Couple ofCan-ots, and fix Onions, and flew them with Butter in a Stew-pan, turning them often, and when they begin to be brown, wet them with a thin Peas Broth, or Puree; fcale, fkin, and bone a Carp, cut the Head and Bones in Pieces, and put them in the Stew-pan, let them boil a Quarter of an Hour, then ilrain them into another Stew-pan, and put in fome Mufhrooms, Truiiks, a Couple of Cloves, a little Parf- ey, Eafil, and a whole Leek; add alfo the Quantity of two Eggs of crumbled Bread: Let them fjmmer fc a Quarter of an Hoar over a gentle Fire; then put in your pounded Al- monds, Eggs, and Fifh; let it fimmer but not boil, for fear it change Colour, then ftrain it, and ufe it for Soops and Ra- goos.

A Cullis of Roots.

TAKE Parfnips, Carrots, Parfley- Roots, and Onions, and cut them in Slices; tofs them up in a Stew-pan, then take about a Dozen and a half of blanchd Almonds, ajid the Crumb of two French Rolls foaked in good Fifh-Broth, pound them together in a Mortar with your Roots; then boil all together, feafon them well as in other Cullifes; then ftrain it, and ufe it for Soops of Cardoons, Chervil, Onions, Leeks, c.

CHAP.

The Ladys Companion, 57

CHAP. IL

Of F I S H.

To drefs Salmon au Court-Bouillon.

AFTER having drawn and cleanfed your Salmon, fcore the Sides pretty deep, that it may take ther Relifli of Court-Bouillon the better: Lay it on a Napkin, and fealbn it with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Nutmeg, Onions, Gives, Pariley, fliced Lemon, Bay-leaf, and Bafil: Work up the Quantity of about a Pound of Butter with a little Flour, and put it into the Belly of the Salmon; then wrap the Salmon in the Napkin, bind it over with Packthread, and lay it in a Fiih-kettle of a Size proportioned to the Largenefs of your Fiih; put to it a Quantity fufficient to boil it in, of Wine,..
Water, and Vinegar, and fet it over a quick Fire: When it is done enough, take it off, and keep it fimmering ovsi- a Stove till you are ready to ferve: Then take up the Salmon, unfold the Napkin it is in, and lay another in the Difh in which you intend to ferve it; place theSalmcn upon it: Garnilh with green Pariley, and ferve it for Firft Courfe.

To drefs a nvhole Salmon, or Pieces ofity a la Braife.

LARD with large Lardoons, well feafoned, and bind it about with Packthread: Take two ot three Pounds of a Fillet of Veal, cut in Slices, and lay it, with fome Bards of Bacon, on the Bottom of a Stew-pan, cover the Pan, and.
fet it over a flack Fire; when the Meat begins to ftick, powder it with a Handful of Flour, and give it feven ot eight Turns over the Stove,.keeping it always moving; then; moirten it with good Broth, and a few Spoonfuls of Gravy J Lay the Salmon in an oval Stew-pan, pour the Liquor o£ your Braife upon it, and lay it over your Slices of Veal; put: in a Bottle of Champaign, or White Wine; fee that there: be Liquor enough; ftrevv in a Seafoning of Pepper, Sak Spices, and favoury Herbs, Gives, Pariley, and iome Slices of Onion and Lemon, add a Lump of Butter, and lay fome Slices of fat Bacon over all; fo fet it to Hew over a gentle Fire: When it is enough done, take it off the Fire, an-iiet it ftand a Couple of Hours in the Liquor, to give iv a Kelih,

r 5 ut

SS 7he L A D YS C O M P A N I O II,

but let the Parx be always covered to keep it warm j when- you are ready to ferve, take it up, drain it, untie the Pack- thread, ]ayit in the Diih you intend to ferveit in, pour upon- it a Ragoo of Crawiifh made with Gravy, or elfe a Ra- goo of Veal Sweetbreads, Cocks -Combs, cjV. and ferve it hot.

The fame drejfa Maigr«r Fiih Days.

YOU muft lard it with Anchovies and the Flefli of Eels, binsi:t about with Packthread, and put it in an oval Stew-pan, or Fifh-kettle, of the Size of your Fiih: Put ar Lump of Butter, as big as your Fill:, into a Sauce-pan; fet it over a Stove, and when it is melted, throw in a Handful of Flour, and brown it, keeping it always moving; then put to it feme Fllli-Broth, and pour the Whole into the Stew- pan to your Salmon, to which put iikevvife a Bottle oi Cham- faigr-t Wine, or White Wine, fothat there may be Liquor enough to Hew it in. Seafon it with Salt, Pepper, favoury Herbs, and Spices, Onions, Cives, Farfley, and Slices of Lemon; fo get it ready over a Hack Fire. When it is enough done, let it fiand a Couple of Hours in its Liquor, that it may have the P.elilh of it; then take it up, unbind and drain it,, lay it in the Difn you intend to ferve it in, and pour upon it either a Ragco of Melts, Mulhrooms, and TrulRes, or one of Crawfilh Tails, and its Garnilhings i fo ferve it,

Salmon in Cafes.

TA IC E a Piece of Salmon, take off the Skin, cut it in thin Slices; mince fome Parlley; green Onions, and Mulhrooms, put your Parfley and green Onions into a Stew-pan, with fome Butter, feafoned with Pepper and Salt; then put in your Salmon vithout putting it over the Fire again, and tofs it up to give it a Tafte: place your.
Slices of Salmon in a Paper Cafe, put your Seafoning upon it, and frrew Crumbs of Bread over all; let it bake to a fine Colour. Your Salmon being done, ferve it up = with Lemon-juice for a fmall Entry, or Hors cCOewvrs.

To drefs a Jch of Salmon the Dutch Wry.

GR T a Jole of Salmon, fcale and wafh it very clean, and put fome Water upon the Fire; take your Salmon, and put it upon a Fifn-plate, which you muit put into your Kettle, Put, a Stevv-;pan, with a little Vinegar, over the.

he Ladys Companion. 59

Fire; feafon year Salmon with Salt, Ibme Onions lliced.
Thyme, Iweet JBafil, and Parley in Bunches; then put your Vinegar hot over it; moiften it with boiling Water, and let the Liquor be of a good Tafte; when done, make a Sauce- with a Piece of goodB utter, a little Flour and Water, a Daili of Vinegar, a few Anchovies, a little Nutmeg, and rome Shrimps picked, and thicken it; when ready to fere, difh up your Salmon. Let your Sauce be well tafted, put it upon your Salmon, and ferve it up hot for your Entry.

To bake Salmon.

TA K E a.- little Piece and cut it into Slices about an Lnch thick, butter the Dilli that you would ferve it to Table- on, lay the Slices in the Dilh, take off the Skin, make a Force -Meat thus: Take the Fleih of .an Eel, the Fleili of a Salmon, an equal Quantity, beat it. in a Mortar, feafon ii with beaten Pepper, Salt, Nutm.eg, two or three Cloves, fome Parfley, a ikw Muihrooms, and a Piece of Butter, ten or a Dozen Coriander-Seeds beat £ne: Beat all together, boil the Crumb of aFFalfpenny Roll in Milk, beat up four Eggs, ftir it till it is thick; let it cool, and mix it well together with-- the reil, and four more raw Eggs; on every Slice lay this Force Meat all over, pour a very little melted Butter over them, and a few Crumbs of Bread; lay a CrulT: round the Edge of the Difh, and Hick Oyikrs round upon it. Bake it in an Oven, and when it is of a very fine Brown, ferve it up; pour a little plain Butter, with a little Red Wine, into the Dilli, and the Juice of a Lemon: Or yon may bake it in any Difn, and when it is enough, lay the Slices into another DiiTi. Pour the Bstter and Wine into the Difh it was baked in, give it a Boil, and pour it into the Diifi.
Garnlih with Lemon, and fqueeze the Juice of a Lemon into -it.

0 hrcil Salmon.

T O U may take either a whole Salmon, a Jole, Rand B. or Chine j flice it, or cut it round about the Thick- nefs of an Inch; lleep it in Claret and Wine-Vinegar, Salt, and Sallad Oil, with grofs Pepper, iliced Ginger, a Clove of Garlick, large Mace, and whole Cloves; then broil it on a llack Fire, bafting it with the Liquor it was lleeped in, with fome Sprigs of Rofemary,, Thyme, Parfley, ard fweet Marjoram; in the mean Time boil up the Gravy with Jome Qi Liquor, and when the Salmon is broiled difh it,

pour

6o 7he Lad ys C o m p a n i o n.

pour the Sauce over it, lay the Herbs about it, and ferve- It up.

Or thus.

BROIL fome Pieces of Salmon, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, and rubbed with Butter. Make a Sauce in this Manner; take ibme Butter, put it into a Stew-pan, with a Bull of Flour, a green Onion, and an Anchovy; feafon the fame with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, moiften it with Water,, and a little Vinegar, and tofs it over the Stove; put half a Ladleful of Crawfilh Cullis into it, put it again over the.
Stove to heat: Let your Sauce be relifhing; difh it up, put your Pieces of Salmon over it, and ferve it up hot for an Entry.

Or this may be varied by adding a Ladleful of Grawfifli Cullis.

To broil Salmon ivith Brown Sauce.

CU T your Salmon- in Slices, melt fome Butter in a Sauce-pan, and put in fome Salt; when it is melted, rub the Slices of Salmon with the melted Butter, and lay them on a Gridiron over a gentle Fire. For the Sauce, put a Lump of Butter as big as an Egg into a Sauce-pan, and fet it over the Fire; and when the Butter is melted, put in half a Spoonful of Flour, and keep it moving over the Fire till it is brown; then put in a Glafs of White Wine and Fifh-Broth; feafon the Whole with Salt and Pepper, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, and a little Parfley fhred. When the Salmon is broiled enough, put them into this Sauce, and let them fimmer in it, till as much of it is wafted away as you think proper then lay the Slices of Salmon in a Difn; then bind the Sauce with a Thickeniag of the Yolk of an Egg or two, beaten up with a little Ver- juice, pour it upon the, Salmon.

To drefs a Tail-piece of Salmon in Cafferole.

GE T a Tail-piece of Salmon, fcale it, loofen the Skin, fo as it may fall off from the Flefh, take avvay the Fil- lets, and fill up the void Space with good Filh Force, or with fine Herbs, Butter, and Clippings of Bread j afterwards put the Skin upon the Tail again, then bread it handfomely, and bake it in an Oven wdth White Wine, Salt, Thyme, Chib- bol, a Bay-leaf, and Lemon-ped, When it is baked, pour.

a Ra§o».

ne Ladys Companion r

a Ragoo upon it, garniih it with what you pleafe, and ferve it up.

7o farce Slices of Salmon.

CU T Slices of Salmon an Inch thick, take oiF the Skins, then make a Farce as follows: Mince fome Fleih of a Salmon with the Flelh of an Eel, Mufhrooms, Gives, and Parfley; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and a little fweet Bafil: When you have hred all thefe together, heat three or four Cloves, and about a Dozen Coriander Seeds in a Mortar; put the minced Fifh to them, with a g6od Piece of Butter, and pound them all together: Then put a Piece of Crumb of Bread, about as big as your Fill, into a Sauce-pan, with Cream, or Milk, and beat up in it the Yolks of four Eggs, and when it is grown thick, take it off the Fire, and fet it by to cool; then put into a Mortar the Yolks of four.
or five more raw Eggs, and the Bread and Cream when it is cold, and pound it all well together; then cover the Slices of the Salmon with this Farce, and rub them over- with beaten Eggs and melted Butter. Then lay a little Butter in a Pafty-pan or Difh, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Spices, fweet Herbs, minced Parfley, and whole Cives; having laid this Seafoning in your Pafty-pan, lay in your Slices of farced Salmon, and put them into an Oven, and when they are baked of a curious brown Colour, put into a Difh a Ragoo of Crawiiih, lay your Slices of farcd Sal- mon on the Ragoo, and ferve it hot.

To roaji a Salmon
YOUR Salmon being drawn at the Gills, ftuiF the Belty of it with fome whole fweet Herbs, fuch as Thyme, Rofemary, Winter Savoury, fweet Marjoram, a fmall Onion, and Garlick, fcale the Salmon, wipe off tRe Slime, and lard him with pickled Herrings, or a fait Eel; then feafon fom.e large Oyfters with Nutmeg, and fill up his Belly with them j bafte him with Butter, lay him upon Sticks in a Tin Drip- ping-pan, fet it into the Oven; draw it out, turn the otHe Side upwards, then put fome Claret in the Dripping-pan under it, with Wine, Anchovies, Pepper, and Nutmeg; let the Gravy drip into it, bafte it out of the Pan, vith Rofemary and Bays; when the Fiih is done enough, take all the Fat- off the Gravy boil it up, and beat it with thick Butter; then, diih your Salmgn, pour the Sauce over it; rio up his

Be.

62 The Ladys C o m p a n i o k.

Belly, take out fome of the O fters, put them into the Sauce, take away the Herbs, and ferve it up hot.

0 Jieiv Salmon.

AFTER your Salmon is drawn, fcore it on the Back, then put it either whole, or in Pieces, iato a Stew pan, and pour upon it as much Beer Vinegar, Water, and White Wine, as will cover it; put in a Seaioning of Salt, whole Pepper, Diced Ginger, large Mace, whole Cloves, a Faggot of Iweet Marjoram, Rofeinary, Winter Savoury, Thyme, Parfley, and an Orange cut in Halves i add a good Lump of Butter: Let all flev together very ieifurely, and when- the Salmon is enough, difh it upon Sippets, lay on it your Spices, and Slices of Lemon, run it over with Butter, beaten up with fome of the ilewd Liquor, C5V. Garnim with grated Bread, and ferve it up hot for a firll Courfe Dilh.

fo haJJ-j Salmon.

TAKE any Part of the Salmon, either Jole, Rand, or Tail, vith fome frelh Eel; fet it in warm Water, take off the Skin, mince it fine j feafon it with Salt, Pepper, beaten Cloves, Mace, and fweet Herbs; put it in a Pipkin, with fome Claret, blanched Chefnuts, Goofeberries, Barber- ries, or Gr-Tes; vhen it has iiewei enough, difh it with Sippets, run it over with beaten Butter; garnifh the Difh with grated Bread fifted, Oyflers fryd in Butter, Cockles or Prawns.

Another Pay to hajh Salmon.

HASH the Flelh of your Salmon in a Sauce-pan, dry it.
over the Fire till it grows Vvhite; then lay it on the- DrefTer, put to it fome Shrim.ps, Mufhrooms, Paifiey, and: TruiHes, flired and mix them all together; fet fome frefft Butter in a Sauce-pan ever a Stove, put in a little 1 iour, and.
snake it brown, then put in your Salmon, tc. give it a Turn or two over the Fire;• feafon with Salt and Pepper, and-- a- li:te Juice of Lemon; moifleii it with Fili Broih, and ferve it as hot as you can.

make a Pufton cf Salmotv.

WHEN you have fcalei, fkinned, and boned your Salmon, lay the Flefh on a DrefTer, with the Fhfh- ©f Eels, aiinced Mufhfconis, Cive5 and Pariley, feafond

With

he Lad ys Companion. 63

with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and a little fweet Bafil: Let all thefe be fhred very well together; beat three or four Cloves, with a Dozen Coriander Seeds, in a Mortar; then- put in the minced Meat, and a fufhcient Quantity of Butter, and pound them all together: Next put a Piece of the Xrumb of Bread, as big as your Fiil, into Cream, orMilk,- and fet it a fimmering over a Stove; then beat up the Yolks of four Eggs in it, and, when it is thick enough, take it off, and fet it a cooling; then put into a Mortar the Yolks of four or five raw Eggs, and the Bread and Cream; vvhen it is cold, pound it all well together, then make a Ragco of Sal- mon as follows: Take fmall Mufhrooms, peel then;, take a: Siice or two of Salmon rubbed with melted Butter, and broiled; then put Butter injto a Sauce-pan, and fet it over a Stove till it is melted, then brown it with a little Flour;, put your Mullirooms into it, and let them have a few Turns over the Stove; put in feme Fifli-Broth, Salt, Pepper, and a.
Faggot of fweet Herbs j take the Skin oJthe Slices of oal- mon that were broiled, cut it into little long Slices, and put them into the Sauce-pan to the Mufhroo g, iffc. add nifo- feme Crawhlh Tails, and blanched Afparagus Tops, and let them fimmer together for a while; when your Ragoo is enough, take ofF all the Fat, and fet it a cooling, then run a Sauce-pan with frelh Butter, butter a Sheet of Pape, and lay over the Bottom and Sides of it; fpread fome of the Farce over it an Incli thick, or more; beat up an Egg, and rub it over with it to make the F arce lye the fmoother; place the Ragoo of Salmon in the Bottom, and cover the Pupton with the fame Farce; rub it over with beaten Egg..
and bake i: in an Oven, or Baking-Cover, with Fire over and under it; when it is baked, turn it upfide down into the Difh in which you intend to ferve it; take off the Paper, make a Hole in the Top of the Size of a Crown Piece, pour in fome CuUis of Crawfifli, and ferve it up hot for the £rll Courfe.

7q fry Salmon.

TAKE either a Chine, Rand or Jole of Salmon, pu§ thin Slices of Butter into the Pan, and fry it till it grows crifp: In the mean Time prepare your Sauce as fol- lows: Put in a Sauce -pan fome Claret, fveet Butter, the Li- quor of pickled Oyfters, the Juice of Oranges, and grated Nutmeg; fet them over a flack Fire, beat them, continually; diih.your FJlh, aiid pour the Sauce over them, garnilh witk.

Siige

64 he L A D ys Companion,.

Sage-Leaves and Parfley fryd in Butter, but not too crifp,, and ferve it up hot.

Or you may add to the Sauce fome Vinegar, and to the Garnilh Slices of Orange and Pippins, flicd and fryd in .
clarify d Butter, or Yolks of Eggs, with Quarters of Oranges round the Difli, and fome fryd Greens.

Or you may make a Sauce with Butter beaten up with three or four Spoonfuls of hot Water, in which an Anchovy has been diiTolvd.

To marinate Salmon to hf eaten eithtr hit or aid.

TAKE a Salmon, cut it into Joles and Rands, and fry them in Sailad Oil, or clarified Butter, then fet them by, then put into a Pipkin as much Claret and Wine Vinegar as will be fufficient to cover them; put in a Faggot of fweet Herbs, as Rofemary, Thyme, Sweet Marjoram, Winter-Savoury, Parfley, Sage, Sorrel and Bay Leaves, Salt, grofs Pepper, Nutmeg, and Ginger fiiced, large Mace and Cloves, bail allthefe well together; lay your Salmon into a Pan, and all being cold, pour this Liquor over it, lay on iliced Lemons and Lemon-peel, and cover it up clofe; and you may either ferve it hot or cold, with the fame Liquor it was foufed in, with Spices, Herbs, and Lemons on it.

Salmon in Surprise njith Gravy.

SCALE and gut your Salmon, without tearing the Skin, which you muft Icofen on both Sides from the Head to within two or three Inches of the Tail, bone it, cut the Flelh in Slices, add Slices of Carp, Soal, Pike, boiled Ham, Neats Tongues, Cervelas, Truffles, and Muihrooms; then put the Cuttings of all your Fifh chopped fmall together, with a Piece of Bacon, into a Stew-pan, together with an Udder of Veal, blar.ched and feafoned with Pepper, Salt, and fweet Herbs; add three or four Yolks of Eggs, the Whites whippd up to Snow; feafon your Slices with Pepper, Salt,.
fweet Herbs, and fne Spice, put thefe in your Stuffing, with half a Bottle of Cho.mfaign, or other White Wine, and the Juice of a Couple of Lemons; when all is well mixed,, and put into your Salmon, turn it again into its natural Shape, and few it up well, to keep in the Stuffing; lay a Napkin over your Drefier, cover it with Slices of Bacon, the Length of your SaLiiOn, with another Laying of Bacon over it, and wrap it up in the Napkin. Make ufe of a- Court-Bouillon Kiade in the following Manner, iz. Get a

The Ladys CoMP ANION. 65

Fifh-kettle big enough to hold your Salmon, and put five, or fix good Bottles of Wine into it, with feme Ladlefuls of Veal Gravy, put in your Salmon, let it foak well, but take Care it be not too much donej keep your Salmon as whole as poffible, and feafon the Court-Bouillon with Pepper, Salt,, fweet Bafil, Thym.e, Bay-leaves, and Onions:_ After this, difh it up, pour a Ragoo of Crawfifh Tails over it, with fome Truffles, Cocks -combs. Sweetbreads of Veal, and fome Pul- lets Eggs, and ferve it up hot for a firll Courle. You may garnifh with Crawfifli and young Pigeons larded or glazed.
Sweetbreads of Veal glazed, the Pvoes of Carp, fat Livers, with a Crawfifh Cullis, or an Effence of Ham over the Difh.

Another Way to drefs Salmon nvth Gravj.

TA KE a Jole of Salnvn, fcale and waih it, and puf i into a Brafs-kettle, with Slices of Bacon, Veal, and Ham; take a Napkin and wrap up your Jole, and put it in- to your Brafs-kettle, moiilen it with two Bottles of White Wine and fome Water, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, fweet .
Herbs and Onions, and let it flew gently; when it is ready, take it out, drain it, and difh it up; put a Ragoo over it, with Sweetbreads of Veal, Cocks-combs, Mufhrooms, and Truffles, or Gravy of Ham, or a Crawiifh Cullis, and ferve It up hot for your Courfe,

boil Salmon.

SCALE the Salmon, and take either the wholeSide, ot what Part of it you pleafe, and cut it into Pieces of 3 rsafonable Bignefs; wipe off the Blood, but do not wafh it; take as much Wine and Water of each an equal Quantityy as will jufl cover it, put in Salt according to the Quantity of your Liquor, then put in the Salmon, make it boil up quick; put in alfo a Quart of White Wine Vinegar; if the Fire be brifk it will be boild in half an Hour, then having prepared a Sauce for it of Butter, beaten up with Water, and the Yolks of two or three Eggs difTolved in it, and a little of the Liquor, with fome grated Nutmeg and Slices of Sal- mon; take up your Salmon, difh it, pour the Sauce over itr Garnifh with fifted Bread, Slices of Lemon, Barberries, fry-d Greens, and ferve it up.



66 TkLADYsCoMPANlON,

7h boil a ]oe o Salmon.

PU T a Pint of Vinegar into Water, a good Quantity of Salt, a Faggot of fvveet Herbs, an Onion Ruck with- Cloves, a little Nutmeg, Pepper and whole Mace, and a Piece of Lemon-peel, fet them in a Stew-pan or Kettle, and boil them well for a good while; then put in your Jole, make it boil a-pace, and it will be done in a Quarter of an Hour: In the mean Time, for a Sauce, boil a Couple of Anchovies in iirong Broth, with a Bit of Lemon-peel, and ilrain it through a Sieve j then put to it a Pound of Butter, and half a Pint of Claret, and thicken them over the Firej then dilh your Jole, pour the Sauce over it. Garnifh the Difn with a Lemon fliced, Horfe-Radifh ana Barberries, and ferve it up.

To fo»fe Salmon or Treats.

LE T yom- Liquor be Wine, Water, White Wine Vine- gar, a little whole Pepper, Mace, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, a little Lemon-peel, Savoury and Thyme, let thefe boil together a little vhile, then put in the Salmon or Trout; a Jole mull boil half an Hour, the other according as in Bignefs; you mufl take it out of the Liquor to be cold, and put your Liquor in a Stone Velfel to cool; then add more Vinegar and Salt, and keep your Fiih therein.

7o make a Sallad njcith frejh Salmon.

TA K E fome foufed Salmon, as mentiond in the fore- going Receipt, and mince it fmall, with Apples and Onion, put to it Oil, Vinegar and Pepper, and ferve it up, garnifliing your Bifh with Slices of Lemon and Capers.

To marinate and fry Salmon.

CU T your Salmon in Slices, take off the Skin, then tske out the middle Bone, and cut each Slice afunder; then put them into a Sauce-pan, feafon them with Salt, Pep- per, half a Dozen Cloves, an Onion cut in Slices, fome whole Cives, a little fweet Bafil, Parlley, and a Bay Leaf; then fqueeze on them the Juice of three or four Lemons, or, inftead of that, ufe Vinegar; let the Salmon lie in this Ma~ rinade for two Hours, then take it out, dry it with a Cloth, drudge it v.ith Flour, and fry it brown in clarifyd Butter; then lay a clean Napkin in i Difn, lay the Slices of fryd

Salmon;

fhs L A D y S C O M P A N I N, 67

Salmon upon the Napkin. Garnifh with fryd Parfley, and ierve it up.

To drefs Salmon mith f-LfJeet Sauce.

CUT your Salmon in Slices, flour them, and fry them in refined Butter; then foak them a little while in fweet Sauce, made of Red Wine, Salt, Pepper, Cinnamon, Cloves, Sugar and green Lemon, and ferve them up with what Gar- niture you think proper, fuch as fryd Sippets, dufted with powdered Cinnamon and Sugar, or lliced Lemon, powdered with Sugar.

fo drefs Salmon zz Stoltado.

TAK E a whole Rand or Jole of Salmon, fcale it, and put it in an Earthen Stew-pan, put to it Wine, Vine- gar, Salt, grofs Pepper, fliced Ginger, four or five Cloves of GarJick, large Mace, and a few whole Cloves; add alfo a Faggot of Rofemary, Thyme, fweet Marjoram, Parfley, and two or three Bay-]yeaves; put in alfo a Pound of good Butter, clofe up the Earthen Pot vith Pafte bake it in an Oven, ferve it up on Sippets, with fon.e of the Liquor and Spices on it: Run it over with beaten Butter and Barberries; lay on it fome of the Herbs, Slices of Lemon and LemOn- peel.

To pickle Salmon.

CUT a Salmon into half a Dozen round Pieces, boll it in two Part3 Water, and ©ne of Vinegar; but do not put in the Fifli till the Liquor has boiled for half an Hour: When the Salmon has boiled enough, take it up and drain it, then put in two Quarts of White Wine, and two Quarts of Vinegar; boil a goodQuanticy of Cloves, Mace, whole Pep- per, Rofemary Leaves, and Bay Leaves, for half an Hour: When your Salmon is cold, rub it with Salt and Pepper, and., put it up in Vvhat you defign to keep it in, laying a Layer of Salmon, and another of Spice that was boiled in the Liquor i- pour your Liquor on the Salm.on, and if you renew it oncQ in three Months, the Fifli will Keep the whole Year.

Another Way to pickle Salmon.

TA K E two Quarts of good Vinegar, half an Ounce or black Pepper, half an Ounce of Jamaica Pepper; Cloves and Mace, of each a Quarter of an Ounce, near a Pound of Salt; bruife the Spice grofly, and put all thefe to

a fmall

68 The Ladys CoM•pANIOf.

a- fmall Quantity of Water, juft enough to cover your Fifh; cut the Fifh round, three or four Pieces, according to the Size of the Salmon, and when the Liquor boils put in your Fifh, boil it well, then take it out of the Pickle, and let it cool; and when it is cold put it into the Barrel, or Earthen- VefTel, you intend to keep it in, flrewing feme Spice and Bay-leaves between every Piece of Fifh i let the Pickle cool, and fkim off the Fat, and when it is quite cold, pour it on your FifK, and cover it up ver clofe.

To recover pickled Salmon that is decayed.

TA KE a Gallon of White Wine Vinegar, Boil it hy itfelf, with three or four Slices of Ginger in it; boil feparately two Quarts of Water, and a Pint of White Wine, with a Handful of Salt; mix thefe together, then fleep the Fifh four or five Hours in warm Water, take it out and dry it; mix the Pickles together, and put them to it lukewarm; cover, or head up clofe, the Cafk or VefTel you put them in, and let them iland ten or twelve Days before you open them.

To keep Salmon frep for a Month or more,

HAVING fcaled and cleaned your Salmon as ufual, put it in an Earthen Pan, and cover it with good White Wine Vinegar, putting therein a Sprig or two of Rofe- mary, and keep it clofe floppd; when you would boil it, flide it into a large Quantity of Water, when it boils, and let it have a Walm or two; it will retain its Talle and Deli- cacy thus for a long, while.

To boil a Turbut.

PU T the Turbut into a Kettle, with White Wine Vine- gar, Verjuice, and Lemon, feafon with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Onions, and Bay -leaf, add to thefe a little Water, and fome Milk, to caufe it to boil white; boil it over a

fentle Fire: Garnifh with Slices of Lemon on the Top, arfley and Violets, when in Seafon.

Another IVay boil a Turbut.

LE T it lie an Hour or two, after it is gutted and wafh- ed, in Salt and Water; and if it be not very fweet fhift the Water three or four Times, or oftener, as you fee Occa- fion, then lay it on a Filh-plate, and put it into a large Kettle of boiling Water, well faked, with a little Vinegar, fkim it well, and when boiled enough take it out, and let it

drain,.

The L A D ys C m p a n I on.

drain, and while it is draining melt fome Butter, and put into it the Body of a Lobfler, and the Meat, cut fmall; give all a Boil or two. When the Filh is dilhed, garnifh with Lemon fliced, Horfe-radifh and Parflay, and ferve away with your Sauce in Bafons and a Bafon of plain melted Butter.

A Turbut au Court -Bouillon.

AFTER having gutted, wafhed, and dryd your Tur- but, fold it up in a Napkin, and lay it in a large round Sauce-pan; put as much Salt and Water into another Sauce- pan as will be fufficient to boil it, ilir it about from Time to Time, till tke Salt is melted; then let it ftand a-while, and Urain it through a Linen Cloth into the Sauce-pan to the Tur« but; when it is enough, take off the Sauce-pan, and fet it over live Embers, put in two Quarts of Milk, and let it ftand till you are ready to ferve; then take up the Turbut, lay it on a Napkin folded in a Difh. Let your Garnifhing be green Parlley, fo ferve it for the iii-ft Courfe.

Glazed Turbuts.

TA K E a fmall Turbut, the Bignefs of your Dilh, gut and wafh it, cut off the Fins, and lard it with fine Ba- con; take a Stew-pan, put in a Bottle of White Wine, with an Onion lliced. Salt, and fweet Bafil, and put your Stew- pan over a Stove; when your Wine begins to boil, put in your Turbut, and when it has boiled fome Time, take it out, and get a Jelly in Readinefs made thus: Take fome Slices of Veal and Ham, cut in fmall Pieces, and put them in a Stew-pan, with an Onion cut in Pieces; moiften it with Broth, and put it to boil; being done, ftrain off your Jelly, put it in a clean Stew-pan over the Fire, and let it boil till it is turned to Caramel, that is, glazed; then put in your Tur- but, and put your Pan over hot Cinders, that it may glaze well; being glazed and ready to ferve up, put an Italian Sauce in your Diih, with your Turbut over it, and ferve it for a firft Courfe.

Larded Turbut.

TA K E a Turbut the Bignefs of your Difh, gut and walh it, cut off the Fins, and lard it with fine Bacon; lay in the Bottom of a Silver Difh, or Baking-pan, Slices of Bacon, and put in your Turbut; feafon it with fine Salt and a Glafs of Wine, fome Slices of Onion and of Lemon, and a Bunch of fweet lafil, then cover it with Slices of Bacon, and put it to bake; being done, take it out, and take off the

Fat,

yo The La d ys Companion.

Fat, difh it up with an Iatan Cullis, or any other, and ferve it up hot for a lirll Courfe, or Remove.

J Turbat witb Veal Gray.

AFTER having prepared your Turbut, lay it in a large round Sauce-pan, with a Seafoning of Salt, Pepper, two Bunches of fweet Herbs, two Onions iuck with Cloves, and one Bay Leaf: Lay into another Sauce-pan, two or three Pounds of a Fillet of Veal cut in Slices, and fome Bards of Bacon j cover the Sauce-pan, and fet it over a Stove with a flack Fire -, when the Meat begins to flick, put in a Piece of Butter, and a fmall Handful of Flour; llir it about over the Stove Vvith a wooden Spoon, and when it is brown, moiften it with good Broth, and fcrape off with the Spoon all that ilicks to the Sauce-pan; cover the Turbut with Slices of Bacon; make a Bottle of Champaign, or White Wine, boiling hot, pour it on the Turbut with the Veal Gravy, and lay the Slices upon it; fo fet it a Hewing, and when it is enough done, let it Hand in the Liquor a Couple of Hours over live Embers, that it may have the . Relifli of it: Then ferve it for the firft Courfe, with aRagoo of Sweetbreads, Cocks -Combs, Truffles and Muihrooms, or with a Ragoo of Cravrfilh.

We likewife drefs a Turbut for Fifli Days in the fame Manner, only that inftead of the above Ingredients of Flefh, we ufe Butter and Fifh Broth, and ferve it with a Ragoo of the Melts of Carps, or with any other meagre Ragoo.

To bake a Turbut.

LA Y fome Butter in a Difh, of the Size of your Tur- but, and fpread it all over it; let your Seafoning be Salt, Pepper, a little fcraped Nutmeg, fome minced Parlley, fome whole Cives, near a Pint of Champaivji, or White Wine: Cut off the Head and Tail of the Turbut, and hav- ing laid it in the Difli, feafon it above as under, rub it over with melted Batter, drudge it well with Bread crumbled very fmall, and bake it in an Oven; take Care it be very brown, and ferve it with a Crawiifh Cullis, or with a Sauce of Anchovies: We fometimes ferve it dry..

Turbuts the Italian Way.

TA K E a middling Turbut, gut, walh, and drain it, take a Baking-pan, and put in it fome Slices of Ba- con, fweet Bafil, and Lemon cut in Slices, then put in your

Turbut;

Ihe La D ys Com pan ion. 71

Turbut; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, fine Spice_, Cloves, Le- mon-Juice and Lemons cut in Slices; cover it with fome Slices of Bacon, and put it to bake in the Oven: Mince a Dozen Shalots, put tiem into a Stew-pan with a Glafs of White Wine; put in fome Beef Gravy, and a little Gravy of Ham; put it over the Fire, and put in it two Spoonfuls of good Oil, the Juice of two Lemons, fome Salt, and pounded Pepper; your Turbut being done, dih it up, put your Sauce over it j ferve it up hot for a Courfe or Remove.

To fry a Turbut.

SLICE your Turbut, hack it with a Knife as if it were ribbed, flour it, fry it vith clarifyd Butter till it begins to turn brown, then drain it, make the Pan clean, put into it Claret or White Wine, Anchovy, Salt, ai:d Nutmeg, Ginger, and beaten Saffron: put in your Filh, fry it till half the Liquor is wafted, then put in a Piece of Butter, and put in a minced Lemon, mix them, rub a Difh with aShalot, or an Onion, or a Clove of Garlick, and put in the Fiih and the, Sauce it was lail fryd in, and ferve it up.

To foufe a Turbut.

BOIL your Turbut, put it into White Wine Vinegar, fome of -.he Water it was boiled in, and Salt; then put in Tops of Fennel and Bay Leaves, Ginger, Nutmegs and Cloves, cover it clofe for Ufe.

Another Way ty foufe a Turbut.

DRAW, wafh, and cleanfe your Fifh from the Blood and Slime, put it into Water ar.d Salt boiling hot, let it boil gently, fkim it well, and as it boils put in more Salt, and when the Liquor has wafted a little, put in fome White Wine and Vinegar, Lemon-peel, two or three Cloves, and a little Mace; when boiled enough, let it ftand till it is cold, put in a Lemon or two cut in Slices, take up the Fifh, put it into an Earthen Pan, pour on it the Liquor it was boiled in, and cover it up clofe.

To fwvj a Turbut.

CU T it in Slices, aod fry them j when they are half fryM, put them into a Stew-pan with Claret, a little Verjuice, fome frefli Butter, three or four Slices of Onion and grated Nutmeg 3 when the Fifh is Ilewd enough, difii it

up.

T

72 he L A D ys C o m p a n 1 ij.

up, run it over with beaten Butter, Slices of Orange, of Le- mon and Lemon-peel, and ferve it up.

To crimp God the Dutch Way.
A K E a Gallon of Pump Water, put in one Pound of Salt, and boil it half an Hour fkim it well: You may put in a Stick of Horfe-radilh. a Faggot of fweet Herbs, and an Onion, but Water and Salt are beft; put in your Slices of Cod, when it boils, and three Minutes will boil them: Take them out, and lay them on a Sieve or Pye- plate, and fend away with raw Parfley about it, and oily But- ter in a Cup.

7o roaft a Cods Head.

GE T -a Head, wafh and fcour it very clean, then fcore it with a Knife, and ftrew a little Salt on it, and lay it ©n a Stew-pan before the Fire, with fomething behind itj throw away the Water that runs from it the firft half Hour; then ftrew on it fome Nutmeg, Cloves, Mace, and Salt, and bafle it often with Butter, turning it till it is enough. If it be a large Head, it will take four or five Hours roafting; then take all the Gravy of the Fifh, as much White Wine, and more Meat Gravy, fome Horfe-radifh, one or two Sha- lots, a little Iliced Ginger, fome whole Pepper, Cloves, Mace, and Nutm.eg, a Bay-leaf or two; beat this Liquor up with Butter, the Liver of the Fifh boiled, and broke, and ftrained in it, the Yolks of two or three Eggs, fome Oyfters, and Shrimps, with Balls made of Fiih, ar.d fryM Fifh round it.
Garniih with Lemon and Horfe-radiTh.

7o boil a Cods Head.

SE T a JCettle on the Fire with Water, Vinegar, and Salt, a Faggot of fweet Herbs, or an Oniqn or two: When the Liquor boils put in the Head on a Fifh Bottom, and in the Boiling put in cold Water or Vinegar; when it is boiled take it up, or put it in a Difh that fits your Fifh Bot- tom: For the Sauce take Gravy, or Claret, boiled up with a Faggot of fweet Herbs, or an Onion, two or three Ancho- vies, drawn up with two Pounds of Butter, a Pint of Shrimps, Oyfters, the Meat of a Lobfler fhred fine, then put the Sauce in China Bafons, flick fmall Toafls or the Head; lay on, and about it, the Spawn, Milt, or Liver. Garnifh it with fryd Parfley, fliced Lemon, Barberries, or Horfe-radifh, and fiyd Fiih.

The L A D y s C M p A N I o N, 73

J fleujed Cod.

TAKE your Cod and lay it in thin Slices in the Bot- tom of a Dilli, with a Piiil of Gravy, and half a Pint; -of White Wine, fome Oyilers and their Liquor, feme Sale and Pepper, a little Nutmeg, and let it Hew till it is almofl .enough, then thicken it with a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, let it fiew a little longer; ferve it hot. Garniih widi Lemon fliced.

To drefs a Cods Tail.

SCALE it, loofen the Skin fo that it may fall from th Flefh, take away the Fillets, and fill up the void Space, with a good Filh Farce, or with fine Herbs, Chippings of Eread and Butter, then put the Skin upon the Tail again, bread it neatly, and put it into an Oven to give it a Colour: Make a Ragoo for it. Gar-niih it with proper Garnitures, and ferve it up.

T<7 fry a Cods Tail.

SC A. L D it in hot Water, but do not boil it, crxiin it.
Hour it, fry it in refined Butter; ferve it up vth white Pepper and Orange -juice: Garniih it with Pieces taken off from the Cods Back, put into Pafle and fryd,

To brcil Cod- Sounds.

LE T them lie in hot Water a few Minutes, take them out and rub them well with Salt, to take off the Skin and black Dirt; when they look white, put them in Water and give them a Boil; take them out and Hour them well pepper and fait them, then broil them; when they are .enough lay them in your Dih, and pour melted Butter and Mullard in the Difh: Broil them whole.

a

Cod.

TAKE a large Cod, and cut the thick Part into Pi.-ces an Inch thick, then flour it v.ell, and put it on your Gridirori over a flow Fire; make your Sauce with a Glafs of White Wine, an Anchovy, fome whole Peeper, or a little Horfs-radifh, a little Gravy, a Spoonful of Wrilnut- Liquor, with fome Shrimps and Oyfcers, or picked Muih- rooms, boil it -together, and thicken it with Butter rolled Flour, with fome of the Liver of the Fifn, that has bee; °L. L • E parboikxi

y4 <   ADYs Companion.

parboiled and bruifed into it. Garnilh with fliced Lemon and icraped Horfe-radiih.

For Frkafeying Qo6.0fe Chapter of Fricafees.

To Jleiv Carps white.

FIRST bale them, and cleanfe them -, fave the Roes and Milts, theii ftew them in fame good white Broth, and feaibn them with Cloves and Mace, Salt, and a Faggot cf Herbs; pat in a little White Wine, and when ftewed enough, thicken your Sauce with the Yolks of five Eggs, and pals ofF the Roes, and dip them in the Yolks of Eggs and Flour, and fry them with forne Sippets o French Bread; then fry fonie Parlley, .and when you difli them, garniih with the Roes, Pariley, and Sippets.

To fiiiii Carps broo:n.

SCALE and cleanfe them, then pafs them 6ft in brown Butter on both Sdes, or lay them in your Pan raw; Urew over all fome grated Bread, Pepper and Salt, Thyme and Paruey minced; put into them cne Quart of Claret, and cne Pmt of Gravy, according to the Largenefs of your Fifn, they muH be quite covered; put in alfo four Anchovies, fome grated Horfc-radilh, one Shalot chopped fmall, two Slices of Lemon, and a Piece of Butter, Gold Colour, with a Spoonful of FloU, and put to your Carp, which will thicken it as Cream; fry fome Sippets with the Roe and Milt, and fome ParCey, fo ferve up hot.

To fy Carp.

AFTER having fcaled and drawn them, flit them in two, ftrew them over with Salt; drudge them well with Flour, and fry them in clarihed Butter: When they are fried, you may either ferve them dry, and eat them only with Juice of Orange, or elfe you may prepare a Ra- goo of Mufhrocms, the Milts of Carps and other Filh, and Artichoak Bottoms: Fry fome thin Slices of Bread, and put them into the Sauce, together with feme fliced Onion, and fome Capers, let them boil in it. Difl. up your Carp, throw your Ragoo upon it, and let your GainiiUre be fried Crulls of Bread and fliced Lemon.

7

The L A D ys C m p a n I n,;5

To drffs Carp a la Daube.

GE T a Couple of Soals and a Pike, and bone them c Of the Flelh of them make a Farce, halhing it ver fmall, together with a few Cives, fome Spice, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, frefh Butter, and fome Cru.nb of Bread, foaked in Cream: Thicken your Farce with Yolks of Eggs; then take a large Carp, fill the Body of it witu this Farce, and puc it a ftewing in an oval Stew-pan, over a little Fire, in White Wine, fealoned with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, fome Slices of Lemon, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and good frefli Butter: While it is a ftewing, get ready a Ragoo of Mufhrooms Truffles, Morels, Artichoak Bottoms, Milts of Carp, and Tails of Crawliih: Lay your Carp on an oval Difh, pour your Ragoo upon it, and qv-jq it up very warm.

y Carp a la Chamhor.

YO U muil take a large Carp, fcale and wafh it, lard i£ with thick Bacon and Ham; being larded, take half a Dozen of Pigeons, with fat Livers, Sweetbreads, Murnrooms, -and Truffles, if you have any; put altogether for a Moment in a Stew-pan, feafon it with Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs, a little Cullis and Lemon -juice; then put this into your Carp, and few it up. Lay a Napkin over your Drefler, take fome Slices of Bacon, fpread them over you,. Napkin the Length of the Carp, put more Slice over it; then fold it up in the fame Napkin, and tie it on both Ends; then take a Leg of Veal, cut it into thin Slices, put them in a Stew-pan, with fmall Slices of Ham, Onions and CaiTOts cut in Slices j put the Stew pan over the Fire, let them fweat like Gravy of Veal, and when they begin to ftick moiilentliem with Broth-, then put them in an oval Stew-pan, together with the Meat and Gravy: Now put in your Carps feafoned vith Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs, Cloves, Mace, three Bottles of Whits Wine, and a Lemon cut into Slices: Cover your Carp with.
the Liquor, let it boil very gently. Make a Ragoo with Sweetbreads of Veal, Mufhrooms, Truffles, Cocks-combs fat Livers and foft Roes of Carps. Take half a Dozen of young Pigeons, which you drefs au SJiel, or with fweet Bafil, or inHead of Pigeons, a Couple of Chickens cut in four, and marinated, or elfe larded with thin Bacon, ard glazed like Fricandos. Take half a Dozen Veal Sweetbreads, larded with Hne Racon, let them ftew a:.u glaze like Fri- candos: Take alfo a Dozen of large fine Crawiifti, bml

E 2 thcmj

76

The Ladys Companion.

them, then pick their Tails, cut off the frnall Claws; if you have Crawf.jfh enough to make a Cullis, you may ule if inftead of other Cullis: Your Carp being done, and ready to be ferved up, take it out, let it drain, keep in Readinels your Ragoo of Pigeons, Sweetbreads of Veal and Crawfiih, unfold the Napkin, take off the Fat, thendifn Op your Carp with the Ragoo over it. Garniih your Diili with one Craw- £fn, one Pigeon, and one Sweetbread, placed by Turns till it is full; ferve it up hot.

TheCe Sorts of Entries generally ferve to remove Scops.

Ei.try cf Carps a rEjhifai

WHEN you have fcaled and waflied your Carps, gut and ah the Infide with Wine; take an oval Stew- pan, the Bignefs of the Carp, put in fome Onions cut in Slices, and then your Carp; feafon it with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, a Dah of Vinegar, and a Bottle of Wine, moiften it with hot Water, put it over a Stove, let it Hew; when ilcu-ed take it off, put the Wine, with which you have uafiied your Carp, into a Stew-pan, v.ith fome Anchovies cut fmall; let it have a Boil or two, then ftrain it off; put it again into the Stew-pan, with a good Lump of Butter, and a Dull of Flour to thicken the Sauce; add Lemon-juice: Put your Stew-pan over the Fire, thicken your Sauce, let it be re-!jfiiing; -beings well done, put in fome good Butter rolled in Flour; Being ready to lerve, difli it, and ferve it up hot.

Ancther Entry cf Carps feiveci.

YOUR Carp being fcaled, wafned, and gutted, fplit it in two, cut each Flalf in three Pieces, put them in a Stew-pan, with a Dozen of fmall Onions blanched, feafon them v.irh Pepper ar.xl Salt, a Bunch made with Parfley and iweet Herbs; moiften tliem with half a Bottle of Wine, put them a ilewing; take fome Butter, put it in a Stew-pan with fome Flour; put it over the Fire, Itir it till it begins to have a Colour; moilen it with a little Fiih Giavy, or with Wa- ter; this being well mixed and flirred together, put it into the Stew-pan with your.Carp: Let it be relilhing, ilh it, and ferve it up h-Ct.

Io

2lf L AD Ys C OM PA NlOlf. 77

To fien.v Carps.

CU T them in Pieces according to their Size, fet them a ftewing in a Kettle, or Sauce-pan, .with White Vinc, or Claret, and feafon fihem well with Salt, Pepper, Onicn- fhred fmall, Capers, and foms Crufts of Bread; let dl this ftew together, and when it is enough, and the Sauce grown thick, ferve it up .

Entry of a hrciled Carp.

SCALE and gut your Carp, flice it upon the Back, rub it with melted Butter, pepper and alt it, then broil it; put to it a Ragoo made with Mufhrooms, foft Roes, Arti- choak Bottoms, with Onions and Capers; being ready to ferve, difh it, with this Ragoo over it, ferve it up hot,

A Carp the Bohemian Way.

WASH your Carp, cut off the Fin and the End of the.
Tail, and take out the Gills, but do not fcale it; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Mace, a Lump of good Butter, a Couple of Pots of ftrong Beer, a Glafs of good Brandy, Onions, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, Parfley, green Onions, fweet Bafil, Cloves, and Thyme, and let it boil upon a quick Fire; being boiled, and of a good Tafte, thicken your Sauce with good Butter rolled in Flour, and ferve it up hot.

At another Tim.e flit it into tvo, cut it in Bits, and boil it after the fame Manner.

To diefs a Carp ati Ccurt-Bouillofu

WHEN the Carp Is fcaled and drawn, pull out the.
Fins, put it in an earthen Pan, and throw fomc fcalding Vinegar and Salt upon it; boil it in White Wmc and Vinegar, with Butter, Pepper, Onion, Cloves, and s Bay-leaf; when it is boiled, garniili with Parfley, ferve it up in a clean Napkin for the firfl Courfe.

To drefs a Carp in a Demi-Court-Bouillon.

CU T the Carp into four Quarters, leaving the Scales on, then boil it in Wine, a little Vinegar and Verjuice, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Nutmeg, Chibbols, Bay-leaAes, burnt Butter and Orange-peel: Boil the Broth till there is but a fma 1 Quantity left; put in fome Capers, and when you ferve it, garnii with Slices of Lemon.

E 3 A Carp

78 he Ladys Companion.

J Carp larded nvith Eelin Ragoo.

TA K E a live Carp, knock him on the Head, fcale and.
flice him from Head to Tail in four or five Slices, on, one Side to the Bone j then take a good Silver Eel, and cut it as for Larding, as long and as thick as your little Finger, rolled in Spice andfvveet Herbs, and Bay-leaf pow- derd; then lard it thick on the flalhd Side, fry it in a good Pan of Lard: Then make for it a Ragoo with Gravy, White Wine, Vinegar, Claret, the Spawn, Mulnrooms, Balls, Capers, grated Nutmeg, Mace, a little Pepper, and.
Salt, thicken it with brown Butter, and garnifti with fliced Lemon.

0 Jlenu Carps a la Roy ale,

WHEN they are cleanfed and gutted, lay them in a.
Marinade of Claret, Salt, Vinegar, whole Spice, whole Onions, Lemon-peel hred, and Horfe-radilh fcraped; then fet them a flewing gently for three Quarters of an.
Hour J then beat fome Butter up in a Sauce-pan, with fome of the Fiih-Broth, a Couple of Anchovies, Shrimps, and Oyfters. Difli your Carps on Sipj« ts, pour this Sauce over them; garnifh the Difh with the Milts, Slices of Lemon,
7o hajh a Carp.

SCALE your Carp, fliin it, and bone it, then hafh th Flefh; put it into a Sauce-pan, and dry it over the Fire, till it grows white; then lay it on the Table; take Mulh- 300ms, Truffles,, Cives, Parfley, fhred them very fmall, mix them together, and put to it. Brown a little Butter and Jlour over the Fire, and put your Haih into it, giving it two qr. three Turns; feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and a Slice of Lemon, moiften with good Filh-Broth, and thicken with » three Spoonfuls of a Cullis of Crawfifn, or other Filh j thea ferve it up for firfl Ceurfe.

To marinate a Carp.

CLEANSE and fcale, then dry your Carp, and fpiit it down the Back; flour and fry it crifp in Sallad Oil; then fry it in a deep Difh; and putting White Wine Vine- gar into a Pipkin, with Salt, Pepper, fiiced Ginger, Nut- meg, whole Cloves, and large Mace, with a Bundle of fweet Herbs of all Sorts, bgil theni all together a little, and poiir

ne L A D ys C o m p a n I o n. 79

it on your Fiih, then prefently cover it ciofe for two Hours, then lay ibme Slices of Lemon on it, and keep them clofe covered for Ufe.

To make a Bifque cf Carps

GE T twelve fmall Carps and one large one, draw thert-, take out the Milts, iiay the fmall Carps, cut o-f their Heads; take out their Tongues, pick the FleOi from the Bones, put to it a Dozen large Oyllers, -Snd the Yoiks of three or four hard Egs: feafon with Salt, Cloves, and Mace, mafh them all well together, and make it into a lliit Pafte, with the Yolks of Eggs, • roll the Paile up in Balls, lay them into a Stew-pan, put to them the Tongues and Milts of your Carps, three or four Anchovies, and twenty or thirty- large Oyilers, with about half a Pound of frefh Butter, a little White Wine, a whole Onion, and the Juice of one or two Lemons, and fet them over a gentle Fire to ilew. i a the mean Time, fcaJd and draw your large Carp, lay it with the Heads of your other Carps in a deep Pan, pour to it fo much White Wine Vinega; as will cover it, and be fufiicient to boil it in; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, a Race of Ginger, whole Mace, an Onion or two, and a Lemon fhred; put iu- alfo a Bunch of fweet Herbs; let your Carp lie in this for half an Hour. Put this Liquor, with the Seafoning, into a.
Stew-pan, lay in your Carp when it boils j let it ftew gently, and after fome Time put in your Heads. When it is irewed- enough, take it off, and let it fland by in the Stew-pan: Then to drefs your Bifque, fet a large Silver Dilh ovef a Chafing-difh, put in Sippets, and a Ludleful of Broth, then lay your Carp in the Middle of the Dilh, with the Heads of the other twelve Carps round it, and the Milts, Tonguei, and Oyllers; then pour in the Liquor in which the Balls, Tongues, C5 SfviL Orange or Lemon. Garnifh with Slices of Orange or Lemon, and pickled Barberries, and ferve it up to Table.

To broil a Carp.

W H E N your Carp is prepared, rub it over with But- ter, and ftrew it with Salt; then lay it on the Grid- iron: In the mean Tim.e prepare a Sauce of drawn Butter, Anchovies, Capers, Vinegar, and lliced Lemon, fcalcnecL with Pepper, Salt, anjd Nutmeg.

So The L A D Ys Companion.

To boil a Carp,.

SCALE it, gut it, and fave the Blood, then boil it in 3» good relilhd Liquor half an Hour; make Sauce with xhQ Blood, Claret, and good ftrong Gravy, three or four An- chovies, an Onion, two Shalots Ihred, a little whole Pep- per, a Blade of Mace, a Nutmeg quartered; let all thefe flew together; then melt fome Butter, and thicken your Sauce with it; let your Fifh be well drained, and ferve up with your Sauce pourd over it, with fome Juice of Lemon.

To roaji Carp.

7 H E N your Carp is cleaned and prepared, fcotclv them, and wafh them over with Eggs, then flrew ©verthem fome Thyme, Fariley, Pepper, S2.It, and Nutmeg,, well mixed together; fpit them on a Lark-fpit, or lay them in a Frame before the Fire; bafte them with Claret, An- chovy, and Butter, and when roailed, make your Sauce with thickeneJ Butter, Claret, Gravy, Anchovy, and the Milts of the Carps: You muft dip the Roes in Yolks of Eggs, and fry them: Garnifli your Difa with Parfley and fried Sippets, and ferve them up.

To roajl a Carp in the Oven.

TA K E a live Carp, draw it, walk it, and take away the Gaul, Milt, or Spawn; tlien make a Pudding of Almond Parte, grated Bread, Salt, Cream, grated Nutmeg, Yolks of Eggs, candied Lemon-peel, Carraway Seeds, make it iViff, and put it through the Carps Gills into the Belly then lay fome fmall Sticks crofs a Pan, and lay the Carp upon the Sticks, and put it into an Oven; make a Sauce of White Wine, or Claret, and the Gravy that droppd from the Carp, with a Couple of Anchovies dilToivd in it add fome grated Bread, then, beat it up thick with fome Butter and the Yolks of Eggs J dilh your Fifli, pour this Sauce upon it, and ferve it up.

7o fry Lampreys.

BLEED them, and keep the Blood, then wafh them in hot Water to take oft their Slime, and cut them in Pieces; fry them in clarified Butter, with a little fryd Flour, white Wine, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and a Bay-leaf; iry all this together very well,

thea

Ihe L A D Y s C O M P A N 1 N, 8 I

then put in the Blood, and a few Capers, and ierve it hot.
Garniih with Siices of Lemcn.

To diffs Lampreys ivth Sweet Sauce.

AFTER having fliced and cut them in Pieces, take out the String that runs along their Backs; tofs them up in Butter, and a little fryd Flour, till they are brown; then add fome Red Wine, a little Sugar, Cinnamon, Salt, Pep- per, and two or three Slices of Lemon; when they are enough done, put in the Blood, give them a Turn or two more -, fo diih up your Ragoo, and ferve it hot.

To broil Lampreys.

TA K E off the Slime, and then cut them in Pieces, as you do Eels that you intend to broil; melt a Lurrp of Butter, and put to it fome Ihred Gives, Parfiey, and favcury Herbs, with Pepper and Salt; put your Pieces of Lampre into the Sauce-pan, and flill it all well together; then take them, out, and drudge them with very fine Crumbs of Bread, and broil them over a gentle Fire; ferve them with a brown Sauce made as follows: Take a Lump of Butter, put it into the Sauce-pan, with a Pinch of Flour, and brown it; add fome Cives, ParHey, and Aiulhroom.s, all fhred wcry fmall, a few Capers, and an Anchovy, and fcafon the Whole with Pepper and Salt, moiflcn it with a little Fifh- Broth, nnd thicken it with a Crawfifn, or other Cullis: Pour this Sauce into the Bottom of your Diili, lay your Lampreys all round it, and ferve them hot.

We ferve them likewife with a fweffBauce, made with Wine, or Vinegar, a Lump of Sugar, a fall Slick of Cin- namon, and a Bay-leaf, all boiled together. Then take out the Cinnamon and Bay-leaf, pour the Sauce into a Difh, and lay the boiled Lamprey round it fo k-c it warm.

Sometimes you may ferve a broiled Lamprey with Oil in this Manner: Take fome Oil and Vinegar, iPepper, Salt, a little Muftard, one Anchovy, a few Capers, and a little Faif- ley fhred very fmall, beat all this together in a Porringer, then pour it into a Saucer, which we place in the Middle of the Dilh, and garnim it all round with Lampreys; fo ferv; it.

At other Times you may ferve broikd Lampreys dry, in Plates, or little Difhes.

E

-

§2- 5r< Lad ys COMP A N 10 N;

To drefs Lampreys the Italian Way,

SIC IN tKern, and feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Ginger, Cinnamon, and Nutmeg; put them into your Paile, either whole, or cut in Pieces; put in Raifms, Currants, dried Prunes, Dates, and Cherries, and cover it all over with Butter -, clofe up your Pye, and bake it. Then chop feme fweet Herbs, pound Ibme Jordan Almonds, and boil with Grapes, Raifms, Sugar, and Verjuice, and when it is baked pour in this Liquor ftrained. Ice it, and ferve it up hot with VhiteWine, the Bload of the Lampreys, the Juice of Oranges and Cinnamon.

To farce Eels.

YO U may farce them on the Eone, in the Nature of a White Pudding, you make your Farce of the Flefh of your Eels, which you mull pound in a Mortar, and put to it fome Cream, fome Crumbs of Bread, with Parfiey, Gives, Truffies, and Mufhrooms, feafoned as ufual. Lay: thsFarce very handfornely on the Bones of your Eels, drudge them well with very fmall Crumbs of Bread, and bake them in an Oven in a Tart-pan, till they are of a fine brown Ca- laur.

To drefs Eels with ixhite Sauce.

HAVING fkinnd and cut them in Pieces, blanch, them in boiling Water, then dry them with a Napkin, tpfs them up in Butter, with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Lemon- peel, together with a Glafs of Vhite Wine. Tofs up like- wife fome Artichoak Bottoms, Mufhrooms, and Afparagus,.
with Butter and favoury Herbs; then make a white Sauce with the Yolks of Eggs and Verjuice, fo ferve them. Gar- niih with fryd Bread and Slices of Lemon.

To drefs Eels njoith hronxin Sauce,

YOUR Eels being cut in Pieces, tofs them up in clarr- fied Butter, a little Flour, a little Fiih-Broth, or thin Puree, Muihrdoms, Cives, and Parfley, Ihred very fmall, and a Faggot of Herbs; to which add Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Capers; make all this boil together, and when your Ragoo is almoll ready, put to it a little Verjuice and White Wine, and let it boil a little longer, then thicken it with an Egg to, tke oiF the Fat, ajad ferve it warm.

Tg

The Ladvs Companion. S3

Tj f-y Eeis.

ST Pv I P them, take out the Bones, cut them_ in Pieces, and lay them to marinate for two Hours in Vinegar, Salt, Iepper, Bay-leaves, fiiced Onion, and. Juice of Le- ir.on; then drudge them wilh Flour, and fry them in clari- fied Butter i ferve them dry with fried Farfley.

To broil Eels.

AFTER having ftri; pd and cut them in Pieces, make;- Gadies in thein, a.d lay them a-while in melted But- ter, a io. favoury Herbs, Parlley, Onion; Pepper, and Salt,, then warm this a little, and Ihake it all well together; this done, take out the Eels Bit by Bit, drudge them with Crumbs of Bread, and broil them over a gentle Fire till they are of a fine brown Colour; when they are broiled, make a Sauce with beaten Butter, Cives, Parfiey, Capers, and a little Vine- gar, then put your Sauce in the Difn, and lay the Eels- round it.

We likewife ferve broiled Eels with green Sauce, which; we make as follows: Pound fome Sorrel, and fquecze out the Juice; then cut an Onion very fmall, and tofs it up with Butter, and minced Capers: Mix with it your Juice of Sor- rel, fqueeze in an Orange, and add fome Pepper and Salti fo ferve it for fiill Courfe., we alfo ferve it with uuce Rc bart.

To drefs Eels a la Daube.

MINCE the Flefh of Eels and Tench, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Nutmeg; cut the Flefh of another Eel into Lardoons, of which lay one Layer on the Skins, and then another of the minced Flefh, continuing ta do fo till you have made it into the Shape of a Brick of Bread; wrap it up in a Linen Cloth, and ilew it in half Va- ter half Red Vvine, feafoned vith Cloves, Bay-leaf, and Peppei-. Let it cool in its own Liquor, cut it in Slices, and feive:::n Plates, or little Dilhes.

To drefs Eels the Englilh Way, f UB an Eel with Salt, then with a Towel, to tnke off Xv the Slime, fKin it, and cut it in three or four Pisces according to its Length; lay them in a Diih, and pcur on them fome good White Vine; when they have L.in a 1 ttle While in it, take them out, and cut Notches froiiv Spac to

bpace

§4 be LaDYS CoMPANfOW.

Space on the Back and Sides, fill up thefe Incifions with a Sort of Farce, which make as follows: Take the Crumb of White Bread, and crumb it very fmall; take likewife all Sorts of favoury Herbs, Parfley, and Gives, a: d fhred them very fmall; fome Pepper, Cloves, Nutmeg, and Salt; add to this the Yolks of Ibme hard Eggs, a convenient Quantity of frefh Buiter; and having mixed all this together, fill up with this Farce the Incifions you made in the Eel; which you then flip again into its Skin, and tie it at both Ends, prick it in feveral Places with a Fork, and then either roail it on the Spit, or broil it on the Gridiron; hen it is done enough, take off the Skin, and ferve it dry with Juice of Lemon, or elfe make a White Sauce of Eutcer, Vinegar,.
Salt, and White Pepper, together with Anchovies and Ca- pers.

Note, That only die large Eels are drefifed in this Man- ner.

7o hah Eels.

C E T large Eels, draw, waili, bone, and mince them;.
J feafon them with Cloves, Mace, and an Onion cut into four Quarters, put in a little White Wine, and fome Oy- Iters, and an Anchovy or two; let them ftew over a gentle Fire, and ferve them up on Sippets: Garniih the Dilh with fome Slices of Orange.

To jieM Eels.

GET large Eels, draw, wafh, and fkin them, then cut them of what Length you pleafe, and put them into a Stew-pan with White Wine, and a little Salt; when they are half flewed, put to them fome Horfe- radih, an Onion, quartered, a little grated Bread, and a little beaten Cloves and Mace; when they are almofi done, put in a little But- ter, and a Glafs of Ciaret, and an Anchovy; give them a Walm or tvo, and ferve them up.

To Jcufe Eels.

GE T four large fat Eels, fcour them in Salt, draw, wain and cleanfe them.; cut them in Pieces four Inches long, fcore on the Back, and lay then, to foak in White Vine Vinegar and Salt, for about two Hours; then boil them with Onions, fvveet Kerbs, and ibme Blades of Mace; then pour away the Liquor, let them cool; then boil a Pkit ofthat Licuor with a Pint of White Wine, and boil it

up

TJk L A D YS C O M P A N I O N, 85

up with Ibme pounded Saffron; then tajce out the Spices that were boiled with the Eels, and put them into your White Wine; put your Eels into a Pot, and pour this Soufe over them.

Eel-Powts in CafTerole.

HAVING cleanfed your Eel-Powts, lay by their Li- vers, and fry the Powts in bnrnt Butter; then put them, with the fame Butter, into a Stew-pan, adding a little Flour and White Wine; feafon them with Salt, Pepper Nutmeg, a Faggo4: of fweet Herbs, and a Slice of Lemon: Make a Ragoo with the fame Sauce as that of the Eel- Powts, adding their Livers and Mufhrooms; when you are r-eady to ferve, garnifh your Diih with it, adding the Juice of Lemon.

0 funjj Eels nx:ith. Broth.

SKIN, gut, and waili them very clean in fix or eight Waters, to wafh away all the Sand, put them in a Sauce- pan, with a Blade or two of Mace, and a Cruil of Bread; ..
put juft Vvater enough to cover them clofe, let them flew very foftly; when they are enough, difh them up with the Broth, and have a little plain melted Butter in a Cup to eat the Eels with. The Broth will be very good, and is fit for weakly and confumptive Conllitutions.

Another Way to Jienv Eels.

CLEANSE your Eels as above, then cut them in Pieces about as long as your Finger, put jufl Water enough for Sauce, put in a fmall Onion fluck with Cloves, a little Bundle of fweet Herbs, a Blade or two of Mace, and fome whole Pepper, in a thin Mufiin Rag; cover it clofe, and let them Ikw very foftly.

Look at them now and then, put in a little Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, and a little chopped Parfley: When you find.
they are quite tender, and well done, take out the Onion Spice, and fweet Herbs; put in Salt enough to feafon it; then difh them up with the Sauce.

To totjl Eds uith Bacon.

TAKE great Eels and fcour them well, and throw away the Heads, gut them, and cut them into Pieces, then cut fome fat Bacon Q-y thin, and wrap them in it, and fbme Bay-leaves, then tie them p the Spit, arjd baHe them

with.

S5 he L A D y s Co m p a n i on.

with Claret and Butter; and when they are enough drudge them with grated Bread; ferve them with Wine, Butter, and Anchovies for Sauce.

To rocji, a large Eel.

WASH it in Water and Salt, cut off the Herxd, and flea ofF the Skin a little below the Vent i gut it, wipe it clean with a Cloth, and give it three or four Scotches with a Knife, then fhred feme iarfiey, Uript Thyme, Win- ter Savoury, fome large Oyfiers parboiled, and fueet Mar- joram, with an Anchovy j mix them with Salt and Butter, and put them into the Belly of the Eel, and into the Scotches, then diaw the Skin over the Eel again; tie the Skin with a Packthread to keep in all the Moifture, • faften it to a Spit, and roail it leifureiy; bale it with Water and Salt till the Skin breaks, and then bafre it with Butter; make your Sauce of beaten Butter and White Wine, with three or four Anchovies di£blved in it.

Another IVay.

TAKE a large Eel, ilrip it, dra.vr it, cleanfe it, and cut it into Pieces about four Inches long; then dry, them well, feafon them v.ith Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and Mace beaten, with two or three Oniotis, a Piece of Lemon- peel and Thyme minced fmall; rub your Seafoning, well mingled, into the Pieces of Eel, and faften it on them with the Yolks of Eggs; fpit the Eel crofs-ways on a fmall Spit, putting a Leaf of Sage or Bay-leaf between every Piece.
You may either turn them round on the Spit, or fet them with one Side to the. Fire till they hifs and grow brown; and then turn the other Side; fave the Gravy in the Diih in: which the Eel was feafcnedj bafteit vvith drawn Butter, then put to your Gravy a pretty large Onion, Nutmeg grated, and Oyfters minced; let them have a Walm or two with a.
little drawn Butter.j difh your Eel, and pour your Sauce over it.

To hah Eels.

WHEN your Eels are flrippd and well cleaned, take a hallow Pot, and cut your Eels in Lengths, ac- cording to the Depth of your Pot, and put them in o that thev may ftand end-ways; put a fmall Quantity of Water, Sale, Pepper, Shalots cut frr.all, fome Sage chopped fmall.
Marjoram, Kofemary Tops, and Thyme, and fet them in

th&

The Ladys Companion, S7-

the Oven j, when they are baked, beat up fome Butter with, the Liquor that conies from them, and ibme White Wine, and ferve them up.

fo pickle a Corger Eel..

FLEA it, and cut it in Pieces, and bind them up together with Tape; then boil it in Water, Vinegar, and Salt, vith a Handful of Fennel; put it into a Pan with fome of the. fame Liquor, Vinegar, and Beer, and lay a Handful oa green Fennel on the. Top of the Fifh.

To marinate a Coiiger Eel.

CU T it Pieces, fry it in clarify d Butter, put it into an earthen Pan, laying between every Layer of Fifh fryd Bay-leaves, Mace, and lliced Ginger, and a few.
Cloves; then pour in White Wine Vinegar and Salt, and cover them up clofe.

To ffttchcock E jIs.

SP L I T a large Eel down the Back, and joint the Bones,, cut it into two or three Pieces, r.elt a little Butter, put-: in a little Vinegar and Salt, let your Eel lay in two or three.- Minutes, then take the Pieces up one by one, turn them,- round with a fmall Skever, roll them in Crumbs of Bread, and broil them of a fine Brown; let your Sauce be plain Butter, with the Juice of a Lemon,

for Collared Eel, fee among the Receipts for Collaring

To ftenv Tench.

CU T them in Pieces, and fry them in browned Butter, then fet them to ftew in the fame Butter with White.
Wine, Verjuice, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, a Bay-leaf or two, and a little Flour. Vvhen the Filh is Hewed enough, put in fom.e Capers and Oyflers, with the Juice of Mulhfooms and Lemon: Garnifli the Didi witii.
fried Bread.

To farce Tench.

TA K E off the Slime, and fiit the Skin along the Bacle.
of your Tenchs and with the Point of yonr Knif- raife it up from the Bone; then cut the Skin crofs-ways e: tlie Tail and He.id, and firip it oft; then take out the Bone Tjvs cone, bone .a Tench or a Carp 3 put to the Fleili of i

i

8S he Ladys Companion.

fome Mufhrooms, a little Parlley, and fome Gives; feafonit with Salt, Pepper, fweet Spices, and a very little fweet Herbs, then having minced it all well together, pound it ia a Mortar, put to it a Piece of Butter, the Yolks of three of four Eggs, the Bignefs of a Couple of Eggs of the Crumb of Bread foaked in Cream, and pound it all well together;• then farce your Tenches with it, and few them up: Set a Pan over the Stove with fome clarified Butter, and when it is hot fry the Tenches in it, one by one, till they are brown, and then take them up; melt the Bignefs of two Eggs of Butter, in a Sauce-pan, then put to it a little Flour, and keep moving it till it is brown, moiften it with a little Fifh-Eroth, and a little White Wine boiling hot, lay your Tenches into this Brown, adding a Seafoning of Salt, Pepper, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, an Cnion lluck with Cloves; fo keep them iimmering in it over a gentle Fire when they are enough lay them in a Difh, poui on them a Ragoo of Milts, and ferve them.

At other Times they may be ferved with a Ragoo of Craw- iiih or Oyfters.

You may likewife broil thefe farced Tenches, rubbing them firft over with melted Butter and Salt; and when they are broiled of a fine brown Colour, ferve them with a Ragoo of Trufiles or Mulhrooms.

Boiled Tench.

GE T Tench frelh from the Pond, gut them, and clear them from their Scales, then put them into a Stew- pan, with as much Water as will cover them, fome Salt Pepper whole, fome Lemon -peel, a Stick of Horfe-radifh, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and a few Cloves; then boil them till they are tender; and when they are enough, take fome of the Liquor, and put to it a Glafs of White Wine, and a little Lemon juice or V rjuice, and an Anchovy ihred; then boil it a few Minutes, and thicken it with Butter, rubbed in Flour, tofling up a Pint of Shrimps with the Sauce; and pour it over the Filh; ierve it with Garnilh of fry d Bread, cut the Length of ones Finger, fome Slices of Lemon and Horfe-radiih fcraped, with fome pickled Mufhrooms, if you will; or you may tofs fome of them in the Sauce.

The L A D ys Com p ANiONT. s

To bake Tench. .

TAKE your Tench frefh from the Pond, gut them, and clean them from the Scales, then kill them, by giving them a hard Stroke on the Back of the Head, or elfe they will live many Hours, and even jump out of the Pan into the Oven, when they are half enough; then lay them in a Pan, with Tome Mulhrooms, Catchup, fome llrong Gravy, half a Pint of pickled Mulhrooms, as much White Wine as Gravy; three or four large Shaiots, an Anchovy or- two,, two or three Slices of fat Bacon, fome Pepper, Coves, and Nutmeg, at Pleafure, a little Salt, fome Lemon-peel, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; then break fome Bits of Butter, and lay them on your Filh, then cover all as clofe as you can and give them an Hours baking.

When they are enough, lay them in a hot Difh, and pour off the Liquor, and ilrain it, only preferving the Muih- rooms; then add to it a Spoonful of Lemon-juice, and thicken your Sauce with the Yolks of four Eggs, beaten with Cream, and mixM, by Degrees, with the Sauce; pour this over your Filh, and ferve it hot, with a Garnifh of Beat-roots fliced, fome Slices of Lemon-peel, and fome Horfe-radilh fcraped.

Another Way to bake Tenches.

GE T your Tenches, prepare and farce them as above 5 then rub a Pafty-pan with Butter, over which lay a Seafoning of Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, and Spices, an Onion cut in-Slices, fome whole Cives, and a little minced Parfley, then lay in your Tenches; lay fome of the fame Seafoning over them, fprinkle them with melted Butter, drudge them with very fine Crumbs of Bread, and bake tiiem in an Oven: We ferve them with Ragoos of all Sorts of Legumes, which mull be laid under them, or with a Cul.
lisofCrawfilh, or with Anchovy Sauce, and fometimes diy.

To roajl Tench.

ITAVING cleansd it well from the Slime, make a 1 little Hole as near the Gills as you can, take out the Guts, and cleanfe the Throat, Huff the Belly of the Filh with fweet Herbs; then tie the Filh to the Spit with two or three Splinters, and roaft it; mix Butter with. Vinegar or Verjuice, and Salt, and bafte it often.

2i»

90 be L A D Y S C M P A N 1 O NT.

To fry Tench.

SLiT your Tenches down the Back, drudg« them with Flour and Salt; or you may cut them in Pieces, and hy them with Muftirooms, Truffles, Artichoak Bottoms, and fweet Herbs; make a S.iuce of Mulhrooms, TrufHes, An- chovies, Capers all chopped fmall and well ftewd, and foaked in Broth; fqueeze in the Juice of an Orange or Le- mon, and add fome Filh Cullis j ferve it up, and garnilh with.
Variety of Pickles.

Another Way.

LE T your Water boil; then put in your FIfh, and ftir them about in it; take them out, rub off the Slime, dry them well in a Cloth, flit them down the Back, drudge them with Flour and Salt, fry them brown, and ferve themr up dry with fryd Parfley.

fo foufe Tench,

DRAW your Tench at the Gills,, and cut them ofiV which will make them boil the whiter j feafon tha Water with Vinegar, Salt, Bay-leaves, Faggots of fweet Herbs, whole Cloves, and Mace; wipe off the Slime, but do not fcale them; and when they are boiled, wafh off the loofe Scales, train the Liquor through a Jelly-Bag, and put fome Ifmglafs into it that has been walhd and fteeped, and boil i:; lay your Fifli in the Dilh, flrain the Liquor through the Bag into the Difli; let it Hand till it is cold, and ferve it.

This Jelly will ferve to jelly Lobfters, Prawns, or Craw- filh; hanging tliem in fome Glafs by a Thread at their full length, and filling the Glaf with the Jelly while it is warm, and turning it out of the Glafs v;heji it is cold.

Tenches nxth Fillets marinated.

YOUR Tenches being fcraped very white, gut themj cut off the Heads, and fplit them in two, which, cub in Slices, muft be placed in a Dilh; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, whole green Onions, Parfley, an Onion cut in Slices, a Bay leaf, a little fweet Bafil, fome Cloves, and a- little Vinegar; ftir all well together, and let them marinate about two Hours; this done, take out the Fillets, wipe Sihem between two Towels, fcour them, and fry them in drawn Butter; being well coloured, take them out, dilh

them.

7he Lad ys Companion. 9:1

them up handfomely, with fryd Pariley, and ferve them.
up hot.

Tff fteifj Barbels.

HAVING fcaied and drawn your Barbels, put them, into a Stew-pan, with Wine, frefh Butter, Salt, Pep- per, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs. When they are ready, knead a Bit of Butter with a little Flour, and pa: it in to thicken the Sauce; fo ferve them.

Others drefs them as above, excepting the Putter, of which they ufe none: But when the Barbels are iievved, then ferve them up with a Ragoo made of Mufnrooms, TrufHes,.
Morels, Artichoak Bottoi;ns, Salt, Pepper, freih Butter, Broth, made of Fiih, or Juice of Onions.

0 bioil Barbels.

AFTER they are fcaied and diawn, make fmall Inci- fions in the Sides of them; then rub them with melt- ed Butter, and drew them oer with pounded Salt: This done, lay them, on the Gridiron, and when they are broiled, make your Sauce with frefli Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmegs Anchovies, Capers, Gives Ihred fmall, with a little Fiour to thicken it; put to it likewife a Drop of Water, and as much Vinegar, Ihaking it continually till it is thickened, and then pour it on your Fifli: Otherwife you may ufe the fme Sauce as for a roafted Pike,

Let your Garniture be fried Mufhrooms, with Roes of Carps, and Slices of Lemon, or larded Sweetbreads.

To dres Barbels au Court Bouillon.

IT is generally the largefl Fifh that is dreffed in this Man- ner: Take, therefore, a large Barbel, and draw it, but do not fcale it; lay it on a Dilh, and throw on it Vine- gar and Salt fcalding hot; then fet your Fiih over the Fire with White Wine, erjuice. Salt, Pepper. Cloves, Nut- meg, Bay-leaves, Onions, Lemon or Orange-peel; when it boils very fail: put in your Barbel, and when it is boiled, take it up, and ferve it dry upon a clean Napkin, infiead of a Diih of RoaA-meat. Let your Garniture be Parfiey, or Garden -Crefies,

7a.

52 he Ladys Compani on.

To hofo Barbels.

BONE them, and halli the Flefh; put it into a Sauce- pan, and dry it over the Fire till it is grown white; then mix it with Mufhrooms, Truffles, Gives, and Parfley cut very fmall; brown fome freili Butter in a Sauce-pan with a little Flour, and put in the Hafli; let it have two or three Turns; ieafon it with Salt, Pepper, and a Slice or two of Lemon; moiften it with fome Fifli Broth, and three or four Spoonfuls of Crawfiili Cullis, or of other Filli, to thicken it and ferve it hot for a firil Courfe.

Barbels larded and glaed.

PU T your Barbels in boiling Water, flir them a little but take them up prefently again fcrape them flightly, let them be very white, and well cleaned, and leave the Liver untouched, that being the molt delicious Bit in the Fifh; wipe them dry, and lard them with fine Bacon; fet a Stew-pan over a lighted Stove, with a Bottle of White Wine, Onions cut in Slices, fweet Bafil, Slices of Lemon, Pepper, Salt, and Cloves; as foon as the Wine boils, put in your Filh two by two; after fome Boils, take them out, and put in fome more to make them ftiff; put a clean Stew- pan over the Fire, big enough to hold all your Fiih, put a Couple of Pounds of Veal into it, with fome Ham cut into fmall Pieces, with an Onion or two, and moiften them with Broth, or Water; when the Veal is almofl done, put in your Fiih, let them boil gently, let them not be too much done, and take them out dexteroufly, to keep them from breaking.
Now put your Broth over the Fire again, and when ftewed to a Jelly, put in your Fifh, the larded Side downwards, and let them glaze over a gentle Fire, being ready to ferve up, put an Effence of Ham, or an Italian Sauce in your Difh, with your Fifh over it.

If your Fifh be not glazed enough, put them on again,, fhaking the Pan now and then, and do not leave them till done i dilh them, and ferve them up hot.

To boil Mullets.

YOU muft boil the Fiih, but lay by the Roes and Livers; when the Fiih is boiled, pour away Part of the Water, and put into the reit a Pint of Claret, fome Salt and Vinegar, and two fliced Onions, with a Bundle of ! j Winter Savoury, Marjoram, and Thyme, iliced Nutmeg, ff broken

he L A D ys C O M P A N I N. 9

broken Mace, and the Juice of a Lemon: Boil all thefe well together, then put in the Fifh, and when you judge that it taftes ilrong of the Ingredients, put in three or four An- chovies, and ferve it up with ftewed OyfterS;, or Shrimps,

To broil Mullets.

SCALE and gut them, and cut Gafhes in the Side of them; dip them in melted Butter, and broil them; make a Sauce with clarified Butter, fried Flour, Capers, Slices of Lemon, a Faggot of Herbs, Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Verjuice, or Juice of Orange.

To fry Mullets.

AFTER you have prepared tbem as above, fry them in clarifed Butter; let your Sauce be fomc of the fame Butter in which tJiey Vvere fried, with Anchovies, Capers, Juice of Orange, and Nutmeg j rub the Difli with a Shalot, or a Clove of Garlick.

You may likewile put them in a Pye, as you do feveral other Fiili.

To marinate a Mullet.

YO U mufl to a Quart of Water take a Gallon of Mne- gar, a good Handful of Bay-leaves, as much Rofe- Riary, a Quarter of a Pound of beaten Pepper; put all thefe together, and let them boil foftly, and feafon it with a little Salt, then fry your Filh with frying Oil, till it is enough, and afterwards put it into an earthen VefTel, and lay the Bay-leaves and Rofemary between and about the Filh, and pour the Broth upon it; and when it is cold, cover it up to keep till yoa want it.

To drefs a Pike the German Way,

GU T your Pike, and wafh it very clean; then fplit it .in two Parts clofe by the Bone, and half boil it in Water; then take it out and fcale it till it becomes very white; then put it into a Stew-pan, with White Wine, Ca- pers, Anchovies, Muihrooms, Thyme, and fweet Herbs choppd very fmall, and alfo fou e Truffles and Morels; let thefe all ftew together gently, that the Fifh may not break; then put in a good Piece of Butter, and a little Cheefe grated when the Sauce is grown thick, dilh it handfomely, garniih it with what yoa pleafe, and ferve it hot.

Pike

94 Ladys Companion.

Pike au Simmier.

TA K E a Pike, gut, wafli, and dry it; then make a good deal of Force- Fifh with Eel, Whiting, Anchovy Sevvet, Pepper, Salt, and crumbed Bread, alio Yolks of Eggs, Thyme, and Parfiey, and a Bit of Shalot; then fill the Belly full of this Forcing, and draw with a Pack-Needle, feme Packthread through the Eyes, the Middle and Tail, in the Shape of an 5; then wafh it over with Butter and Egg, and crumb it over with Bread: You may bake it, or roaft it with t Caul over it, and fauce it with Capers and Butter the Trench Way.

Another Vay to drefs a Pike.

YO U may roafl it with a good Forcing in the Belly, with Oyllers, Liver, Sewet, Crumbs of Bread,Thyme, Parfiey, and Eggs, Ancho-.ies, and a Shalot; fill the Belly, and either bake or roail: it -, fauce it with Oyiler-Sauce; the French Way is with Caper- Sauce, and you may boil it with Anchovy- Sauce, or fry it in -Slices; and ferve it with plain Butter, or fried Parfiey.

lo f.ufe a Pike.

AFTER having put your Fike into as much Water as will cover it, with a Handful of Bay leaves, fome Cloves and Mace, let it boil till it is fo tender that a Straw may be run thro it; then take it up, and put it in Liquor, White Wine and Vinegar, with an Anchovy: When your Pike is cold, fiip it into the Pickle, which will turn to a Jelly, and keep for a cenfiderable Time.

To drefs a Pike
SCALE and gut it, walh it clear, cut it in Pieces, and put them in a Stev-pan, with White Wine, Parfiey, Cives, Mufiirooms, and TruiHes, all of them hafhed toge- ther, with Salt, Pepper, and Butter, and fet over a Stove to ftew; blanch fome Oy iters in Water, and a little Verjuice; then throw them, with their own Liquor, into the Stew- pan, but not till the Pike is near enough; when done, ferve it, garnilhing your Dilh with fiiced Lemon.

T

n L A D Y S C O M P A N I N. 95

To farce a Pike.

A K K a Pike, draw, fcale, and take out the Bone by the Back, fo that the Head and Tail may be left hanging by the Skin; then mince the FJefh with a Piece of Carp or Eel, Muflirooms, Cives, and Parfley; feafon all with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; then add a Clove, and half a Dozen Coriander Seeds bruifed; put Butter to it, and pound all together, with Crumb of Bread, fimmering over the Fire in Cream, and the Yolks of two raw Eggs; thefe being all mixed together, fluff your Pike vith this Farce, few it up, and lay it in a Stew-pan at its full Length; put fome Butter and Flour into a Sauce-pan, and biown it; then put in fome White Wine and Filli-Broth, of each a like Quantity, pour this into your Stew-pan to the Pike; feafon with Salt, Pep- per, Cloves, fweet Herbs, Parfley, and Onions; let your Pike only fimmer, leil it break. Iv,. the mean Time, pre- pare a Ragoo of the Tails of Crawfifh, Mufhro.ms, the Tops of Afparagus, if in Seafon, tofs thefe up in a little frelh Butter, add to them a little Fifn-Broth to moiflen it, and a little Crawiifh, or other good Cullis, to thicken it: When jour Pike is enough, take it up, lay it in a Dilli to drain, then diih it in another Difh, pour the Ragoo upon it, and ferve it up to Table hot.

Take Notice, that if you ufe the Tops of Afparagus, they mufl be firfl blanchd, and not put into the Ragoo, till you arc juft going to ferve it up, or elfe they will be too much done.

To hoil a Pike.

CLEANSE and trufs your Pike in a round Ring, fcotch i: on the Back, fet it on the Fire in a Stew-pan, with as much Water and White Wine as will cover it; make the Liquor boil, then put in your Filh, and boil it with a quick Fire: For the Sauce, mince the Liver of the Pike, feafon it with Pepper and Mace, put to it Oyllers or Cockles boild or fryd, and fweet Herbs flaied fine, fcrape in fome Horfe-radifh, and boil them m White Wine Vinegar: When your Pike and Sauce is rtady, beat up the Sauce with a iiece of Butter and minced Lemon; difli your Pike on Sippets; pour in your Sauce: Garnilh with Slices of Orange or Le- mon, and ferve it up.

Another

95

The L A D ys Companion,

Another Way,

TAKE a Male Pike, rub tlie Skin off with Bay -fait while it is alive; cleanfe it well both Infide and Out- fide; fet on a Kettle with White Wine, Salt, whole Pepper,
7o boil a Pike the French Fajhion.

TA K E a Pike, cut it in three Pieces, boil it in Wine and Water, an equal Quantity of each, and a little Lemon-psel: When the Liquor boils, put in the Pike, with a good PLindful of Salt; then, having prepared a Sauce of beaten Butter, Water, two or three Lemons in Slices, the Yolks of two or three Eggs, and fome grated Nutmeg, difli your Pike on Sippets, and llick it with fome fryd Bread j run the Sauce over it: Garnilh with fome Barberries, or Le- mon, and fiiced Ginger.

7o drefs a Pike a Cabilo, the Dutch Way.

TA K E a large Pike, fcale it, gut it, wafh it clean, and cut off the Head; then cut it in Slices about an Inch thick, endeavour to cut it in the Joints,: When you come toward the Tail, cut through the Bone, and leave the Fifn whole on the I.Tnder-fide, fo that it may hang together; then put it into a Pan of cold Water; fet on good Store of Water, feafon it pretty high with Salt; when it boils up, pour in a Quarter of a Pint of Vinegar, fkim it well, divide the Head in two, and put that and the Tail in the boiling Water about five or y. Minutes before you put in your Slices, take the Gaul from the Milt, and put the Milt inalfo: When they have boiled about a Quarter of:
over

The L A D ys C O M P A N I O N. 97

over the Fire, ftirred about with a Ladle, and poured over the Fifh: But you may ufe drawn Batter. A Pound of But- ter, with a Spoonful of Water drawn up, will be as thick as Cream: Squeeze in a Lemon, and ferve it up hot,

To drcfs a Pike in Cafierole.

AFTER having fcaled your Pike, lard it with the Fleih of an Eel; then put it into a Stew-pan with White Wine, burnt Butter, Verjuice, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, a Bay-leaf, or a Lemon, and a Faggot of fwcec Herbs: Let them Hew over a gentle Fire: In the mean Time prepare a Ragoo of iVIufhrooms, Oyflers, Capers, fome of the Liquor wherein they are Hewed, and fome Flour.
When all is enough, difh your Fifh, pour your Ragoo over it: Garnilh with fryd Mulhrooras, Carps Roes, and Slices of Lemon, and ferve it up hot.

To fry a Pike;; Fillets.

GU T and fcale your Pike, cut it into Slices or Fillet5, put them into a Marinade of Verjuice, Salt, Pepper, the Juice of Lemon, Cives, Bay-leaves, but not above half an Hour; then dip them in a thin Palle or Batter, and fry them, difh them; garniih with Slices of Lemon, and Parfley, and ferve them up: Or you may put them into white Sauce, which is made of the Crumb of Bread pounded, and ftrained through a Sieve, after it has had two or three Walms in a Stew-pan with a little Broth, or a Cullis of Fifh; when you ferve it up, fijoeeze in fome Juice of Lemon.

To marinate a Pike.

MAKE a Marinade as mentioned in the laft Receipt; Gut and fcale your Pike, then lay it in this Mari- nade for two Hours; take it out, drudge it with Flour, and fry it, or you may bake it in a Patty-pan j then dip it m melted Butter, drudge it with Bread grated fine, and fifted through a Sieve, and Salt, bake it brown, and ferve it up with Sauce made of clarified Butter, the Juice of an Orange, Salt, Pepper, and Anchovies, melted, and ftrained through a Sieve: Garnifh with the Milts of Carps, or Livers of Pike fryd, and fryd Parley, and ferve it up hot.

Vol. I. F iF

9 he Ladys Companion.

fry a Pike.

WHEN you have ckanfed your Pike well from the Slime and Blood, dry it, flour it, and roll it round, or elle you may flit it, put it in your Pan, fry it in frefli Butter crifp; then riake your Sauce of Butter, beaten up with the Liquor of Oyfters, White Wine and Nutmeg. Gar- nifli with fryd Parfley, and Slices of Orange and Lemon.

Another Way.

OPEN your Pike by the Belly, and fcore it with a Knife; lay it to marinate in Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Cives, and a Bay-leaf; drudge it well with Flour before you Iry it, and let your Sauce be Anchovies melted in oiled Butter, ftrain it through a Sieve; add the Juice of an Orange, fome Capers, and white Pepper.

To drefs Pikes a la Saint Rot art.

GUT, fcale, and flit your Piies, divide each into Pieces, fcore them, then lay them for an Hour in a Marinade of Vinegar, Sak, Pepper, feet Eafil, Bar-leaves, Slices of Onions and Lemon; then tak.e them out, dry them with a Linen Cloth, flour and fjy, them in Butter j make your Sauce Robatt in the folloving Manner: Set a Sauce-pan over;. Stove wirh a gQcd Quantity of Butter; put into it fome Orions cut m Slices, fry them brown, moiiien them with <;;ood Fifli-Broth lee them ilew iii it for fome Time; v.hen they are ftewed enough ftiim off the Fat, and thicken the Liuuor with a Cullis. Lay your Pikes into this Sauce; let them fimmer in it a little while; then difli your Pikes, and fer the Difh over a Stove, piit in a little Mufl:ard, and a Drop if V inegar, pour yoar Sauce on ycur Pikes, and fcrve them iiphot.

Jo fte -v a Pike rhe French JVg.

YOUR Pike being gutted, and fplit dovvn the Back, let the Liquor be Water and Salt, and boil before you puc it in; then take a Stew-pan, put into it as much Claret c
©Yfr

the L A D ys C O M P A N I O N, 99

aver it: GarniHi it with Slices of Lemon and Lemon-peeU run it over with beaten Butter. Garnifh the Diih with dry grated Manchet, and ferve it up hot.

7o Jleiv Pike another Way.

CLEAN well your Pike, and lard it witli fmall Lar- doons, then flew it in clarified Butter, Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, fome Mar- joram, and fliced Lemon; make a Ragoo of Mulhrooms, tofs them up in Butter moillened with Fiih-Broth; thicken your Sauce with fome Flour, or Cullis, and when you dilh up pour it upon your Pike.

To ronjf a Pike.

GE T a large Pike, gut it, and clean it, and lard it with Eel and Bacon, as you lard a Fowl; then take Thymsi and Savoury, Salt, Mace, and Nutmeg, fome Crumbs of Bread, Beef-fewet, and Pariley j fhred all very fine, and mix it up with raw Eggs; make it in a long Pudding, and put it in the Belly of your Pike, flcevver up the Belly, and dif- folve Anchovies in Butter, and bade with it; put two Splints on each Side the Pike, and tie it to the Spit; melt Butter tliick for the Sauce, or, if you pleafe, Cyder Sauce, and bruife the Pudding in it. Garniih with Lemon.

Another Way to ronjl a Pike.

SCALE your Pike, and flafli it from Head to Tail, and lard ic with Lardoons of Eel, rolPd in fweet Herbs and Spice; fill it with Forced-Meat of Filh; roaft it at Length, bafte and bread it; or you may turn its Tail into its Mouth, and brown it oiF in the Oven; let the Sauce be drawn But- ter, Anchovies, the Roe and Liver with Balls, MulTirooms, Capers, and Oyilers. Garniih with fliced Lemon.

Another Way.

CLEAN, fcrape, and gut your Pike, lard the Back vyith pickled Herring; take Claret and large Oyflers; iz- fon your Oyfters with Pepper and Nutmeg; mix them with fome Slices of Onion, Winter Savoury and Thyme, and hll the Belly of your Pike with them; few up its Belly, and bolfter up its Sides with two flat Sticks, about the Breadth of a Lath; lay it down to the Fire, tie Rofemary and Bays Iq, keep off the Heat from coming too much to it, where it is not defended by the Laths, from fcorching; baile it with

i, Butter

i oo fbe L A D ys C m p a n I

gutter beat up with Claret; when it is«i-oailed enough, takc it up, take the StufBng out of the Belly, and make a Sauce of th&t and its own Dripping, feme beaten Butter, and Cla- ret; and having diihed it, lerve it up hot.

Another Way.

TA KE a large Pike, draw, wafli, and clean it; then take a Pint of Cyflers or Shrimps, three or four An- chovies, an Onion or Shalot, Nutmeg, Cloves, and Mac-e, with a little Parfiey, Ihred thefe very fmall, and mix it with Butter; with this lluiT the Belly of the Pi;:e, and ftrcw fome of it -uj-ron -the Cutfue of it; then fallen your Pike on the Spit, and bafte it either v,ith Butter or Claret, fome of the Liquor of your Oyfiers, Butter, Anchovy, Spice, and Vine- gar, with a little Flour to thicken it.

Another yfay

AFTER cleaning your Fifh well, feafcn it with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Mace, and fome fweet Herbs, rub it very well with the Seafoning, then roll it in a Caul of .a Brcaft of Veal, and tie it to the Spit, and when it is half roaiied take off the Caul, drudge it with Bread fnely grated, then bafte and flour it: When of a fine yeliov Colour, diHi it xip; and garniih vvith rafped Lemon and Flowers.

To hcjfj a Pike.

WEI E N you have cleansd your Pike, bone it, fcale it, then mince the Flefh with an Eel and fweet Fierbs; feafon with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and Mace beaten; Ut it into a Dih with White Wine, and let it Hew; when it is enough, ftir in a Piece of Butter: In the mean Time, take large ilewM Oyfters, and fry them in Batter, fome green with Spinach, others yellow with Saffron: When your Meat is fcewd enough, difh it on Sippets: Garnifli with Oyfiers, ..and ferve it up hot.

To drefs a Pike at a vhite Sauce.

WHEN you have gutted, fcaled, and cleansed your Pike, boil it iji Wine and Water, of each a like uantitv, put in Salt, Pepper, and a Bunch of favour Herbs; melt Butter in a Sauce-pan with a little Flour, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a Slice or two of Lemon, three or four vvhole Cives, a Couple of Anchovies, a little Water, and a Drop or two of Vinegar; Give this Sauce a Turn or two

The L A D Y s C O .AJ P A N I O N. lOt

9ver a Stove till it is thickened; difn your Pike, pour it over it, and ferve it up.

To drefs a Pike au Court-BsuiHon.

HA V I N G cleansd your Pike, lay it in a: Pan, either whole or cut into Quarters, Iprinkle over it boiling.
hot Vinegar, with Salt in it: When it has lain fome Time, take it out, and fealbn it with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, fweet Herb, Onions, and a Bay-leaf; put a good Lump of Butter in the Belly of it, wrap it up in a Napkin; then put into a a Stew-pan fome White Wine, erjuice. Salt, Pepper, Onions, and Lemon fliced. Nutmeg, Cloves, and a Eay-leaf, make thefe boil very fail, then put in your Pike; when it is boiPd enough, ferve it on a clean Napkin, garnifhd with Parfley, for a iiril Courfe.

To broil a Pike.

SPLIT your Pike, and fcotch it with your Knife on the Outfides, feafon it with Salt, lay the Gridiron on a clar Fire, make it very hot, lay on your Pike, bafte it with But- ter, turn it often; and when it is broiPd iliff and crifp, difh it, and ferve it up with beaten Butter, and the Juice of Le- moris, or Wine Vinegar, g arnifhd with Slices of Oranges or iLemons.

To fry a Jack,

SCRAPE, gut, and cleanfe your Jack, ipe it, flour it,- and fry it brown and crifp in Butter; then take it out of the Frying-pan, fet it before the Fire in a Difli i pour off the Butter it was fryd in i then fry a good Quantity o Sage- and Pariley crijp in other Butter, lay them on the Filh: In- the mean Time let fome Butter be beat up with three or four Spoonfuls of hot Water, in which an Anchovy has been dif- folved; pour this on your Filli: Garnilh with Strawberry- - leaves and Pariley, and ferve it up.

To crimp Scate.

IT mull be cut into long Slips crofs-ways, the Flefh into ten Pieces, Inch broad, ten long, more or lefs, according, to the Breadth of your Fifh; then boil it off quick in Water and Salt, and fend it dry on a Difh turnd upfide down in another, and ferve Butter an d Mullard in one Cup, and But- ter and Anchovy in another.

F 3. Scate,

102 ff La D ys Com p A N ION.

Scate, or Thornback, the Dutch or Englifh IVay.

HAVING fklnned them on both Sides, cut the tw& Sides from the Body, and each Side down through the Middle; then lay each half crofs-ways, and cut it in Slices half an Inch thick. When you come up towards the thick Part, cut it thinner; throw it in cold Water with the Liver, an Hour or two before you boil it. If your Fifn is freih, it will make it curdle and turn crimp; then boil it in a Brafs Difh, with frelh Water, Salt, and Vinegar; fkim it well in the Boiling; put your Liver a boiling two or three Minutes before you put in your cut Fifh, which will be boiled in a Quarter of an Hour; take up your Slices carefully, that you break them not; for they will be turned round like a Hoop, and very tender; drain them well, -- flip them into your Difli, with fome Sippets under them; Kit your Sauce be a Pound of Butter, a Spoonful of Vinegar, tvo Spoonfuls of Vater, a little Dull of Flour, the Yolks of tvo Eggs, fome fcraped Nutmeg, a little beaten Pepper, and minced Anchovy; draw this up together to the Thicknefs of a Cream; then put in a good Spoonful of Muftard and half a Lemon j pour it hot over your Fifn, and lay the Liver upon it; let your Garnilhing be a little picked Parfley, clean waflied; fo ferve it up.

This Sauce is proper for boiled Smelts or Sparlings, or for boiled frefti Herrings.

- Scate, or Thornback, au Court-Bouillon.

WA S H it clean, and gut it, then boil it in Water with Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and favoury Herbs; when It is almoit boiled, throw in the Liver to boil in a Mo- ment, then take the Fifh off the Fire, and let it Hand in its own Liquor: When it is almoU cold take it up, fein it, and pick out the Thorns; having cleaned it well, lay it in a Difh, and ferve it with a brown Sauce, made of oiled Butter and Parfley tofiTed up in it, with a Drop of Vinegar.

Scate, njuith Anchcvy Sauce.

TH E Scate being boiled, as in the foregoing Receipt, let it ftand to cool, then Ikin it, and take out the Thorns in like Manner; lay it handfomely in the Diih you intend to ferve it in, and fet it over a Chafing-difli of Coals; mean while prepare the following Sauce; put into a Sauce- pan fome frefli Batter and a Pinch of Flour; feafoh it with   Salt

ne Ladys Companion. ig

Salt, Pepper and Nutmeg, moiften it with a little Vinegar and Water; wafh a Couple of Anchovies, mince them, and put them into the Sauce, and turn it over the Stove; when the Sauce is thickened, pour it on your Scate, and ferve it up hot for the firlt Courfe. . .

At another Time you rnny ferve it with Capers in White Sauce, or with a Crawfifh Cullis in White Sauce likewile, and pour it on your Fifh.

To fry Scate vito a hroi.vn Sauce,

YOUR Scate being gutted, cut it in two in theMiddle.
and blanch it in fcalding Water, take oft the Skin and the Thorns, and fet it a cooling; then drudge it with Flour, and fry it in clarified Butter; when it is fried, take it up, drain it, and put it into a Sauce-pan: Make a brown Sauce as follows: Ivlir.ce fonie Cives and Parfiey; fet a Sauce -pan over a Stove, with a Lump of frefli Butter, and melt it; then put in a little Flour and brown it: when it is brovned, put in the Cives and Parfiey, together with Fiih-Eroth, or Juice of Onions; feafon it with Salt and Pepper; let it fim- mer a-while, then put it into the Saunce-pan to your Scate, with fome minced Capers, and let it all iimmer together; take up your Scate, and having laid it in a Difh, bind up your Sauce with a Crawfiih or other good Cullis, pour it on your Scate and ferve it.

At another Time the Scate being fried, and having fxm- mered in the brown Sauce, as above, it may be ferved witlp pouring on a Ragoo of Crawffli, or of Pvliits, or Ivlafcles.

Flounder 3 -ith Sorrel.

TAKE Flounders, gut, and cleanfe them well, theni flafh them crofs-ways three Cuts only on cne Side, and lay them in your Sauce-pan put in as much Water as will jull cover them, vith a little Vinegar, Salt, and one Onion, boil them quick, then boil four Handfuls of Sorrel, pickd ofFthe Stalks, and chop it very fmall, and put about half a Pound of melted Butter, or more, according to the Quantity of your Fifn, fo put it over your Flounders, and ferve away quick.

Ta i Flounders or Plaice.

PU T Salt, whole Spice, White Wine, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs into your Water; when it boils .put in a little Vinegar, for that v;ill make the Fifh crifp i iet it boil

F 4 apacg

i04- The L A D Y s C o m p a n i on.

apace before you put in your Fifh; let them boil till they fvvini, then take them up, and drain them; take a little of the Liquor, put it into fome Butter, two or three Anchovies, and fome Capers; fet it over the Fire, and beat it up diick, then pour it over the Fiih, with ParHey, Capers, Orange and Lemon.

Anothtr Way.

BOIL Tweet Herbs, Tops of Roferaary, Thyme, Winter Savoury, and fweet Marjoram, picked Parfley, and a little whole Mace, in White Wine and Water, of each an equal Quantity; when they have boiled for fome Time, then put in your Flounders, Ikim them well, then put in the Cruft of a French Roll, a Quarter of a Pound of Butter j feafon with Salt, Pepper, and Verjuice, and ferve it up hot.

To broil Plaice or Flounders.

SPLIT them, put fome Parfley and green Onions cut Imall in a Stew-pan, with Pepper, Salt, and a Lump of Butter; put in your Plaice or Flounders, and turn them two or three Times, to make them get a Tafte, without putting them over the Fire; then ftrew them with very fine Crumbs of Bread, and put them a broiling; when done, you may ti them up with a Ramolade under them, or any Sauce you think fit.

0 drefs Flounders or Plaice iith Garlick and Muflard.

TAKE Flounders or Plaice, that are very frelh, cut all the Fins and Tails, then take out the Guts, and wipe them very clean -, they mufl rtot be at all waftisd theii with your Knife fcore them on both Sides very grofly; thea take the Tops of Thyme, and cut them very fmall, and lake a little Salt, Mace, Nutmeg, and mingle the Thyme -ind thafe together, and feafon the Flounders, lay them on a Gridiron, and bafte them with Oil or Butter, let not the Fire be too hot: when that Side next the Fire is brown, turn it, balle it on both Sides till you have broiled them brown i, when they are enough, make your Sauce Vv-ith Mullard, ac- cording to your Liking, fix Anchovies diilblved very well, above half a Pound of Butter drawn up with Garlick, Vine- «rar, or bruifed Garlick in other inegar, rub the Buttom of vour Difh with Garlick, fo put your Sauce to them, and ifiive them j you may fry them if you pleafe.

Jnother

ne Ladys Companion. 105

Another Way to drefs Flounders,

HA V I N G flead ofF the black Skin, and fcored the Fiih over on that Side, with a Knife, lay them on a Diih, and pour on them Ibme inegar, and ftrevv good Store of Salt, let them lie for half an Hour: In the mean Time, fet fome Water on the Fire, with a little White Wine, Gar- lick, and fweetHcrbs, putting to it the Vinegar and Salt; whcrsin they lay; when it boils put in the biggell Fifh,then the next, till all be in; when they are boiled take them ou and drain them very well, then draw fome fweet Butter thick, and mix wich it fome Anchovies ihred fmall, which being dilTolved in the Butter, pour it on the Fifh, ilrewing a little, iliced Nutmeg, and minced Oranges and Barberries.

To JteiK Flounders.

GE T large Flounders, and fcore them; then lay thenr on a Pan; pour round them a Pint of Sallad Oil; Hice two or three Races of Ginger over them, alfo fome Cloves and a Blade or two of Mace: Pour upon them a Pint of White Wine inegar, mixed with a Pint of Claret; add a Nutmeg fliced, two or three Onions cut, and a Bunoh of f.veet Herbs; ilew all thefe together, mince a Handful of Pariley fmall, put it in a little before they are dewed enough, lay Sippets in the Difli, put in your Fiih, pour on the ftewed- Liquor: Garnilli with green Pariley and Slices of Lemon.

Another TVay.

TAKE fmall Flounders, clean them, cut them a-crofs in the Middle, and place thefe Halves, Heads, and Tails, in your Stew-pan, with as much Water as will cover them; put into the Liquor a Blade of Mace, fome Salt, a.
Bit of Lemon-peel, and a Spoonful of Lemon-juice; mix- together fome Crumbs of Bread, Salt, Pepper, Nutmegs Thymic, and Onion fhred very fine, and ftrew thefe over your Filli, when enough, ferve up hot. Garnilh with rafped Bread. f and fliced Lemon.

To Jienjo Plaice.

GU T and wafn them well, cut off the Ends of the Talls put the Fifh into a Stew-pan with fome White Wine Mufhrooms, Truffles, Morels, Pariley, Cives, Thyme, the • Milts, and a little Butter, worked up in Flour; ftir and turn them gently for fear of breaking them; WhfH they are done

F 5 enough, .

o6 The Lad ys Co m p a n i g n,

enough ferve tliem with a White -Sauce, ard garnilli with fryd FuiF-pafie and Lemon, or any Fifli Garniture.

To fry Plaice, we only drudge them with Flour, fry them brown, and ferve them with .fryd Parfley. We likewife broil them on a Gridiron, and ferve them with a White Sauce, or Butter and Vinegar.

Plaice n.vtth Crawf.ili CuUis.

YOUR Plaice being gutted, wafhed and wiped dry, pat them in a Stew-pan, and feafon them with Pepper and Salt, fome Onions, green Lemon Slices, green Bay-leaves, Bafil, green Onions, Parfley, and Vinegar, then fet thenr a Hewing, and when they are done, take them off, but leave them in their Liquor to get a Tafte, make a Sauce with good frelh Butter, which you m.uft put in a Stew-pan, with a Couple of Anchovies and two whole Onions, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, a Dull of Piour, with a little Vine- gar and Vater; Ihake your Stew-pan, and when your Sauce i-s grown thick, put Crawf fli Cullis to it, till it be of the fame Colour, then take your Plaice out of their Liquor, difli them up, let your Sauce be relifliing, put it over them, and ferve them up hot for Entry.

Plaice ixiith Anchovy and Caper Sauce.

YOUR Plaice being boiled, as before directed, make a White Sauce; take a Stew-pan, put good frefh But- ter into it, with a Couple of Anchovies, Capers, two green Onions whole, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, a Dait of Plcur to it, a Daih of Vinegar and Water; and make your Sauce upon the Stove; take your Plaice out of the Liquor, let them drain, and dilli them up; let the Sauce be relifning; put it over your Plaice, and ferve them up hot.

They may be ferved up with the fame Sauce, vhen broiled and lie wed, with Crumbs of Bread,.

To hah Plaice sr Flounders.

BUTTER a Pally-pan with Butter, ilrew it over with a Seafoning of Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a little Parfley minced, and fweet Herbs, and three or four whole Cives; cut off the Heads and Ends of the Fifh, lay them in the Pafty-pan, and pour upon them a Glafs of White Wine; ftrew Salt and Pepper over them, and fprinkle melted Butter upon them, drudge them well with grated Bread, and fet th§m in the Ovsn when they are baked of a fine brown Co-

je LAjyyh Companion. 107

loar, take them out, take care you dont break them as you take theiYi up, then put into a Difh fome Anchovy Sauce, or Crawfifii Cullis, lay them in the Diih with your Sauce, and ferve them up.

To fry Salt-Fiih.

HAVING watered the Tail of the Salt-Fiih, till it is very frefn, cut it in Slices, or fry it whole, as ycu pleafe; when you have dryd it well, drudge it with Flour, fry it in clarified Butter till it is brown, and ferve it up dry with nothing but fryd Parlley.

To farce the Tail cf a Salt-Fifn.

MINCE the FleOi of a Carp, and half the Quantity of the Flefh of an Eel together, with Mnfhroonis, and add to them Cream, and the Yolks cf three or four Egrs raw; fealbn them with Salt, Pepper, Spices, -Cives, Parfley, and fweet Kerbs minced; mingle all thefe well together, and pound them in a Mortar with fweet Butter: Boil the Salt- FifhTail, take cut the Flefh in Flakes, keep the Bone whole, with the End of the Tail hanging to it -.Then brown fome Butter with Flour in a Sauce-pan. and tofs up fome Mufri • rooms and Truffles in it; put in a little Fifli-Broth to moiUcri them; let them Hand a little vhiie to fimmer, then fliim off all the Fat, and add to the Ragoo the Flakes of your Salt- Fiih, with the Milts of Carps; put in fome Crawffli Culli:; to bind it, and let it by to cool: Lay the Bone of your Salt- Fifh, Vvith the Tail, in a Difh or Pafty-pan, and lay your Fifh about it in the Shape of a Salt-Fllhs Tail; make round it a Rim two or three Inches high, pour your Ragoo into it., and cover it with fome Farce of Carps, &c. fmooth it over with a Knife, dippd in beaten Egg; pour over it melted Butter, drudge it with grated Bread, and fet it in an Oven.» till it is of a fine Colour, and ferve it up for a firft Courfe,

If it be but a Pafty-pan, thin Slices of Bread mud be laid, under it, to prevent it from flicking to the Fan, and that you may flide it the eafier out of thePafly-pan into the Di you intend to ferve it in.

10. Ths Ladys Companion.

To drefs Salt-Fiih. a la Sainte Menebcut.

TAKE a Couple of Tails of Salt-Fiih, put them into boiling Water, and when they are boiled, divide them: into Steaks as large as you can: In the mean Time, make a Sauce for them thus: Take a Stew-pan, put in it fome_ iweet Butter, a Pinch of Flour; fet it over a Stove, put in alfo fome Cream, Pepper, and Nutmeg, Capers, Mufnrooms, Truffles, and Parfley Ihred j when thefe have fimm.ered toge- ther for fome Time over a Stove, fet it by to cool, vhile you make a Hafh of Carp in the Manner following: Take a Carp, fcale, ikin, and bone it, ha£h the Fldh, put it into- a Sauce-pan, and dry it a little over the Fire till it grows white; then take it out put to it a few Mufnrooms ar. Truffles, fome Cives and Parfley all minced very fine and mixed well together; then fet a Sauce-pan over a Stove with- a good Piece of frefli Butter in it, brown it with Flour, then put your Hafh into it, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, and a Slice or two of Lemon.; let it have two or three Turns over the Fire, then mciilen it wdl with Fifh-Broth, and thicken it well with three Spoonfuls of Crawlifh, or other Filh Cullis.
When this Hafh is made, put it into a Difh: Garnilh the JBrims all round with your Salt-Fiih, but lay them not to cover the Hafh in the Middle; ftrew over the whole crumbd Bread, crumbled very fine, fet it in an Oven to brown, and- ferve it up hot for a firll Courfe.

To drefs Salt-Fifh a la Montizeur.

PICK the Flefh of Carp from the Bones and clear from the Skin, mince it fmall; put a Stew-pan over a Stove with a good Quantity of Butter, and five or fix whole Onions; when the Butter is melted put in the minced Carp; feafon it with Nutmeg and Pepper: In the mean Time boii your Salt-Fifn, pick the Flefh of that from the Skin and.
Bones, and mince it very fmall, with two or three Rolls foaked in Milk very thick; mix all thefe together with a Piece of fiefh Butter, and fome Nutmeg j when you have done this, fpread your Cod as long as the Size of your Difh will allow; lay on the Difh fome of the minced Fifh; lay the whole Codin the Middle cf the Difli, with fom.e of your minced Fifh about it; lay Oyfters upon it, pour melted But- ter over it, and then ilrew over it grated Bread, and fet it under a baking Cover, or in an Oven: Make a Sauce for it of Butter; Milk and Nutmeg; pour a litde over the Fifa

hs3..

The L A D ys Co m p a n i o n. 109.

when it comes out of the Oven, put the rert in a Bafon or Porringer, and ferve it up hot for tlie firft Courfe.

Soals, ixiih a Ragco of Cratvfjh.

TAKE fomeSoals, and having gutted, fcraped, wafhedp.
and dryd them, cut off the Heads and the Tails; flit, them along the Back, and take out the Eones: Take a fmall 3oal and bone it, lay the Fleili on a T; ble, with a littla Parfley and Cives, feme Mufhrooms, the Yolks of three or.
four raw Eggs, the Bignefs of an Egg of Bread foaked in Cream, and frefh Butter in Proportion; feafon this with Salt, Pepper, fvveet Herbs, and a little Spice, mince it all- well together, and pound it in a Mortar, then farce your Soais with it: Rub the Bottom of a Difli, or Pally-pan, over with Butter; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, a very little fweet Herbs, and minced Parlky, together with a Couple of whols Leeks, then turn in whe Soals, the farced Side downwards, and feafon the uppermoll Side with Salt, Pepper, and Nut- meg; fprinkle them over with melted Butter, drudge them fiightly with Bread crumbled very fme, and fet them to bake.
in the Oven, or under a baking Cover; when they are done- enough, and of a fine Colour, lay them in a Difh, and pour.
a Ragoo of Crawfifh upon them. We likewife ferve them with a Ragoo of Oyflers, or of Mufhrooms or Truffles.

To drefs Soals in Champaign Wine.

GET fome middle-fizd Soals, and having gutted and fcaled them, cut off the Head and Tail, and the Fins all round them -, lay them in a Stew-pan, feafon them with Salt, Pepper, an Onion lluck with Cloves, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, lorhe whole Cives, minced Parfley, and Slices of Lemon: Pour on them a Pint of Champaign Wine, and a little Fifti-Brothj to which add a Ljmp of Butter, and fome Crumbs of Bread grated very fine; fet all this over a Stove with a quick Fire: When the Soals are enough flewed, and the Liquor is vvafled away as it ought, thicken it with a brown CuUis, or with one of Crawfifh; lay the Soals handfomelv on a Difh, pour the Sauce upon them, and ferve them warm for a firft Cburfe.

To mirinate Soals.

LET large Soals be well wafhed, Ikind, and dryd 5 that done, beat them with a Rolling-pin and dipthen «a- hotK Sides in the. Yolks of Eggs tempered with Flour:

Than-

I lo The Ladys Companio n.

Then putting ypur Fiih into a Fry -pan, with as much FIo tince Oil as will cover them, fry them till they are brown, ind coaie to a bright yellow Colour, or fry them in clarified Butter: At that Inilant take them up, drain them on a Plate, and let them by to cool. For the Pickle take White Wine Vinegar well boiled vith Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, and Mace: It is requifite to turn the Liquor into a broad earthen Pan, that the.Fiih may lie at full Length; and the Difn is to be garniilied with Flowers, Fennel, Dill, and Le- mon-peel..

A Surtoat of Soals.

YO U muft make a Farce of the Fleih of a Crp and an Eel, as follows: Mince it on a Table with fome Mufh- rooms, Parfiey, and Cives; ieaion the Vhole with Sslt, Pep- per, a little fweet Herbs, and Spice, and put it into a Mortar; take the Bignefs of two Eggs of the Crumb of Pread, put it into a Sauce-pan, with fome Cream or Milk, and boil it over a Stove; when it comes to be half thickened, put in the Yolks of two Eggs, fiir them vell about in it, and when it is boiled very thick, take it off, and fet it a cooling: Mean while, the Farce being well pounded, add to it as much But- ter as your Difcretion thinks fit, three or four Yolks of raw Eggs, and the Breai Cream; pound the Whole again toge- ther, then take it out of the Mortar: Fry two or three Soals, .
and when they are fried, raife up the Flefh in long Flakes or Slices; fet a Sauce-pan over a Stove with a Lump of But- ter, a Flandful of fmall Muftirooms, and fome Trufiles cut in Slices; tofs them up, moiften them with a little Broth; feafon the Whole with Salt, Pepper, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and boil it; when it is enough boiled, take the Fat clean off; and having bound the Sauce with a brown Cul- lis, or one of Crawfilh, put in the Slices or Flakes of your Soals, and let them fmimer over a gentle Fire, then take them off, and fet them a cooling: Take a Difh, fpread the Bottom of it with fome of the Farce round it; when your .Ragoo of Soals is cold, pour it into the Dilh, and cover it v;ith fome of the fame Farce; dip a broad Knife in beaten Eggs, and rub it gently over the Farce, to make it lie fmooth; lay all round it fome thin Slices of Bread, fprin- kle it over with melted Butter, drudge it with very fine Crumbs of Bread, and fet it to bake in an Oven; when it is baked, and of a fine Colour, take it out of the Oven, clear

1:153 Ladys Companio7J i

it well of the Fat, wipe the Brims of the Difii very clean, and ferve it hot for the firil Coarfe.

lote. We make all Sorts of Surtouts of Filli, in the fame Manner; that is to fay, always with tlie fame Farce; it is only the Ragoo you put in that makes the Difference, and gives the Name to it.

FL E A and draw your Soals, then boil them in VinegaW White Wine, Salt, and. Mace, but make the Liquor boil before you put in the Soals; when they are enough, clifh them on Sippet:.; garnifii with Slices of Lemon, whole Mace, Goofeberries, Barberries, or Grapes; run the Fifh over with Batter beat up thick with the Juice of Oranges 5 and you may lay llewd Oyflers over the Soals.

Another Way.

HAVING flead and dravvn them, fcore them on one Side with a Knife, lay them in a Difh, and pour on them fome Vinegar and Salt, then let them lie in it for half an Hour; in the mean Time, fet fome Water on the Fire with White Wine, Salt, half a Dozen Cloves of Garlicky ard a Bunch of fweet Kerbs; when the Liquor boils, put in your Soals, and pour in the Vinegar and Salt that they lay to.
lleep in; vhen they are boiled drain them well, and bead up Butter very thick, and put in fome Anchovies minced ery fmall, and diflclve them; diih your Fijh, pour on thsi Sauce, llrew on a little grated Nutmeg, and Orange minced,, and mix it with the Butter.

To drefs So ah nvith Cucumbers.

AFTER have fcaJed, gutted, and dryd your Soan,.- flit them down the Back, and fry them, cut off their Heads, and the Ends of their Tails, and fet them to drain; cut three or four Cucumbers into Dice, lay them for two Hours in a Marinade of Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, and an Onion cut in Slices; turn them often, and when they have Liin the Time, dry them with a Linen Cloth -, put Butter into a Sauce-pan, melt it, put in the Cucumbers, brown them then put in Filh-Broth to moiflen them, fet them over a gentle Fire, and let them fimmer a little; when they are enough, clear off all the Fat, and put in a brown Cullis to bind it, or elfe a Brown made of frydjjFlour; put the fryd Soals into the Sauce-pan to the Cucumbers j hi them fmimer

a.-while

312 7Z
awhile, then difh them, pour the Ragoo over them ani ferve them up.

To drefs Soals;; Fricandos.

SCRAPE, gut, vvalh, and dry your Soals; cut off their Heads, Tails, and Pins, quite round them j then flea ofF the upper Skins, and lard th&in with fmall Lardoons, and flour them; then fet a Stew-pan over the Fire, with a little melted Bacon, and when it is hot, lay in the Soals one by one, and brown them; when they are come to a good Co- lour take them up: Mince Muihrooms or TruHies fmall,.
put them into a Difh, with an equal Quantity of Cullis of Veal, and Ham, and EiTence of Ham; then lay the Soals in- a Dih the larded Side uppermoft; lay another Difn over them, and let them fimmer a-while over a gentle Fire; when they are done enough take oif the Soals, pour the Cullis into a Diih you defign to ferve in, fqueeze in the Juice of a Lemon, lay your Soals on the Cullis, and ferve them up hot.

7o fry Soals.

GU T your Soals, wafh them, dry them vith a Clothe drudge them with Flour, and fry them brown in cla- rified Butter; then drain them well, lay a Napkin in a Difh, lay them upon it with fryd Parfley, and ferve them up hot for a firft Courfe. They are commonly eaten with Salt, Pepper, and the Juice of Lemon or Orange.

Another Way.

CU T open your Soals on the Back and both Sides, and bone them till the whoe Flefh appears, and drudge them with Flour, and fry them with clarified Butter; then garnifn them with the Flefh of other Soals, and make a white Sauce with an Anchovy and Capers, or Poburt Sauce, or elfe a Ragoo of Mufhrooms, with Livers of Pikes, Arti- choak Bottoms chopt very fmall, and the Roes of Carps, and fqueeze in the Juice of Lemon wheiryou ferve it up to Table,

7o fry Soals with a browun Cullis.

YOUR Soals being gutted, wafhed, and dried, flit them down the Back, and fry them; then cut off their Heads, and the Ends of their Tails; fet fome Butter over the Fire in a Sauce-pan, with fomc Cives and Parfley fhred

vvhea-

he Ladys Com pan ton. 113

when it has flood a little, put in fome Fifli-Broth to moiften it; put in alfo fome Salt and Pepper, let them fimmer for a while, then put in a few Capers, and pour in fome brown CuUis to bind it, put the Soals into the Sauce, let them fim- mer in it a little, then diih them, pour the Sauce over theni;, and ferve them.

Another Way to fry Soals.

TA K E a Pair of large Soals, flea off their Skins on- both Sides; fry them in Sewet with Spice, Salt, and Bay-leaves; lay them in a Difh, and put them to Claret, Anchovies, and Butter; lay another Dilhover them, and fet them over a Chafing-diih of Coals; let them flew a -while, tqueeze in fome Juice of Lemcn -, garnifh with Orange or Lemon, and ferve them up.

To roajl Soals.

HA VIN G drawn them, Ikin and dry them, minceWin- ter-favoury. Thyme, fweat Marjoram, and a Sprig of Rofemary together; mix thefe with Salt, grated Nutmeg, and feafon your Soals with them; having firfl larded them with a fat frefh Eel, and lay them to lleep for an Hour in White Wine that has had Anchovies diffolved in it; roaft them on a fraall Spit, fet them under the Difh wherein they were fleeped, bafle them with Butter; and when they are enough, boil up the Gravy and the Liquor in the Difh it dropped into together j then difh them, pour the Sauce over them, lay on them Slices of Lemon, and ferve them up.

To foufe Soals.

SCOTCH your Soals on the white Side thick, lut not deep; boil them in White Wine, Wine Vinegar, Salt, fliced Ginger,. Cloves, and Mace, jufl as much as will cover them; when your Liquor boils put in your Soals, then put in fiiced Onions, Winter-favoury, fweet Marjoram, Rofe- mary, Sage, Thyme, and Parfley 3 when they are. boiled enough fet them by to cool.

To drefs Soals the Spanifh Way,

FR Y your Soals, and afterwards cut tliem into Fillets make a Sauce for them of White Wine, Salt, Pepper, a Couple of Cloves of Garlick, Thyme, and a Bay-leaf.

Then

ii4 T< L AD Ys Com p A N ION.

Then foak them by Degrees in the Sauce, and garnllli them with what you pleafe.

Slices of larded Soals.

SCRAPE, and cut them in four Slices ofi from the Bones, lard them with fine Bacon; boil them in White Wine, feafoned with a little Salt, Farlley, green Onions, fweet Banl, fome Sprigs of Thyme, Bay-leaves, and Slices of Lemon; after a Boil or two, take them out to drain;, put fome Slices of Veal and Ham, with an Onion cut in four, into your Stew-pan; moiften it with Broth, and fet it on to ftew; your Veal being done, put in the Slices of your Fifli for a Minute or two, and take them out to drain. Put your Broth in a clean Stew-pan, big enough to hold your Slices, and let it boil to a Jelly; then place your Slices of Fifh in it, the larded Side downwards, and let them glaze over a gentle Fire. Being ready, ferve them up for a fmail Courfe.

Soals drefcd the Dutch Way.

SCRAPE your Soals, flit them about two Inches from the Tail up the Gills, and put them in frefli Water for an Hour; put Water over the Fire to boil, and put in Parf- ley-roots well fcraped, with the Heads of your Fifh cut in four, if they are large, but not parted from each other, and a good Bunch of Parfley wafhed clean; thefe bing boiled, take them out with your Skimmer, put in your Fifn, the Water being high feafoned with Salt; let them boil about Half a Quarter of an Hour, and put your Roots ard Parfley in again for a Moment, before you take out your Fifh, to- make them take the Tafte of Salt; then put your Fifh in a deep China Plate, with your Parfley-roots, and the Parfley over them, and fill up your Difh with the, fait Water your Fifh were boiled in They commonly eat thefe Fifh with Toaft and Butter.

5o Jleir Soals.

WK E N your Soals are waflVd, and the Fins cut ofT, put them into a Stew-pan, with no Liquor but a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine, fome Mace, whole Pep- per, and Salt; when they are half flewd, put in fome Cream, and a little Bit of Butter dipped in Flour; when that is melted put in fome Oyfters with their Liqvior, keep them often Shaking till the Fifli and Oyilers are enough, or the Oyfters

break,.

ne Lad ys Companion. i 15

break, fqueeze in a little Juice of Lemon, and pour it into the Dim.

Another Way.

TA K E a Pair of Soals, lard them with watered Sale Salmon, then lay them on a fmooth Board, cut the- Lard out of an equal Length; on each Side let it be but fhort, then drudge the Fifn with Flour, and fry them in Al till they are half done; then lay them in a DiHi with fix Spoonfuls of White Wine, three of Wine Vinegra, three Ounces of Butter, and fome Slices of Orange and Lemon, with Salt and g -.ted Nutmeg; lay another Diili over it, and- let them Hew j then difa them up with Slices of Lemon, beaten Butter, and the Juice of Oranges.

0 drefs Soals a la Sainte MenchoKt.

GU T, fcrape, wafli, and dry your Soals, and cut olF their Fins, boil a Quart of Milk, then put it into a Stew-pan, and put the Soals to it, with a good Lump of Butter; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Spices, whole Cloves, Gives, Bay-leaves, fweet Bafil, Parfley, and fome fliced Onions; put in your Soals, let them ftevv i when they arc- enough, take them out, rub them over with the Fat of their own Liquor; drudge them with grated Bread, broil thera.
on a Gridiron over a gentk Firs; vhe.n they are enough,, and finely browned, lay a Napkin in a Dih, lay the Soals upon the Napkin, and ferve them up. You may, if yoa pleafe, fet a SWer of Ramolade in the Middle of the Diih.

To farce Soals nvith ftveet Herbs,

FR Y your Soals, let them Hand to cool,, then make 3; Farce of fme Herbs, vi. Ihyme, Savoury, fvveet Ba- fil, Parfley, and Gives, all minced fmall together, feafoned with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and Cloves; then drefs all thefe with a good Piece of Butter, take out the Bones of your Soals at the Top of the Back, and farce them vvidi this Farce; then foak them in melted Butter, drudge them with grated Bread, broil them on a Gridiron, and bring them to a fine brown Colour with a red-hot Iron: Serve them up v.-wi Lemons cut in Halves.

Spa!;J

iiS Th Lad ys Compan iof.

Soals drejed irith Fennel.

GU T, fcrape, and wafh large Soals, and wipe them dry, chop ofF the Heads and the Ends of their Tails; melt fome Butter, put a little Pepper and Salt to it, and turn your Fifh in it; put fome green Fennel over a Gridiron, lay your Fifh over it, and let them broil gently over a fiow Fire; being done on one Side, turn them, and keep up your Fire. Put a little Butter into a Stew-pan over a Stove with a few green Onions and Parfley choppd fmall, llir it up now and then, and moilkn it with a little Fifli-Broth, or Water; then add a Couple of Anchovies choppd, a few Capers, and fome Fennel; thicken your Sauce with your or- dinary Cull is, let it be high relifned, and diih it up; take off your Soals from the Gridiron, clean them from the Fennel that ilicks to them, lay them over your Sauce, andi fierve them up hot.

Soals drejfed ivith Lettuce.

STUFF your Soals, and order them as in the firft Receipt for drelhng Soals with a Ragoo of Crawfifh: Take a Dozen or two of the Hearts of Lettuces, blanch them, put them into cold Water, fqueeze the Water well out of them, and tie them up in two Parcels j put them in a Stew-pan, moiften with Broth, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and let them flew over a flow Fire; being done, fkim off the Fat, thicken your Sauce with Cullis, let your Ragoo be of a good Tafte, and diih it up j take out your Soals when well coloured, lay them over your Lettuces, and ferve them up hot.

Soals fluffed ivitb Ancbofvies.

STUFF the Soals, and order them as in the foregoing Receipt; and make a white Sauce thus: Put fome frefh Butter in a Stew-pan, with a Dull of Flour, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, and a little Nutmeg; moillen the Pan with a little Water and a Daih of Vinegar; walh and bone_ a- Couple of Anchovies, chop and put them in your Sauce, with a whole green Onion, and a Slice of Lemon, and put your Sauce over the Stove; your Soals being done, and of a good Colour, take them out, put them over your Sauce, and ferve them up hot. .

51 Lad ys Com PA N ION. iiy

To bake Soals.

HA V I NG cleaned your Soals, cut off their Heads and Tails, flit them along the Back, and feafon them with Salt, Pepper, fome fweet Herbs, a little Parfley, and whole Cives; then rub a Difli with Butter, and lay m your Soals feafoncd both over and under; fprinkle them with melted Butter, and drudie them with fine Crumbs of Bread; bake them of a fine brown Colour; and when enough, take off all the Fat, and ferve with a Sauce of Anchovies under them.

To roaji Lobfters.

HAVING run a fmall Bird-fpit through the Lobilers Bellies, tie them fail to the Spit with Packthread, and wiien they are enough, they will crackle; lay a whole one, the largell of all, in the Middle of the Difli; butter the relt in Shells, as in the Receipt below, with Pepper, Le- mon, and an Anchovy diflblved in White Wine; mix the Whole together, and ierve them up with Lemon and Oy- fters.

To roajl Lobllers alive.

AFTER having tied them fail on the Spit, baftc them with Salt and Water till they look red, and then with Butter and Salt; let the Sauce be Anchovies diflblved in White Wine, a little Pepper, and the Juice of a Le- mon.

To butter Lobflers.

TAKE out the Meat, mince it fmall, and fet it to flew gently in a Stew-pan over a Stove, with White Wine, Salt, and a Blade of Mace; when it is very hot, put to it fome Buttet and Crumbs of Bread; warm the Shells before the Fire, fill them with v4eat, and ferve them up.

You may do Shrimps, or Prawns, the fame Way, only you muft not put them into the Shells again, but garnifliyour Difli with them.

To broil Lobflers.

GE T Lebflers, boil them, then lay them on a Gridiron, bafte them either with Butter alone, or mixed with Vinegar; let them broil leifurely, and when you think they are enough, ferve them up with Butter and Vinegar

beat

fiS The Ladys CoMPANiOfi.

beat thick, to which put fome grated Nutmeg and lliced - Lemon.

To fry Lobflers.

TA K E a boiled Lobller, take out the Meat, flice it long Ways, flour it, and hy it in Butter white and crifp, or roll it in a Batter made of Cream, Eggs, Flour, and Salt, and fry it, beat fome Butter up thick with grated Nutmeg, Claret, and the Juice of Oranges, for Sauce; rub the Diili with an Onion or Shalot; lay in the Lobiter, pour on the Sauce; garnilh the Dilh with Slic of Lemon and •Orange, and ferve it up.

To fnarinate Lobflers.

PARBOIL them, take out the Meat, and lard the Tails with a faked Eel; then cut the Tails longways, and fry them in Oil; then make a Sauce with White Wine Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Mace, iliced Ginger, Parf- ley. Sage, Winter-favoury fweet Marjoram, the Tops of Rofemary and Thyme, and Bay-leaves; difh yourFifh, and pour Sauce upon them, and lay on them three Lemons fliced, and run it all over with Butter.

To pickle Lobfters. ~

BOIL them in Vinegar, White Wine, and Salt; tlien take them up -, then put into the Liquor all Sorts of fv.eet Kerbs, fom.e whole Cloves, Pepper, and large Adace; then put in your Lobikrs again, boil them all together, put their, up in a Barrel or VYfiel, that will jufl hold them, and pour the Liquor upon them, and keep them for Ufe.

Another Way.

EO I L them in Water and Salt till they will flip out of their Shells j then take the Tails out whole; make a

Pickle for them of Port Wine and Water, an equal Quantity, put in a Sprig or two of Rofemary, Thyme, Savoury, a Couple of fmall Cucumbers, Capers, and whole Muflirooms; put your Lobflers in this Pickle, and let them have a Boil or two; take them out, fet them by to cool; boil the Pickle a little more, let it fland till cold, then put both Lobflers and Pickle in a long Pot, and tie it up clofe.

9

he Ladys Companion. 119

To Jlevj Lobflers.

PU T the Meat of the Lobilers in a Stew-pan, with Vine- gar, Claret, Butter, Salt, and Nutmeg; flew it ibme- what dry, and then take it up, and lay it in a Difh; pour Butter over it, and garnifii it vith Slices of Lemon.

To butter Lobilers.

PARBOIL your Loba;ers, then break the Shells, pick out all the Meat, cut it fmall, take the Meat out of the Body, mix it line with a Spoon in a little White Wine: For Example, A fmall Lobiler, one Spoonful of Wine, put it in- to a Stew-pan with the Meat of the Lobuer, four Spoonfuls of White Wine, a Blade of Mace, a little beaten Pepper and Salt: Let it Itew all together a few Minutes, then llir in a Piece of Butter, Ihake your Stew-pan round till your But- ter is melted, put in a Spoqnful of Vinegar, and llrev in as many Crumbs of Bread as will make it thick enough: When it is hot, pour it into your Plate, and garnilh with the Chine of a Lobiler, cut in four, peppered, faked, and bfoiled.
This makes a pretty Plate, or a iine Difli, with two or three Lobilers. You may add one Tea-lpoonful of iine Sugar to your Sauce.

Another Way to roaft Lobflers.

BOIL your Lobilers, then lay them before the Fire, and baile them vWth Butter till they have a fine Broth: Difh them up with plain melted Butter in a Cup. This is as good a Way to the full as roafling them, and not any-thing like the Trouble.

To make a fine Dijh of Lobflers.

TAKE three Lobflers, boil the largeil as above, and froth it before the Fire: Take the other two boiled, and butter them as in the Receipt above: Take the two Body Shells, heat them hot, and £11 them with the buttered Meat: Lay the large Lobiler in the Middle, and the two Shells on each Side; and the two great Claws of the Middle Lobiler at each End; and the four Pieces of Chines of the two broiled Lobflers at the End of the Shells .; This, if nicely Uojie, makes a pretty Difh.

Ioblbrs

20 The L A D ys C o m p a N I N,

Lobflers, the Italian Way.

TAKE from your Lobfters, when boiled and cold, the Flefh of the Tails, and great Claws, and cut it in Slices; put a little Butter in a Stew pan, with fome Chibbol, Parfley, Mufh rooms, and Truffles, cut fmall, and tofs it up, put in your Slices, moiften it with Gravy, and a Glafs of White Vvine; then fcaion it with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, and Rocambole. Let it Hew flowly, put a Spoonful of Oil, the Meat of the Body, tjc. Juice of a Lemon, in your Sauce, thicken with fome Cullis.

To irefi Crabs.

HA1NG taken out the Meat, and cleansd It from the Skins, put it into a Stew -pan, with a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine, or Canary, fome Crumbs of white Bread, an Anchoy, and a little Nutmeg: Then fetting them over a gentle Fire, flip in the Yolk of an Egg, with a little beaten Pepper, and llir all well together, in order to be fcrved up for a Side-difh.

To broil Crabs.

BOIL your Crabs in Water and Salt; beat Oil and inegar well together, lay your Crabs to fleep in it; then lay them on a Gridiron over a gentle Fire; as they broil bafte them with Rofemary Branches; ferve them up wit beaten Butter and Vinegar, or Oil and Vinegar, with the Roiemar Branches they were balled with.

To butter Crabs.

BOIL your Crabs, take the Meat out of their Bodies, and ftrain it, with the Yolks of three or four hard Eggs, into fome Claret, Vinegar, Sugar, and beaten Cinnamon; then put all into a Pipkin with frefii Butter, and let it Hew for a Quarter of an Hour, and ferve them up as before.

Another Way.

BOIL your Crabs, take the Meat out of their Shells, and alio out of their great Claws; cut it into Dice- work, and put both the Meats into a Pipkin with White Wine, the Juice of Oranges, Nutmeg, and Slices of Orange; let it have three or four Walms over the Fire i and having cleaned the Shells well, put the Meat into them, and lay the Legs on the Difh round about.

he Lad ys Companion. m

To fry Crabs.

FIRST boil a large Crab, take the Meat out of the great Claws, flour and fry it, then take the Meat out of the Body, firain it, keep one half to be fryd, and the other for the Sauce; mix that you fry with Almond Palte, grated Bread, Salt, Nutmeg, and the Yolks of Eggs; dip thefe firft in Batter, and fry them in clarifyd Butter; then beat feme Butter up thick with the Juice of Orange and grated Nutmeg; put in the reft of the ilrained Meat, let this be your Sauce; dilh your fryd Meat, placing the Legs about it, run it oier with beaten Butter, and lay fryd Parllcy about the Brim of the Diih.

To ficnjo Crabs,

BOIL them, take the Meat out of the Bodies, fave the great Claws and the fniall Legs whole to garnifh •i;]:e JDilh, Icrain the Meat with Claret Wine, VinegarjSalt, Nut- meg, and a Piece of Butter; put them into a Stew pan, and let them ftew for an Hour over a gentle Fire, till they are almolr dry; then put in Butter, beat up diick, with the [uice of Oranges; diili the Shells, being waihd, with the Meat in them, lay the Claws and little Legs round about them, and lerve them.

Or thus.

OIL them, take tlie Meat out of tlie Shells, and put it into a Stew-pan, with Claret Wine, Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, grated Bread, minced Thyiie, the Yolks of hard Eggs, minced very fmall, and flrained, frefh Butter, large Mace, and Capers, let them ftew together, rub the Slielk with a Clove of Gaiiick, and difti them as before dircl:ed.

To make an artificial Crab or Lobfler.
T is fuppofed that you have by you the large Shells of Sea Crabs cleaned; then take Part of a Calfs Liver, boii it, and mince it very fmall, and a little Anchovy Liquor, and but very little, to give it the Fiih Tafie. Mix it with a Jiule Lemon-juice, fome Pepper, and fome Salt, with a little Oil, if you like it, and fill the Shells with it; and then the putfide Part of the Liver, being a little hard, will feel to the Mouth like the Claws of the Crab, broken and picked, and the inner Parts will be foft and tender, like the Body of a Crab. One may ferve this cold, and it will deceive a Vol. I. G very

X 2 2 he Ladys Companion.

ery good Judge, if you co not put too much of the Anchovy Liquor in it. It is very good cold, but if you would have it hot, take the following Receipt.

To make artificial hot buttered Sea-Crabs.

MAKE the great Shells of Crabs clean, and prepare fome Liver, as before; or if you cannot get Calfs Liver, get a Lambs Liver, or a young Sheeps Liver will do tolerably well: Boil thefe, and fhred them as directed be- fore, and put a little Anchovy Liquor to them, add a little White Wine, fome Pepper and Salt at Pleafure, and fome other Spice at Difcretion, with Butter neceffary to make it mellow, over a gentle Fire, or a little Sallad Oil, if you like Oil: Then add a little Lemon-juice in the Shells, ftir- ring the Mixture together; then ferve them up with Lemon ihced.

To make ariif.cial Craos.

YO U mull take fome of the White of a roafied or boiled Chickens Breair, and fhred it very fmall; then add fome Roots of Potatoes boild and beat into Pulp; mix thefe together, and grate a little Lem.on-peel upon it, add fome Anchovy Liquor to it, with fome Oil, and, put a little Le- mon-juice to it, or Vinegar, with fon.e Pepper or Salt; ferve iit upon Sippets, garnifiied with diced Lemon: Thefe may be buttered in Shells as the former; but the nril is rather the beil.

To make artificial LobRers.

PR.A C T I C E the fame Method with either of the for- mer; and to imitate the Tail of the Lobfter, put in the Tails of Shrimps, Buntings, Prawns, or Crawiilh; the Jaft cut in Pieces, and ferve them either upon Sippets in a Plate, or in the large Shell of the Lobfler.

This is a Sort of Salmi, or Salmigundy, as we call it in BnglarJ, but is very much like the Thing we want; and we think if the Shrimps, or others, were put into the firft, it would make it better than putting in the Anchovy Liquor; bu: if they are to imitate a Crab, they muil chop the Shrimps ox Prawns sry fmall.

he L A D ys C M p A N I o N. 123

To boil Perches.

GUT your Perches, give them three Scotches with a Knife to the Bone, only on one Side; after that put.
into a Stew-pan or Kettle, Water, as much hard rtale Beer, WMte Wine, and Vinegar, as will cover your Fifh, and Herbs, c. then put in a good Quantity of Salt, a Bunch of Winter-favoury, Thyme, Rofemary, and Parlley, and a Handful of Horfe-radilh Root lliced: Set your Stew-pan over a briik Wood Fire, and let it boil up to the Height, and then put in your Fiih one by one, that they may not cool the Liquor, fo much as to make it fail in its boiling: While the Filh are boiling, for your Sauce take a little of the Liquor, and beat up Ibme Butter with it j then, when your Perches are enough, take them up, take off the Skins, dilli them, ftrcw iliaved Horfe-radifh over them, and fome beaten Ginger; ran them over with your melted Btjcter.
Garnifh the Sides of the Diih with fliced Lemon, and fend it up to Table.

Perches ivith Jnrhfi-vy-fauce.

GU T your Perches, and ftew them in a Ccwt-Bouillon.
as loliows: Lay them in a Stew-pan with fom.e fliced Onion and Lem.on, fome Parfley, Gives, Bay-leaves, Bafil, Cloves, Pepper, and Salt, iwo GlalIVs of Vhite Wine, a lit- tle Vinegar, and as much Water as v.ill cover them, fo flew them over a Stove; then take them oft, and fet them to cool a little in the Court Bouillon: When they have ilood a while take them out, ikin them without breaking the Fiefh, lay them in a Diili, and cover them that they may not grov cold: Put fom.e frefh Butter into a Stew-pan, with a little Flour, a Couple of m.inced Anchovies, fome Capers, and a whole Leek, a Slice or two of Lemon, the Whole belnjr feafoned with Salt, Pepper, and a little Nutmeg, add to it a little Water and Vinegar; keep turning the Sauce: over a Stove with a Spoon, and when the Butter is meked and thickened, take out the Leek and filced Lemon, pour it on the Perches, and ferve them up for the iirfl: Courfe.

Perches, W a Cullis of Cravjfijh.

STEW your Perches in a Court- Bouillon, fkin them, and lay them in a Dilh, as in the foregoing Receipt, make a Sauce as follovs: Put the Quantity of two Eggi of fre Ih Butter JB a Stew-pan, with one minced Anclfovy ome

G 2 Fspper,

1 24 ne L A D ys C m p a n I n.

Pepper, Salt, a Iktle grated Nutmeg, a Pinch of Flour, a Drop or two of Water, and as much Vinegar, turn it over a Stove with a Spoon; when the Butter is melted, and a little thickened, put in fome Crawfiih Cullis; pour this Sauce on your Perches, and ferve them for the firil Courfe. They may be ferved likewile with all Sorts of Cullifes as well as this.

Perches drejfed in Filhts.

CLEANSE Muihroorns well, and beat them in a little Cream; then having cut your Perches into Fil- lets or Slices, the whole Length of the Body, dividing each Perch into four Pieces, mix them together, and boil them with a Thickening made of the Yolks of three Eggs, fem.e Nutmeg grated, a little Parfley fhred, and tViC Juice of a Le.- irioa: Str them very carefully that you do no: break your Fillets j and when they are boiled enough, cifli them, pour your Ragoo over them, with fome Parile, aid Slices of Lemon.

0 fry Perches.

AFTER having fcraped off the Slime and Scales, wafli them in Salt and Water, gut them, and dry them in a Cloth; flour them, and fry them in fwect Butter, till they are brown and crifp; then lay them in a warm Dih before the Fire, and pour away that Butter: Take other frefh But- ter, and fry in it a good deal of ParHey and Sage crifp; lay thefe fryd Herbs on yourJFifh. In the meanTim.e, let an Anchovy be diilblved in three or four Spoonfuls of fcalding hot Spring Water, and with them beat up fome Butter; pour this on your Perches. Gamifh with Parfley and Strawberry- leaves.

Perches the Armenian Way.

TAKE Perches of about a Pound Weight, fcale and fli them, fealbn them with Mace, Salt, pounded Bifkets, and Slices of Lemon, and Butter all over them, turn them Infide out, tie them with Packthread, and broil them till thoroughly done i then cut off the Thread, open them and ferve ttem up with melted gutter and the Juice of a Le- mon.

7o

TJce Lad ys C o m p a n i o n. 125

ro boil Bafs.

SAVE the I,ivers and Roes of your Bafs, fcale and vvaHi them well, then boil them in Water, Wine Vinegar, Salt, a Faggot of Tweet Herbs, fome whole Onions, and Lemon fiiced; make a Sauce of drawn Butter, Mace, Cin- namon, a Nutmeg quartered, and three or four Anchovies diflblved vith them; difh your Fifii, pour on the Sauce, and garnifh with fryd Oyllers and Bay-leaves.

To fry Trouts.

YO U muft, with a Knife, gently fcrape oiFall the Slime from your Filh, wafh them in Salt and Water, gut them, and wipe them very clean with a Linnen Cloth; that done, flrew Flour over them, and fry them in fweet Butter, till they are brown and crifp; thea take them out of the Frying-pan, and lay them on a Pewter Difh, well heated before the Fire j pour off the Butter they were fryd in, into the Greafe Pot, and not over the Trouts: Afterwards, good Store of Parfley and young Sage being fryd crifp in other fweet Butter, take out the Herbs, and lay them on your Fifh.
In the mean while, fome Butter being beaten up with three or four Spoonfuls of fcalding hot SpringWater, in which an Anchovy has been diffolved, pour it on the Trouts, and Ice them be fcrved up. Garnifh with the Leaves of Strawber- ries, Parfley, c.

After this Manner, Grailings, Perches, fmall Pikes or Jacks, Roaches and Gudgeons may be fryd, their Scales being firfl fcraped off: And you may thus fry fmall Eels, when they are flead, gutted, wiped clean, and cut into Pieces of four or five Inches long; feveral Pieces of Salmon, or a Chine of it, may likewife be dreffed in the fame Man- ner.

To boil Trouts.

LE T the Trouts be wafhd and dryd with a clean Nap- kin; then open t li, and having taken out the Guts, with all the Blood, wipe them very cleaji on the Infide, without wafhing, arid give each three Scotches, with a Knife, to the Bone, only on one Side: After that pour into a Ket- tle, or Stew-pan, as much hard ilale Beer, with Vinegar, and a little Vhite Wine and Water, as will cover the Fifh; then throw into the Liquor a good Quantity of Salt, a Handful ©f fiiced Horfe-Fadilh Root, with a fmall Faggot of Parfley,

G 3 Rofc-

120 he Ladys Companion.

.Rofcmary, Thyme, and Winter- favonry; that done, fet the Fan over a quick Wood Fire, and let the Liquor boil up to the Height before you put in your Fifh; then flip them in one by one, that they may not fo cool the Liquor as to make it fall: While the Fifh are boiling, beat up Butter for the Sauce, with a little of the Liquor, and as foon as it is enough, drain off the Liquor, lay your Trouts in a Dilh, and pour melted Butter upon them, brewing them plentifully over with fcraped Horfe-radifh, and a little powdered Ginger: Garnifh the Sides of the Difh with fliced Lemon, and fend it to Table.

In the fame Manner you may drefs Grailings, Carp, Bream, Roach, and Salmon, only they are to be fcaled» vhich mull be done very lightly and carefully with a Knife.
A Pike may alfo be thus dreffed, the Slime being tiril fcoured oft with Water and Salt.

To fjuje Trouts.

TA K F a Quart of Water, a Pint of White Wine, and two Cjuarts of White Wine Vinegar, with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Cinnamon, and Mace, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, a little Lemon-peel, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs; let thefe boil together a little while, and put in your Trouts, and boil them according to their Bignefs; then take them out of the Liquor to be cold, and put your Soufe Liquor in- to a Stone Jar to cool: If tis not fharp add more Vinegar, -and a little Salt, and keep your Fifli therein; if you would have them, hot, you may take them out of the above Soufe, when enough, and take for Sauce a little of the Liquor, fomxC White Wine, an Anchovy wafhed clean, and fom.e Mace, with Oyllers and Shrimps, and Butter kneaded in Flour.
Garnilh v.ith fried Smelts, and fiiced Lemon, and ferve it.

You may do Salm.on, Pike, Mullet, and moll other Filh the fame Way; only if you drefs them to eat hot immedi- ately, you rnay alter the Sauce if you pleafe.

To make Virginia Trouts.

TAKE pickled Herrings, cut off their Heads, and lay the Bodies two Days and Nights in Water; then wafh- ing them well, feafon them with Pepper, Cinnamon, Cloves, Mace, and a little red Saunders: Afterwards lay them clofe in a Pot, with a little choppd Onion llrewd over them, and caft between ever Layer; wherx you have done thus put in

a Pmt

The Ladys Companion. 127

a Pint of Claret, cover them with a double Paper tyd on the Pot, and fet them in an Oven: They are to be eaten cold .

To pickle Trouts.

PU T all Sorts of Spice, and a Faggot of fweet Herb, into as much Water and Vinegar as vili cover ihe Fifh; boil the Fifn in them till it is enough, let it lie in the Pickle till you are difpofed to eat it.

7o niarinaie Trouts.

FR y them in a good Quantity of clarified Butter, Sewet,, or Oil, till they are crifp, then lay them a draining in a Difh till they are cold; then rnake a Marinade of White Wine and Vinegar, of each an equal Quantity; put in Salt whole Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, IVlace, fliced Ginger, Wln- ter-lavoury, Sweet Marjoram, Thyme, Rofemary, a Bay- leaf, or a Couple of Onions; boil thefe together for a Quar- ter of an Hour, put your Fifli into a Stew-pan, pour the Ma- rinade to them hot, put in a Pint of Oil, and llice in a Le- mon-peel: It will keep a Month covered with the Liquor; ferve them, with Oil, Vinegar, and Lemon.

To ftcw Trouts.

] T A V I N G put three or four Trouts in a Diih, with 71 better than a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine, and a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, with a little whole Mace; thea mince Thym.e, Winter-favoury, and Parfley together, and put to them let them flew a Quarter of an Hour, then mince the Yolk of an Egg, and put in your Trouts; w hen.
they are enough difh them, lay the Herbs on them; pour the Liquor over them, and ferve them up; Garnilh with Barber- ries and Capers choppd.

Another Uay.

WA S H them in Vinegar and Water, let them lie in it a little while; then put them into a Pan with a Cover; add four or five Spoonfuls of Vinegar, as much White Wine, a good Quantity of Salt, a Stick of Cinnamon, feme whole Mace, a few Cloves, fome Sorrel, and a Paggot of fweet Herbs; fet this Pan into a Kettle of boiling Waters, and keep it boiling for three Hours.

Thus may you drefs Salmon, Carps, Eels, c.

G A. Anothit

128 ne Lad Ys CoMP A Nio N.

Alother Way of drejftr.g Trouts.

YO U muft take two or three good Trouts, gut them at the Gills, fcrape them, and wipe them well; then lay them on a DrefTer- board, heat a Fire-fhovel red-hot, pafs it over them lightly feveral Times to harden them; then lard them with Slices of Bacon in Rows: Garnifli the Bottom of a Stew-pan with Bards of Bacon, lay the Trouts upon them, cover the Stew-pan, put Fire over and under it; you mall flir them now and then, to keep them from ftieking; when they are well coloured, take away the Bacon, lay the Fih to foak in good Gravy, a little White Wine, and an Onion fluck with Cloves; ilew thefe gently together, and feafon them in the Stew-pan: When a pretty deal of the I jquor is itewed away, and the Trouts are near enough, pui Muihrooms, Truffles, and other Garnitures in Seafon, into Gammon EfTence, and make a Ragoo; then difli your riih, take away the Fat, pour your Ragoo about them; garnifh withAvtichcak Bottoms, or fmall Trout CoUops, well larded, fo iiit them np.

1o broil Trouts.

GU T them, wafh them, and dry them in a Cloth, fprinkle them with melted Butter and Salt, then lay them en a Gridiron, over a gentle Fire, and turn them often: Make a Sauce of Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a little Flour, a little Vinegar and Water, an Anchovy, and a few Capers; keep moving thefe in a Stew-pan over the Fire till it becomes pretty thick, then difh your Fifli, pour the Sauce over them, and ferve them. up.

You may aifo ferve them with a Ragoo of Cucumbers, cr of Muihrooms, and you may bind the Sauce with a Cul- lis of CrawMi, but then you mull put no Capers in the fiauce.

Another Way,

WHEN you have gutted, wafhed, and dryd your Trouts, cut off their Heads and Tails, and fprinkle them with melted Butter, Pepper, and Salt; lay fome green Fennel on your Gridiron, and placing the Trouts upon it, broil them over a llack Fire: Make a Sauce of fome Cives and Parfley fhred, then put them in a Stew-pan, with fome Butter, and let it over a Stove; add a little Fifh-Brcth, and when near wafted away, two Anchovies, with a few Capers;

« bind

frZc La D ys Com p A N I ON. 129

bind it with a Fifh Cullis, pour it over your Trouts, fo fervc them.

To drefs Haddock the Dutch Way.

BEING fcaled and gutted, gafh them with a fiiarp Knife into the Back bone on both Sides, and throw thenv into cold Water and Vinegar. They will boil in lefo than half an Hour, but that mull be according to the Bignefs, only boil them till they will come from the Bone; then, for your Sauce take Turnips, cut them as fmall as Yolks of Eggs, and boil them tender in Water and Salt. In Holland they boil them with the Fih, and they take very little more boil- ing than the Fifli, becaufe they are better than ours; but if you boil EvgliJhTmmVS, you muft boil them a little before yoa put in your Fiih; but you mull not boil your Turnips la tender as if they were to eat with Beef or Mutton; then drain them from the Liquor, and put two or three Dozen of Turnips, according to the Bignefs of your Difh, into a Found of drawn Butter, and a little minced Parfley, fo pur.
your Haddocks into the Difh, and Sippets under them; and pour your Turnips and Sauce over them; throw a little minced Parfley about your Difh, fo ferve it. You may tfo Vhitings, or Soals, the fame Way.

To broil Haddocks.

SCALE them, gut and wafh them clean, do not rip open the Belly, but take the Guts out with the Gilk, dry them in a clean Cloth very well; if there be any Koc or Liver, take it out, but put it in again: Flour them well, and have a clear good Fire: Let your Gridiron be hot and clean, lay them on, turn them quick two or three Times for fear of llicking; then let one Side be enough, and turn the other Side; when that is done, lay them in your Diflj,;ind have plain Butter in a Cup.

They eat finely falted a Day or two before they are dref • fed, and hung up to dry, or boiled with Egg Sauce. A.v- ccjle is a famous Place for falted Haddocks j they come in Barrels, and keep a great while.

To make Water- Soochey.

TAKE fome of the fmalleil Plaice, or Flounders, yoi can get, wafh them clean, cut the Fins clofc, ]-!;t them in a Stew-pan; put jufl Water enough to boil them in, a little Salt, and a Bunch of Parfley: When they are enough

lesti

1 30 The Ladys Companion.

fend them to Table in a deep Dilli, with the Liquor to keep them hot, have Pariley and Butter in a Cup.

To roaj a Chub.

SCALE your Chub, vvalh it well, and take out the Guts; make a little Hole as near the Gills as you can, and cleanfe the Throat; afterwards, having put fome fweet Herbs into the Belly, tie the Whole with two or three Splin- ters to the Spit, and roafl it, bailing the fame often with Vinegar, or Verjuice ancl Butter, mixed with good Store of Salt: By this Means, the watery Hum.our, with which all Chubs abound, is eifeftually dried up. A Tench may be drelled after the fame Manner.

To broil a Chub.

AFTER having fcaled your Chub, cut off its Tail and Fins, wafli it clean, and .flit it through the Middle j then give it two or three Cuts, or Scotches on the Back, with a Knife, and broil it on Wood Coals; all the Time it is broiling, bafle it with fweet Butter, mingled with a good deal of Salt, and a little Thyme Ihred very fmall.

To boil a Chub.

YOU mull fet a Kettle over the Fire, with Vinegar and Vvater, fo much as will cover the Fifh, and put Fennel therein, with good Store of Salt: As foon as the Water boils, f.ip in your Chub, being iirft fcaled, gutted, and cleanfed about the Throat: When it is enough, take it out, lay it on a Board to drain, and after an Hours lying thus, pick all the Fiih from the Bones: Then turn it into a Pewter Difn, fet it over a Chafing-difh of Coals with melted Butter, and fend it very hot to Table.

To cure ox pickle i Sturgeons froTn Hamburgh,

TA K E a Sturgeon, gut it, and clean it very well within Side with Salt and Water, and in the fame Manner clean the Outlide, wiping both very dry with coarfe Cloths, witaout taking any of the great Scales from it: Then take off the Head, the Fins, and Tail; and if there is any Spawn jn it, fave it to be cured for Cavier; when this is done cut vour Fifh into fmall Pieces of about four Pounds each, and take out the Eones as clean as poffible, and lay them in Salt and Water for twenty-four Hours, then dry them well with coarfe Cloths, and iuch Pieces as want to be rolled up,

tie

he Lad ys Com PA N ION. 131

tie them clofe with Bafs Strings, that is, the Strings of Bark < which coinpole the Bafs Mats, fuch as the Gardeners nfe, for that b ing fiat, like Tr.pe, will keep the Fifh clofe in the boiling, which would otherwife break, if it was tied with Packthread -, ilrew fome Salt over the Pieces, and let them lie there three Days, then provide a Piece of Wicker made fiat, and wide as the Copper, or Cauldron, you boil your Filh in, with two or three Strings tied to the Edges, the Ends of which fhould hang over the Edges of the Copper: The Pans we generally boil our Fifh in, are generally flial- low and very broad; then make the following Pickle, ws;.
one Gallon of Vinegar to four Gallons of Water, and to that Quantity put four Pounds of Salt; when this boils, put in your Fifli, take care to fkim off the Oil as it boils, and keep fupplying the Liquor with hot Water as it boils away, or elfe the Sturgeon will be rufty; when it is boiled enough, take it out, and lay it in fmgle Pieces, upon Hurdles, to drain, or upon fuch Boards as will not give an extraordinary Tafte to the Fifii; fome will boil in this Pickle a Quarter of a Pound of whole black Pepper.

When your Firti is quite cold, lay it in clean Tubs, which are called .Kitt, and cover it with the Liquor it was boiled in, and clofe it up to be kept for Ufe.

i at any Time you perceive the Liquor to grow mouldy or begin to mother, pafs it through a Sieve, add fome freili Vinegar to it, and boii it j and when it is quite cold, walh your Fifh in fome of it, and lay your Pieces afrcfh in the Tub, covering them with Liquor as before, and it will keep good feveral Months: This is generally eaten with Oil and Vine-

To f rep are the Cavier or Spaavn of the Sturgeon.

WA S H it well with Vinegar and Water, and then if it in Salt and Vvatertvvo or three Days j thenbou it in frefh Water and Salt; and vhen it is cold put it up for Ufe: This is eaten upon Toafts of Whine Bread, with a little Oil.

To roaji a Piece of freJJy Sturgeon.

GE T a Piece of freih Sturgeon of about eight or ten Pounds; let it lie in Water and Salt fix or eight Hours, with its Scales on; then fallen it on the Spit, and bade it well with Butter for a Quarter of an Hour, and after that drudge it with grated Bread, Flour, forae Nutmeg, a

little s

12 The Ladys Companion-.

I little Mace, powdered Pepper, Salt, and rome fvveet Herbs dryd and powderM, continuing drudging and bailing it till it is enough; then ferve it up with the fo; lowing Sauce, -viz, one Pint of thin Gravy and Oyfter-liquor, withVome Horfe- radifh, Lemon-peel, a Bunch of fweet Kerbs, fom-e whole Pepper, and a few Blades of Mace, with a whole Onion, an Anchovy, a Spoonful or two of Liquid Catchup, or fome Liquor of pickled Walnuts, with half a Pint of White Wine J ftrain it off, and put as much Butter as will thicken it; to this put Cyfters parboiled, Shrimps or Prawns pickd, or tire Infide of a Crab, which will make the fame Sauce very rich; then garn-fh vvith fryd Oyfters, Lemon fliced, butterd Crabs, and fryd Bread cut in handfome Figures, and pickled Mufhrooms.

Note If you have no Catchup, you m. ay ufe Mufhroom Gravy, or fome of the Travelling Sauce mentioned in this

Book, or elfe a fmall Tea Spoonful of the dry Pocket.

1 Sauce.

To roajl a Fillet- or Collar of Sturgeon.

TA K E a Piece of frefli Sturgeon, gut it, take out the Bones, and cut the fielhy Part in Length, about Qvtxi, or eight Inches; then provide fome Shrimps, choppd very Kmall, with Oyfters, fome Ci-umbs of Bread, and fuch Sea- foning of Spice as you like, with a little Lemon-peel grated; when this is done, butter one Side of your Fifh, and ftrew fome of your Mixture upon it; then begin to roll it up as rclofe as porsTible, and vvhen the iirft Piece is rolled up, then roll upon that another, prepared as before, and bind it round with a narrow Fillet, leaving as much of the Filh apparent as may be; but you muft remark, that the Roll fhould not be above four Inches and a half thick for elfe one Part would be done enough before the Infide was hardly warmed; therefore, we have fometimes parboiled the infide Roll be- for« we begin to roll it.

When it is at the Fire, bafte it well vith Butter, and drudge it with Mi Rafpings of Bread. Serve it with the fame Sauce as diredled for the former.

A Piece of frejh Sturgeon boiled,

TAKE a Rand of Sturgeon, and prepare as much Li- quor to boil it in as will cover it; that is, take a Pint . of Vinegar to about two Quarts of Water, a Stick of Horfe- ladiih, two or three Bits of Lemon-peel, fome whole

Pepper,.

ne Ladys Companion. 153

Pepper, a Bay-leaf or two, and a fmall Handful of Salt, boil your Fifli in this till it is enough, and ferve it with the fol- lowing Sauce.

Melt a Pound of Butter, then add fome Anchovy Liquor, fome Oyfter Liquor, White Wine, fome Catchup boiled to- gether, with whole Pepper, and Mace ftrained; put to this the Body of a Crab, and ierve it with a little Lemon-juice.
You may likewife put in iome Shrimps, the Tails of Lob- flers cut to Pieces, dewed Oyilers, or Crawfifh, cut into fmall Pieces. Garnilh with pickled Mufhrooms, and roalt- ed, or fryd, Oyilers, Lemon fliced, and Horfe-radiih fcraped.

fo fry Sturgeon.

TA K E a Rand of frefh Sturgeon, and cut it into Slices about half an Inch thick, hafh it, and fry it brown in clarifyd Butter; when it is fryd it will look as if it was rib- bed; then take up the Sturgeon, and clean the Pan; and put in fome Claret, Salt, an Anchovy, and beaten Saffron, put in your Sturgeon, fry it again in thefe, and when half the Liquor is wafted, put in a Piece of Butter, Nutmeg, and Ginger grated and Lemon minced; rub the Difh with a Clove of Garlick, dilh it, garnifh the Dilh with Lemon,

0 hi oil Sturgeon.

BROIL your Sturgeon either in a whole Rand, or cut into Slices an Inch thick; fait them, fteep them in fweet Oil and Wine Vinegar, broil them on a gentle Fire, and baftc them with the Oil and Vinegar that they were ileeped in, with Sprigs of Rofemary, Thyme, and Parfley; when, it is broiled, ferve it up with the Dripping it was bafVed with, and fome of the Branches of Rofemary: Or you may balle it with Butter, and ferve it up with Butter and Vinegar, beaten up with Slices of Lemons, or Juice of Orange.

To drefs Sturgeon in Haricot niitb Turnips.

BOIL your Sturgeon in Water, with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Onions, and Thyme, and you may pour in fome Broth, and then you mull fry your Sturgeon brown with Lard; then you mufl clear it from the Fat, and put it into a Cullis that you have ready prepared, with Turnips and a little Gammon of Bacon cut into Slices, or choppd

&iall:

1 34 The L A D ys Companion.

fmall •. It may be ferved with Lemon-juice, and fet out with Marinade, or fome other Garniture.

To diefs Sturgeon a la Sante yianehout.

CU T your Sturgeon into thick Slices, and ftew them leifurely in Milk, White Wine, a little reeked Lard, with a Bay leaf, and all well feafoned with the ufual Sea- fonings; then take them out, drudge them with grated Bread, and broil them on a Gridiron; and ferve.them up upon a Sauce of Anchovies, Capers, Chibbols, and Parfley, ihred a-part, good Gravy, a Clove of Garlick, and a Drop of Oil.

Tq marinate Sturgeon.

LE T your Sturgeon be he, cut it into Joles and Rands, walh it well, wipe it dry, flour it, and fry it in four Gallons of Rape Oil clarified; when it is fried brown and crifp, put it into Trays, then pack your Sturgeon in them, in the fame Manner tnat you do boiled Sturgeon that is kept in Pickle, with two Gallons of White Wine, and three Gal- lons of White Wine Vinegar, with half a Dozen Handfuls of Salt, three Ounces of fliced Ginger, fix Ounces of whole Pepper, and four Ounces of whole Mace -, put the Sturgeon into your Cafes or VeiTels, pour the Pickle upon them; and when you ferve it, do it with fome of its own Fickle, the Spices on it, and Slices of Lemon.

To foiije Sturgeon.

DR A W the Sturgeon, and divide it down the Back in equal Sides and Rands, put it into a Tub with Water and Salt, walh and cleanfe it well, bind it up with Tape or Bafs; and boil it in Water, Vinegar, and Salt, but take care not to boil it too tender, take it up, and lay it to cool, then pack it up clofe with the Liquor it was boiled in.

To fnake Velfh Sturgeon.

SE A S ON a Leg of Ieef with Salt, white Pepper, beaten Mace, Sweet Marjoiani Vvinter fr.voury, Thyme, Pen- ny-royal, and Parfley, fhred fmall j fome 1 imon-peel, and a fmall Onion; bone a Ntacs Foot, and cut it into Dice, or Diamond-wife, and lay it fo together in the Pan; put to it as much Vater as will juil cover it, fet it in an Oven, and bake it till it is tender; make a Dinner of it, then pick it all out of the Liquor, clean from th- Bones, and

when

The L A D Y s C O M P A NM N. 1 35

when it is cold, ilired it very fmall with Beef Sewet; then pound it in a Stone Mortar, and fqueeze it into a Venifon Tot, and put to it the Fat that came oit when it was firft baked, and fet it into a cool Oven for an Hour.

Roaches broiled.

BROIL the Roaches on a Gridiron after they have been foaked in Butter: Fry the Livers in a Pan with a little Butter, in order to be beaten in a Mortar, andpafled through the Strainer: Then put a Cullis to your Fifh, feafond with Salt, s.hite Pepper, and Orange or Lemon-juice: Before they are drelTed rub the Dilli with a Shalot, or a Clove of Garlick.

To boil Roaches.

SCALE, draw, vvaih, and cleanfe your Roaches well, wipe them dry with a Cloth, give them three or four Scotches with a Knife, to the Bone, only on one Side; then put into a Stew pan as much frale Beer, Vinegar, and Water, with a little White Wine, as will cover the Filh: Then put in a Handful of Salt, a Bunch of Rofemary, Winter-favoury, Thyme, and Parfley, and a Handful of Horfe-radifh Root flicd; then fet the Stew-pan over a quick Wooden Fire, and boil the Liquor up to a Height.

To fry Roaches.

GU T, fcale, and wafh them in Salt and Water, and wipe them clean with a Napkin; then flour them, and fry them in frefh Butter till they are brown and cri;p; then take them out; and lay them in a heated Diih; fet them be- fore the Fire to keep; pour off the Butter you fryd them in; then in other Butter fry Sage and Parfley crifp, and lay them on your Roaches. In the mean Time, lei. iome But- ter be beaten up, with a few Spoonfuls of fcaliing hot VVa- ter, in vhich an Anchovy has been diflblved, and pour this Sauce over your Roaches: Garniili the Difli with Parfley and Strawberry-leaves, and ferve it up.

To marinate Roaches.

GET Roach-s, ileep thm in Oil, Wine, and Lemon- juice, and other nfujJ Seafonings, then breaa ihem well, and bake them in a gentle OverCiy as chey ma take a fine Colour: Afterwards they are to be neatly drei.ed in a Diih, and garnifliea with fried Bread, and green Parfley.

Roaches

13 The La D ys Companion.

Roaches en marinade.

GU T your Roaches, cut oft their Heads, and take ofF fome Slices; then put them in a Difh or Stew-pan, with fome Bay -leaves, feafoned with Pepper and Salt ] add the Juice of a Couple of Lemons, or elfd a Da:h of Vine- gar; let them marinate for an Hour or two; when mari- nated, take them out of the Marinade, and wipe them dry- between two Linen Cloths, fcrew them with Flour, and fry them in drawn Butter: When they are fried and pretty brown, take them out, and let them drain: Put a Napkin folded up in the Dih, place them handfomely upon it, and ferve them up hot for Hors eC Oewvres.

Roaches in Slices.

GUT your Roaches, and fry them, then cut off their Heads, and take the Slices, which you may place in a Diih for an Entry, pouring over them a fmali Ragoo of Crawfifh or Oyllers, or elfe a white Sauce.

To broil Shads.

THESE Fifh are to be well fcaled and cut: After- wards, having rubbed them with Butter and Salt, broil them on a Gridiron, till they come to a fine Colour: They are to be diihed with Sorrel and Cream, adding Parfley, Chervil, Chibbol, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and fweet Butter: They may alfo be ferved up with a Ragoo of Mulhrooms, or a brown Sauce with Capers: Or you may ferve it vith Butter, Cives, and Parfley mincd, and Capeis tofsd up in a Sauce-pan, with the ufual Seafonings, and the Sauce thick- ened with the Liver of the Shad bruifed, or elfe with a Craw- fifh Cullis, or fome other meagre CuUis.

To boil Shads.

HAVING fcaled and cut them, let them boil in White Wine, with Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, a Bay- leaf, Onions, and green Lemon, and fend them to Table on a Napkin.

To drefs a Shad au Court Bouillon.

AFTER having fcaled and fcored it, boil it in Vhite Wine, with a little Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Bay-leaf, Onions ftuck with Cloves, Slices of Lemon, and a Lump of

Butter 5

T L A D ys Companion. 137

Butter; when it is boiled, ferve it dry on a Napkin for a Diih of the firft Courfe.

fo fry Smelts.

LAY them to marinate in Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Bay- leaves and Gives, then dry them well with a Lmnen Cloth, drudge them well with Flour, and very fine Crumbs of Bread, dry them, and ferve them up hot with fryd Pari- ley,

7o drefs Smelts au Court-Bouillon.

WHEN you have laid them in a Stew-pan, put to them fome White Wine, fliced Lemon, Pepper, Salt and Bay-leaf; when they are enough, ferve them on a Nap- kin with green Parlley, or elfe with a Ramolade.

0 marinate Smelts.

PU T a Quart of Sallad Oil into a Frying-pan, vvhen it is hot, put in the Smelts, and as it voiles fupply it with more; and put in alfo fome Bay-leaves in the Oil the Filli was fryd in, and put fome Claret into an Earthen Pan; put the fryd Leaves into the Bottom of it, and let fome of them lie above; flice an Ounce of Ginger and Mace, and an Ounce of Nutmeg; put in fome White Wine and Cloves, and then put in your Filh, fo that the Bay-leaves and Spices .
may cover them, and ferve them wdth Bay-leaves and Spices.

to len.v Smelts.

YOUR meks being laid in a deep Dilh, put to them a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine, fome whole Pep- per, a little Thyme, Winter-favoury fhred fmali, and a Quar- ter of a Pound of Butter, with the Yolks of three or four Eggs mincd, let them flew together, turn them now and then with the Fiih, and when they are enough, ferve them up on Sippets. Garnifh with pickled Barberries.

Another Way to Jlenjj Smelts.

PU T them in a Sauce-pan with Butter, White Wine» Nutmeg, fryd Flour, and Pieces of green Lemon: Whea you ferve them up to Table, do it with Capers and Lemon- juice.

Anothr

138 fhe Ladys Companion.

Another Way

YO U may fry them, and ferve them up in a Sauce of burnt Butter, diilblved Anchovies, white Pepper, and Orange -juice.

Vveavers ficved.

TAKE fome Weavers, gut, wafh, and wipe them dry, put a Lump of Butter into a Stew-pan, with Parfley and green Onions, cut fmall, and feafoned with Pepper and Salt, fweet Herbs, and fine Spice; then put in yourWeavers, placed upon hot Cinders, to take a Taile; turn them now and then, place them handfomely in a Difh, or Baking-pan, and ftrew them both with Crumbs of Bread and Parmefan Cheefe; fend them to the Oven to take a Colour; when they are done, and well coloured, ferve them up hot, with Lemon-juice over them for an Entry.

Weavers friea.

GU T them, wafh, and wipe them, fiafh them on the Back, flour and fry them in clarified Butter; when fried and well coloured, take them up, let them be drained, dilh them, garnifh with fried Parlley, and ferve them hot Or you may ferve them with a Caper-fauce, made as fol- lows: Melt a Bit of Butter in a Sauce-pan, brown it with a Pinch of Flour, then put irt Muflirooms, Cives, and Parfley, mincd fmall; add a little Fifli-Broth, Salt, and Pepper, then put in your fryd Weavers, and let them fimmer together a little while: Then difli your Weavers, put fomc Capers into the Sauce, and fome Cullis of Crawiifli, or brown Cullis; pour this over the Weavers, and ferve them up.

To broil Weavers.

GU T them, and vvaih them clean, dry them in a Cloth, flour them, then broil them, and have melted Butter in a Cup. They are fine Fifli, and cut firm.

When you prepare them you mufl: take care not to hurt yourfelf with the two fharp Bones in the Head.

Another Way.

GU T, wafli, and diy them in a Cloth, fcore them on the Sides, rub them well over with Butter and Salt, lay them on a Gridiron over a gentle Fire, turn them often that they may take a good Colour. Blanch the Hearts of half a

Score

ne Ladys Companion. 139

Score Lettuces in hot Water, put them m cold Water, then fqueeze them out with your Hand, one by one: Put a Piece of Butter about the Bignefs of an Egg into a Sauce-pan, put in a little Flour, and brown it; keep moving it till it is fo: Cut the Lettuces in two, put them into the Sauce-pan, and when they have had four or five Turns, put in a little Fiih- Broth, with Salt, Pepper, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs, and let them fimmer a-vvhile over a flack Fire. When all is done enough, take off the Fat, put in fome Cullis of Crawhih, pour the Ragoo into your Difh, lay the Fifh upon it, and ferve away hot.

You may alfo ferve them with a Cullis of Crawfifh, or an Anchovy Sauce, or with a Ragoo of Mulhrooms or Truffles.

To drefs Weavers Tvi Ojjiers.

GU T, wafli, and dry your Weavers in a Cloth; then having put a Pint of White Wine, a little Fifli Broth, and Butter, into a Sauce-pan, feafon your Fifh with Salt, Pepper, and Spices j lay them handfomely in the Sauce-pan, with a Bay- leaf, two or three Slices of Lemon, a little Parf- ley, and a Couple of Onions; then brcvvn fom.e Butter with a little Flour in another Sauce-pan; pour the Liquor from your Weavers into this Butter, make it juft boil; then pour it back again into the Sauce-pan, to the Weavers, and let them flew in it. When they are ftewd enough, drain them well, difh them, pour on them a Ragoo of Oyfters, which you are to prepare in the mean Time, as follows: Open your Oyllers, lay them in a Sieve to drain over a Pan to fave the Liquor: Brown a Piece of Butter in a Sauce-pan, with a Pinch of Flour, liirring it with a wooden Spoon, till it is brown; then put in Bits of Crufts of Bread, as big as your Fingers, and then put in your Oyfters; let them have five or fix Turns over a Stove, feafon them with Pepper, Cives, and Parfley i put to them fome of their own Liquor, and fome Fifh-Broth, of each a like Quantity, to moillen them; let them have a Heat over the Fire, but let them net boil.

To roajl Ve avers.

HAVING gutted, wafhd, and dryd them, lard them with Bits of Eel and Anchovies; put them on Skew- ers, and fallen them to the Spit; roaft them, put a Quar- ter of a Pint of Fifh-Broth, and a little Vinegar into the Dripping-pan, with Salt, Pepper, Slices of Lemon, Slices of Onion and whole. Gives: Bafte them as they roaft with this

Marinade.

140 The Ladys Companion,

Marinade. While they are roafting, make for them the Sauce following: Melt a Bit of Butter in a Sauce-pan, brown it with a Pinch of Flour, and having mincd a Couple of Muflirooms, a raw Truffle, fome Gives and Parfley, each by themfelves, put into your Butter in the Sauce-pan firil the Gives, next the Parfley, then the Mufhrooms and Truffle: Let thefe have three or four Turns over the Fire, then put in a little Fifn-Broth, feafoned with Salt and Pep- per, to moiften them, and let them liand a little over a flack Fire to fimmer: When it is wafted away as much as you think convenient, put in a few Capers and an Anchovy, and add fome Gullis to thicken it; then difh the Weavers, pour the Sauce over them, and ferve them up.

H you pleafe you may l.rd them with Bacon inftead of Eel and Anchovy, and then bafle them with the following Liquor; put a little Efieace of Ham and Vinegar into your Dripping-pan, feafond with Salt, Pepper, Butter, Slices of Lemon and Onions fliced, and vhole Gives. When thej are roafted enough, lay them in your Dilh, pour EiTence of Ham over them, and ferve hot.

7o marinate a Dab or Sandling.

CU T your Filh along the Back, to the End that the Pickle may penetrr.te the fame: When it is marinated bread it well with Chippings feafond, and bake it in aa Oven. Garnifh your Dilh with Petty -patties.

Dab in a Sallad.

LE T your Dab be boiled in a Pickle after the ufual Manner, and when cold, cut into Fillets, with which you are to garnifh a Plate, and a fmall Sallad; feafoning the Whole with Salt, Pepper, Vinegar, and Oil.

Or you may drefs them with Anchovy Sauce, and ferve them up, when cold, on a Napkin, for Intermefs. You may alfo bake them in a Pye like Turbuts: Or you may leave your Dab entire, and ferve it up hot with white Sauce and Cream, for a Side difh.

To Jienv Gudgeons.

AFTER having put an equal Quantity of Wine and Water over a Fire in a deep Difli, put in a Race of Ginger hred, a Nutmeg quartered, a little whole Mace, a little Salt, and a Faggot of Marjoram, Thyme and Parfley; Ut thefe boil a little, then put in your Gudgeons; put in

fome

he L AD ys Co MP A N I ON. 141

fome Butter, make them boil a-pace; when they are enough, pour out all the Liquor into a Pipkin, and fet it on the Fire with the Spice and Herbs that were in before; then mince a Handful of Parfley, with a little Thyme and Fennel, and boil them in the Filh-Brodi: Afterwards beat the Meat of a Couple of Crabs, the Carcafs of a Lobfter, the Yolks of three Eggs, with a Ladle of drawn Butter, and fome of the Fiili-Broth, and put it into the Fipkin, and keep liirring it till it thickens, then difh your Gudgeons on Sippets, pour your Sauce over them, and lerve them up.

bake a Lump,

YO U may either flea your Lump, or not; cut it in two Pieces, and part it on the Sides -, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; lay it in the Pye; lay on a Bay-leaf, or two, three or four Blades of Mace, and an Orange cut in Slices, Barberries, Grapes, Goofeberries, and Butter; clofe it up, bake it, liquor it with beaten Butter,

To fry a Lump.

FLEA the Lump, fplit it, divide it, and cut each Side into two Pieces ] feafon it with Salt, Pepper, and Nut- meg; ry it in clarify d Butter, made very hot; difh it with Slices of Oranges, Barberries, Grapes, Goofeberries, and Butter.

To roaji a Lump.

FLEA it, and cieanfe it well on the Infide; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Mace, and Nutmeg; put an Onion and Bay-leaf into the Belly of it; rpaft it, and ferve it up with Butter and Slices of Lemon.

To foufe Lumps.

CLEAN, fcrape, and fcald your Lumps very well, boil them in their Skins; then take the Tails of Lobfters, large Oyfters, Prawns, and the Yolks of hard Eggs, and mince them together with fweet Herbs; then add to them grated Bread, Salt, Ginger, Mace, Cloves, and Nutmeg and, if you pleafe, an Anchovy for every Lump; put thefe into the Bellies of the Lumps, and boil them in Vinegar, White Wine, Water, and Salt; ferve them to the Table with fome of the Liquor.

To

142 he Lad ys Companion.

To drefi Mackarel.

GU T and w afli your Mackarel, then either flit or gafh them down the Back, that they may take the Seaibn- ing, then lay them a-while in Oil, Salt, Pepper, and Fen- nel; then wrap them up in the Fennel; lay them on a Grid- iron, and broil them: Make a Sauce for them of clarified Butter, fweet Herbs fnred very fmall, Salt, Nutmeg, Goole- berries. Fennel, a little Vineg.ir and Capers.

Or you may ferve them up with clarified Butter, Salt, Pepper, a litcie Vinegar, and fryd Parfley.

They may alfo be Iervd in a Soop, being firft fryd in cla- rifyd Butter, and then fet a fimmering in good Fili-Broth, or Broth of Herbs. Garnifh with a Ragoo of Muibrooins, and fome Capers.

7q pidh Mackarel.

F T E R having flit your Mackarel in Halves, take out the Roes, gut, clean, and ilrew Salt over them, and lay one on another, the Back of one to the Infide of another, ib let them lie two or three Hours; then wipe every Piece clean from the Salt, and llrcw them over with beaten Pepper, and grated Nutmeg; let them lie;wo or three Hours longer; tlien fry them well, take them out of the Pan, and lay them on coarfe Cloths to drain; when cold put them in a Pan, and cover them over with a Pickle of Vinegar boiled with Spice, and a little Bit of Lemon-peel, when it is cold.

Another Way.

CUT your Mackarel in Pieces, feafon them as for Pot • ting, and rub it in well, fry j:hem in Oil, or clarified Butter; then lay them on Straw by the Fire to drain; when cold put them in Vinegar, and cover them with Oil, dry them before you feafon them: They will keep, and are ex- tremely good.

broil Mackarel.

A V I N G drawn the Mackarel at the Gills, wafli and drythem, then fait and broil them with Mint and green Fennel on a foft Fire, and balte them with Butter and Vine- gar, or Oil and Vinegar, with Rofemary, Thyme, and Parfley; difli it up with beaten Butter, Slices of Lemon or Orange.

They

The Ladys Companion. 143

They may be done with a StufTing made of Parfley, But- ter,. Pepper, Salt, Crumbs of Bread, Nutmeg, and the Liver, mixed together, with the Yolk of an Egg, and put into the Belly where the Roe came out.

Another Way to broil Mackarel.

CUT off their Heads, gut them, wafn them clean, pull out the Roe at the Gills, boil it in a little Water, then bruife it with a Spoon, beat up the Yolk of an Egg with a little Nutmeg, a little Lemou-peel cut fine, a little Thyme, fome Panley boiPd, and cnoppd fine, a little Pepper and Salt, and a few Crum.bs of Bread -, mix all well together, and fill the Pvlackarel; flour it well, and broil it neatly; let your Sauce be plain Butter, with a little Catchup, or Walnut Pickle.

To ronfi Mackarel.

ROAST them with Fennel, after they are roafted open them, and take out the Bone; then make a good Sauce with Butter, Parfley, and Goofeberries, all feaibned; foak your Mackarel, a vry little, with your Sauce, then ferve them hot.

7o fry Maids.

AFTER you have fkinnd them, put them into boiling Water, feafoned with Salt, let them lie a-while, then take them out, and dry them with a Coth, flour them, beat the Yolks of half a Score of Eggs, and the Whites of four, with a little Canary, Flour, Salt, Ginger, Nutmeg, and a little Parfley boiled green, and minced fmall, beat them till the Batter is pretty thick; put clarify d Butter into a Fr ing- pan, make it hot, dip your Maids in the Battei, and fry them brown and crifp i difli. them, let the Sauce be Butter, Vinegar, the Livers of the Fifli, and Nutmeg, beaten toge- ther; fry a good Quantity of Parfley crifp and green, and fl:rew all over the Fifti.

To bake Gurnets.

RAW them, cut off their Heads; rub a Tart-pan or

Difli with Butter, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, fome

Spice, Cives, flired Parfley, and favoury Herbs; lay the Gurnets iii the Tart- pan or Difli, and lay the fame Seafon- ing over . s you did under, then fprinkle melted Butter over them, and drudge them over with Bread crumbled very line, put them into an Oven. Againft they are

baked.

144 Ladys Companiont.

baked, prepare a hafhd Sauce for them thus: TakeMufh- rooms, Truffles, Gives, and Parfley, fhred them, feafon them with Salt and Pepper, moiilen them with Fifh-Broth, and fet them a fimmering over a gentle Fire: When it is enough, thicken it with a CuUis of Crawfifh; when your Gurnets are baked brown, pour this Sauce into your Difh, lay the Gur- nets round it, and ferve them for the firft Courfe.

To broil Gurnets cvith Anchavy Sauce.

CU T off their Heads, dip them in melted Butter and Salt, and broil theni over a Fire not too fierce: Put frefh Butter, a little Flour, and a whole Leek, into a Sauce- pan, feafon with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, moiilen it with Vinegar and Water, put in a Couple of Anchovies, keep it continually Ihaking over the Fire till the Filh are enough, diih them, pour on the Sauce, and trwt them hot.

To broil Gurnets n.Lith Crawfifh Cullis.

THIS is done the fame Way as with Anchovies, only leaving out the Anchovies, and pouring fome Craw- filli Culiis on the Fiih when difhed up.

To boil a Garnet.

DR A W It, and wafh it well, boil it in Water and Salt, and a Bundle of fweet Herbs; when it is enough, take it up, and put it into a Dilh, with Sippets under it, over a Chaf.ng-diih of Coals, then make a SaiKC of Verjuice, But- ter, Nutmeg, Pepper, and the Yolks of two Eggs, and pour over it, and ferve away. Garnifh as you pleafe.

To boil Breams.

HAVING waflid and dryd them vith a Cloth, theu open them, gut them, wipe their Infides clean with a Cloth, but do not wafh the Infides; give them three Scores with a Knife to the Bone on one Side only; boil them in as much Water, White Wine, hard ftale Beer, and Vinegar, as will jufl cover them j feafon with a good Handful of Salt, a Faggot of Winter-favoury, Rofemary, Thyme, and Parf- ley, and a Handful of Horfe-radifli Rogt fcraped; put them not in till the Liquor boils up to the Height. For the Sauce, beat up Butter with a little of the Liquor j drain your Fifh, difh them, pour the Sauce over them, fcrape over them Horfe-radifh and powdered Ginger. Garnifh the Difh with Slices of Lemon, and ferve it up.

To

he Ladys Companion. 145

To broil a Bream.

GE T a Bream, fcale and draw it, notch the Side of it, dip it in melted Butter, lay it on a Gridiron, and bafte it frequently with melted Butter; make a brown Sauce with Anchovies, Capers, Cives, and Parfley, tofsd up in a Sauce- pan with a little Butter; then put in a little Fifh-Broth, and thicken it with a CuUis that is to be thrown on the Fiih, but do not put the Anchovies in till you are going to ferve; when it is broiled enough, ferve it up with the aforefaid Sauce.

You may alfo ferve it up with a white Sauce, made as you will fee in the Receipt for a broild Barbel: Vou may alf<» ferve it with a good Sauce of Herbs.

To Jiew a Bream.

HAVING fcaled and wafhed your Bream well, pre- fer ve the Blood to ftew it in, put to it Red Wine, two or three Slices of a Race of Ginger, the Pulp of three Quar- ters of a Found of Prunes boiled, and llrained into the Broth, Salt, Vinegar, a Couple of Anchovies, feme Root of Horfc- radifh ilanipd and ftraind, and fome fweet Herbs j let there be no more Liquor than will juil cover your Fiih and other Ingredients; when it is enough, make a Sauce Vvith Butter, a little of the Bream Liquor; beat them up together, then difh your Fiih, pour the Sauce upon it, garniih the DiHi with Oranges, Lemons, and Barberries, and ferve it up.

Another Way to Jieuu a Bream.

HA 1 N G fcaled and cleanfed your Bream, put it int© a Stew-pan, cither Whole or in Pieces, ilevv it in White Vine, Water, and Beer Vinegar, as much as will juft cover it, with Salt, Pepper, a Bay-leaf, whole Cloves, and Mace, a Faggot of Rofemary, Winter fa voury, Sweet-m.arjoram, Thyme, Parfiey, an Onion cut in Halves, and fom.e Butter: When it has ftewed enough, diih it on Sippets, with Spice, and fome Lemon; beat up Butter with fome of the Liquor, and pour over it: Garniih it with grated Brea,
VCL. I, H fg

145 T]y Lad ys C OM PA N I ON.

To fry Whitings.

WASH and gut your Whitings, then fldn them, and turn their Tails into their Mouths, to lie round; fea- fon them with Salt and Pepper; lleep them in Vinegar, flcur them, and dip them in Batter, then fry them.

To dfffs Whitings the Dutch IVay.

SCALE and gut your Whitings, gadi them in the Back- bone with a Knife, on both Sides, and throw them into cold Water; let them lie an Hour, then boil them in Wa- ter, Vinegar, and Salt; tlien for your Sauce take Turnips, and cut them in Pieces about the Bignefs of Yolks of Eggs, and boil them tender in Water and Salt, then drain them, and put them inro drawn Butter, and Farlley, mmced hne; then dilh your Whitings on Sippets, and pour your Turnips and Sauce over them, frrew Ibme Ihrcd Parlley about the Difn, and ferve it up.

Ycu may drefs Soals the fame Way.

To picvj Whitings. .

PUT into deep a Difh an equal Quantity of White Wine and Water, put in a Blade or two of Mace, a Nutmeg quartered, a Race of Ginger ficed, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs, and Salt j fet it over a Fire, and make it boil a little while i then lay in your Whitings in the Order you intend to ferve them, put in fome Butter, make them boil pretty fail i when they are boiled enough, pour away all the Li- cjuor from them into a Pipkin, and let it on the Fire, with the Spice and fvveet Kerbs that were in it before; mince a Hvandful of Parfiey with a little Thyme and Fennel, and put them into the hilh-Broth; then take the Carcafs of a Lob- flerf, with the Meat of two Crabs, and the Yolks of three Eggs, and a Ladleful of drawn Butter; beat all thefe well together with fome of the Liquor, put them into the Fifh- Broth, and ilir theai together till it thickens; then dilh the Whitings m anotht;r Dilh upon Sippets, piur on yjur Sauce, and kj ve it up: After the fame Manner you may drefs Siieks and Gudgeons.

Another Way.

SCRAPE and waPn your Vhitings, fiit them down the Back, cut off their Heads, take out the Bones, and fpread them on a Table or Dieiler, and lay a good Fiih

Farce

the Ladys Companion. 147

Farce over them, and roll them up, and flew them in good Fifli-Broth, feafond with Salt, Pepper, Spices, Nutmeg,

To boil Whitings do them after the Manner of boiling Flounders or Plaice.

0 drefs frefl Herrings.

GU T them through the Gills, wafh them, rub them over with melted Butter, drudge them with Crumbs of Bread, and broil them on a Gridiron: Make your Sauce of Vinegar, Butter, Salt, Pepper, and Muftard. Or elfe yoii may brown fome Butter, and fhred fome fvveet Herbs very fmall, and put into it; feafon with Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Anchovies, and Capers.

To lake Herrings.

TA K E an hundred Herrings, put them into a Pan, and cover them with three Parts Water and one Part Vinegar, with a good deal of All fpice, fome Cloves, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, two whole Onions, and a fev Bay- leaves, tie them down clofe, and bake them; when the come out of the Oven, heat a Pint of Red Wine fcalding hot, and put to them, then tie them down again, and let them ftand four or five Days before you open them, ard they will be very firm and fine.

Another Way to hake Herrings.

GE T fome Plerrings, wafh them, and flrew them with Salt, put them into a deep glazed Pot, feafon them, with whole Pepper, Mace, Onions, and Bay-leaves to your Talte; pour as much good Vinegar to them as will cover them, then tie ftrong Brown Paper over the Pot they are in, and let them ftand all Night in the Oven with Bread.
They will keep good a Month at leaH.

7o broil Herrings.

SCALE them, gut them, cut off their Heads, walk them clean, ry them in a Cloth, flour them, and broil them, but firft icore them acrofs with your Knife; take their Heads and mafh them, boil them in Small Beer or Ale, vitli a little whole Pepper and Onion: Let it boil a Quarter of an Hour, then llrain it, thicken it with Butter and Flour, and a good deal of Muftard: Lay the Fifh in the DiCi, and H 2 pow

i48 The Lad ys Com pa n i o n.

pour the Sauce into a Bafon, or plain melted Butter and Muflard,

To fry Herrings.

SCALE them, gut them, cut off their Heads, wafhthem clean, dry them in a Cloth, flour them, and fry them in Butter; have ready a good many Onions peelVi and cut thin.
Fry them of a light Brown with the Herrings; lay the Her- rings in your Dilh, and the Onions rourd, with Butter and Murtard in a Cup. They mufl be done with a quick Fire.

To diefi Red Herrings njcith Cabbage.

BOIL your Cabbage tender, then put it into a Sauce- pan, and chop it with a Spoon; put in a good Piece of Buttcr, let it ll:ew, ll rring it leit ir Ihould burn: Take Ibme lied Herrings and fpiit them open, and toail them before the Fire till they are hot through. Lay the Cabbage in a Difh, and lay the Herrings on it, and fend it hot to Table.

Or you may pick your Herrings from the Bones, and throw the Meat over your Cabbage: Hold the hot Salaman- der over the Difli a little, and ferve away quick.

To pickle Herrings or Mackarel.

CU T oiv the Heads and Tails of your Fifli, gut them, wafh them, and dry them well; then take two Ounces and a Half of Salt-petie, three Qiiarters of an Ounce of Jamaica Pepper, and a Quarter and half Quarter of vshite Pepper, and pound them imall; an Ounce of Aveet Marjo- ram and Thyme chopped frnall; mix all together, and put fome within and without the Fifh; lay them in an Earthen Pan, the Roes at Top, and cover them with White Wine Vinegar, then fet them into an Oven, not too hot, for two Hours. This is for Fifteen; and after this Rule do as many as you pleafe.

To pickle Smelts to exceed Anchoxaes.

YOUR Fifli being wafhd and gutted clean, lay them in Rows, and put between xtrs- Layer of Fifh, Pepper, Nutmeg, Mace, Cloves, and Salt, well mixd, and four Bay- leaves, powderd Cochineal, and Petre-falt, beat and mixd V, ith Spice; boil Red Wine Vinegar enough to covpr them,;.nd put to them when quite cold.

The Ladys Companion. 149

To fry Mufcles.

PU T them in a Pot that has as much boiling Water as will cover them j when they are fcalded take off their Beards, and wafh them in warm Water, dry them with a Cloth, and Hour them; fry them crifp, beat up fome Butter with the Juice of Lemon, fry fome Parfley crifp and green, llrew it over them, pour the Butter upon them, and ferve them up.

To Jhnx Mufcles.

WASH them clean, boil them in Beer and Salt, then take them out of the Shells, take off their Beards, cleanfe them, and look under the Tongue for a Crab, if you find one throw that Mufcle away, though fome People will only pick out the Crab and eat the Mufcle: Then fry them in Butter, pour the Butter out, and put into their own Li- quor a Piece of freih Butter, a little White Wine, Salt, flicd Orange, the Yolks of three or four Eggs, and fome fvveet Herbs fhred fmall; give all thefe a Walm or two in a Sauce- pan, and ferve them up in Scollop Shells.

Another Way to Jleiv Mufcles.

CLEAN your Mufcles, and wafh them from the Sand in two or three Waters, put them into a Stew-pan, cover them clofe, and let them flew till all the Shells are opened, then take them out one by one j and to a Quart of Mufcles put a Pint of Liquor, and a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, rolled in a little Flour: When they are enough, have fome Crumbs of Bread ready, and cover the Bottom of your Difh thick, grate half a Nutmeg over them, and pour the Mufcles and Sauce all over the Crumbs, and fend them to Table.

Another JVay.

STEW them as above, and lay them in your Dilh; ftrew your Crumbs of Bread thick all over them; thea fet them before a good Fire, turning the Diih round and round, that they may be brown all alike; keep bailing them with Butter, that the Crumbs may be crifp, ferve it for a Side-difii. You may do Cockles the faaie Way.

H 3 Ts

I50 7 La D ys Com p A N I ON.

10 phkJe Mufcles.

GET fome frefh Mufcles, vvafh them very clean, and put them in a Pot over the Fire till they open i then take them out of their Shells, pick them clean and lay them to cool; then put their Liquor to fome Vinegar, whole Pep- per, Ginger fliced thin, and Mace; fet it over the Fire; when it is fcalding hot, put in your Mufcles, and let them flew a little, then pour out the Pickle from them, and when both are cold, put them in an Earthen Jug, and cork it up dole; in two or three Days they will be fit to eat. Cockles are done the fame Way.

Jlenv Scollops.

BOIL them ery well in Salt and Water, take them out and ftew them in a little of the Liquor, a little White Wine, a little Vinegar, two or three Blades of Mace, two or three Cloves, a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, and the Juice of a Se-ville Orange j flew them well, and ferve away.

To Jienv Cockles.

TAKE them out of the Shells, wafh them well with Vinegar, broil or broth them before you take them out of the Shells, then put them in a Difh with a little Cla- ret, Vinegar, a Handful of Capers, Mace, Pepper, a little grated Bread, minced Thyme, Salt, and the Yolks of two or three hard Eggs minced; flew all together till you think them enough; put in a good Piece of Butter, Ihake them well together, heat the Difn, rub it with a Clove of Garlick, af you like it, and put two or three Toads of white Bread in the Bottom, laying the Meat on them. Crawiifh, Prawns, or Shrimps, are excellently good the fame Way, being taken out of their Shells, and make Variety of Garnifh with the

Shells.

Another Way.

HAVING got fome Cockles, lev them with Claret, Capers, Rofe, or Elder Vinegar, Wine Vinegar, large Mace, grofs Pepper, grated Bread, rninced Thyme, the Yolks of hard Eggs minced, and Butter; lew them well together.
Thus you may flew Scollops, but leave out Capers.

he L A D ys C M xP A N I N, 151

To drejs Tunnies.

YO U may drefs them in Slices, or Fillets, with Veer Mans Sauce, viz. Shalct cut fmall. White Pepper, Vinegar, and Oil, or in a Sallad with Ramolade.

Or they may be broiled on a Gridiron, nril rubbing with Butter, and llrewing them with Salt and Pepper; eat them with burnt Butter and Orange.

They are Iometimes fryd in round Slices, and ferved up in a Marinade made of Slices of Lemon or Orange, put into a Frying-pan, with Bay-leaves, clarified Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Chibbols, and Vinegar.

broil Pilchards.

GILL them, walb them, dry them, feafon them with Salt, then broil them over a gentle Fire, bafte them with Butter; when they are enough, ferve them up with beaten Butter, Muftard and Pepper, or you nj-y make a Sauce of their own Heads, fqueezed between two Trenchers with fome Beer and Salt.

To fry Kollibut.

CU T the Fifh into thin Slices, hack it with a Knife, and it will be ribbd, then fry it alm.ofc brown with Butter, take it up, draining all the Butter from it; makc- clean the Pan, and put it in again with Red Wine, fliccd Ginger, Nutmeg, Anchovy, Salt, and Saffron beaten, fry it till half is coniumed; then put in a Piece of Butter, fhake- ing it well together vith a minced Lemon, and rub the Difh with a Clove of Garlick.

Note, HoUibut may be drefTed all the Ways thatTurbut is.

To fry Ray.

AFTER it is well cleansd, wafh it with Vinegar well feafond; and a little before you fervc it, hy it with refined Butter, or with Sallad Oil; when it is well fryd and crifp, fct it a draining, and beltrew it with fine Salt; then ferve it whole, or the two Sides fet together again. Garniili with fliced Orange, and fqueeze fome Juice of Orange over it.

S4

12 T La D ys Com p A N I o N.

To drrfs Crawfifh.

BOIL them in Water, pick out the Tails, take off the fmall Claws, leaving the two large ones on, but take the Shells cif from them i then tofs them up with a little frefh Butter, fome Mufhrooms and Truffles; moillen them with a little Fifii-Ercth, and a few Spoonfuls of Crawfilli Culiis, and let them fimmer a-while over a gentle Fire; beat the Yolk of two Eggs with Cream, put in a little fhred Parley, thicken your Sauce with it, giving it a Tofs or two over the Stove, then ferve them up in Plates or little Difhes.

Another Way.

BOIL them in Water and a little Salt, let them ftand till cold, pick the Meat out of the Tails and Legs, and fet it by j then take the Bodies and Claws, and beat them in a Mortar with fome of the Liquor in which they were boiPd, put a Quc.rt of Milk and a Quart of Cream to a Quart of that Liquor; put in a Nutmeg cut into Quarters, a Clove or two, and a Blade of Mace; boil all thefe together, then beat a little Sorrel and Spinach, and take a Handful of Leeks cut ]a:-ge; put thefe to the Crawfifh that you pickd out of the Tails and Claws; boil them well together, but take care that the Kerbs do not lofe their Colour; then put in a French Loaf, which place in the Middle of the Difh: When you are ready to ferve it up, thicken it with a Quar- ter of a Pound of frelli Butter, and the Yolks of Eggs, t® the Thicknefs of good Cream.

A Bifque of Crawfifh.

TA K E Crawfilli, waili them very clean, boil them, ar.d pull off all the Claws from the largeil of them, and pick out the Tails fo as to leave them hanging at the Shells; but pick the Tails quit off the fmall ones, and keep the Shells to help to make the Culiis, which you may make after this Manner: Take a Dozen of fweet Almonds, blanch and pound them in a Mortar with the Shells of your Crawfiih; then flice an Onion, with two or three Carrots, and as many Parfnips, and tofs them up with a little Butter; and when they begin to turn brown, pour upon them fome Filh-Broth; feafon it with fome Salt, fome Trufiies and Mufhrooms, two or three Cloves, a little Bafil, Parfley, and a whole Leek. Let all thefe fimmer together, then mix among it your pounded Almonds and Shells of Crawfifh;

and

The Ladvs Companion. 153

and when they have boiled a little, ftrain all through a Sieve into a Pan, and ufe it in all your meagre Scops and Ragoos.

When you have prepared this Cullis, take the Tails of your Crawfifh, fome Truffles cut in Slices, fmall Muihrooms, and tofs them up in a Sauce- pan with a little Butter, and a fmall Quantity of Fifh-Broth: Then add a Bunch of fweec Herbs, and let it fimmer over a gentle Fire: When it is enoush, put in fome Tops of Afparagus, half a Dozen Arti- choak Bottoms, and thicken it with the aforefaid Cullis: Set fome Cruils of Bread a fimmering in good Fifh-Broth till they flick to the Bottom of the Difh j then garniih your Difli with a Border of your picked Crawfifn; put a Roll fcuffd with Oyflers, or any -thing elfe you like, in the Mid- dle, and the Artichoak Bottoms about it, with fome Pieces of the Miks of Carps; pour upon it the Ragoo and Cravvfili Cullis, and ferve it very hot.

7o Jlen.v Prawns.

LE T your Prawns be boild, and pickd, Hew them m White Wine, or Claret, and frefh Butter; ftafon wit i Salt and Nutmeg; difn them in Scoilop-fhells, and ru i them over with beaten Butter, and Juice of Orange or Le- mon; or you may flew them in Butter and Cream, and fervs them up in Scollop-fnells.

To butter Shrimps.

TW O Quarts of Shrimps being Hewed In a Pint of White Wine with Nutmeg, beat up eight Eggs with White Wine, and half a Pound of Butter; then fhake them well in a Difft till they are thick enough, and ferve them on Sippets.

To grill Shrimps.

OUR Shrimps being feafond with Salt, Pepper, and fhred Parfley, butter Scollop-fiiells well, and add a lic-

tle grated Bread; let them flew for half an Hour, brcvvii

them with a hot Iron, and ferve them up.

To Jienxj Oyflers.

TA KE a Pint of Oyflers, fet them over the Fire in their Liquor, with half a Pint of White Wine, a Piece of Butter, fome Salt, a little white Pepper, and three Blades of Mace; let them ftew foftly about half an Hour; then put

in

< 54 s L A D vs Companion.

in another Piece of Butter, and tofs all together; as foon as it is melted, turn your Oyllers, c. upon Sippets made ready, and laid in Order in a Dilh.

To fteiM Oyflers another IVay.

TA K E a Quart of Cyllers, waih them one by one in their own Liquor, with a little Vinegar and White Wine, then ilrain the Liquor into a Sauce-pan, and pat your Oyllers to it, with -Ji Bit of Mace, whole Pepper, Cloves, Nutmeg, and a very little Thyme and Savoury, a whole Onion, and a little Lemon-peel; cover it clofe, and let it ilew very low alraofl a Quarter of an Hour; then make a Sauce with fix Spoonfuls of the Liquor, Shalot, Anchovies, fome Butter, a little Mace, and Juice of Lemon; wet Sip- pets in the ftevved Liquor, and lay them in a Plate, lay your Oyfters on them, the beft Side upwards, and crumble the Yolks of two or three hard Eggs over them, fo pour on your Sauce. Garnifn with Slices of Lemon and Barber • lies.

To ftew Oyfl&rs in French Rills,

TA K E a Quart of large Oyllers, flew them in their own Liquor, with a little Salt, fome PefJper, Mace, and fiiced Nutmeg, and when near enough, thicken them with Butter; then take fix French Rolls, cut a Piece oif the Top, and take out the Crumb, and fill the Rolls with your Oyllers andLiquor, and fet them near the Fire,on aChafing- dilh of Coals, and let them be hot through, and as the Li- quor foaks in iiil them with more, or fome hot Gravy; fo ferve them up inilead of a Pudding.

To roajl Oyfiers.

WHEN you have the largeil Oyflers you can get, open them, and throw them in a Difh with their own Liquor; th-n take them out, put them into another Difh, and pour the Liquor over them, but take care that no Gravel get in; that done, fet them covered on the Fire, and fcald them a little in their Liquor: As foon as they are cold draw feveral Lards through every Oyller, the Lardoons being firfl feafond vith Pepper, Cloves, and Nutmeg, beaten very line. Afterwards, having fpitL ed your Oyflers on two wooden Lark Spits, tie them to another Spit, and roafl them: la the mean while bafle them with Anchovy Sauce, macie with fome of the Oyfler Liquor, and let them drip into the fame

Diih

he L A D y s C o M p A N I o N. 155

Dlfti wherein the Sauce is; when they are enough, bread them with die Crull: of a Roll grated, and when they ars brown, draw them off: At laft blow the Fat from the Saucs with which the Oyfters were bailed, and put the fanr.e thereto i fqueeze in the Juice of a Lemon, and io let all be ferved up.

Another Way.

TAKE the largefl: Oyfters, parboil them in their ow Liquor, wafli them in warm Water, dry them with Cloth, then lard them with fine Lard, fpit them on Skewers llrew over them Pepper, Cloves, and Nutmeg, beaten fine tie the Skewers to a Spit, and fo roaft them; bafte them with Anchovy Sauce, and mz of their own Liquor; when they are roalled, drudge them with grated Bread, difh them with Gravy, blowing off the Fat, then add Juice of Oranges or Lemons.

To ficiKi Oyilers the French Way.

PARBOIL a Quart of Oyflers in their own Liquor, wafh them in warm Water, beard them, and put them into a Fipkin with a litte of their ov;n Liquor, White Wine, Salt, Pepper, and a whole Onion, and let them ilew till ity are half enough; then put them, Liquor and all, into a Frying-pan, and fry them a little; then put in a Lump of freih Butter, and fry them a little longer; then take the Volks of four Eggs diffolved in Vinegar, with minced Pariley, and grated Nutmeg j put thefe into the Frying-pan to the O flej i, Ihake them, let them have a Walm or two, andferve them.

Io hroil Oyflers.

PET them, put them on the Fire in their Shells, put in fome Butter, Pepper, a little ihred Parfley, cover them with grated Bread, broil them, and brown them with a red-hot Iron; feiTe the.n up to Table in their Shells UDOn a Difh.

Another Way,

PARBOIL larg:; Oyllers in their own Liquor, then pour them into a Colander, but fave the Liquor; afcerward wafli them clean in warm Water, wipe them iVc beard them, and Hew them in a Pipkin with fome of their own Liquor, VhiteWineVinegarBuUerp alarge Onion, and a Blade or two

5

he Ladys CoMPANIo.

of Mace, and Salt. When they are pretty well fleweJ, fct fome Scollcp-fhells, or large Oyfter-fhells, over a Gridiron, put into them as many Oyllers, and as much of the lievvd Liquor, as they will contain; let the Fire be gentle; and when they are enough, fill the Shells with drawn Butter, and ferve them up.

hrcil Oyfrers the Dutch Way,

OPEN the Oyfters, parboil them in their own Liquor; put them in a Strainer; then put them into a Sauce- pan with Butter, Onions flicd, and a little Mace; flew them; then put two or three of them into one Shell, and brol them; then put them on Plavics, fJJ them with beaten Butter, and ferve them up.

To farce Oyflers.

FIRST open the Oyfters, then blanch them, afterwards mince them fmall with Gives, Parfley, and Anchovies, leafon with Salt and Pepper; add to them Butter, and the Crumb of a French Roll ioaked in Cream, the Yolks of two or three Eggs, fwcet Spices and Nutmeg; beat all thefe to- gether in a Mortar; then fill your Scollop-fhells, or Oyller- ihells, with it; grate Bread over them, and lay them on a Gridiron, or fet tlem in an Oven, and ferve them up dry, or with Lemon-juice.

Mother Way

TAKE a Dozen Oyllers blanchd, Mulhrooms, Gives, Pariley, favoury Herbs, and fweet Spices; make a Farce of thefe with the Fleih of an Eel, with frefh Butter, ibme Crumbs of Bread foakd in Cream, the raw Yolks of a Couple of Eggs, mincd all together, and pounded in a Mortar: Lay this Farce thin, and put in an Oyfler that has been ragood: For the Manner of ragooing them, fee the Chapter of Ragoos. Then cover your Oyflers with the fame Farce, and rub them over with beaten Egg; then pour over them a little Butter melted; drudge them with grated Bread and fet them in an Oven till they become brown, and ferve them up.

To fy Oyflers.

LET your Oyllers be large, walh them, Avy them; beat Eggb well, and dip the Oyfters in them, and then fry them: 1 hen put their Liquor, wirii an Anchovy, and fome

Butter,

The L A D ys Com p A N TON. 157

-pan, and heat them; lay your Oyflerc- in a Dilh, pour your Sauce over them, and ferve them up.

Another JVay,

DR Y your Oyfters very well, then beat the Yolks of three Eggs, with a little Cream, or Milk, and ftir in a little grated Bread; dip your Oyllers into it, and fry them of a fine brown Colour, in a large Quantity of boiling Lard or Scwet. You need not turn them at all, nor Smelts, when you have Store of Sevet.

Or thus.

OPEN large Oyfters, and lay them on a Sieve to drain; then put them into a Ivjarinade, of the Juice of three or four Lemons, a llicd Onion, Pepper, a little Bafil, a Bay- leaf, and five or fix Cloes; turn the Oyllers often when they lie in this Marinade: Then make a Batter with Flour and Water, one Egg, and a little Salt: Beat thefe well to- gether, melt a Bit of Butter as big as a Walnut, and mix it with your Batter: Then take your Oyllers out of the Mari- nade, and dry them well between two Napkins -, dip the Oyfiers in the Batter, and fry them in clarifyd Butter, made very hot. When they are fryd brown, ferve thera up on a clean Napkin, with Parfley fryd.

Or thus.

TAKE two Quarts of large Oyfiers, parboil them in their own Liquor; then wafli them in warm Water, dry them, bread them, and flour them; then fry them crifp in clarifyd Butter; then lay in the Dilh Prawns, or Shrimps, butterd with Cream and fweet Butter, and lay the fryd Oyllers about them; run them over with beaten Butter, and the Juice of Oranges; lay Bay-leaves, and Orange or Le- mon, ilicd, round the Oyllers.

Another Way.

TA K E a Score or two of the largell Oyllers you can get, the Yolks of four or five Eggs, beat very well, put to them a little Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt, a Spoonful of fine Flour,, and a little raw Parfley fhred, fo dip in your Oyfters, and fry them in Butter a light Brown.

They are very proper to lie about either ftewd Oyllers, or any other Fifh, or made Dilhes.

Oyfiers

153 The Ladys Companion.

Oyllers on Shivers.

PU T a little Butter in a Stew-pan, with fome Chibbols, Parfley, and Mufhrooms, cut fmall, tofs them up, put in your Oyilers, feafon them with pounded Pepper, fvveet Herbs, and fine Spice, a d put a Dull of Flour over them; put them on a Silver, or Wooden Skesver, and put fome Mulhrooms between each Oyll:er. Your Skewers being filled up, dip them in Crumbs of Bread, and broil them.: Or you may dip them in Batier of Eggs, Rrew theni with Crumbs of Bread, and fry them to a good Colour.

To hafa Oyfters.

PARBOIL three Pints of Oyfters in their own Liquor, mince a Quart of them fmali, and ilew them in a Quar- ter of a Pint of White Wine Vinegar, and an Onion quar- tered; two Blades of Mace, grated Nutmeg, Chefnuts fiicd, and Piilachoes; add to them Salt, Pepper, half a Pound of fvveet Butter, and a Faggot of favoury Fierbs, let thefe ilew together over a gentle Fire, and feafon the Pint of Oyfters you left, with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, and fry them in Batter made of Flour, Cream, and Eggs; put in a little Spi- nach to make it green, and ferve them up with Lemon- juice; garnilh with fiicd Oranges and Olives.

Another Way.

TAKE three Pints of large Oyfters, parboil them, and preierve their Liquor; then mince a Quart of them very fine, and Hew them in a Pipkin, with fome of the Oyfter liquor, and near half a Pint of White Wine, an Onion, grated Nutmeg, and large Mace, two Spoonfuls of White Wine Vinegar, three Ounces of Butter, fome Piftachoes and Chefnuts, fome Salt, Pepper, and a Faggot of fvveet Fierbs f let ail thefe ftev together over a gentle Fire for half an Hour.
Then feafon the other Pint of Oyfters with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; dip them in Batter made of Flour, Eggs, Salt, and Cresni; the one Half of the Batter being made green with the Ijice of Spinach, and f.veet Herbs flired fmali and fry them in larifyd Butter; then fet them by, and keep them warm Cut Sippets, fteep them with fome Gravy of the Haft or Ovfter liquor, and White Wine, boiled together: Ly .he Sijpets in a Difli, and the Hafti upon them, and the f r, d Oyfters upon the Hafti, with the Piftachoes and Chef- nuts; then beat up a SaUce of Butter, White Wine, Juice of

Oranges

ns Ladys Companioi. 159

Oranges, or Lemons, and the Yolk of an Egg, and pour this Sauce over the Hafn; lay on Slices of Lemon and Le- mon-peel. Garnifii the Diih with fryd Oyfters, carvd Le- mons, Chefnut5, Fiilachoes, and grated Bread, dryd and feared.

Oyfters grilled in Scolhp Shells.

FIRST let them be bearded and lightly feafond with Salt, Fepper, and flir.d Pavfley: Afterwards, the Scol- lop Shells being well butterd, lay your Oyfters in neatly, adding their Liquor and grated Bread: Let them ftew thus half an Hour, and then brown them with a red-hot Fire Shovel or Salam-.nder.

Shrimps may be grilld after the fame Manner, and they will prove very good.

Jlmiher Way to drefs Oyfiers.

TA K E a Fint of Oyfters, and drain them from their Liquor, put fome Butter in a Sauce-pan, and fet it over a gentle Fire; put in a little Flour, and keep it ftirring till brown, then put in feme Crufts of Bread, and after that your Oyfters; give them a few Turns, feafon with Pepper, moiften them with ftrong Broth and their own Liquor, warm them all together, but dont let them boil j ferve tkem hi Plates.

Another Way,

HAVING opend your Oyfters, fave the Liquor, and put thereto ome White Wine, with which you are to wafn your Oyfters one by one, and lay them in another Difh; then ftrain to them that mingled Liquor and Wine wherein they were waflid, adding a little more Wine, with an Onion choppd, fome Salt and Pepper: Cover the Diih, and ftew them till they are more than half enough; that done, turn them, with the Liquor, into a Frying-pan, and fry them a pretty while; then ilip in a good Piece oi Butter, and let them fry fo much longer: In the mean Time, having pre- pared Yolks of Eggs, four or live to a Quart of Oyfters, beaten up with Vinegar, ftired Parfley, and grated Nutmeg, mix them with the Oyfters in the Pan, which mufc ftill be kept ftirring, left the Liquor make the Eggs curdle: Laftly.
let all have a thorough Walm over the Fire, and fend tixem to the Table.

ro

1 60 lhe Ladys Companion.

To pi-kle Oyilers.

TAKE the largeil Oyflers you can get, wafh them clean, and let them lettle in their own Liquor; then ftrain it, and add a little White Wine Vinegar, with Salt, whole long Pepper, a Race of Ginger, three Bay-leaves, and an Onion: Thefe being well boiled together, flip in your Oyfters, and let them boil leifurely till they are tender; be fure to clear them from the Scum as it riles: When they are enough take them out with a Spoon, and not touch them with your Fingers, and fet them by till the Pickle is cold: Afterwards they may be put into a long Pot, or into a Caper Barrel, and they will keep very well iix Weeks.

j not her IFay.

PARBOIL a Quart of Milfon Oyflers in their own Li- quor: For the Pickle take a Pint of White Wine, a Pint of Vinegar, and their own Liquor, with Mace» Pepper, and Salt; boil and fkim it, and when it is cold keep the Oyflers in this Pickle.

Another Way.

OPEN your Oyilers, and get the Grit from them, and flew them in their own Liquor in an Earthen Pipkin, till they are tender; then take up the Oyflers, and cover them, that they may not be difcoloured; then increafe the Liquor with as much more Water, and let it boil till one Third is confumed; then put your Oyflers into your Pot or Barrel, laying between the Rows fome whole Pepper and Spice, and a few Bay-leaves; and when the Pickle is cold put it to your Oyilers, and keep them clofe floppd.

Another Way,

TAKE the largeft Oyilers, wafh them well in their ov;n Liquor, drain them in a Sieve; flrain the Li- quor, put them into a Sauce-pan, and for every Quart of Oyflers put in a Spoonful of Salt, a Race of Ginger, three Blades of Mace, half a Nutmeg cut in three Pieces, twelve Corns of white Pepper, and twelve whole Cloves; fet them on the Fft-e, and let them fimmer gently for feven or eight Minutes, and yLVo. them a Turn before they are quite enough j put in two Spoonfuls of White Wine Vinegar, let them have a Walm or two, take them off the Fire, put them into Earthen Pots, and flop them up clofe for Ufe.

Another

he L A D ys C O M P A N I O N. 1 6i

Another Way

PU T your Oyfter Liquor into a Pipkir, h 1th fome whole long Pepper, Salt, an Onion flit, fome Bay-leaves, a Kace of Ginger flicd, and a good deal of Mace; boil thefe well together, then put in the Oyllers, and let them boil for a Quarter of an Hour; then put them into the Earthen Pot you defign to keep them in; give your Pickle two or three Boils, fet it by till it is cold, then put it to the Oyfters; and if you pleafe, you may put in a Clove or two of Garlick.

Another Way.

TA K E a hundred of large Oyfters, pour the Liquor into a Porringer, cut off the Beards, put them in their ovn Liquor, let them boil for half an Hour over a gentle Fire, fkim them clean; then take them off the Fire, take out the Oyfters, and alfo a Pint of the Liquor while it is hot; put to it a Quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, and better than a Quarter of an Ounce of Mace; then fet the Liquor over the Fire till it boils; then put the Liquor to the Oyfters, and ftir up the Spice well among the Oyfters; then add half a Spoonful of Salt, and almoft half a Pint of White Wine Vinegar, and half a Quarter of an Ounce of whole Pepper, then fet them by till they are cold, then put your Oyfters into the Veflel you defign to keep them in, then fill the Bar- rel up with Liquor, and ftop them up clofe.

To make Oyfter-Loaves.

PREPARE what Number o French Rolls you think fit, cut a Hole on the Top of every one, about the Com- pafs of Half a Crown, and fcoop out the Crumb, fo as not to break the Cruft; then let fome Oyfters ftev, in their own Liquor, with a little White Wine, Salt, whole Pepper, Nut- meg, and a Blade of Mace; take off the Scum carefully, and thicken the Liquor with a Piece of Butter, rolled up in Flour. Afterwards fill up your Rolls vith the Oyfters and Sauce, and lay on the Piece again that was cut off. At laft, having put the Rolls in a Diih, pour melted Butter over them, and fet them in an Oven to be made crifp. If you have not the Convenience of an Oven, fry your Loaves crifp in Butter, or Lard, before you pui your Oyfters into them.

Oyfters

iSz The Ladys Companion.

Oyfters au Parmejan.

RU B over the Bottom of a Difh with good Butter, and having opend your Oyfters, lay them in it, and ftrew over them a little Pepper and minced Parlley; then put to them half a Glafs of White Wine; covr them with Slices of frefli Butter cut very thin, ftrew over them fome fine grated Cheefe; lay a Tart-pan over the Difh, and fet them a ftevving, with Fire over and under them, till they are of a vtxy fine brown Colour; then take off ail the Fat, clean the Brims of your Difh, and ferve them hot.

lote, Inftead of grated Cheefe, you may put only Crumbs of Bread, and then they are called ftewed OyAers.

Oyflers a la Daube.

OPEN your Oyfters, and feafon them with Parfley, Bafil, and Cives, flired very fmall, putting a little of at to each Oyfcer, with Pepper and a little White Wine; then cover them with the upper Shell, and broil them on a Gridiron; lay, from Time to Time, a red-hot Shovel over them: When they are enough, take off the upper Shell, and ferve them in the under one.

To foufe Oyfters.

TAKE two Quarts of large Oyfters, parboil them in their own Liquor, put them into a Colander, then wafh them in v.arm Water; then make a Pickle for them with half a Pint of White Wine, and half a Pint of Wine Vinegar, put into a Pipkin with Salt, whole Pepper, Ginger, and Nutmeg flicd, a Couple of Cloves, and a Blade or two of Mace; give it four or five Walms; then put in your Oyfters, with a Lemon fticd, and fome Lemon-peel; cover the Pipkin clofe. Thefe are to be eaten either hot or cold.

To fcoikp Oyfters.

PU T your Oyfters in Scollop Shells for that Purpofe, fet them on your Gridiron over a good clear Fire, let them llev till you think your Oyfters are enough, then have ready fome Crumbs of Bread, rubbed in a clean Napkin; fill your Shells, and lay them before a good Fire, and bafte them well with Butter: Let them be of a fine Brown, keeping them turning, that they may be alike fo all over; they are beft done in a Tin Oven before the Fire, and eat much beft done this Way, though moft People ftew the Oyfters firft in

a Sauce-

W La D ys Com p A N I ON. i6g

a Sauce -pan, with a Blade of Mace, thickened with a Piece of Butter, and fill the Shell, and then cover them with Crumbs, and brown them with a hot Iron: But the Bread has not fo fine a Taile as the other Way.

You may garniih a Difh of Fiih with theiiij or ferve them for fecond Courie by themfelves.

A Matelottee of Fifn.

GE T a Carp, an Etl, fome Tench, Pike, Barbel, in fnort, what Fih you can get, and think proper for your Purpofe; after having gutted and fcakd them, cut thern in Pieces, and lay them in a Stew-pan, with fome TrufHes, iViLfiirooms, an Onion Huck with Cloves, fome Cives and Panley, Bay leaves, and a little Bafil: Seafon this with Salt and Pepper, put to it fome White Wine, a little Fifn-Breth, or Juice of Onion, but juil enough to cover the Fifh; then fet it over a quick Fire, and v»hen the Court Bcui lion is half wafted away, put fome Butter, more or lefs, according to the Quantity of your Fifh, into a Sauce-pan, and brovn it in a little Flour; then empty the Liquor of your Matelotte into the Sauce-pan, mix your Brown and that well together, and pou. the Whole back again into your Matelottee, and keep at ftewing till it is enough done; then put it to fome Craw- fifh, or other meagre Cullis, lay it handfomely in a Difh and ferve it warm for firft Courfe.

To make an Olive of all Sorts of Fifh.

YOU muft take all Sorts of Fifh that are not flat, as Carps, Pikes, Mullets, Trouts, ic, being cleanfed and wafiied, take the firmeft and biggeft for boiling, and the other for frying and farcing: Your Fifh being boiled off quick, as likewife your other Filh being all ready, difn on your Sippets fome large Filh turned round in the Middle of your Diib, or a Collar of Salmon baked in the Oven, vith the Heads of Filhes on the Top of it, and your fryd Fifu betwixt them; your Smelts and Gudgeons round th Brims of your Difh, and have a Force-meat made of Fifh in little Balls; place them between the Boiled and the Fryd; then, having good Oyflers, Cockles, Prawns, Perriwinkles, Craw- jifh, or fliced Lobflers, or any of thefe ready in your Sauce of thick Butter, as likewife Anchovies, pour it all over your Fifh, having Nutmeg grated therein: Garnifh it with Le- mon, and fend it to Table fmoaking hot.

A Bifque

164 he Ladys Companion.

J Bifque of Filh.

YO U may take what frefli Fifh you pleafe, and clean it very well, then fteep it in White Wine Vinegar, whole Spice, fome whole Onions, fweet Herbs, tied up, one Lemon ilired, a Handful of Salt; cover the Fifli almoft with Ingredients; let it lleep an Hour, then have ready boiling a Kettle of Water, then put in your Filli, with the Ingredients, on the Fire, and when it is about half enough, put in the boiling Water to it; and this Way will ma;e the Fifh much firmer than the old Way; then fry fome of the other in hot Liquor, then have a rich Sauce made with Oyllers, Shrimps, Mufhroor.is, tv;o Anchovies, Capers, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, two whole Onions, one liuck with Cloves, Horfe- radilh, fcraped Nutmeg, the Juice of a Lemon, the Yolks of two Eggs; mix all thefe together with two Pounds of But- ter, and draw it up very thick; then difh your Fifli on Sip- pets, and run over your Sauce. Garnifh your fryd Fifh with Parfley, Horfe-radijh, and cut Lemon, and ferve it up hot.
Thus you may do all frefh Fifh.

ji Marbree of Fifh, or Fifh marbled.

TAKE Fifh of all Sorts, vix. a Couple of Eels fkim- ned, and well cleanfed, half a Dozen Perches gutted, and well wafhcd, fmall Smelts or Gudgeons, Trouts, half a Dozen Barbels, as many Weavers, Bret Fifh, or Flounders.
All being well cleand, put tlem in a Stew-pan, or Fifn- kettle, feafon them with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, fweet Bafil, Thyme, Bay-leaves, two or three Bottles of White Wine, and fome Slices of Lemon, and moiften them with Water; let not your Fifh be too much boild, left they break. Being done, take them off, and let them cool in their Liquor; be- fore they are quite cold, begin with taking out your Perches, fcale them, and place them in your Difh; do the fame with the other Fifh, one after another; ftrain oiF their Liquor, and let it cool; then put in a clean Kettle two or three Quarts of Water, with two Pounds of Hartlhorn Shavings, let it boil well, and when boiled enough, ftrain it off thro a Napkin; let your Fifti-jelly be pretty firm, mix it with your Jelly of Hartfhorn, put it over the Fire, and let it be of a good Tafte; whip up the Whites of a Dozen Eggs, and put them to your Jelly, with the Juice of three or four Le- mons; your Jelly being clarify d, ftrain it off through a Flannel Bag or Napkin. Now boil a Dozen Crawfifh, take

a cleaa

The Ladys Companioji. 165

a clean Stew-pan, big enough to contain your Mahree, and put in the Bottom four Crawfifh, forming a Crofs; cut an Orange and a Lemon in Slices, and lay another Crofs with Slices of Orange, and another with Slices of Lemon, alter- nately lay an Eel round it, a Trout, a Perch, a Plaice, fome Smelts or Gudgeons; put your Crawfifh in it, fome Slices of Orange and Lemon, with fome Orange-leaves placed alternately, one near the other; put the moil ordinaiy Fifh in the Middle, with the fineil Fifh round it, all your Fifh being in the Stew-pan, add your clarify d Jelly to them, in which your Fifh mull foak, and put your Stew-pan in a cool Place, that-our M.r.rrf may be dazd well. If this Side- dlfh is to be fervd up at Dinner, it mufi: be made the Even- ing before. Two Hours before you fervc it up, put a folded Napkin in the Difh you ferve up your Malre in; keep boiling Water in another Stew-pan, chat is bigger than that your ivjarbee is in, put a Dilh or Plate over your Ivlai-breey and put the Stew-pan wherein your Marbree is, into the Stew-pan, with boiling Water; leave it in but a Moment, turn in topf turvy, diili it up, and ferve it for a Side-difh.

To pickle Sprats ike Anchovies.

PULL the Heads off of your Sprats, and fait them a little over Night; the next Day, take a Barrel, or Earthen Pot, lay in it a Layer of refined Salt, a Layer of Sprats, a little Lemion-peel, and fome Bay-leaves; then lay another L-ayer of Salt, and another Layer of Sprats, V. fo do till you have filled the VefTel; then cover it clofe, and clofe it up with Pitch, that no Air can get in; fet it in a Cellar, and turn it upfide down once a Week -, they will be .eatable in three Months.

To keep Anchovies.

YOU muil take Anchovies, and cover them two Inches thick with Bay-falt.

7b make a Sallad of Anchovies.

W A S H them in Water or Wine till the Liquor be clear; then dry them with a Linnen Cloth; take ofl: the Tails nd Fins, flip them from the Bones, and having laid them in a Plate, garnifh them with young Onione, Parl- ley. Slices of Lemon and Beet-roots; then beat up fome fweet Oil with Lemon-juice, and pour it on the Anchovies.

Fiih

i6 he L A D ys Companion.

Fiih Sauce.

TAKE fome good Gravy, and make it pretty flrong of Anchovie:, and a little Horfe-radifli, tnen work a Piece of Butrer in fome Flour, and put to it, with fome more Butt-er, and draw it up thick; then, with rtewd Oyxiers and Shrimps, put it to your Filli: Garniih with fryd Parfley, Lemon, and Sippets.

Sauce for pickled Fiih.

TAKE Parfley and Gives, of each an equal Quantity, fome Anchovies and Capers ihred very fmall, with a little Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Oil, and Vinegar, all mixd well together; when you difh the Fifh, pour this Sauce up- on them, and ferve it in a China Bafon.

Another Fifli Sauce.

GE T two Anchovies, and boil them in a little White Wine a Quarter of an Hour, with a little Shalot cut thin; then melt your Butter very thick, and put in fome pickled Shrimps, and pour it over your Fifa. You may add Oyfter-liquor.

Fifh Sauce to keep the njchole Tear.

YOU mufi take twenty -four Anchovies, chop them.
Bones and all; put to them ten Shalots, a Handful of fcraped Horfe-radifh, four Blades of Mace, one Quart of Rhenilh Wine, or White Wine, one Pint of Water, one Le- mon cut in Slices, half a Pint of Anchovy Liquor, one Pint of Claret, twelve Cloves, and twelve Pepper-corns; boil them together till it comes to a Quart, then Itrain it off into a Bottle, and two Spoonfuls will be fufficient to a Pound of melted Butter.

A Sauce yor Mackarel, n.Kiith Fennel and Goofeberries.

ROWN fome Butter in a Sauce-pan, with a Pinch of Flour, then put in a few Cives fhred fmall; add a little Fiili- Broth to mxoiften it, feafon with Salt and Pepper; make thefe boil, then put in two three Sprigs of Fennel, and fome Goofeberries; let all fimrner together till the Goofeberrisjs are foft, then put in fome CuUis,



AMthit

ne Ladys Com p an i ok; 167

Another Sauce for Fifli.

O 1 L a little Thyme, liorfe-radifh, Lemon-peel, and whole Pepper, in Water, add four Spoonfu-s of White Wine, with two Anchovies, and let all boil together for a- while; then ftrain them out, and turn the Liquor into the fame Pan, wieh a Pound of frefli Butter; as foon as it is melted remove the Pan, and flip in the Yolks of two Eggs, well beaten, with three Spoonfuls of yhite Wine. Laftly, fet your Sauce ovc:r the Fire again, and il:ir it continually till it is as thick as Cream, then pour it on your Fiih very hot, and fend it to Tabic,

A particular Saucc called Ramclade.

TH I S Sauce being proper for feveral Sorts of Fifl-i cut into Fillets, or thm Slices, is made of Parfley, Chib- bois. Anchovies, and Capers, all chopped fniall, and put into a Dilh with Oil, Vinegar, a little Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, well te perd together: Aftcr the FilleLs are drefsd, this Ramolade is ufuall tarnd over them, and fometimes Juice of Lemon is added, v»hen they are to be ferved up cold,

J Sauce yo Fifh or Flerti.

TAKE a Quart of Verjuice, nnd put it into a Jug then take Jamaica Pepper whole, ibme flicd Ginger, Mace, a few Cloves, fome Lemcn peel, Horfe-radifh llicd, fome fweet Herbs, fix Shalots peePd, eight Anchovies, and two or three Spoonfuls of fnred Capers; put all thefe into a Linnen Bag, and put the Bag into your Verjuice; then Hop the Jug clofe, and keep it for Ufe; a Spoonful cold, or mixd m Sauce for Fiih, or Flefh, is very agreeable to moll Palaces.

Oyller Sauce.

TAKE half a Pint of Oyfters, put them into a Sauce- pan with their own Liquor, and two or three Blades of Mace; let them fimmer till they are plump, then with a Fork take out the Oyllers, firain the Liquor to them, put them into the Sauce-pan again, with a Gill of White Wine hot, a Pound of Butter rolled in a little Flour; ihake the Sauce-pan olten, and when the Butter is melted, give it a boil up.

Mufcle

i68 Ti L A D ys Com p A N ION.

Mufcle Sauce made the fame Way is very good, only yon muft put them into a Stew-pan, and cover them clofe, firil to open, and fearch that there be no Crabs under the Tongue.

A Spoonful of Walnut Pickle in the Butter makes the Sauce good, or a Spoonful of Catchup. Horfe-radifh Sauce may be made thus: Melt your Butter, fcrape a good deal of Horfe-radiui fine, put it into llie melted Butter, grate half a Nutmeg, beat up the Yolk of an Egg with one Spoonful of Cream, pour it into the Butter, keep it lUrring till it boils, then pour it diredly into your Bafon.

Sauce for Salmon, Turbut, Cod, c.

ME L T a fufhcient Quantity of Butter thick; flir int© it the Body of a Lobiler, then mince the Meat of the Lobfter very fne, and put it in alfo, ftew all together, and when done enough, pour it into a Bafon: Some make it of one half Gravy, and the other melted Butter, and Lobfter.

Mince-Meat of Fifh.

TAKE fome Carps, Pikes, and other Fifli, fkin them, take out the Bones, and mince all thefe together upon a Table; put in the Crumb of Bread boiled in M:Ik, and eight or nine Yolks of Eggs; put in a good Piece of Butter, and feafon it with Sal, Pepper, fine Herbs, and fne Spice, mincd Mufhrooms, and Truffles f put your mincd Meat into a Mortar, with your Whites of Eggs beat to Snow, pound all together, and make Ufe of it for any Stuffing of Filli, or Balls, as you think proper.

To make Filh-Balls.

T A K E Carp and Eel, mxince it fmail together, with the fame Quaniity of Sewet, fome Aveet Herbs, and voury Spice, Crumbs of Bread and Eggs; beat all in a Mortar, and make it into Balls.

Another Way,

TA K E a little Thyme, Savour, and Spinach, mince it fine, add fome Crumbs of Bread, an Anchovy or two, fome Sewet, and the Yolks of two Eggs well beaten; feafon it with a little Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, and mix all well together, and make it into Balls,

V3i

T[7 L AD ys Co MP A N I ON. 169

ne Times when Fijh are i2 Seaf.n

J A ] U A R r.

GOLDEN Smelts, Grailings, or Humbers, Green River Carps, fmall Pvoaches, Codlings, Dabs, Feter- foam Oyfters, Cods, Sea Flounders, Cockles, Colchejier Oy- flers, Green Velfleet Oyiiers, Holibuts,. Coles-Fiih, Gray Lumps, Miltcn Oyllers, Red Lumps, Chars, large River Flounders. Pike, in Seaion moil Months in the Year.
Popes, in Seafon moft Months in the Year. Plaice, the fame, and fmall River Flounders. Turbuts, in Seafon moll Months of the Year. Thornbacks, Maids, Soals, and Gudgeons, ail the Year, as are Bleaks and Grigs.

F B B RU A R r.

Large River Flounders, Sea Flounders, Chars, Holibuts, large Dace, large Roach, Salmon-Trouts, Salmon, Breams, River Treats, Sea Perches, Chubs, which laft, if not eaten the fame Day it is taken, is worth but little; it fpawns in March.

MARCH.

The Month of fafch is the Time when all Pond Fifh are in the greateH Perfeflion -, and it is to be obfervd, that both Males and Females of all kinds of Filh are bell: before the Spawning Time, and that they are fick and unvvholeforae for three Weeks after Spawning Time. Fifh in Seafon _this Month are,

Large River Flounders, Sea Cabs, Cods, Sea Flounders, Chars,_ BafTes, AlliiTes, Silver Smelts, Sea Tench, Willifes, and Kingilons.

APRIL.

Sea Crabs, Sea Crawiifh, large River Flounders, Salmon- Trout. Thames Salmon comes into Seafon in April, and is allowM to be caught till Hofy-RooBy the 13th of Septem- ber. River Trout, Ha7npfhire the chief County for Trouts.
Sturgeon is catchd this Tvonth in the Northern Seas, but is now and then taken in our great Rivers, the Thajnes, the Seaerfi, and the Tcr.e: This Filh is of a very large Size, even fometimes to meafure 1 8 Feet in Length; it is in great Efteem when freih taken, to be cut in Pieces of eight orten Pounds,

Vol. L I to

1 7© The Ladys Companion.,

to be roafted or baked, befides to be pickled and kept for cold Treats; and moreover the Cavier, which is efteemed a Dainty, is the Spawn of this Fiih.

Pilchards come in Seafon this Month for the firil Time.
Sea Liabs continue in Seafon.

Pond Carp, in Seafon this and moil Months of the Year, except Part of May, in the Beginning of which they fpawn, they increafc wonderfully, fci- they breed three Iimes a Year.

The Melter Carp is much the f ner Fiih, but the Spermer is largeft. Lamper Eel, Fire Flaws, S-.rx.uy Lobikrs, tc.

M A Y.

Sea Crabs flill in Seafon, Sea Crawf.ih the fame; Brown Shrimps, Shads, Guard Fifh, Red Mullets, Mackarel, White Prawns, and Herrings, Irouts flill in Seaibn. Scollops in the Mackarel Seafon.

7 C A £.
Mackarel continue in Seafon, and Flerrings; Eels, the Eels that are taken in Rivers and running Waters are better than Pond Eels, and of thofe the Silve ones are moil efteem- ed. Chich,Jhr and Black LoL-flers. Red Mullets continue in Seaibn.

J u L r.

Red Mullets ftill in Seafon; right Anchovies the Begin- nino- of this Month -, Cravvfifli are in Seafon all the Year; theeft in England are faid to be taken in the River Kennet at HuvgerforcL Oyiters firfl come in Seafon on 6V. Jameses Day, the 25th of this Month.

AUGUST.
tobfters and Crabs come in Seafon inAugvJl and hold till Chriftmas, which is called the firft Se-fon; and from Chriji- fPMi to June is called the fecond Seafon. Smeer Dabs, RufFs, and John Dorees.

SEPTEMBER.
Barbels, they take their Name from their Barbs; they are not a very pleafant Filli to eat, for they are dry and full of Bones; their Eggs and Spawn vomit and purge violently.
Gurnctf, fmall Roaches, fmall Dace, green Smelts, Mack- arel, Homelings Herrings, and Brills. r

OCT € •

he L A D ys C o M p A N I N. 171

OCTOBER.

Scotch Lobfters, grey Mullets, Dabs, Haddocks, Whitings, Sea Spiders, Perches, and Pilchards. Herrings flill in Sea- fon.

N O V E M B E R.

Tench; Dabs ftill in Seafon; Haddock the fame; Sea Cravvfifn, Whitings Hill in Seaibn; Stock Haddocks, Cods, Ling, PouUing, Sprats, Codlings, Milion and white lFtl- fi.ci Oyfters from this Month till January,

DECEMBER.

Codlings Hill in Seafon, and large River Flounders; Dabs ftill in Seafon; Haddocks and Whitings the fame. Cockles and Cohhejier Oyilers. Ling yet in Seafon. Sea Flounders, Weavers Chars, Mufcles, Sprats, brown Shrimps, red Lumps, River Coney Fifhes, and Lampreys in Seafon from Chrij-.mas to J une: The beA of this Sort of Filh are taken in the River Seuerr, and when they are in Seafon, the Fifh- mongers and others in Loud », have them generally potted from Gloucejler, but if you are where they are to be had frefh, you may drefs them different Ways.

CHAP. III.

Of BUTCHERS MEAT.

To force the hfide of a Surloin of Eeef.

CAREFULLY lift up the Fat with a lliarp Knife, and take out all the Meat clofe to the Bone, chop it fmall, take a Pound of the Sevvet, and chop it fine, about as many- Crumbs of Bread, a little Thyme and Lemon-peel, a little Pepper and Salt, half a Nutmeg grated, and two Shalots chop- ped fine; mix all together, with a Glafs of Red Wine, then put it into the fame Place, cover it with th« Skin and Fat, fkewer it down with fine Skewers, and cover it with Paper; dont take the Paper off till the Meat is in the Difh. Tak» a Quarter of a Pint of Red Vine, two Shalots fhred fmall

I 2 boll.

172 7-6 Lad rs Com p A Nio N.

boil them, raid pour into the Difli, with the Gravy which comes out of the Meat. Spit your Meat before you take out the Infide.

To force the Inftde of a Rump of Beef.

YO U may do it juft in the fame Manner, only lift up the outfide Skin, take the Middle of the Meat, and do as before direcled; put it into the fame Place, and with fine Skewers put it down clofe.

When you roail Beef, be fure to paper the Top, and bafie it well all the Time it is roafting, and throw a Handful of Salt on it. When you fee the Smoak draw to the Fire, it is near enough; then take off the Paper, bafte it well, and drudge it with a little Flour to make a fine Froth. Never fait your Meat before you lay it to the Fire, for that draws out all the Gravy. If you would keep it a few Days be- fore you drefs it, dry it very well with a clean Cloth, then flour it all over, and hang it where the Air may come to it; but be fure always to mind that there is no damp Place about it; if tliere is, you muft dry it well with a Cloth.

To drefs PiCef a la Braife.

GE T two or more Pihs of Beef, only the ilelhy Part of them that is next the Chine, cutting off. the long Bones, and taking away all the Fat; lard it with large Pieces of Bacon, feafond with Spices, fweet Herbs, Parf- ley,, young Onions, a little Quantity of Mufhrooms and IVufRes, flired very fmall. When your Beef is thus larded, bind it about with Packthread, for fear it Ihould break to Pieces when you come to take it out of the Stew-pan, v»hich mull be bigger, or lefs, according to the Size of your Beef: Cover the Bottom of it with Slices of fat Bacon, and over that lay Slices of lean Beef an Inch thick, well beaten, and feafond with Spice, Herbs, Onions, Lemon-peel, Bay- leaves, Pepper, and Salt; then put in the Beef, obferving to lay the flelhy Side downvards, that it may the better take the Taile of the Seafoning. You muft feafon the upper Part ©fit as you did the lower, and lay over it, in like iVIanner, Slices of fat Beef, and over them Slices of Bacon; This done, cover your Stew-pan, and clofe it well with Pafte all round the Edge of your Cover; then putfome Fire as well over as under it: While your Beef is thus getting ready, make a rvagoo of Veab Sweetbreads, Capons Livers, Mufh- rooms

7 L A D Y S C O M P A N I O N. I 73

rooms, Truffles, Afparagus Tops, and Artichoak Bottoms, which you mull tois up with a little melted Bacon, moiilen with good G ravy, and thicken with a Cullis made of Veal and Gammon of Bacon. When you are ready to ferve, take up your Beef, and let it drain a little; then lay it in the Dilli in which you intend to ferve it, and pour your Ra- goo upon it.

This Beef a la Braife is fometimes fervd with a hafhd Sauce, made in the following Manner: We take a little of the Lean of a Gammon of Bacon, iome young Onions, a little Parfley, fome Muihrooms, and 1 ruffles, and fhred all of them very fmall together; then we tofs it up with a little Lard, moifien it with good Gravy, and thickan it with the Cullis laft mentioned; and when we ferve up the Beef, we pour the Sauce upon it.

At other Times it maybe fervd up with a Ragoo of Car- doons, or Succory, or Sellery, or of roailed Onions, or Cu- cumbers; which lail: is made as follows:

Take fome Cucumbers and pare them, cut them in two In the Middle, take out the Seeds j then cut them in fmall Slices, and marinate them for two Hours, with two or three ilicd Onions, Vinegar, and a little Pepper and Salt j after this, fqueeze your Cucumbers in a Linnen Cloth, and then tofs them up in a little melted Bacon; when they begin to grow brown, put to them fome good Gravy, and fet them to fimmer over a Stove. When you are ready to ferve, take off the Fat from your Cucumbers, thicken them with a good Cullis made oi Veal and Gammon of Bacon, and pour them on your Beef.

This Ragoo of Cucumbers ferves likewife for all Sorts o: Butchers Meat, that is either roafled, or ilewd in whole Joints in its own Gravy.

Beef ij la Brcife, is made of all the Pieces that grow nex: the Chine, from the Neck to the Rump, as well as of the Ribs.

Beef yr.

THE fame Pieces of Beef only are farced that are dreffed a la Braip, that is to fay, thofe that are com- monly called Roailing Pieces, and thofe may be farced with a Salpicon; or elfe, when your Beef is almofl roafted, raif; up the Skin, or Outfide of it, and take the Fleih 6f the Middle, which you mufl Ihred very fmall, with the Fat of Bacon and Beef, fine Herbs, Spices, and good Garnifiiinsc.

I 3 .With

1 74 he Ladys Companion.

With this you farce, or fluff Beef between the Skin and the Bone, and few it up very carefully to prevent the Flefh from dropping into the Dripping-pan, when you make an End of r-oafling it.

Brifcuit of Beef a la Cholonnoife.

T O U mufl take a Brifcuit of Beef, and fet it a boiling, when it is half boiled, take it up, and lard it with large Larcoons of Bacon, then put it on a Spit, and to make it Hick fall:, take two Sticks, and tie them at both Ends of it.
Have in your Dripping pan a Marinade made of Vinegar, Pepper, Salt, Spice, Onion, the Rind of Lemon and Orange, Rofemary, and Sage, and keep bafiing it with this all the uhile it is roafting: When it is enough, fet it a fimmering in the Sauce, which you may thicken with Chippings of Bread or Klour, ftirred in a little flrong Broth. Let your Gar- nifhmgs be Mufhrooms, Palates, and Afparagus.

A Rump of Beef roUed.

HAVING taken out the Bones, make a Slit the whole Length of it, and fpread it as much as you can: Lard it with large Lardoons of Bacon well feafond: Make a Farce of the Flefh of the Breafls of Fowls, Beef-fewet, Mufh- rojrr.s, and boild Ham: Seafon your Farce with Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs, Spices, Parfley, and feall Onions, a few Crumbs of Bread, moiflend with Cream, and three or four Yolks of raw Eggs; hafh all thefe together, and pound it in a Mortar: Having fpread this Farce on the Piece of Beef, roll it up at the two Ends, and tie it fail: w-ith Packthread: Take a Pot, cr Kettle, of the Size of your Piece of Beef, and garnifii the Bottom of it, firft with Bards of Bacon, and then with Slices of Beef well feafond with Salt, Pepper, Herbs, Spices, Onions, Carrots, and Parfnips; put the Piece cf B.ef into the Pot, and cover it with Beef and Bacon, as under it; cover your Pot very clofe, put Fire under and over it, and keep it fleving for ten or twelve Hours; Make hr.rnd Sauce, with fome Ham or Bacon cut in Dice, with halhd Iviufr.rooms and Truffles, fmall Onions and Parfley: Tofs up all this in a Sauce-pan, with a little melted Bacon, and moiilen it with good Gravy; when it is enough, take oft ail the Fat, and thicken the Sauce with a CiJUs of Veal r.r:d Mcdn. When you are going to ferve, m,ix among it a hafhd AiKhovy and a fev Capers: Take up your Beef and

drain

, La dys CoMPAN ION. 175

drain it very well; then lay it in your Diih, pour your Sauce upon it; fo ferve it very warm.

At another Tirae you may ferve it with a Ragoo of Calves Sweetbreads, and Cocks-combs, or with a Ragoo of Cucum- bers and Succory.

Tg kil a Rump of Eeef.

LE T it be well rubbd over with common Salt, all So-ts of Pot-herbs, Pepper, and a little Salt-petre, and lie three or four Days; then put it into a Pot, according to its Size, and fill the Pot with Water, putting in fome Onions, Garden Pot-herbs, Bay-leaves, Salt, Pep-er, and Ciove.s put in alio fome Carrots. When it is boiled fufficiently, lay it in a Diih. Grirnilli it with gicen Parlley, and ierve it up for the firil Conrfe.

To koil a Rump of Beef the French F Jhion.

PARBOIL your Rump of B.ef for half an Hour: take it up, and put it into a deep Difh; cut GaHies in tlvi Side, that the Gravy may come out; then put Salt and Pep- per in every Galli; then fill up the Dilli with Claret, and put in two or three Blades of Mace; fet it over a Chafing- dilh of Coals, and cover it clofe, and lee it ftcw for rmKour and half, but turn the Meat often; then take off:he Fat, put in a Handful of Capers, five or:.x Onions flicd, half a Dozen of hard Lettuce flicd, and a Spcronful or two of Ver- juice. Boil all thefe together till the Meat is tender, and ferve it up to Table with brown Bread and Sippets fryd in Butter.

To carbonado, hroU or roaji Beef, the Italian IVciy.

HAVING got Ribs of Beef, cut them into Steaks, and back them; then fprinkle them wkh Rofe iregar, and Elder Vinegar, and feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Coriander-feed, then lay them one upon another in a Th for an Hour, and broil them on a Gridiron, or toail them before the Fire, and ferve them up with the Gravy that came from them, or the Gravy and Juice of Orange boiled toge- ther.

To make Beef Cullis.

HAVING roafled a Piece of Buttock of Beef very brown, cut off all the brown Part, and beat it hot in a Mortar, with the Carcafes of Partridges, or any other

I 4 Fowl

iy6 Tbe LjAD Ys Companion-.

Fowl that you have, and Crufts of Bread; then put it into a Stew-pan, with ftrong Gravy and good Broth; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Cioves, Thyme, fweet Baiil, and a Piece of green Lemon. Let thefe have four or hve Boilings up, then ilrain them for Ufe.

JjortRih of Beef farceJ.

WHEN the fnort Rib is almoR roafted, take fome of the Flefh out of the Middle, mince it imall with Ba- con, Beef-fewet, fome Herbs, Spice, and good Garnitures; then farce the Rib betwixt the St:in and the Bone with it; then ew it up again, that the Meat may not fall into the Dripping-pan. Garniih with Fricandos or Scotch Collops, in Form of larded Cutlets, with fryd Bread; and when it is fervd up at Table, the Skins are to be taken off, that the Meat may be eaten with a Spoon.

Side-dilh cf Beef Fillets.

GE T fome Beef Fillets, or Slices larded, and marinated with Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Thyme, and Onions, let them be roafted leiiurely on a Spit, and then put into good Gravy, with Truffles; and garnifh them with mari- nated Pigeons or Chickens.

Beef efcarlot.

HAVING got a Brifcuit pf Beef, rub it all over with half a Pound of Bay Salt, and a little White Salt mixd with it; then lay it in an Earthen Pan or Pot, turn it every Day, and in four Days it will be red; then boil it four Hours very tender, and ferve it with Savoys, or any kind of Greens, or without, with pickd raw Parlley all round.

Another Way.

TA KE a Brifcuit of Beef, half a Pound of coarfe Su- c;ar, two Ounces of Bay Salt, a Pound of common Salt, mfx all together, and rub the Beef, lay it in an Earthen Pan, and turn it every Day. It may lie a Fortnight ift the Pickle, then boil it, and ferve it up either with Savoys, or a Peas-pudding.

Note, It eats much finer cold, c«t into Slices, and fent to Table.

Beef

be Ladys Companion; 177

Beef a la Daub,

HAVING got a Rump or Buttock of Beef, lard it, and force it, then pals it off brown; put in fome Li- quor, or Broth, and a Faggot of Herbs; fealbn with Pep- per, Salt, Cloves, and Mace; ftove it four Hours very ten- der, and make a Ragoo of Morels, Truffles, Mufnrooms, Sweetbreads, and Palates, and lay all over. Garnilh with Petty-patties, and flick Atlets over.

Beef tf la Daub another Way.

YO U may take a Buttock or a Rump of Beef, lard it, fry it brown in fome fweet Butter, then put it into a Pot that will juft hold it, put in fome Broth, or Gravy, hot, fome Pepper, Cloves, Mace, and a Bundle of fweet Herbs, ftew it four Hours till it is tender, and feafon it with Salt; take half a Pint of Gravy, two Sweetbreads, cut into eighc Pieces, fome Truffles and Morels, Palates, Artichoak Bottoms, and Muihrooms, boil all together, lay your Beef into the Diih, flrain the Liquor into the Sauce, and boil all together.
If it is not thick enough, roll a Piece of Butter in Flour, and boil in it. Pour this all over the Beef. Take Force-meat rolPd in Pieces, half as long as ones Finger, dip them into Batter made with Eggs, and fry them brown, fry fome Sip- pets dippd into Batter, cut three Corner-ways, flick them into the Meat, and garnilh them with the Force-meat.

Beef a la hiode in Pieces.

YO U mull take .a Buttock and cut it in two Pound Lumps, lard them with grofs Lards feafond; pals them off brown, and then Ilove them in good Liquor, or Broth, of fweet Herbs, juil enough to cover the Meat; put- in a Faggot, and feafon with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and Salt; and when tender, ikim all well, and fo ferve away hot or cold.

Beef Or-oes.

CUT a Rump of Beef into long Streak, cut them fquare, and wah them with fome Eggs, and feafon. them 5 lay on fome Force-meat, and roll them, and tie them up fail, and either road them, or Hove them tender. Sauca thcra with Shalots, Gravy, and Vinegar.

411

17 hi Ladvs Companion.

A Hafh of raiv Beef.

CU T fome thin Slices of tender Beef, and put them in a Stew-pan, with a little Water, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, fome Lemon-peel, an Onion, with fome Pepper Salt, and fome Nutmeg; cover thefe clofe, and let them ftew till they are tender; then pour in a Glafs or two of Claret, and when it is warm, clear your Sauce of the Onion, Herbs, crV. and thicken it with burnt Butter. It is an ex- cellent Dilh. Serve it hot, and garnifh with Lemon ilicd, and red Beet Roots, Capers, and fuch like.

hin Beef Collops Jiewed.

CU T raw Beef in thin Slices, as you would do Veal for Scotch Collops; lay them in a Difh, with a little Water, a Giafs of Wine, a Shalot, fome Pepper and Salt and a little fweet Marjoram powder d; then clap another Dilh over that, having firft put a thin Slice or two of fat Ba- con among your Collops i then fct your Mefs To as to reft on the Back of two Chairs, and take fix Sheets of Whited- brown Paper, and tear it in long Pieces, and then lighting one of them, hold it under the Difh till it burns out, then light an- oiher, and fo another, till all your Pacer is burnt, and ther your Stew will be enough, and full of Gravy. Some wilt put in a littk Mufhroom Gravy, with the Watci, and other ingredients, which is a very good Way.

Stenjoed Beef- Steaks.

WHEN you have get Rump Beef- Steaks, feafon them with Pepper and Salt; then lay them in thie Pan, and pour in a little Water, then add a Bunch of fweet Herbs, a few Cloves, an Anchovy, a little Verjuice or Vine- gar, an Onion, and a little Lemon-peek with a little Bit of Butter, or fat Bacon, and a Glafs of White Wine. Cover thefe clofe, and ftcw them gently, and when they are tender pour away the Sauce, and itrain it; then take out the Steaks and flour and fry them; and when you put them in the Dilh, thicken tlie Sauce, and pour it over them.

To fry Beef-Steaks.

AFTER they are well beaten with a Roller, fry them with half a Pint of Ale; fured fome Onion fmall, mix it vith Salt, and a few Crumbs of Bread, and ftrew them therewith. When they are fryd, take a little Onion, a Sha- lot,

ne L A D ys C O AI P A N I O U. 1 79

lot, Thyme, Parfley, and Savoury, and chop them very fmall, add icme grated Nutmeg, then roll up a Piece of But- ter in Flour, and fhake it up very thick, and ferve them.

Another Way,

CU T the Beef into Steaks, beat them with the Back of the Shredding-knife; then put only the Lean into a Frying-pan with juil fo much Butter as will moiilen the Pan; let them on a gentle Fire, turning them often; and as the Gravy runs from them, k.ep pouring it out; then fry the Fat by itfelf, and lay it on the Lean; then put a little Anchovy, Onion, Nutmeg, Pepper, and Claret, in the Gravy, and Hew it a little.

Sidtfiijh of a Piece of Beef ivith Cucumbers.
T OAST a good Piece of tender Beef larded, or co- iV vered with thin Bards of Bacon, and wrappd up in Paper; when it is roailed, cut it into Fillets, or thin Slices, and lay them in a Diili -, then let fome Cucumbers be llicd and marinated, then fqueeze them, and put them into a Stew- pan with fome Lard, and ievv them well; then drain off all the Lard, and put in a little Flour, and tofs them up again a little while; then foak them In good Gravy, and add fome thickening Liquor to make the Ingredients incorporate well together, a Spoonful of Gammon EiTence is very good for that Purpofe, put to it a little Verjuice or Vinegar, and let not the Fillets boil too long, left they grow hard. Garnifh with fryd Bread, Marinades, or RilToles, and ferve them hot to Table.

To drffs a Buttock rf Beef.

LARD your Buttock with Gammon and other Bacorr, well fer.fbnd with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Cinnamon, Coriandei-fecd, and grated Nutmeg; alfo Onions, Parfley, Shalots, all mixd together. Let as much of thefe as you can, he Rutted into the Bacon, and lard the Buttock botli on the Top and underneath; then feafon it again with all your Ingredients, and put it into a Stew-pan to be marinated a little vhile with Onions, Garlick, Shalots, Parfley, fweet BafiL Thyme, Slices of Lempns, Verjuice, and a Ikile Broth.
Let it lie in tnefe two Hours, then put it in a Napkirr with thin Slices of Bacon, wrapping it up clofe, rhat no Fat may enter. Put a Plate in the Eottom of the Pot, fo keep tlieNa5kin and Meat from being burnt to the Bottom, and,

bOil

iSo W Lad ys Com PAN I ON.

boil it in the Evening againll the next Day. To feafon iC;,.
you may put in about two Pounds of Leaf- fat of a Hogs Belly, Verjuice, Salt, long Pepper, Ginger, Cinnamon, Nut- meg, Slices of Lemon, Onion, Parfley, Bay-leaves, fweet Bafil, and whole Coriander, Annis, and Fennel; when all tliefe are put into the Pot, let it be covered very clofe, and let the Beef be ilewd very gently; and when it is enough, let it cool in its own Fat; then make a Godivoe, put it into the Dilh in which the Piece of Beef is to be dreifed; then cover it with the fame Godivoe, and then put it into the Oven for an Hour. Before you ferve it up, prepare a yell feafond Beef Cullis, and make a round Hole in the Top of the Godivoe, and pour in your Cullis, fo that it may pene- trate into every Part, and the Juice of a Lemon upon that.
This Beef may be fervd up cold in thin Slices, inflead of Beef a la Royal.

ronji a Fillet of Beef.

THIS Fillet lies only in the Infide of the Surloin next to the Chine, and is the tenderell Part of the Ox fpit this on a fmall Spit, and do not run it through the beft of the Meat; roafl it gently, and balle it with Butter; catcli the Gravy in a Diih whilfl the Beef is roalling; in the mieai Time make a Sauce for it with fweet Herbs, and Parfley ihred fmall, the Yolks of three or four Eggs, an Onion, and ibme Orange-peel mincd; put thefe mto fweet Butter,, Gravy, a Spoonful or two of ftrong Broth and Vinegar ftew them all together, then put your Beef into it, and ferve it up hot to Table.

0 male a Beef Hotchpot.

TAKE a Brifcuit-rand of Beef, fome Mutton, and Veal, boil them together in a good Quantity of Wa- ter, fkim it well, then mince Cabbage, and fweet Herbs, and Micd Carrots, and put in, feafon vith Salt and Pepper; let them boil till they are almoft a Jelly, then ferve them up on Sippets.

Beef- Steaks roikd.

TAKE three or four large Beef-Steaks, and flat them, with a Cleaver: Make a Farce with the Flefli of a Capon, foine of a Fillet of .Vea4, and fome Gan.on of Ba- con, both Fat and Lean; add to this tne Fat of a Loin of Veal, Sweetbreads, young Onions, Parfiey, Muflirooms, and

Truffles,

The Ladys Companion. iSi

Truffles, the Yolks of four Eggs, with a little Cream; fea- fon all thcfe with Spice and Herbs, and halh them, then ftrevv them on your Slices of Beef, and roll it up very hand- fomely, that they may be firm, and of a good Size; then let them Hew a good while. When they are enough, take them up, and drain away the Fat very well, then flit them in two, and lay them in a Dilh, the cut Sides uppermofc. You ma put to them a Ragoo, or a good CuUis, as you pleafe

To fie-iK a Rump of Beef.

HAVING boiled it till it is more than half enough-, take it up, and peel off the Skin -, take Salt, Pepper j beaten Mace, grated Nut.neg, Parfley, Marjoram, Savoury, and Thyme ihred, and fluff tnem in large Holeb through the Fat; and lay the reil of the Seafoning aii over the lop, and fpread over it tne Yolk of one cr two Eggs to Lind it on.
Save the Gravy that runs out while you are ftuiung u, and put to it a Pint of Claret, and fome Vinegar; put it into a deep Pan, io fit for it, that the Liquor will fill it up ta the Top y let it bake for two Hours, then put it into a Djlh, and pour the Liquor it was baked in all over it.

Another Way,

CUT Beaf-Steaks off the Rump, half broil them, thea feafon them high, and put them into a Stew-pan, and cover them with Gravy; roll a Piece of Butter in Flour, pu: it in, add the Yolk of an Egg, and ferve them up.

Another Way.

GE T an oval Stew-pan, with a clofe Cover, lay in a Rump of Beef, but cut off the Bone, cover the Beef with Water, put in a Spoonful of vhole Pepper, two Onions a Bunch of fweet Marjoram, Savoury, Thyme, and Parlley, half a Pint of Vinegar, a Pint of Claret, and ieafon it with Salt, fet it on the Stove clofe coverd, to Hew four Hours, fhaking it fometimes, and turning it four or five Times; if it be too dry pour in warm Water, make Gravy as for Soop, and put in three larts of it; keep it Hewing till Dinner is near ready, then ilew twelve Turnips cut the broad Way, in four Slices, and flour them well, and Iry them at twice in boiling Beef-fewet, and drain them. When the ti is tender, put it dry in a Difli, and put the Turnips into the Gravy, fliake them togetlier, and let them heat over the Fire, and pour it ovr the ieefj melt two Ounces of But- ter

l82 The Lad ys Companion.

ter m the Sauce-pan where you hook up your Turnips, with a little Gravy, and pour it all ovvr the <,i, and ierve it.

Beef-Steaks nvith Oyller Sauce.

HAVING cut Steaks from the Rump, or any other tender Part, fcafbn them with Pepper without Salt, for that would make them hard, ry them, but keep them pretty conilantly turning; when they aie enough, fait them to your liking; then take the Oyfters from their Liquor, and waih them with faked Water to tleanfe them from Grit; let the Liquor iland a little to fettle, and pour off the clear Part of it; -then ftew the Oyrters gently in their own Liquor, wieh a little Nutmeg, a Clove or two, fome whole Pepper, and an Anchovy. If you ftew them too much they will be hard, which you mull: take cate to avoid When they are near enough, put a little White Wine, and a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour to thicken it.

Portugal Beef.

BROWN the Thin of a Rump of Beef in a Pan of brown Butter, and force the Lean of it with Sewet, Bacon, boiPd Chefnuts, Anchovies, an Onion, and feafoti it; ftew it in a Pan of ftj-ong Broth, and make for it a Ra- £00 of Gravy, pickled Gerki«i5, and boiPd Chefnuts; thicken at with brown Butter, and garnifti it with flicd Lemon.

0 Jlfw a Rump, or fat End of a Bricuit of Beef,. th& French JVaw

AFTER having boild a Rump of Beef, fKim it clean, let it be clofe coverd, and ftewd for an Hour; then jDut to it Salt, whole Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, llafh the Meat with a Knife to let out the Gravy j then put in fome Claret, and f ve or fix flicd Onions; when they have boild an Hour, put in fome Capers, or a Handful of Broom. Euds, and having boild half a Dozen Cabbage Lettuces in Water, put them into your Meat, wich two or three Spoonfuls of Wine Vinegar, and as much Verjuice: Let all ftew together till the Meat is tender, then put Sippets of Frevch Bread ia the Difh, and difli it on them; take the Fat off the Broth,, and flick it with fryd Bread.

Cakci

ne Ladys Companion. 1S3

Cakes of Beef to be fryd

CHOP fome of the tendered Part of the Pecf very fmall, and bruile it as much as for Smifages, mix afufR- cient Quantity of clean Eeef-ievvet with ir. feafon the Mifti with Salt, Pepper, and a Sprig of Thynne: then beat up an Egg, or two, accordirg to the Quantity of your Meat, and mix the Whole well together in the Form of Cakes, and fry them in their own Gravy.

To flenu a Fillet of Beef the Italian Tojhion.

TAKE the Skins ard Sinews from a Fillet of Beef, put it into a Bowl with White Wine, crufli it in and wafh it well; then ftrew upon it a little Pepper, and a Powder called the Itallun Tarara, which is made of one Ounce of Coriander-feed, half an Ounce of Fennel ieed, half an Ounce of Annifeed, an Ounce of Cinnamon, and an Ounce of Cloves, beaten into grofs Powder, with a little Powder of Winter-favoury; thefe all kept in a Glafs Vial and as much Salt as will feafon it; mingle them all well together, and put in as much White Wine as will cover it; put a Board on it to keep it down, and let it lie in fleep for two Nights and a Day; then take it out, and put it into a Stew-pan, with fome good Broth that is falc, but none of the Pickle j put in whole Cloves, and Mace, cover it clofe, let it flew till it is tender, then ferve it with as much of the Broth as will cover it.

To Jlev Beef in Gobbets the French Tajhlon.

GE T any Piece of Beef, except the Leg, cut it in Pieces as big as Pullets Eggs, both of Fat and Lean; ftew it in a Stew-pan with Water, Ikim it clean, and when it has boiled an Hour, put in Salt, whole Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, Carrots, Turnips, Parfnips, and whole Onions, cover k clofe, and let it ftew till it is tender, putting in half an Hour before it is enough, Parflcy, Thyme, fweet Mar- joram, Spinach, Sorrel, and Winter-favoury, and fome Cla- ret; then d-ifti it on Sippets, and lenx it to Table hot. Gar- nifti with Barberries, Grapes, or Goofebrries,

Olives

184 La D ys Companion;

Olines of Bqq Jieixed, or rcajied,

CUT Slices off a Buttock of Beef as broad as your Hand, hack them with the Back of a Knife, lard them with fmall Lard, and feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; then make a Farce of the Yolks of hard Eggs, Beef-fevvet, or Lard, f.veet Herbs, Thyme, and Onions, all mincd fmall. Barberries, Grapes, or Goofeberries, mincd fmall likewife, and feaiondwith Salt, and the former Spices; mix thefe well together, and lay it on the Slices of Beef, roll them up round with fome Caul of Mutton, or Veal; bake them, or roaft them, then put them into a Stew-pan with fome Butter; blow the Fat from the Gravy, and put the Gravy into the Stew-pan; and having, in the mean Time, blanched and boiled Artichoaks, Potatoes, or Skirrets, in Claret, put them into your Meat, diih them on Sippets, and ferve them with Slices of Orange, Lemon, Barberries, and Grapes, or Goofeberries.

J Way of eating cold boiled Beef.

SLICE your Beef as thin as poffible, and alfo an Onion or Shalot, then fqueeze on it the Juice of a Lemon or two, and beat ail together between two Plates as you do Cu- cumbers; when it is well beaten, and taftes fharp of the Le- mon, put it into a deep Dih, pick out the Onion, and pour Oil on it, fhred fome Parfiey, and itrew over it; garnilh it with Lemon, and ferve it up.

7o ftetAj a Leg of Beef.

YO U muft break it, then put to it two or thfee Quarts of Water, Salt, whole Pepper, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; then let it Hew for feven or eight Hours; then pour out all, both Meat and Broth into a Pan, and let it Hand till the next Day; then fet it on the Fire again, and put in a Quart of Ale, and let it boil about half an Hour; then take it off, and put it in a Difh with Toafts upon it.

Beef RcyaL

TAK E a Surloin, or large Rump of Beef; bone it and beat it very well; then feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, and Mace, with Lemon-peel, Thyme, Sa- voury, and Marjoram; then lard the Meat quite through with large Pieces of Bacon; in the mean Time, m.ake a Urong Broth.,pf the Bones; then put into your Stew-pan a

good

ne L A D ys C O M P A N I N, I 85

good deal of fweet Butter, and brown it; then put in the Meat, and brown it on both Sides; then put in the Liquor with the Butter, put in two Bay-leaves, fix Truffles, Ox- palates, or Sweetbreads, pulld in Pieces; and cover the Stew-pan clcfe, letting it Hew till it is tender, then take it out, and fkim oft all the Fat; then pour in a 1 int of Claret, and put in three Anchovies; then put the Beef in again to be made thoroughly hot, and add what Pickles you have, with fryd Oyfters, thicken your Sauce, and pour over the Meat, and fend it up. It. is to be eaten hot or cold.

Beef a la Vinagrette,

GE T a large Slice of Beef three Inches thick, moll lean; from the Buttock, or ellewhere; flew it with Water, and a Glafs of White Wine, feafond with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, a Faggot of Herbs, and a Bay leaf; let it boil till moil of the Liquor is boiled avvay; then fet it a cooling, and when it is cold, ferve it up, with Slices of Lem©n, and a little Vinegar.

To fQufe Beef.

GE T either Buttock, Chuck, or Brifcuk of Beef; fea- fon them with Salt and Pepper for four Days; then roll them up as even as you can; then tie a Cloth fall about it, and boil it in Water and Salt till it is tender; then take it up, and foufe it in Water, Vinegar, a little White Wine, and Salt; then put it into a Hoop Frame, to fafhion it round and upright; then dry it in fome fmoaky Place, or in Air: When you ufe it, cut it out in Slices, and ferve it up with Sugar and MuHard.

To make Dutch Beef.

GE T eight Pounds of Buttock of Beef, without Bone, and rub it all over with aboAit fix Ounces of coarfe Su- gar, let it lie two Days, then wipe it a little, and take a Pint of white Salt, a Pint of Salt-petre, and fix Ounces of Petre- fait, beaten, and rub it well into the Beef; then let it lie for three Weeks, turning and rubbing it every Day; then feV it up in a Cloth, and hang it up in the Chimney to dry; let it be turned upfide down every Day, that the Brine does not fettle; afterwards boil it in Pump Water till it it very ten- der.

Another-

i86 he Lad y s Com pan ion.

Jnother Way to dry Eeef after the Dutch Manner.

CUT the beft Part of the Btittock of a fat Ox inta what Shape you pleafe; then take an Ounce of Petre- falt, and as much good Bay-fak as will fait it very well, and let it ftard in a c Id Ceilar ten Days in Salt, in which Time you nr.cit turn it, and rub the Salt in; then take it out of the B ine. and hanp it in a Chimney, where a Wood-Fire is kept for a Nknh, in which Ti.ne it will be dry, and will keep a Twelve-nio: rh. Vhen you eat it, boil it tender, ai d uhen cold, cut it n thin Shivers, and eat it with ine- gar, Breau and Butter.

Palates if zi en gratin.

SOME rafp.d Pa. • eOr. being put in the Bottom of you Difh, with a httle Cullis, put in your Palates, pour fomc v.uius, and Itrew fome Parmfan over them, then fend youi Dilh to the Oven to et a Colour, and when that is done, add fon.e Efitiice of Kam and Juice of Lemon.

fillers of Vtit after the Indian Way,

PREPARE a Fdlet of Beef, lard it with middling Ba- con, and fhce it on the Side it is not larded; then ma- rinate your Fillet duiing tv»o Hours, with Salt, Pepper fwcet Herbs, Garlick cut fmal, the Juice of two Lemons, and a Glafs of good Oil. Put your marinated Fillet, wrap- ped up in Papers, upon a Skewer, tie this to the Spit, and bafie it with your Marinade, which mull be mixd with a Glafs of White Wine. Your Fillet being done, take off the Paper, diih it up wicli Sauce, and ferve it hot for a firlt Couife.

-< Dutch Way ofdrfffng Beef, called Pater-Stuck-Gherockt.

IT is a Brifcuit of Beef ioaked eight Days in Brine, and then hung up for three Months. It is then to be wafnd.
in feveral Waters to get the Salt out, and boiPd with Cauli- flowers, Cabbage, Spinach, and thickend Butter fervd with it. It may be like wife ftewd with Carrots.

Roaft Beef nvith a Salpicon.

ASalpicon is a Sort of P.agoo, fo calPd, and is ufed in great Difhes of Roaft Meat, in the fxrft Courfe, fuch as Chines of Beef, or Mutton, Barons of Beef, and Quarters ©f Mutton, or Veal, Cr. It is made as follows: Pre-

ne Lad ys Com PAN I ON. iZy

Prepare fome Cucumbers, cut them i;i Dice, srid lay them in a Diih to i:arinate in Vinegar, Peprr, and Sslt, and an Onion or two cu-t in Slices; cut fome of the Lean of Ham or Bacon in Dice; take fome Mufhrcoms and Truffls, the Breads of Pullets, fat Livers and Vc3l Sweetbreads. Squeeze the Cucuii.bers, tofs them up ir a Souce-pan over a Stove with a little melted Bacon; mcillen tliem with Gravy, and let them fimmer in it over a gentle Fii e; then take the Fat clean off: Set over a Stove another Sauce-pan with a little melted Bacon, into which yut the Ham you had cut in Dice, a few Gives, and a little Parfley. Mince the Mufhroorrs, Truffles, Sweetbreads, . id tofs up all the Ingredients toge- ther, and then moiften them with fome Gravy, feafon them with Pepper, Salt, and a Bunch of Herbs; and v.hen they have fimnrkerd a-v» hiie in it, take off all the Fat; when they are almoft en jugh, put to them the fat Livers, and the Breafts of your Pullets cut in Dice; then bind your Salpicon with fome Cullis of Veal and Ham, and fome Eifencc of Ham. When rhe Cucumbers are ready, bind them likevvife with the fame Cullis, and put the Whole into the fame Sauce-pan; that is to fay, put the Ragoo of Cucumbers into the Salpicon.

Make a Hole in your Piece of Roaft-meat, in the Part you think moft convenient: For Example, if it be a Quarter of Veal, or Mutton, make it in the Leg, and having taken out the Flefii, that may ferve for fome other Ufe, put the Salpi- con in the room of it.

A Salpicon may be fervd in a Dilh by itfelf.

To bake a Leg Beef.

DO it in_ the fame Manner as for Gravy Soops; and when it is baked, drain it through a coarfe Sieve: Pick out all the Sinews and Fat, put them into a Sauce-pan, with a little Gravy, Red Vine, a Bit of Butter roUd in Flour, and fome MuHard, when the Sauce is hot and thick, ferve it up.

To roaft a Tongue and Udder.

BOIL the Tongue a little, blancli it, and lard it with Bacon, the Length of an Inch, being frft feafond with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Cinnamon, and f:.uff the UJder full of Cloves; then fpit and roaft them, balk then: with Bat- ter, and ferve them up with Claret Sauce. Garnifh witli fJcd Lemon.

Anothtr

iS8 57 Ladys CompanioiV.

Another Way.

BOIL it a little, blanch it, lard it, with pretty big Lard all the Length of the Tongue, as alfo the Udder, being lirlt feafond with Nutmeg, Pepper, Cinnamon, and Ginger; then fpit and roaft them, and bafte them with Butter j being roafted, drudge them with grated Bread and Flour, fome of the Spices aboveLid, and fome Sugar, and lerve it with Juice cf Oranges, Sugar, Gravy, and flicd Lemon on it.

A Neats Tongue the Polifh Way.

TA KE a Neats Tongue, put it in boiling Water, take off the Skin, and let it be done in a Braife; - when your Tongue is boild, cut it in two, but not quite off, and Hick it with prefervd Lemon, and Slices and Bits of Cinna- mon; put a Bit of Sugar in a Stew-pan over the Fire, with a Glafs of Wine, and a little Gravy; the Sugar being melt- ed, put in your Tongi e, let it ftew a little while, dilhi it up with your fweet Sauce, and ferve it up hot.

Neats Tongue another Way,

TH E Tongue being done in a Braife, lard it with fine Bacon, and put it on a Spit; when roafted, difh it up, pouring over it a thick Pepper-fauce, or a fweet Sauce.

To fry a Neats Tongue.

FIRST boil it, then cut it into thin Slices, feafon it with Nutmeg, Cinnamon, and Sugar, dip your Slices of Tongue into Yolks ol Eggs, adding a little Lemon-juice; make fome Butter very hot in a Frying-pan, fry your Tongue, and pour Eggs by Spoonfuls; and when they are done, ferve them up with White Wine, Butter, and Sugar, well beaten together.

Another Way.

BEING prepared, and cut into Bits, as before, put to them fome fryd Onions, and ftew them with Mufh- rooms; feafon them with Mace and Nutmeg, rub the Difh with a Shalot, and ferve them up on Sippets,

Qx

he Ladys Companion. 189

Ox Tongues a la Mode.

HAVING large Ox Tongues, boil them tender, tlien blanch them, take off the Skin, and lard them on both Sides, leaving the Middle, then brown them of and ftove them one Hour in good Gravy and Broth; feafon with Spice and a Faggot of Herbs, and put in fome Morels, Truffles, Mullirooms, Sweetbreads, and Artichoak Bottoms; then fkim off the Fat, and ferve them either hot or cold.

Neats Tongues a la Braife,

CU T away the Roots of the Tongues, and then put them into boiling Water, that you may take off the Skin as clear as poihble; lard them with large Bits of raw Gammon of Bacon well feafond: Then take a Boiler, and cover the Botom of it with Lards of Bacon, and Slices of Beef well beaten: Lay in your Tongues with fiicd Onions, and all Sorts of fweet Flerbs and Spices; feafon them be- fides, with Pepper and Salt; and cover them with Slices of Beef and Bacon, in the fame Manner as under them, fo that they may be entirely wrapped up in them; put them to flew la Braife with Fire over and under: You muft keep them fo eight or ten Hours, that they may be thoroughly done: After which, you muil have in Readinefs a good Cullis of Mufhrooms, or fome good Ragoo, with all Sorts of Inrre- dients, as Mufhrooms, Morels, Truffles, Sweetbreads, ijc.
Having taken up your Tongues, you drain them, and take oiF the Fat; then lay them in a Difh, and your Ragoo over them; if you would garnifh the Dilh, you may cut one of the Tongties in Slices, or elfe garnifh it with Fricandoes, all ferved very warm.

Calves Tongues are fometimes drefsd in the fame Man- ner; and, if you will, they may be farcd without larding, and ferved up with the fame Ragoo.

To boil a Neats Tongue.

LE T your Tongue be faked three or four Days, boil it in Water, and ferve it with Brewis, with boiled Tur- nips, and Onions; run it over with beaten Butter j ferve it on carved Sippets, with Barberries, Goofeberries, or Grapes, and ferve it with what Sauce you pleafe.

Ta

10 The Ladys Companion.

To fry a Neats Tongue, or any other Tongue.

LET your Tongue be frelh, boil it tender, fet it by to be cold; then cut it into thin Slices, fry it in Butter, put to it ftrong Broth, Salt, Nutmeg grated, the Yolks of Eggs, Saffron, Cloves, and Mace, foaie Verjuice, and Grapes; when the Tongue is done, difh it on Sippets.

To roaji a Neats Tongue.

YO U mull boil a Neats Tongue tender, peel the Skin, fet it by till it is cold, cut a Hole in the Root-end of it; take out fome of the Meat, mince it with Beef- fe wet and Pippin, and the Yolks of hard Eggs; feafon it with Salt, beaten Ginger, Thyme, and Savoury fhred fmall; fill the Tougue with this Farce, and cover the End with a Piece of a Caul of Veal or Mutton, lard the Tongue, and roaftit; make a Sauce for it with Butter, Juice of Oranges, and Nut- meg grated. Garnifn with Barberries, and Slices of Lemon, and fer ve it up.

Another Way,

YO U mull: boil it in Water with a little Salt, and a Fag- got of fweet Herbs: When it is alraoft enough, cut off the Pvooc, take off the Skin, and lard it with long Bits of Ba- con, then lay it down to the Fire, and while it is roafling baite it with Butter, Salt, Pepper, and Vinegar. When it is roafted, cut it in large Slices, and tofs it tip in a Stew-pan with a Ramolade made of Anchovies, Capers, Parfley, and Onions, fhred very fmall; then tofs all up in good Beef- Gravy, with Salt, Pepper, a few Rocamboles, and a Drop of Vinegar, and ferve it for the firil Coufe.

We ferve it likewife, after having cut it in Slices, with a Ragoo of Mufhrooms, Sv, eetbreads, Artichoak Bottoms, Salt, Pepper, Butter, or melted Bacon: We fet it a fimmering in this Ragoo, and fo ferve it, but obferve, that when we ferve it this Way, we ufe no inegar in bailing it but only Butter.

Calves Tongues are drelsd in the fame Manner, and may be fervd whole, either with a Pitjrade, or a fweet Sauce.

To Jicw a Neats Tongue ivhok,

TAKE a Neats Tongue raw and frefh, fet it a dew- ing between two Difnes, in ilrong Broth and Vhite Wine, v.ith Salt, whole Pepper, whole Cloves, and Mace, Turnips, Carrots, or any other Roots cut, and fome Capers j Cet thefe over a gentle Fire, and let them ftew gently fcT two

or

7he Ladys Companion. 191

•r three Hours; then take up your Tongue, blanch it, put feme Marrow to it, let it hare a Walm or two, and ferve it or carvd Sippets. Garniih with mincd Lemon, Baiberries or Grapes, run it ovsi with beaten Lutter. Garnilh with fcaid Manchet, and lerve it up hot.

To hajh Neats Tongues.

OIL them very tender, peel them, and flice them thin _ then take ftrong Meat-Broth, blanched Chelhuts, a Fag- got of fweet Herbs, large Mace, and Endive, a little Pepper, whole Cloves, and a lit. le Salt, boil all together till they be enough, -vvith lojie Butter, and pour all into a Difh on Sip- pets. Garnifh with Barberries.

Another Way to diefs a Neats Tongue.

BO I L it in Salt and Water, with a Bunch of fweet Herbs; when it is enough, blanch it, and cut off the Root, lard it with Bacon; then roail and bafle it with But- ter, Salt, Pepper, and feme Vinegar; when it is roailed, cut it in Slices, and tofs it up in a Stew-pan a Minute, or two, with Anchovies, Capers, fome Parfley, and an Onion cut fmall, then tofs up all in good Beef-Gravy, with Salt, and a little Vinegar, fo ferve it hot.

To fickle Tongues.

YO U muft iriake your Pickle with Salt-petre and Sal- prunella; to fix Quarts of Water put one Ounce of each, and half a Pound of Bay-falt, a Pound of White Salt, and a Quarter of a Pound of coarfe Sugar j boil all thefe to- gether till the Scum rifes; let it be very llrong, fkim it clean, and when it is cold, put the Tongues to it, and let them lie at their full Length to be covered; turn them thres Times a Week, let them lie three Weeks, and then you may boil and peel them; eat them with Chickens or Pigeons, and Aiparagus, Colliflowers, Spinach, or what is in Seafon.
You may keep them in Pickle as long as you pleafe, or rub them in Bran, and hang them in your Chimney.

To drefi a Neats Tongue the Italian Way,

BOIL your Tongue in a Pipkin, either whole, or cut In Halves, till it may be blanchd, put in fome ftrong Mutton-Broth, and two or three Blades of Mace, White Wine, and fome Slices of interlarded Bacon; fkim it when it boils, and put to it Pepper, Ginger, Nutmeg, and large

Mace,

12 ne Ladys Companion.

Mace, three or four whole Cloes, let it all flew well, and ferve it on Slices of FtJich Bread.

7o dry Neats Tongues.

BEAT Salt arid Salt-petre very fine, an equal Quantity of each, lay the Tongues in Pump Water all Night, rub them very well with the Salt, and cover them all over with them, iliil putting on more as they wafle; when they are fiift and hard they are enough; then roll them in Bran, and dry them before a gentle Fire; before you boil them, lay them in Pump Water all Night, and boil them in Pump Water.

Another Way.

BE A T Salt and Salt-petre, of each a like Quantity, into a fine Powder, foak the Tongues in warm Water, and rub the Salts very well into them, efpecially at the Roots, put them in a Pot, cover them over with the Salts -, and as the Salts wafte, put Sugar upon them, turning them frequently till the Sugar has penetrated j and when flifF, dry them before a Fire, or hang them up in a Chimney j when they are dryd, prefs them liattim, and length-v.-ays, lay them up dry.

Tongues ivlth forced Udders roajled,

YO U muil: firil boil off your Ox Tongues, and your Udders, then make a good Forcd- meat with Veal; and as for your Tongues you muft lard them, and your Ud- ders you muft raife in the Infide, and fit them with Forced- meat, wafhing the Infide with the Yolk of an Egg; then tie the Ends clofe, fpit and ro aft them: Make a Sauce with Syrup of Claret or Gravy. You may draw the Udders on the Top with Lemon-peel and Thyme,

To drefi Neats Tongue atid Udder in Stoffado.

SEASON them with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmegs, lard them with large Lardoons, and let theni lay all Night in Wine Vmegar, Claret, Ginger, feafoned with Salt, whole Pepper, Nutmeg fliced, and whole Cloves; bake them in an earthen Pan, and ferve them on Sippets, lay the Spices verthem, and fome Slices of Vernon and Saufages.



TZ L AD ys Com PA N ION. i

To marinate Neats Tongues.

BOIL them, blanch them, lard them, if you ileafe, put them in a Vefiel; make a Pickle of Nutmegs and Ginger flicd, large Mace, whole Cloves, a Bunch of fvveet Herbs, Parfley, fweet Marjoram, Rofemary, Thyme, Win- ter-favoury. Sage, and Bay-leaves; boil thefe in as much Wine Vinegar and White Wine as will iill the Vefiel you put your Tongues into; put in fomeSalt and flicd Lemons; when they are cold clofe them up for Ufe, ferve them with fome of the Liquor, Spices, Herbs, and Saliad Oil, and Slices of Lemon.

To roaji a Neats Foot.

AFTER you have boild and blanchd it, let it Hand by till it is cold, then lard it, fallen it on a fmall Spit, and balte it with Butter, Vinegar, and Nutmeg; for the Saufe, toaft fome Bread, foak it in Claret and Vinegar, flraia it through a Strainer, put the iiiquor int6 a Pipkin, and put in a few flit Cloves, Ginger, and beaten Cinnamon; fet it on the Fire, ftir this with a Sprig of Rofemary till it is pretty veli thickend: Difh your Foot, pour the fame on it, and ferve it up.

To fry Neats Feet.

BOIL your Neats Feet, blanch them, and fplit them; then fry them in clarifyd Butter, or take out the Bones and fry them in Butter with a little Salt, and fome flrong Broth; when you have fryd them a little, put in fome Mint, Thyme, and Parlley, Ihred fmall, and fom.e beaten Pepper; beat the Yolks of Eggs, Mutton Gravy, Vinegar, the Juic of Lemons, or Orange, and Nutmeg, pour the Sauce upou it, and ferve it up.

To hake Ox Cheeks.

BONE them, pick out the Balls of the Eyes, cleanfe the Mouth, foak them, walh out the Blood, wipe them dry with a Cloth, feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, put them into an Earthen Pan with three or four large Onions, Mace, and Cloves; lay the Jaw-bones on the Top of the Meat, then put in half a Pint of Water, and half a Pint of Claret j cover the Pan witn coarfe Pafte, and bake it. Serve it on fryd Greens, and run it over with beaten Butter; but the common Way is, in its own Liquor.

Vol. I. K Jmfer

194 2i& Lad ys Com PAN ION.

Another Way.

LA Y your Cheeks in Water all Night, then bone them, and llufF them with all Manner of Spice: Seafon them with Salt and Pepper, then put them into a Pan, one Cheek clappd clofe together upon the other; lay over them Bay- leaves, and put in a Quart of Red Wine, fo cover the Pan, and bake them; when you take it out of the Oven, pour off the Liquor, and take the Fat off, and mix it with fome melted Butter, and pour it over the Cheeks. Serve them cold with Muilard and Sugar, they will eat like Venifon.

To boil an Ox- Cheek to be eaten cold.

BO N E your Ox-Cheek well, then lay it to fteep in White Wine for twelve Hours; then feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Nutmegs, Cloves, and Mace, roll it up, tie it tight v.ith Tape, boifit in Water, Salt, and Vinegar, till it s very tender; prefs it hard, and when it is cold, cut it into Slices, and ferve it up with Oil and Vinegar.

Another Way,

BONE your Cheeks, lay them in foak for four or five Hours, then wafh and pick them very clean, pare off the Roof of the Mouth, and pick out the Bails of the Eyes, Huff them with Beef-iewet, hard Eggs, Salt, Pepper, Fat, and fveet Herbs, mingle all together and ftuff them on the In£de, ikewer boih the Sides of the Head together, and boil them among other Beef; when they are tender, ferve them on Brewis with interlarded Bacon, and Bohgnia Saufages, or Pork Links laid on the Cheeks; cut the Bacon into thin Slices, and ferve them with Saucers of Muflard or green Sauce.

To marinate Ox-Cheeks.

BONE your Ox-Cheeks, then either roaft them, or Hew them with Red Wine and Wine Vinegar, feafond with Salt, Pepper, and flicd Nutmeg; Hew them till they are tender, then take them up, and put to the Liquor you llewd them in a Quart of White Wine, and a Quart of Wine Vinegar, Sage, Parfley, fweet Marjoram, Thyme, a Bunch of Rofemary, and Bay-leaves, tie them up tight to- gether; add Salt, vhole Pepper, Nutmegs, and Gmger, Sicd, Cloves, and large Mace; boil all thefe together; put the Cheeks into a Vcffel, and pour the Liquor upon them,

lay

51 L AD Ys Companion. 195

lay on them fome Slices of Lemon, cover them very clofe, and keep them for Ufe.

To marinate Palates, Nofes, and Lips.

AFTER having boird them tender, blanch them, then fry them in clarifyd Butter, or fweet Oil: Make for them a Pickle with Wine Vinegar, and Whitfe Wine, Salt, whole Pepper, Nutmeg, and Ginger flicd, large Mace, and Cloves; add a Faggot of fweet Herbs, as Sage, Parfley, Savoury, fweet Marjoram, Thyme, Rofemary, and Bay- leaves; boil them all together. Spices and Kerbs, put the Palates, Lips, and Nofes in a Veffel, pour this Marinade to them; add Slices of Lemon, and cover them clofe for Ufe.
When you ferve them, do it in a Dilh with Sallad Oil.

To roafi Ox-Palates.

HAVING boiPd your Palates tender, blanch them, cut them into Slices about two Inches long, lard half of them Vvith fmall Lardoons; then having drawn, fcalded, and trufsd Pigeons, 2nd Chicken-peepers, lard half of them, fpitthemon aBird-fpit, putting a Sliceof interlarded Bacon, and a Sage-leaf betwixt every Bird; take alfo Cocks-combs and Stones, and Lamb-flones parboild and blanchd, large Oyilerc. parboild, and iarded with fmall Lardoons of Ba- con, Sage, a.d interlarded Bacon, fpit them with your Ox- Palates on a fmall Spit, with a Bit of Bacon and a Sage- •eaf between them; then beat up the Yolks of Eggs with Salt, Nutmeg, Thyme, and Rofemary ihred very fmali, and grated Manchet; and when they are hot at the Fire, bafte them often: In the mean Time, prepare Artichoak Bottoms, boird, quartered, and fryd, dipped in Butter and kept warm, and alfo Marrow dippd in Butter and fryd: Then rub the Dilh with a Clove of Garlick, pile up the Fowls in the Mid- dle of the Dilh upon one another, the roafted Materials round about; then lay the Palates by themfelves, the Lamb-ftones by themfelves, the Cocks combs and Stones by themfelves, the fryd Marrow and Artichoaks by themfelves, and the Sweetbreads by themfelves; then having prepared a Sauce of Claret, Gravy, Oy Her -liquor, with a Couple of dilTolvd An- chovies, fweet Butter, Salt, and an Onion flit or quarterd, giving it a Walm or two over the Fire, put in three or four Slices of Oranges, pour it on, and garniih it vlth Oranges and Lemons flicd.

K 2 To

16 he Ladys Companion,

lo J;e-xv Ox-Palates, Lips, and Nofes.

BOIL them, blanch them, cut them into Bits about the Bignefs of a Shilling; put them into an Earthen Pipkin with ftrong Broth and White Wine; add raw Cahes Udders, Veal Sveetbrer.ds, Saufages, and Sparrows or Larks, or ether imall Birds, Anchovies, or Potatoes boild j feafon with Salt, two or three whole Cloves, large Mace, fmall pickled Cucumbers; add alfo Marrov, Butter, Grapes, Bar- Ijerrics or Gcofeberries, and the Yolks of hara Eggs. Let ail thefe ilew together rill tender, then ferve them upon Toafts ci French Bread, and Sliccb of Lemon j you may thicken the Broth with Yolks of Eggs Uraind with Vei juice.

To pickle Ox -Palates.

TAKE your Palates and waih them well with Salt and Water, and put them in a Pipkin with Water and fomc Salt, and when they are ready to boil, ikim them very well, and put into them whole Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, as much as will give then a quick Talle: When they are 1:oird tender, vhich will require four or five Hours, peel them, and cut them into fuiall Pieces, and let them cool; then make the Pickle of White Wine Vinegar, and as much White Wine; boil the Pickle, and put in the Spice that was boild in the Palates, with a little more frefn: Put in fix or feven Bay-leaves, and let both Pickle and Palates be cold before you put them together; then keep them for Ufe.

To roaji or bake a BuUccks Heart.

LARD it with large Slices of Bacon, and make a Stuf- fing of Winter-favoury, ftript Thyme, Parfley, fome Sevvet, a Couple of Anchovies, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and eiated Bread, work all up with the Yoiks of a Couple of Eggs, and put i: into the Cavities of the Heart, fkewer it up clofe to keep in the Stuffing, and place it in a deep Diih, on a Couple of Skewers laid in the Diih to keep it from burning; when baked enough, ferve it up with Gravy- Sauce.

Mutton grilled nxith Capers.

BO I L a large Breaft of Mutton tender, and after you have carbonaded it all over, feafon it with Pepper and Salt; then wafh it over with Yolks of Eggs, Crumbs of Bread, a little Thyme choppd, and Parfiey, then broil it

gently,

The Ladys CoMPANiofr. 197

aently. For Sauce take Butter, Gravy, Capers, Shalots, and Mangoes, or Muflirooms cut fn.all.

To ronft a Leg of Mutton ixiith Cockles.

STUFF it all over with Cockles, and roaft it. Garnifn with Horfe-radilh.

A Leg of Mutton a fa Hautgout.

LE T- it hang a Fortnight in an airy Place, then h:]v« ready fome Cloves of Garlick, and fluff it sll over, rub it with Pepper and Salt, roaft it; have fome good Gravy and Red Wmo, in the Difn, and fend it to Table.

J Leg of Mutton a la Royals.

HAVING taken off the Fat, and the Fiefli, fkin that which is about the Shank-bone, lard the Leg with large Lardoons well feafond; lard like wife, at the fame Time, a round Piece of a Buttock of Beef, or of a Leg of Veal; then feafon all this very well, drudge it with Flour, and put into boiling Hog s Lard to give it a Colour: Then put it; into a Pot, with all Sorts of favoury Herbs, an Onion or two lluck with Cloves, and put in fome Broth or Water; cover the Pot very clofe, and let it boil two Hours; mean while get ready aRagoo of Mufhrooms, Truffles, Afparagus Tops, Artichoak Bottoms, and Veal Sweetbreads, to which put a good CuUis. Take up your Leg of Mutton, lay it in a Dilh, and cut your Piece of Beef, or Veal, into Slices, to make a Rim round your Mutton; pour the Pvagoo hot upon it, and fo ferve away.

Shoulder cf Mutton in Epigram.

TA K E a Shoulder of Mutton and roaft it, take off the Skin as neatly as you can, about the Thicknef of a Crown, leaving the Shank-bone to it; then take the Meat and cut it in fmall thin Slices, the Bignefs of a Shilling; then put it into a Cullis that is well feaond, and take care not to let it boil then take the Skin of your Shoulder of Mutton, and put fome Crumbs of Bread, with fweet Herbs over it, and put it on the Gridiron, and when it has taken Colour, fee that your Hafii be well feafond, difh it up, put- ting on the broild Skin.

Ihie fome call a Shoulder of Mutton in Gallimaufry.

Mut-

198 be Ladys Companion.

Mutton Collops.

YO U mud take fome Mutton that is well mortify M, that is. Hale, but fweet, take out the Skin and Sinews, and cut them fmall and thin, about the Bignefs of a Crown Piece, fuch a Quantity as you think will be enough for your Difn; take a Stew-pan with fome Butter, and lay your Col- lops in, one after another; take care they are very thin, and put a little Salt, Pepper, Spices, Parlley, and green Onions, chopped very fine, over them, with feme Truffles, or Mufli- rooms, and put your Stew-pan over a Fire that is very quick, and far them with a Spoon, and when you think they are cone, drefs them in the Diih you are to ferve them in: Then put in the Pan a little Cullis and Gravy, with a Ro- cambole, and when it is boild up, and a little thick, put in the Juice of a Lemon, and put it over your Collops, and ferve them up hot.

J Harrico 0 Mutton.

TA K E a Neck, or Loin of Mutton, cut it into fix Pieces, feafon it with Pepper and Salt; then pafs theih off on both Sides in a Fr ing-pari or Stew-pan; put to them fome good Broth, a Faggot of- Herbs, fon e diced Carrots, or Turnips, fryd off, and tv;o Dozen of Chefnuts blanchd, and three or four fmall Lettuces; ftew all this w ell together.
You may put in half a Dozen fmall, round, whole Onions, and when very tender, Ikim off the Fat well, and feive away.
Garniih with forcd Lettuce, and Turnips, and Carrots ilicd.

Hind Saddle p Mutton.

AFTER having cut ofr the two Hind Quarters of a Sheep, cut off the two Knuckles, that it may fet even on a Difn; then take off the Skin as neatly and as far as you can towards the Rump, without taking it quite off, or breaking it: Then take fome lean Ham, Truffles, green Onions, Parfley, Tliym.e, fweet Herbs, Pepper, Salt, and Spices, well choppd together, and ftrew it over your Mut- ton, where the Skin is taken off; then put the Skin over neatly, and wrap ft over with Paper well buttered, and tie it, and puc it to roaft, and being roafted, take off the Paper, and ftrew over Crum.bs of Bread, and when it is well Qoloured, take it off the Spit, difh it up, and put under it an

Effence

The Ladys Companion. 199

Efience of Ham, or a Shalot Sauce, and ferve it up hot for the firll CouiTe.

Hind Saddle - Mutton done a la St. Menehout.

CU T your Muttort as above mentionM, and lard it with large Lardoons of Bacon, feafond with Pepper, Salt, Tweet Herbs, fmall Onions, and Parlley, then garnifning an oval, or large Gravy-pan, that will hold ir, put at the Bot- tom fome Bards of Bacon, and Slices of Beef, put in alfo fome fmall Onions, Parfiey, and fweet Herbs, and then put in your Mutton, feafond with Pepper, Salt, and Spice, a Bottle of Wine, and ftrong Broth, and put the fame over it as under. Bards of Bacon, Slices of Beef, with a little Gar- lick and Bay-leaves, and put it a Hewing with Fire over and under; and when done, take it out, and put it in the Dilh, pare it neatly, and put fome Crumbs of Bread over it, mixd with Parmejan Cheefe, and put it in an Oven to take a good Colour, then ferve it up hot, with EiTence of Ham under it, for the firll Courfe.

Leg of Mutton, Ham Fajhion.

GE T a Hind Quarter, very large, and cut it like a Jigget, that is, with a Piece of the Loin; then rub it all over with Bay-falt, and let it lie one Day; then put it into the following Pickle: Take a Gallon of Pump Water, put into it two Pounds of Bay-falt, two of White Salt, fix Ounces of Salt-petre, and four of Petre-falt, one Pound of Brown Sugar, fix Bay-leaves, one Ounce of Salt Prunella: Mix all this in your Liquor, then put in your Mutton, and in feven Days it will be red through, then hang it up b the Handle, and fmoke-dry it vith Deal-duft and Shavings, making a great Smother under it, and in five Days it will be ready: You may boil it with Greens, and it will cut as red as a Cherry; fo ferve it as you would a Ham.

Amphilias of Mutton.

GE T two Necks, or two Loins, bone them, leaving the upper top Bones on about an Inch; then lard one with Bacon, the other with Parfley; fkewer them, and you may either ftove or roaft them; you may fry fome Cu- cumbers, and Hew them after, and lay under, or make a Sauce Robart with Onions, Muftard, Vinegar, Gravy, and lay under either flewd Sellery or Endive, which you choofe.

K 4 Tu

soo ne Ladys Companion.

iQ farce a Leg of Mutton or Lamb.

LE T all the Meat be taken out, leave the Skin whole; then take the Lean of it, and make it into Force-meat thus: To two Pounds of your lean Meat, three Pounds of Beef-fevvet; take away all Skins from the Meat and Sewet; then fhred iDoth very fine, and beat it with a Rolling-pin, till you know not the Meat from the Sewet, then mix with it four Spoonfuls of grated Bread, half an Ounce of Cloves and Mace beaten, as much Pepper, fome Salt, afevvfweet Kerbs ihred fmall, mix all thefe together with fix raw Eggs, and put it into the Skin again, and few it up. If you roaft it, ferve it with Anchovy-Sauce; if you boil it, lay Cauli- flowers or Trench Beans under it. Garniih with Pickles, or ilcwd Oyilers, Forcd-meat Balls, or Saufages fryd in But- ter.

Another Way.

RO A S T a Leg of Mutton, and take all the Fiefh ofFit, leaving the Bones hanging together; pick all the Fat from the Flelh, and hafh it with Marrow, a few Cives, the Crumb of a French Roll foakd in Cream, and the Yolks of four Eggs; feafon it as ufual, put the Bones into the Difh you intend to ferve it in j then lay one Flalf of the Meat all round it in the Shape of a Leg of Mutton; leave a Hole at the Top, and pour into it a Ragoo of Sweetbreads and Arti- choak Ecttorcs; then cover it with the other Half of your Farce, placing it as you did the former; ftrew over crumbd Bread; fet it in the Oven ro make it of a fine Brown; then take it out, and take oft the Fat that is round the Difh, • make a little Kole on the Top, and pour in fom,e good Gravy; then clofe the Hole, and ferve it hot to Table.

Another Way.

CUT a Slit on the Backfide of your Leg of Mutton, and take out all the Meat you can get, but dont deface it on the Outfide; then take the Pvleat and chop and ihred it fine, with two or three Anchovies, fome beaten Mace and Nutmeg, a little Lemon-peel, one Onion, fweet Herbs, Salt, Pepper, Oy iters, and Marrow, pound all thefe in a Moitar very fine; force your Leg with it, and few it up round the Edges to keep in your Force meat; then put it in a Pan, vvafn it over with the Yolks of Eggs, and drudge it with Flour i lay Bits of Butter over it, and bake or roaft it;

then

he L A D ys C m p a n I If. 201

then have ready ftewd Oyfters in White Wine, with a Blade of Mace; keep the largeft out to lay with Anchovy-Sauce, a few Mulhrooms, and a good llrong Gravy, and pour all over your Mutton.

To roafi a Leg of Mutton.

PA R E oiF all the Skin as thin as you can, then lard i with fat Bacon, and put it down to the Fire, when it i half roafted, cut off three or four thin Slices, and mince i with fome fweet Herbs; then put it into a Sauce-pan, with a Ladlefal of Broth, half a Pint of Red Wine, a little beaten Ginger, a Piece of Butter, two Spoonfuls of Verjuice or Vinegar, fome Pepper, a few Capers, and the Yolks of two hard Eggs choppd fmall; let em all lew a-while, and wheiv your Leg of Mutton is enough, dilh it up, and pour this- Sauce over it.

To boil a Leg of Mutton.

YO U muft lard your Mutton with Lemon-peel and Beet- root, and boil it as ufual: For Sauce, take llrong Broth and White Wine, Gravy, Oyllers, Anchovies, an Onion, a Faggot of Herbs, Fepper, Salt, and Mace, and a Piece of Butter roird up in Flour.

Amther Way.

TA K E a Leg of Mutton, hang it for three or four Days with the Shank downwards, then take a coarfe Cloth and rub it very well with it, then few it up in a Cloth very tight, and bury it in Salt foraFortnight or three Week, then take off the Cloth and boil it, with what Roots you think proper, and when it is cut a large Quantity of Gravy will iifue forth.

To drefs a Leg of Mutton nvUh Cucumbers.

FIRST marinate your Cucumbers, then tofs them up, and make a Ragoo of them, take fome Bacon, and brown a little Flour; put to it fome good Gravy, a Dr@p of Vinegar, and a Bundle of favoury Herbs, and feafon all well.
Roifl the Leg of Mutton, and ferve it up with this Ragco.

In the like Manner you may make a Ragoo of Succory, but take care the Succory turn not black in the XitiTi.

Muttfp

202 he Ladys Companion.

Mutton Cutlets the French Way.

SEASON your Cutlets with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, and fweet Herbs; then dip two Scotch Collops in the Batter of Eggs, and clap on each Side of each Cutlet, and then a Rafher of Bacon on each Side again: Broil them, or bake them in a flow Oven; when they are done, take off the Ba COR, and fend your Collops and Cutlets in a Ragoo, and gar- nifh them with flicd Orange and Lemon.

Cutlets a la Maintenon.

CU T your Cutlets handfomely, beat them thin with your Cleaver, and feafon them well with a little Pepper and Salt; then cover them all over, except within two Inches of the Rib-bone, as thick as a Crown Piece, with fome Porcd-meat, and fmooth it over with a Knife. This done, take as many Half Sheets of white Paper as you have Cut- lets, and butter the.i, on one Side, with melted Butter: Dip your Cutlets likewife in melted Butter, and throw a little grated Bread on the Top of your Forcd-meat all round: Lay each Cutlet on a Half Sheet of Paper crofs the Middle of it, leaving the Bone about an Inch out; then clofe thjc two Eds of your Paper on the Sides, as you do a Turnover- Tart; cut off the Paper that is too much, broil your Mutton Cutlets half an Hour, your Veal three Quarters of an Hour: Then take off the Paper, and lay them round in the Difh, with the Bones outmoll: Let your Sauce be Butter, Gravy, and Lemon.

Mutton, or Veal Cutlets, another Way.

MARINATE your Cutlets for three Hours in Ver- juice, Juice of Lemon, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Bayr leaves and Cives. Then make a thin Batter with Water, Flour, a raw Egg, and as much Butter as a Walnut mixd together, and well beaten; dip your Cutlet- in this Batter, and fry them in Hogs Lard, Garnifh with fryd Parfley, and ferve them for the firil Courfe.

Another Way.

FLAT your Cutlets with a Cleaver, lard them and drudge them with Crumbs of Bread, Salt, Perpcr, and Ihred Parfley; then tofs them up m melted Bacon, or clarir, fyd Butter, and, when they are done of a pure brown Co- lour, lay them, in a Dilh, pouj on them a Ragoo of Sweet-.

breads

The Lad ys Companion. 203

breads and Muflirooms. Garnilh with fryd Parlley, and ferve them.

Another Way.

DI P your Cutlets in melted Bacon, feafon them well with fhred Herbs, Salt, and Pepper, llrew Crumbs of Bread over them, and broil them on a Gridiron. Serve them up with Gravy.

Another Way.

BOIL your Cutlets in Water, then dip them in a thin Batter, made of Flour and Eggs, then fry them in Lard; and ferve them up with Salt, Pepper, and Vinegar, or Ver- juice.

Or you may make a Hotch-potch of them with Turnips, c. well feafond and boiPd in ilrong Broth: We generally, when we drefs them in this Manner, put Chefnuts among them.

To hafo a Shoulder of Mutton.

OUR Shoulder being half roafted, cut it in very thin Slices, then take a Glafs of Claret, a Blade of Mace, two Anchovies, a few Capers, a Shalot, Salt, a Sprig of Thyme, Savoury, and Lemon-peel; let it ftand coverd for half an Hour in an Oven; and when enough, Ihake over it fome Capers, and ferve it up.

To hafh Mutton.

TA K E a roafted Leg of Mutton, take off all the Skin, and cut the Meat from the Bone in thin Slices, and firew upon it fome Parfley and Cives, with fome Truffies and Mufhrooms cut pretty fmall; then put it all together into a Sauce-pan, with fome Pepper and Salt, and a Slice or two of Lemon, with the Rind take off. Put fome good Gravy, and give it two or three Turns over the Stove 5 thicken it with a Cullis, and ferve it.

Another Way to hajh Mutton.

CU T your Mutton in little Bits, as thin as you can, ftrew a little Flour over it, have ready fome Gravy, enough for Sauce wherein fweet Herbs, Onion, Pepper, and Salt, have been boiPd -, llrain it, put in your Meat with a little Piece of Butter rolPd in Flour, and a little Salt, a bhalot cut fine, a few Capers, Samphire and Gerkins,

chopped

204 i Ladys Com p A N I ON.

choppd fine, and a Blade of Mace: Tofs all together for a Minute or two, have ready fome Bread toalled thin, and cut into Sippets, lay it round the Difh, and pour in your Hafh.
Garnifh your Dilh with Pickles and Horfe-radifh.

Note, Some love a Glafs of Red Wine, or Walnut Pickle: You may put jufl what you will into a Haih.

A Halh of cold Mutton.

GE T Gravy, Oyfter-liquor, Anchovies, and Nutmeg according to the Quantity of Meat, and boil it up, then flrew in your Meat, and give it a Heat or two; put in half a Pound of fweet Butter, and half a Pint of White Wine, and fend it to the Tr.ble. Garnifh the Difh with Rafpings of French Bread and Lemon.

Carbonaded Mutton.

GET a Joint of Mutton, cut it into Steaks, and fry them in melted Lard, then flew them in Broth, with Salt, Pepper, and Cloves, a Bunch of Herbs, and Mufh- rooms; then flour it a little to thicken it. Garnifli the Difh with Mufhrooms and fryd Bread, and ferve it with Capers, and a little Lemon-juice.

To roll a Peafl c Mutton.

BONE the Mutton, and make a favoury Forcd-meat, wafh it over with the Batter of Eggs; then fpread the Forcd-meat on it, and roll it into a Collar, and bind it with Packthread; roail it till enough, and put under it ii Re- galia of Cucumbers.

To foufe a Breafl of Mutton.

TA K E a Breafl of Mutton, bone it, foak it well from the Blood, wipe it dry, and feafon it on the Infide with Salt, Nutmeg, and. beaten Ginger, fweet Herbs Ihred fmall, and Lemon-peel mincd; lay broad Slices of fweet Lard over ivit Seafoning; then roll it into a Collar, tie it up in a Cloth, and put it into boiling Liquor, fkim it well; then put in Salt, Nutmeg, and Ginger flicd. Fennel and Parfley-roots: When it is almoil boiPd, put Ih a Pint of White Wine; when it is enough, take it off, and put in Slices of Lemon, a whole Lemon-peel, and half a Score Bay-leaves, and let it boil clofe coverMj or you may bake it in a Pot with Wiiite Wine and Water,

9

The Ladys Companion. lo

To rcaji a Chine of Mutton.

TA K E a Chine of Mutton, and having raifed up the Skin from the Chine-bone downwards, leave it hang- ing to the lower Part; then take fome Slices of a lean Gam- mon of Bacon, fealbn with white Pepper, Cives, and Parf- ley; fpread them over the Chine, lay Barbs of Bacon upon them, then turn the Skin over them j tie up your Chine with Tape or Packthread, put Paper over it, and roall it; when it is near enough, drudge it with Crumb-bread, put a Ragoo under it, and ferve it up to Table, garnilhd with Mutton Cutlets.

The fame may be done with a Quarter of Mutton, or Lamb.

To drefs a Neck of Mutton.

LARD the Neck with Lemon peel, boil it in Salt and Water, and a Bunch of fweet Kerbs: In the mean Time, flew half a Pint of Oyilers in half a Pint of White Wine, as much ftrong Broth, and a little of their own Li- quor, put in two or three Anchovies, two or three whole Onions, fome grated Nutmeg, and a little Thyme. Then take a little of the Broth, and beat in it the Yolks of three or four Eggs to thicken it; then difh it upon Sippets, laying your Oyilers upon your Meat Garnifh with Lemon or Bar- berries.

After the fame Manner you may drefs a Chine, Leg, ic,

Another Way.

E O I L it in Water and Salt, and fkim it well -, make I Sauce for it with Samphire, and a little of the Liquor, Vinegar, Mace, Pepper, an Onion, the Yolks of hard Eggs mincd, fome fweet Herbs, and a little Salt; let thefe boil together half an Hour or more, then beat it up with Butter, and Juice of a Lemon; dilh your Meat on Sippets, and pour the Sauce on it j garnilh with the hard Whites of Eggs and Parfley mincd together with flicd Lem.on.

You may drefs a Leg or Brealt of Mutton the fame Way.

Another

7

66 the Ladys Companion.

Another Way,

DRAW your Neck of Mutton with Parfley, and roaft it: When its almoft roafted, drudge it with Salt, white Pepper, and grated Bread. Serve it up to Table with Gravy, and the Juice of Orange.

We alfo boil a Neck of Mutton, then dip it in a thin Bat- ter, fry it with melted Bacon, and ferve it with Verjuice and white Pepper.

To Jieixj a Neck of Mutton.

CU T your Neck of Mutton into Steaks; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; put them into a Stew- pan with as much Water as will cover them, let them flew, ikimming them as there is Occafion. In the mean Time, parboil Tome Cabbage, Carrots, and Turnips, drain them well, and when your Steaks are half ftevd, put in your Roots and Cabbage; then put in a Handful of Capers, then flired fweet Herbs, Spinach, and Parfley, a Handful of each, and put them into the Stew, alfo a Couple of Anchovies choppd; brown a little Butter, and fliake into it a little Flour, and a Ladleful of the Broth: Boil it up, and pour it over the Meat, and let all Hew together a little while; when it is enough, lay Sippets in the Difli, put in your Stew, fqueeze in an Orange or Lemon or two, and ferve it up to Table.

Another Way.

CU T a Neck of Mutton into Steaks, and put them into a Stew-pan with fome Butter; then take a Bunch of fweet Herbs, fome Pepper, and a little Salt, and put to them; cover your Stew-pan, and let them ftew till they are enough, turning them fometimes, then put in a little Red Wine, two Anchovies, and a Spoonml of Vinegar. Difli your Steaks upon Sippets, and pour over them the Liquor they were ftewd in.

A Neck, or a Loin of Mutton, in Cutlets,

FIRST cut all the Steaks out, and hack them; feafon with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Parfley, Thyn e, and Mar- joram, choopd fmall, and ftrew over them fome grated Bread; waQi them over with drawn Butter, and lay them on white Paper butterd, and made up like a Dripping-pan, that it may not boil over; then put them over a Charcoal, 3r Wood Fire j and for Sauce take Gravy, White Wine,

two

The Ladys Companiom, 207

two Anchovies, with a little Lemon-peel or Orange, mincM fmall, cut it into Vvater, boil all up together, and £tir in feme Butter; difh your Cutlets, and pour over them your Sauce.

To fry Mutton Cutlets.

CU T a Neck of Mutton Bone by Bone, and beat it flat with your Cleaver; have ready Seafoning, with grated Bread, a little Thyme rubbd to Powder, fhred Parf- ley, with grated Nutmeg, and fome Lemon-peel mincd; then beat up two Eggs with Salt, flour your Cutlets on both Sides, a, d dip them in the Eggs, fprinkle them with Seafon- ing on both Sides ] put fome Butter in a Frying-pan, and when it is hot lay in your Cutlets, and fry them brown on both Sides; for Sauce take Gravy, or ftrong Broth, an Onion, fome Spice, a Bit of Bacon, and a Bay-leaf, and boil them well together; then beat it up with Anchovy, or fome Oy- flers, and a Quarter of a Pint of Red Wine, and pour over your Cutlets, Garnifti vith pickled Walnuts cut in Quar- ters, Barberries, Samphire, pickled Cucumbers, and flicd Lemon.

To drefs a Leg of Mutton a la Dauphine,

FL E A ofF all the Skin and Flefli of the Shank-bone, and alfo all the Fat, and fcrape it clean j then parboil it, and lard it with fm.all Lardoons of Bacon: Spit it, put Paper over it, and roafl it with a foft Fire; fee that it be well coloured. When it is roafled enough, difli it, and ferve it up with fome Ragoo of Legumes, as Cucumbers, young Onions, or Succory; or with a good Culiis under it, or an Eifence of Ham.

To drefs a Ug nf Mutton a la Daub,

AR D it with Bacon, and half roaft it, draw it off the „ Spit, and put it in as fmali a Pot as will boil it, put to it a Quart of White Wine, ftrong Broth, a Pint of Vinegar, whole Spice, Bay-leaves, fvveet Marjoram, Winter-favoury, and g-een Onons; when it is ready lay it in the Difh; make Sauce with fome of the Liquor, Mufnrooms, flicd Le- mon, two or three Anchovies; thicken it with brown Butter, and garnifh with flicd Lemon.

u

20S The Ladys Companion.

7o drefs a Loin of Mutton.

HAVING coverd the Bottom of a Stew-pan with Bards of Bacon, lay on them Slices of Veal, and on the Veal, Slices of Onions; then lay your Loin of Mutton upon them, and cover it with Slices of Onion, Veal, and Bacon, as under it. Seafon all with Salt, Spice, and fweet Herbs. Then fet the Stew-pan covered either between two Fires, or in an Oven; when they come out, bread them, and broil them on a Gridiron. In the mean Time, prepare this Sauce calld a Ramolade: Take Gives and Farfley, ihred them fmall, Capers and Anchovies, and flew them in good Gravy, with a Clove of Garlick, and other Seafon- ings; put in a little Oil. When all is done, lay our Loin in a Difh, pour Sauce upon it, and ferve it up hot.

Mother Way.

PARBOIL a Loin of Mutton, then lard it with large Lardoons, feafon with Salt and Pepper, a little Nut-, meg, fome Parfley, a few Cives, and Spices of all Sorts; put fome Slices of Bacon and Veal in a Stew-pan, feafon with Salt and Pepper, favoury Kerbs, Slices of Onions, Carrots, j Farfnips, and fome Lemon; feafon it over and under, cover J it with Slices of Bacon and Veal, fo flew it with Fire over - and under it. When it is enough, drain it very well, lay it in your Dilh, pour over it a Ragoo of a Breail of Mutton, Cucumbers, and Lettuce, and ferve it for iiril Courfe.

I 0 Jlcv a Loin of Mutton.

UT your Loin into Steaks, and put it into as much V Water as will cover it; when it is fkimrnd, put to it thiee or four Onions fiicd, with fome Turnips, whole Cloves, and flicd Ginger; when it is half ftewd, put in ilic d Ba- con, and fome fweet Herbs mincd fmall, a little Vintgar and Salt; when it is ready, put in Capers, and difh your Meat Ujon Sippets; pour over the Liquor and Ingredients; 1 garniih with Barberries and ilicd Lemon.

J rcaji a Lrg oMutton Jjith Oyflers.

T A K E a little grated Bread, fome E-ef-iewet, Yolks A or hard Lgs, three Anchovies, a Bit of an Gidon, ° Sait, Feppcr, Thyme, and Winter- favoury, twelve Oyflers, Oiue iNuimeg grated: Mix all ihefe together, and fhred thesa

The Ladys Companion. 209

them very fine, and work them up with raw Eggs like Pafte, and fluff your Mutton under the Skin in the thickeft Place, or where you pleafe, and roaft it; when it is about half done, cut off Ibrne of the Underfide of the fleihy End in little Bits; put thefe into a Pipkin with a Pint of Oyfiers, Liquor and all, a little Salt and Mace, and ftew them till half the Liquor be wafted. Then put in a Piece of Butter, and when the Leg is thoroughly roafled, difh it, pour this Sauce over it, ftrew Salt about the Sides of the Difh, and ferve it up.

Another Ifay.

YOUR Oyilers being £ril parboiPd, put to them fome Parfley, a little Thyme and Savoury Ihred imail, with the Yolks of three Eggs; mix all thefe together. Your Shoulder of Mutton being fpitted, lay it on a DrefTer, and cut Holes in it, and put in your Oyfters with the Herbs, and other iBgredients after them, or place them behind the Flap of the Shoulder -, twenty Oyilers are enough; then take a Pint of Oyfiers for Sauce, and put them in a deep Difli, with ibme Claret, two or three Onions ihred grofs, with two or three Anchovies; put all thefe under in the Dripping-pan to fave your Gravy, and when your Meat is ready, put your Sauce over the Fire; put to it the Yolk of one Egg beaten, grated Nutmeg, and drawn Butter; dilh up your Shoulder of Mutton, and pour your Oyfter-Sauce all over it j garnilh with Lemon, and ferve it up hot.

Another Way.

CUT five or fix Holes to receive the Oyilers after they have been rolled in Eggs, with Crumbs of Bread and Nutmeg, and ftufi: three hand fome Oyfters in every Hole.
If you roaft it, cover it with a Caul, but if you boil it, tie it in a Cloth, and, while it is dreffing, prepare Oyfter- Sauce to ferve up with it hot.

To drcfs a Shoulder of Mutton in Blood.

SAVE the Blood of a Sheep, take all the Strings and Knots out of a Shoulder of Mutton, lay it in the Blood five or fix Hours to foak; then fluff it with fweet Herbs, then put it into a Caul, fprinkle it with Blood, and roaft it.
Serve it up with Venifon or Anchovy-Sauce,

1:0

2io he Ladys Companion.

fo drefs Mutton the Turkiili Way.

CU T your Meat into thin Slices; then wafh it in Vine- gar, and put it into a Pot or Sauce-pan that has a clofe Cover to it, then put in fome Rice, whole Pepper, and two or three Onions; let all thefe ftew together, kimming it frequently; when it is enough, take out the Onions, and difh it with Sippets, and ferve it up.

Shoulder of Mutton, nxith a Ragoo of Turnips.

TA K. E a Shoulder of Mutton, get the Blade-bone taken out as neat as poffible, and put in the Place a Ragoo of Sweetb- cads, with Mufhrooms, Truffles, Cocks-combs, well feafond; when done, let it be cold before you put it in, and take care to few it tight, that it may keep its natural Form, £:id put it in a Stew-pan, with fome Bards of Bacon, Slices of Veal and Ham, Onions, Parfley, Thyme, fweet Herbs, Salt, Pepper, Spices, with a Ladleful of Broth, and put it a doiT;g with Fire under and over -, then you mull have lomeTurmj5, cut in what Shape you think proper, and blanch then in boiling Water; then ftrain them off, and let them be vii draind; then put the a in a good CuLis, andletembt .oneenough; then take your Shoulder of Mut- ton out of tLo Braife, and fee it be well drained from all the Fat, difh it up, and pour over it your Ragoo of Turnips, and ferve it in the firft Courfe.

Shoulder o Mutton a la Rourhi.

TA K E a Fore-quarter of Mutton- tke out the Bones as neatly as you can from the Neck and Breaft, and lard the Fillet, not parting them from the Shoulder, and put it on a Spit to roaft; and when it is done, put under it fome ilewd Endive, and ferve it up hot, with the larded Part up- permofl, for the firft Courfe.

Leg of Mutton larded a la Braife, with a Ragoo of Chef- nuts.
TA K E off the Skin, and lard your Leg of Mutton with Bacon and Ham through and through, but feafon your Ham and Bacon well, tie it, and put it in a Braife; then take fome Chefnuts, roaft them, and take off both Skins very clean, and put them in fome good Cullis of Veal and Ham, and put them over a flow Fire; and when you find they begin to be very foft, fee they be well relifhd, and

put

ne Ladys Companion. an

put them over your Mutton, and ferve it hot for the firft Courfe.

To make a Gammon of Mutton.

TAKE a very large i: Leg of Mutton, cut off the Knuckle-bone, take off the Skin, then fcick it with Cloves, Sage, and Bay-leaves; then pound Pepper, Salt, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Ginger, and Cloves; put them into White Wine, with a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and lay your Mutton in this Marinade for twenty-four Hours, fetting it in a cool Place clofe coverd: Then take out your Leg of Mutton, and powder it with Sage fhred fmall, and pounded with Pepper, Salt, Ginger, Nutmeg, Cinnamon, and Cloves, then take off the Skin of a frefliHam of Bacon, with feme of the Fat, and cover your Leg of Mutton with the Skin of the Ham, fevving it up round the Edges j then hang it up the Chimney for twenty -four Hours to be fmoakd; then boil it in five Quarts of Water, put in a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and a Quart of the clearefl: of the Wine in which it was marinated. When it is enough, take off the Swerd im- mediately, letting the Fat Hick to the Mutton, and ferve it up cold in Slices.

To dry Mutton to cut out in Shivers as Dutch Beef,

TAKE half a Pound of coarfe Sugar, and rub it hard ail over a Leg of Mutton, and let it lie twenty-four Hours; then take an Ounce and half of Slt-petre, and mix it with a Pound of common Salt, and rub that all over the Mutton every other Day till it is all on, and let it lie nine Days longer; keep the Place free from Brine, then hang it up dry three Days; then fmoak it in a Chimney where Wood is burnt, the Fire mull not be too hot; a Fortnight will dry it j boil it like Hams, and when it is cold, cut it out in Shivers like Dutch Qqq.

To dy a Leg of Mutton like Pork.

BE A T it down flattKh with a Cleaver, to make it like Wefphalia Ham; then take fome Salt-petre and beat it line, and rub it all over your Mutton, and let it lie all Night; then make a Pickle with Bay-falt and Pump-water, flrong enough to bear an Egg, and put your Mutton into it, and let it lie ten Days, then take it out, and hang it in a Chimney where Wood is burnt, till tis thoroughly dry, which will be about three Weeks. Boil it very tender with Fowls,

or

212 !r< La D Y s Com p A N ION.

or eat it cold like Wejiphalia Ham. Do it in cool Weather, or it will not keep.

I Sheeps Rumps njoith Rice.

HAVING got Tome Sheeps Rumps, clean and blanch them, and put them a ftewing in a good Braiie; and when they are enough, take themx out to cool; then take fome Rice well walhd and pickd, put it in a Pot with fome good fat Broth, with an Onion ftuck with Cloves, a little Pepper and Salt, and fee it be well feafond, and very thick, and vhen it is done, put it to cool then take your Sheeps Rumps, and put them raund the Rice as neatly as you can; do them round in Eggs, and Crumbs of Bread over them: And when you have done them all, take a Frying-pan with fome Hogs Lard, put it over a Stove,, and when your Fat is, hot, put your Sheeps Rumps in it, and fee they be of a good jl Colour, and difh them with fryd Parfley round.

75 drefs Rumps cf Mutton a la Sauce Hohart,

TAKE half a Dozen Sheeps P.umps cut large, boil them for three Hours in Water, and three or four Spoonfuls of Vinegar, feafond with a Handful of Salt, a Spoonful of Pepper and Cloves, three or four Onions, a Sprig or two of Thyme, and a Bay-leaf Put the Spice and Herbs in after the Pot has been fkimmd: When the Rumps are boild tender take them out, and lay them in a Colander to drain, fcore them on the Sides with a Knife, dip them in drawn Butter, roll them in grated Bread, and broil them brown: In the mean Inne, make your Stance Robart thus: Put a Piece of Butter, the Bignefs of an Egg, into your Sauce- pan, fet it over the Fire till it is almoft brown, then put in a Handful of Onions mincd very hne let them ftew gently till they are brown, then put in half a Spoonful of Flour; let them itew a little longer; then put in a Ladle of Gravy, a little Salt and Pepper, let them boil for a Quarter of an Hour, Ikim off the Fat, and put in half a Spoonful of Muf- tard, the Juice of a Lemon, or a little Vinegar, pour the Sauce into your Diili, lay the Rumps upon it. Garnifh with fryd Parfley, or Lemon, or both, and ferve it up for a firfi: Coiirfe.

To

the Ladys Companion. 21 j

To drefs Rumps 0 Mutton a la St. Menehout,

GARNISH the Bottom of a Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon, and then lay. over them Slices of Veal, reafond with Salt, Pepper, all Sorts of Spice, and fweet Herbs, and on thern Slices of Onions; then lay in your Rumps, lay Slices of Onions upon them, Slices of Veal on the Onions, and Slices of fat Bacon on the Veal j cover the Stew-pan .clofe, and either let ic in an Oven, or a la Braie between two fires: When the Rumps are enough, take them out, and drudge them •Aeli with grated Bread, and broil them on a Grid ron. While they are doing, make for them a Sauce called Ramolade, thus: Tofs up Anchovies, mincd Capers, Cives, and Parfley, and a Clove of Garlick, in fome good Gravy, a little Oil, and with Salt, Pepper, and other common Seafoaiugs; pour this Ramolade in the Difn, lay the Rumps upon it, and ferve them up to Table hot.

To foce and f y Rumps of Mutton.

COVER the Bottorn of a Stew-pan with Bards of Ba- con, C5V. as in the Receipt above diredled, and ftew I them a Lx Braife, or bake them in an Oven. Then wrap: them up in Foicd-meat made as follows: Take a Pound of a Leg of Veal, half a Pound of fat Bacon, and half a Pound of Sewet, boil them for half an Hour, then throw them a little into cold Wa er, that your fat Bacon may not run to Oil in mincing. Then mince each of them feparately by themfelves very fine, then inince all together, and pound them well in a Marble Mortar, vith the Crumb of a French Roll, foaked in Milk or Broth, and four raw Eggs; feafond with Salt and Pepper, according to your Difcretion, a little Nutmeg, a little Parfley and Onion mincd very fine. Have- ing pounded all thefe together to a Pafte, wrap the Rumps up in this Forcd-meat, dip them in beaten Eggs, drudge them with Flour, and fry them in Hogs Lard, till they are of a fine brown Colour; then dilh them, and ferve them up.

Sheeps Rurnps ith Parmefan Cheefe.

PU T your Sheeps Rumps in a good Braife, as before, and when done, put them to cool; then take fome Crumbs of Bread very fine, and as much Parmefan Cheefe mixd together, then take your Rumps and dip them in Eggs, and put the Crumbs of Bread and Parmefan Cheefe I

overl

214 W Lad ys Companion.

over; and if you find that once doing over is not enough, do them twice, and fry them in good Hogs Lard, of a good Colour, and ferve them with fryd Parlley.

Mutton Kebobd,

TA K E a Loin of Mutton, and joint it between every Bone, feafon it with Pepper and Salt moderately, grate a fmall Nutmeg all over, dip them in the Yolk of three Eggs, and have ready Crumbs of Bread and fweet Herbs, and dip them in, and clap them together in the fame Shape again, and put it on a fmall Spit, roaft them before a quick Fire, fet a Difh under, and balle it with a little Piece of Butter, and then keep balling with what comes from it, and throw fome Crumbs of Bread all over them as it is a roafting; when it i enough take it up, and lay it in the Difh, and have ready half a Pint of good Gravy, and what comes from it, take two Spoonfuls of Catchup, and mix a Tea-fpoonful of Flour with it, and put to the Gravy, flir it together, and give it a Boil, and pour over the Mutton.

hbte, You mull obferve to take off the Fat of the Infide, and the Skin off the Top of the Meat, and fome of the Fat, if there be too much; when you put in what comes from your Meat into the Gravy, obferve to pour out all the Fat.

Carbonades of Mutton glazed,

TA K E a Leg of Mutton, cut off as many Slices as you can, of an Inch thick, flatten them with a Cleaver, and lard them with fmall Bacon, as clofe as you can; then put them a doing, as if they were Scotch Collops of Veal; wnen they are done and glazd, put under them a Ragoo of Cu- cumbers, Lettuce, or Endive, and ferve them up hot.

A Neck of Mutton larded nvith Parfley,

TA K E a Neck of Mutton, pare it neatly, take off the Bones from the Fillet, lard it with Parfley, put it on a Spit and roaft it; being roafted, take and difh it up, and ferve it with Shalot Sauce, or flewd Endive.

A Neck of Mutton, calld, the hajiy Difh.

TA K E a large Pewter or Silver Difh, made like a deep Soop-difh, with an Edge about an Inch deep on the Infide, on which the Lid fiixes with the Handle at top fo fafl that you may lift it up full, by the Handle, without fall- ine; this Difh is calPd a Necromancer. Take a Neck ofMut- ton

TJje Lady s Companion. 215

ton, about fix Pounds, take ofF the Skin, cut it into Chops not too thick, ilice a French Roll thin, peel and ilice a very- large Onion, pare and Ilice three or four Turnips, lay a Row of Mutton in the Dih, on that a Row of Meat, then a Row of Turnips, and then Onions, a little Salt, then the Meat, and fo on; put in a little Bundle of fweet Herbs, and two or three Blades of Mace j have a Tea-kettle of Water boil- ing, iill the Diih, and cover it clofe; hang the Dilh on the Back of two Chairs by the Rim, have ready three Sheets of brown Paper, tear each Sheet into live Pieces, and draw them through your Hand, light one Piece, and hold it under the Bottom of the Difh, moving the Paper about; as fail: as the Paper burns light another, till all is burnt, and your Meat will be enough; fifteen Minutes jufl does it j fend it to Table hot in the Difh.

0 boil Sheeps Tongues nxith Oyllers.

BOIL half a Dozen of Sheeps Tongues in Water and Salt, till they are tender, peel off the Skin, cut them into thin Slices, put them into a Stew-pan with a Quart of Oyilers, a little Red Wine, and fome whole Spice; fet them a Hewing for fome Time; then put to them fome Butter, and the Yolks of three Eggs well beaten; fhake them well together, difh them on Sippets; garnifh with raw Parfley, Barberries, and Oyllers, and ferve them up.

0 farce Trotters.

AFTER you have fcalded your Trotters, boll them m good Broth, with a little Cives and Pariley j cut off the Claws, take out the Leg-bones, flitting the Skin the whole Length; fpread them open, make for them a Forcd-meat thus: Take a Pound of a Leg of Veal, half a Pound of fat Bacon, and half a Pound of Sewet, boil them for half an Hour; then put them into cold Water, that the fat Bacon may not run to Oil in mincing: Then mince them very- fine, each by themfelves, mix them together, pound them in a Mortar, with the Crumb of a French Roll, foakd in Milk or Broth, Salt, Pepper, and four raw Eggs, a little Nutmeg, Onion, and Parfley Ihred. When you have pounded thefe to a Pafte, lay this Forcd-meat on your Trotters, roll them up, one by one, fprinkle them with melted Sewet, drudge them with Flour, and fet them in a Dilh or Pan in an Oven to brown j then drain the Fat from the.m, rub the Dilh with a

Shalot

2i6 ne Ladys Companion.

Shalot, pour to them fome Ragoo or Cullis of Mulhrooms, and ferVe them up hot in Plates or little Difhes.

And her Way.

WHEN they are farcd as above, dip them in beaten Eg2;s, and drudge them with Flour, or Bread crumbd very fmalirthen fry them in Hogs Lard, and ferve them with fryd Pariley, in Plates or little Difhes.

We ferve them likevvife with a White Sauce, toffing them up in melted Bacon, with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, toge- ther v»ith favoury Herbs, and whole Gives, which laft we take out before we ferve them; whiten your Sauce with the Yolks of Eggs and Vinegar, or Verjuice.

Sheeps Tongues larded.

YOUR Tongues being larded with fine Bacon, put them on Skewers and roaft them; being done, difli them up wich Pepper and Vinegar, or fweet Sauce, accord- ing to the jM after s Palate, and ferve them up hot.

. Sheeps Tongues the German Way.

TAKE feme Carrots, cut them in pretty fmall Slices, put th«m in a Stew-pan with Gravy and Cullis, and let them ftew; then take your Sheeps Tongues, and let them ftew foftly with your Roots; put in it a Glafs of White Wine, and fo let them foak; let them be relifhing, difh them up, put your Roots over them, with their Cullis and Lemon- juice, and ferve them up hot for Entry.

Sheeps Tongues in Papers.

TAKE boild Sheeps Tongues, that are good and pa- latable, flit them in two, and make a little Forced- meat with a Bit of Veal, blanchd Bacon, and a Bit of Beef- fewet; feafon thefe with Parfley, green Onions, Muflirooms, fweet Herbs, iine Spice, Pepper, and Salt, and mince all well together. Then cut fome Paper big enough to wrap in your Tongues, take off your Force-meat, and put fome into your Paper; put in it a Tongue, and after that your Force-meat over the Tongue, as you have done under it, and wrap it up as dextroufly as you can; do the fame with all your other Tongues, place them in a Baking-pan, and let them be baked in the Oven, or under a Cover j being baked, difh them up, and ferve them up hot for a fmall Entry.

Sheeps

The Ladys C o m p a k i o n. 217

Shceps Trotters in Surtoat.

TAKE Sheeps Trotters; being bciid, cut them into Bits, and throw them into a Stew-pan, with a Lump of Butter, moiften them with Gravy and Cullis; let thern have a good Tafte, and let them be cold; being cold, cilh them up, cover them with a little Force-meat, very thin, and make them very fmooth; ftrew over them Crumbs of Bread, let them have a good Colour in the Oven, or under aCover, and ferve them up hot.

Another Time ilcw them with Parmefan Cheefe, and they mufi be but a little while in the Oven.

Jn Entry of Sheeps Trotters forced.

LE T your Sheeps Trotters be well fcalded, and let them itew in good Seafoning, taking care they be not over-
Thefe Trotters are alfo drefsd with a white Sance, by put- ting them into a Stew-pan with melted Lard, fweet Herbs, green Onions, vhich you muil take out again. Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg; thicken your Sauce with Yolks of Eggs and Verjuice, and ferve it up hot for a fmall Entry.

To rooft a arfcr of Lamb.

ONE Half being larded, drudge the other with fmall Crumbs of Bread, wrap it up in Paper before you lay it down, for fear it fhould burn -, uhen it is almoft roailxd, drudge, as before, the Part of it that is not larded, with Crumbs of Bread, adding to them fomc Salt, and Parfley.
fhred fmall; make a brilk Fire to brown it well, and ferve it with juice of Lemon and Orange.

Lamb n,mih Rice.

TAKE a Fore-quarter of Lamb, and road it about three Parts; take a Pound of Rice, and put it into two Quarts of good Broth, with two Blades of Mace, fome Salt, and Nutmeg; Hove it an Hour, and take it off; put in the Yolks of iix E2;gs, and a Pound of Butter, then put Vol. L I yo

ii8 The Ladys Companion,

your Lamb in Joints in the Difli, and the Rice over it; walk it over with Eggs, and fo bake it.

A Leg of Lamb forced.

YO U mufl take the Meat out of the Leg clofe to the Skin, and bone and mince it with Beef-fewet, Thyme, Parfiey, and Onions; beat it in a IVl oriar with iaucury Spice, iind two Anchovies; then wafh the Jnfide of the Skin with the Batter of Eggs, and fill it; bafte, flour, and bake it: The Sauce maybe ieafond with Gravy, or put to it a Regalia of Cucumbers, Cauliflowers, or Fny.ch Beans.

Another JVay to force a Leg of Lamb.

TA KE a large Leg of Lamb, cut a long Slip on the Backfid, take out all the Meat, but dont deface the other Side i then chop the Meat fmaJl with Marrow, Beef- fewet, O fters. Anchovies miwaflid, an Onion, fweet Herbs, fome Lemon-peel, feafond with Salt, Pepper, a little beaten Nutmeg, and Mace. Then pound all thele well in a Mor- tar, ftuff your Skin, few it up, wafli it over with the Yolks of Eggs bea.en, put it oi the Spit, drudge it with Flour, and lay Pieces of Butter over it or you may bake it, if you plcaie: Stew fome Oyfrers in White Wine, with a Blade of Mace; keep out the largeft to lay with Anchovy Sauce, Mufiirooms, and a good deal of Gravy, and fo ferve it, Lricaley the Loin to lay round it, cut into fmall Pieces very thin, feafond with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, Mace, Gives, and favoury Herbs: Pry them in clarify d Butter, and when they are fryd enough, pour out the Butter, clean the Pan, put in a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine, a Pint of flrong Gravy, fl:ew your Lamb in the Gravy; then add an Anchovy, a few Oyfters, and Muihrooms, with the Liquor; then roll up a Piece of Butter in Flour, and the Yolk of an Egg, and fqueeze in the Juice of a Lemon. Garnih with Pickles and Lemon, and ferve it up.

To fry a Keck or Loin of Lamb.

CU T the Ribs afunder, beat them with your Knife, then fr them in a little Ale; feafon them with a little Salt, and cover them clofe with a Plate -, take them out of the Pan with the Gravy in them, fet them in a Difli before the Fire; clean your Frying-pan, put in Half a Pint of White Wine, fome Capers, and the Yolks of two Eggs beaten with a little Sak and Nutmeg; add to this the Liquor they

were

he Lad ys Co mi» anion. 2 f 5

ivere fryd in; ftir it with a Spoon, all one Way, till it is thick, then put in the Lamb, and ftir all together: Garnifh with Parfley and Lemon, and ferve it up.

To drijs a Lambs Head in Pottage.

TAKE the H.ad, Feet, and Liver of a Lamb, and young Bacon, fcald them; then boil them all together in a large Pot, in fome Broth: When they are boild, and well fealbnd, lay your Pottage a foaking with good Brotk and Gravy, and pat the Lambs Head in the Middle: Bread the Brains, and fry them thoroughly, then put them into their Place again. Garnifh your Pottage with the Feet, Ba- con, and Liver. Thicken with a white Cullis made of Crumb-bread Toakd in good Broth, a Score of fweet Al- monds, and the Yolks of three hard Eggs, pounded and ftraind, well foakd, and fcafond with the Juice of Lemon; Then ferve it up.

To foufe a Side of Lamb.

BONE it, fcak it well from the Blood, wipe it dr and feafon it with Salt, Nutmeg, and Ginger beaten, fweet Herbs, and Lemon-peel mincd, and Coriander-feed whole.
Lay broad Slices of Lard over the Seafoning, then roll it in- to a Collar, and bind it up in a Linnen Cloth; put it into a boiling Liquor, Ikim it well, put to it Salt, Nutmeg, and Ginger flicd, Fennel, and Parfley-roots; when it is almoll boiPd put in a Quart of White Wine; when it is enough, take it off, put in Slices of Lemon, the Peel of two whole ones, and a Dozen Bay-leaves, and give it a Boil clofe go-.
verd.

Another Way.

TAKE the Bones out of a Side of Lamb, lay it to foak in Salt and Vater, then wipe it dry; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and favoury Herbsihred fmall, and Lemon-peel. Lay this Seafoning upon the Lamb, and broad Slices of Bacon upon the Seafoning; then roll it up into a Collar, tie it up tight in a Cloth, and boil it in Water and Salt; when it is fkimmd, put in Fennel, Parfley-roots, Ginger flicd, and Nutmeg; and when it is near boiPd enough, pour in a Quart of White Wine; when that has boiPd put in half a Dozen Bay-leaves, the Peel of a Lemon, and Slices of Lemon, then put all in a Pot, and govc -ii: dofe for Uf.

L 2 !9

aao fhe L A D ys Companion.

a Jlenv a Lamb s Head.

HAVING taken out the Brains, make a Pudding of them; boil them, and when they are cold, cut them into Bits; then mince Lamb and Beef-fevvet together, add to it fome grated Bread, feafon with Salt, Pepper, and fweet Herbs mincd fmall, add four or five raw Eggs, Fill the Lambs Head with thefe; then ftew it in a Stew-pan with ibme ftror.g Broth; make Balls of the Remainder oi your mined Meat.

7o make Lamb like Venlfon.

BONE your Lamb, then dip it in the Blood of a Pig, Sheep, or Calf; then parboil it in Small Beer and Vine- gar, one Pan of the Firil, and three of the Latter, let it Kand in it all Night: Then put in fome Alkanet-root, or Turnfoil, and bake it with Pepper, Cloves, Mace, Claret, and Butter, and fome Sprigs of Rofemary.

To fry Lamb-Stones.

PARBOIL them, mince them fm.all, fry them in fweet Butter, flrain them with fome Cream, Pepper, and beat,en Cinnamon, and when it is ilraind, put to it fome grated Cheefe; then fry them, and ferve them up with Su- szr and Rofewater.

o

The m-o Hind-quarters of Lam.b i.oith fn,ceet Herbs.

TAKE the Kind-quarters of Lamb, and raife the Skin without breaking it, fo a; it m.ay flick on the Side, wiihout taking it oft, beginning at the Knuckle; take fome fcrapd Bacon, Panley, and Chibbol, cut fmall, feafond with Sr:lt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, Spice, a Bit of Butter, and Ivlufh- rooms; the Whole being well mincd and mixd together, put it between the Skin and the Flefh of your Lamb, tie up ihe Skin, to keep in the Stuffing, and fpit your Hind-quarters with Slices of Bacon and Paper round: Your Lamb being roaRcd, take off the Slices of Bacon and Paper, flrew fome Crumbs of Bread over it, and let it roaft a little more, to get a Colour; difh it up with Gravy and Cullis, mixd to- «-ether, with fome Shalots cut fmall, a little pounded Pepper, and Orange -juice. You may add a Couple of Rocamboles, if thev are likM, This is fervd up iiot in the firft Courfe.

You

Th L A D ys C O M P A N I O N. 2.2 I

You may likevvlfe lard thefe Hind- quarters, and do them in a large Stew-pan, being glazd.

Lambs Plucks the Italian JVay.

TAKE a Lambs Pluck, iz. The Head, Trotters, Harllet, c. take out the Jaw-bones, cut the Tip oi the Muzzle, and put the Head and the Harflet in freih W.- ter J after thefe have been bianchd, put in the Trotters, and the Head, Harflet, and Feet, of your Lamb, being par- boird, put them in a Kettle over Slices of Bacon.; the Wholj being feafond with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, fweet Bafil; Thyme, and Slices of Onions, vith more Slices of Eicon over, pour fome Water in it, and let it boil; when boiPd enough, put it in a Diih, ikin the Tongue, cut it in two, open the Head by the Skull, and take out the Bone, to take the Brains out the eailer; put the Head, fo orderd with ihe Tongue, in the IVliddle of your Dilli; cut the Lights .ni Liver in four or five Bits, placing them with th« Frotters round the Head, pour over the Whole an Italian Sauce, and ferve it up for a fmall Difh.

For a Change, take your Liver and Lights, cut in ve.y thin Slices, and tofsd up in a Frying-pan, feafond wth Sale, Pepper, Chibbol, Parlley, and a Dull of Fiour; when d;ne, add a Dalh of Vinegar and Gravy, and ferve it up hor.

7 marinate a Leg of Limb.

TAKE a I eg of Lamb cut in Pieces the Bignefs of Haf a Crown; hack them with the Back of a Knife, then take a Shalot, three or four Anchovies, fo ite _k,v ...
Mace, Nutmeg, all beaten; put your Meat in a Dilh, and ftrew the Sealoning over it, and put it into a Stew-pan, v. ith as much White VVine as vvill cover it, and let it lie tvvo Hours; th n put it all together in a Stew pan, and let it bs half e ough; then take it out, and drain it through a Colan- der, faving the Liquor, and put to your Liquor a little Pep- per and Salt, and Haifa Pint of Gravy; dip your Meat in Yolks of Eggs, and fry it brown in Butter; thicken un your Sauce with Yolks of Eggs and Butter, and pour it in the Difn with your Meat; lay Pieces of Sweetbreads and Force- meat Balls over your Meat, dipped in Eggs and fryd. Gar- nih with Slices of Lemon.

L j
222 tTifc Ladys Companion.

To drefi Lambs Trotters.

BOIL them well, then take out the Middle Bone, and Huff them with a good Faice, dip them in beaten Eggs,.
drudge them well with crumbled Bread, and fry them brown..
Let your Garnifhing be fryd Parfleyj fo ferve them.

far Lamb-Pie, fei Chap, of V A st ky,

Loin cf Veal a la Braife,

HAVING parboiPd your Veal, lard it with large Lar- doons, feafond with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg. Gar- nifh the Bottom of an oval Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon and Veal, feafond with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, and Spices,, mincd Parfley, Slices of Onions, Carrots, Parfnips, and Le- mon: Then lay in your Loin of Veal, the Kidney Side up- permoft, feafon it over as under, cover it in like Manner with Slices of Veal and Bacon; fo having coverd your Stew-pan very clofe, ftew it with Fire over and under it;, when it is enough, drain it well, then lay it in a Dilh, pour upon it a Ragoo of Veal Sweetbreads, Cocks-combs, Mufh- jGoms, Morels and Truffles, or of Cucumbers, or of Let- luce i fo ferve it for the firft Courfe.

To make Veal a la Mode,

C» U T out the Bone, and take the hard Skin oiF a Filleti I of Veal, take Salt, Pepper, Mace, and Cloves in Pow- der, mix them with Thyme, Savoury, Lemon-peel, and Sha- lot fhred fmall: Then cut the Rind off from about Half ai Pound of Bacon, cut it into Pieces about the Thicknefs of your Finger, and the Breadth of two Fingers; roll them up in the Seafoning, feewer it up clofe, and tie it in the fame Fafhion as before you cut it. Beat the Yolks of feme Eggs, and wafh it all over with them, put it into a Dilh and bake it, with Pieces of Butter all over it; and when it is baked, take out the Veal, and ferve it.

If you would pot it, take it from tRe Gravy, and pour over it as much clarify d Butter as will cover it, and tie a Paper over it, and when you eat it, cut it out into thin Slices, and eat it with Oil and Vinegar, or Juice of Lemons, or Lime- juice, bea.t up thick together.


7 Ladys CoMPANfaw. 223

To drefs Veal a la Burgoife.

YO U may cut pretty thick Slices of Veal, and lard them with pretty large Lardoons of Bacon; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, all Sorts of Spices, Parfley and Gives mincd; then garnifli the Bottom of a Stev-pan with Bards of Bacon; lay in your Slices of Veal upon them; fet your Stew-pan over a gentle Fire, that may keep them fweating for fome Time j then brifk up the Fire, and brown them on both Sides; then add a little Flour, and brown that; put in fome good Broth to moiften them, and let them llew gently; when they are enough, take off the Fat, and put in the Yolk& of two or three Eggs, beaten up with Verjuice, to bind it.
Pifli it, and ferve it up.

boil a Leg of Veal and Bacon,

LARD your Leg of Veal all over with pretty Iarg& Lardoons of Bacon, and Lemon-peel, boil it with a Piece of middling Bacon j when the Bacon is enough cut it into Slices, feafon them with dry Sage and Pepper mixd together. Difh the Veal, lay the Bacon round it, ftrew it ver with Parfley, and ferve it with green Sauce in Saucers; which green Sauce you muft make as follows:

Beat two or three Handfuls of Sorrel in a Mortar, with a Couple of Pippins quarterd, and put to it Vinegar and Sugar.

Or take a Couple of Handfuls of Sorrel, pound it in a Mortar, fqueeze out the Juice, and put it in a Pipkin, with a little drawn Butter and Sugar, and grated Nutmeg. Warm it, and pour it on your Veal and Bacon.

To boil a Leg o Veal.

STUFF it with Beef-fewet, and fweet Herbs chopped, feafondwith Salt and Nutmeg, and boil it in Water ana Salt; then take fome of the Veal, and put to it fome Ca- pers, Currants, whole Mace, a Piece of interlarded Bacon, two or three whole Cloves, fome Artichoak Suckers boird; and put in beaten Butter, boiPd Marrow, and Mace, and Pieces of Pears. Then take Sorrel, Sage, fweet Marjoram, Thyme, and Parfley; mince them coarfly, and bruife them with the Back of a Ladle; put thefe into your Broth to make it green, and give them a Walm or two, then your other Materials, fome Barberries, or Goofeberries, beaten Butter, and Lemon,

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2 24 Ladys Compan ion.

Loin of Veal fnarlnated,

PARBOIL and lard it with large Lardoons, lay it ia a great deep Dilli, put to it a fiifficient Quantity of Vine- gar, together vith Salt, Pepper, fome Slices of Lemon and Onion, Eay-leaves, and whole Gives, and let it marinate in it three or four Hours, then put it on a Spit, lard it with Slices of Kani and Bards of Bacon, wrap it round with Pa- per, and lay it down to the Fire; put into the Dripping-pan a Pound of Butter, together with the Pickle in which you marinated the Veal, andbaile it fom Time to Time as it is roafting; when it is enough, take off the Paper and Slices of Bacon, brown it well wich a brifl: Fire, fo ferve it, with ibmc EITence of Ham under it, and garnifli with fryd Veal Cutlets.

v Pillav cVeal,

A Neck or Bread of Veal being half roafted, cut it in fix Pieces, and feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and Nut- meg, butter the Iiifide of your Difh; ftove a Pound of Rice tender, with fome good white Broth, Mace, and Salt; llov« it very thick; put in the Yolks of fix Eggs; ftir it about well, and cool it, and put fome at the Bottom of your Dilli, and lay your Veal on a round Heap, and cover it all over with Rice; wafli it over with the Yolks of Eggs, and bake, it one Hour and an half; then open the Top, and pour in fome good thick Gravy, and f-ueeze in an Orange, and fa ferve away hot. Garnifh with flicd Orange and Veal Cut- lets.

Bomharded Veal.

GE T a Fillet of Veal, cut out of it £ve lean Pieces as thick as your Hand, round them up a little, then lard them very thick on theraund Side, lard iive Sheeps Tongues, being boird, blanchM, and larded with Lemon-peel and Eeet-root, then make a well-feafond Force-meat, with Veal, lean Bacon, Beef-fewet, and an Anchovy, roll it up into a Ball, being well beat, then make another tender Force-meat with Veal, fat Bacon, Beef-fewct, Muftroom, Spinach, Parfley, Thyme, fwee: Marjoram, Winter-favoury, and green Oniorvs; feafon and beat it: Then put your ForcM ball into Part of this Force meat, put it into a Veal Caul, and bake it in a little Pot i Then roll up that which is left in another Veal Caul, wee with the Batter of

EcrcrS,

The Ladys Companion. 225

Eggs, roll it up like a Bolognin Saufage, tie it at both Enc flightly round, and boil it; your Forcd ball being bakM,put it in the Middle of the Dih; your larded Veal being Hewd in ftrong Broth, lay round it, and the Tongues fryd brown, between each, then pour on them a Ragoo, lay about it the other Forcd-meat, cut as thin as a Half Crown, anci fryd in the Batter of Eggs; then fqueeze on it an Orange, and garnifh it with flicd Lemon.

Veal a la Dauh.

WHEN you have interlarded a good Fillet of Vea,l as the Beef is cone, add to the ilewing of it a little White Wine; then make for it a Ragoo, and garnifh it with flicd Lemon.

Olives of Veal.

WASH ten or twelve Scotch Collops with Batter of Eggs, and feafon them; then lay over them a little Forcd-meat, roll them up, and roall them: Make for thein.
aRagoo and garnifh the Dilh with flicd Orange.

Olives of Veal another Way.

WE take the Flefh of a Fillet of Veal, with fome Mar- row, two Anchovies, the Yolks of two hard Egg;, a few Muflirooms, and Oyflers, a little Thyme, Marjoram,.
Parfley, Spinach, Lemon-peel, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, an.l Mace, finely beaten; then take your Veal Caul, and lay fc- veral Layers of middling Bacon, and of the Ingredients above. one upon another, and roll ail up in the Caul to be roailed or bakd; and when it is enough cut it in thin Slices, and Lrve it in a Dilb of ilrong Gravy.

At-other Ifaj,

CUT the FI fh of a Leg of Veal into thin Slices; take Thyme, Marjoram, raiiley. Marrow, Cloves, Mace, Nut.reg, and Salt i chop all thefe together, and roll them up in fome of the long Pieces; then .pit chem on a Bird- fpit, and tie them on; and when they are roaiied, mak Sauce for them of Butter, and the Juice oi two or thrcs- Oranges.

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22 6 ne L A D ys C m p a N ! O N.

jn admirable Way of drejftng CoUops.

CUT a Leg of Veal into thin Slices, and hack them with the Back of a Knife; then lard them thin with.
Bacon; then take a few fweet Herbs, cut fmall, fome Nut- meg grated, and ftrew over the Meat, flour them, and fait, them; then take them and fry them brow.n in fweet Butter.
For the Sauce, take Half a Pint of Gravy, a Quarter of a Pint of Claret, one Anchovy, one Shalot; Ihred them and boil them together; then put in a Quarter of a Pound of fweet Butter, the Yolks of two Eggs well beaten; then pour out the Butter you fryd them in, if any is left, and put in- your Sauce, and Ihake it together; diih them up very hot,.
Aith Lambs Stones, and Sweetbreads, fryd brown. Garniih your Diih with Lemons, or Truffles, and Morels.

Scotch CoUops another Way.

PREPARE a Fillet of Veal, and cut it into thin Slices, then cut off the Skin and Fat, lard them with Bacon, and make three Pints of Gravy, as for Soop; fiour your CoUops and fry them brown, and lay them by; then take a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, and put it into a deep Stew-pan j let it mek, and ftrew in a Handful of Flour, fhaking and flir- ring it till it is brown; then put in the Gravy, and one whole iinall Onion, a Bunch of Herbs, which mull be foon taken out; let it boil a little, and put in the Collops to Hew Haifa Quarter of an Hour: Put in Balls of Forcd-meat, ready fryd; beat the Yolks of two Eggs, break them into iix Ounces of Butter, a little Vinegar; take up a little Li- quor out of the Stew-pan and mix with it, then pour it all in and hake them well together; take out the Collops, lay them on the Difh, and let the Sauce thicken a little more, and pour it over the Meat: You may add fryd Bacon, Mulh- jooms, and Palates; put in the Juice of a Lemon.

Vhite Scotch Collops.

AFTER you have cut your Veal in thin Slices, lard it with Bacon, and feafon it with Cloves, Mace, fweet Herbs, and grated Bread; flew the Knuckle with as little Broth as you can, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, a few Cloves, and Mace; then take a Pint of it, and put in two Anchovies a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine, and fome Mulhrooms; thicken it up with the Yolks of thxee Eggs, asd a Piece of « utter.

hs Ladys Companion. 22.7

Jnother Wayl

LARD the flefhy Part of a Leg of Veal with Bacon, as much as you think fit, flicd very thin; then take Half a Pint of Ale, and put the Veal in it, till the Blood be out;.
then pour out the Aq into a Porringer, and take a little Thyme, Savoury, and fweet Marjoram, choppd fmall, ilrew it over the Veal, and fry it in Butter, and flour it a little ti.ll enough; then put it into a Difh; put the Butter away, and fry thin Bits of Bacon and lay in the Midus of the Dilh.
For the Sauce, put into the Ale four Anchovies, and a little White Wine, the Yolks of two Eggs, a little Nutmeg or Pepper: Melt the Anchovies before you put in the Eggs, and when it begins to thicken, put in a Piece of Butter, and fhake it about till it is melted; then pour it over your Meat.
You may do it in Gravy inllead of Ale; melt your Anckovies in White Vine.

0 make Balls of Veal.

MINCE the Lean of a Leg of Veal, and cut cut the Sinews; then mince with it fome Fat of Beef- fewet, if the Leg be of a Cow Calf, the Udder will be good inftead of Sewet; when it is very well teraperd together with the Chopping- knife, have fome Cloves, Mace, and Pepper beaten, and with Salt feafon your Meat, putting in fome Vinegar; then make up the Meat into little Balls, and fet them to boil in good ilrong Mutton-Broth; as foon as they are boild enough, take the Yolks of iive or fix Eggs well beaten, with as much Vinegar as you pleafe, and fome of the Broth mingled together; Ilir it into all your Balls and Broth, give it a Walm on the Fire; then dilTt up the Balls upon Sippets, and pour the Sauce on it.

To make Savoury Balls.

WE take the Flefti of Fowl, Beef-lewet, and Marrow, of each the like Quantity; feven Oyfters, a little .
lean Bacon, with fweet Herbs, Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, audi Mace 3 pound them, and itialce it up into Balls.

To make Force-meat Ball.

GET a Pound of Veal, and the fame Weightof Beef-; fewet, and a Bit of Bacon, fhred all together; beat it in a Mortar very fine j then feafon it vith fweet Herbs, Pep- per, Salt, Cloves, Mag-e, and Nutmegs; and when you rolb

it

22 8 The La d ys C o .r a n i o n.

it up to fry, add the Yolks of two or three Eggs to bind it: You may add Oy flers, or Marrow, at an Entertaimr.ent.

BreaH of Veal in Galantine,

BO N E a Breall: of Veal, flretch it, and beat it as flat as you can; feafon it with Parfley, Thyii.e, Mcrjoram Wmter-favoury, Marygolds, all well mincd, Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg; roll it up well, and tie it very clofe; then tie it up in a Cloth, and boil it in good fealond Broth, Wine, and a little Thyme. Vhen it is boird, let it cool in the fame Liquor; fend it up either Whole or in Slices, upon a Nap- kin. Garniih it as you like.

Jigget of Veal a la Daub.

AFTER having taken off the Skin, blanch it, lard i with fmall Lardoons. ard lay it to fcak in Verjuice White Vire, Salt, a Faggot of fweet Herbs, Pepper, Bay- leaves, and Cloues: Then roaft it, bafting it with the fame Wine, mixd with Verjuice and a little Broth: When it is rcafled, if you intend to eat it hot, make your Sauce of the Dripping, a little fryd Flour, Capers, Slices of Lemon, Juice of IViui]iroomb and Anchovies. Let your jigget f.mmer irt it for fome Time, and ferve it avay.

A Lq-t of iVlutton may be done the fame Way.

Loaf Veal.

tT A V I N G beat fome thin Slices of Veal flat with your Cleaver, take Meat enough to make your Loaf with-; then take another Lump of your Slices of Veal, and cut into Bits, together vith fome Beef-fewet, fome Bacon, and a Calfs Udder blanchd; put all together In a Stew-pan over the Fire, feafon it with Pepper, Salt, iweet Herbs, fine Spice, Chibbcls, Parfley, Garlick, Muflirooms, and Truffles, if you have any; tofs it up, and flir it together, and put into it Oumbs of Bread boild in Milk, and four .or five Yolks of Eggs: All this being well n.incd, garnifh the whole Bot- tom of a Stew-pan with fome thin broad Slices of Bacor, and ever them fome Slice of Veal, and then your Fcrcd- ineat all round it, the Thicknefs of two Fingers: At laft, 2 ar in a fmall Ragoo made of Griftles of eal, and feme green Pcae; let all be we;] dene, and of a good Tafle, and put this Ragoo into your Loaf of Veal, putting, at the feme Time, more of your Forcd-meat, and fmall Slices ef Veal over the fame j brijng your SHcea of Bacon to lay

about

ne L A D ys C o m p a n I j. 229

about It, and let them ftew: Jt being done, take oit the faid Slices of Bacon, pour out the Fat, turn it uplide down in the Dilh, ikim it well, and put your Ragoo of green Peafe over it, or, infiead of Peaie, a Cullis.

At snother Time you may ferve up your Loaf with a Ra- goo of Sweetbreads of Veal, Cocks-combs, Muihrooms, TruHies, or an Effence cf Ham.

At another Time you may make Ufe of a Calfs Caul, inftead of Slice: of Veal, and ferve it up.

At another Tiire, inifead of taking Griilles of Veal to put into your Loaves, take Fi lets of all Sorts of Fowls, and yut over your Loaf an EiTence, or a Ragoo oi hpanifh Car- dcons, or fuch other Sauce, or Ragoo, as you think fit.

At another Time, inftead of fuch Fillets, ycu may make Ufe cf a Ragoo of Svte threads.

To mh Stove Veal.

YO U mull: talkie the Fillet of a Cow Calf, cut away an Inch of the middle Bone, on each Side, cut off the Udder, and cui; it in long Slices, and roll it in a Sealoning of Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and fweet Herbs fhred fmnll; make Holes in the Fillet of Veal, and in them Hick ihefe Pieces of feafond Udder as thick as you can j then put into a. Stew pan your Fillet, fet it over a Stove with a gentle Fire, turning it, and iliaking it as you £nd Occaijon; when it is pretty near enorgh, fkim oft the Fat, and put in an Onion ftuck with Cloves, pare and cut a Lemon in Halves, fqueeze it, and put it in, fhake it now and then; it will take five Hours ilewing if your Fire be fJack: About an Hour before it is enough, put in a Pint of flrong Broth; whei it is quite enough, put in a Pint of MuHirooms, and a Pint of Oyllers, with a little of the Broth, and two Spoonfuls < f Ca- pers. Then - im off the Fat again before, you ufe the Li- quor, thicken it with Flour, and pour it on the Difh of Meat, and ixN it up.

To Jiev Veal.

AFTER having cut your Veal into fmall Pieces, fea- fon them with Salt, whole Pepper, an Onion, Lemon- peel, and Mace, and two or three Shalcts j Hew ail in Va- ter, or Port Wine, with a lircle- Butter; when your Meat is fiewd enough, put in fome Yolks of Eggs beaten, give tlisni a Walm or two, diih them, ajid ferve them up.

2o ST Lad ys CoMP ANioK.

Veal Blanquets.

RO A S T a Piece of Veal, cut ofF the Skin, and ner- vous Parts, into little thin Slices; put fome Butter in a Stew-pan over the Fire, with fome chopped Onion; fry it a little, then add a. little Duft of Flour to it, and wet it with good clear Broth; put to it a Faggot of fweet Herbs, and young Onions, feafon it with Spice; make it of a good Talle, then put in your Veal, bind it with Eggs and Cream like a Fricafey, feme Shalot, Rocambole, and Pariley, chopped fmall, and fome grated Nutmeg, and grated Lemon- peel, with fome Lemon-juice, m.ake it favoury; and lallly, put in a Spoonful of Oil; ferve it hot.

To fie-cv a Knuckle of Venl.

BE fare let the Pot or Sauce-pan be very clean, lay at the Bottom four clean wooden Skewers, vvafh and clean the Knuckle very well, then lay it in the Pot, with two or three Blades of Mace, a little vhole Pepper, a little Piece of Thyme, a fmall Onion, a Crull of Bread, and two Quarts of Water; cover it down clofe, make it boil, then only let it fimmer for two Hours, and when it is enough take it up, lay it in a Diih, and ilrain the Broth over it.

Another Way.

CLEAN it as before direded, and boil it till there is jull enough for Sauce, add one Spoonful of Catchup, one of Red Wine, and one of Walnut Pickle, fome Truffles and Morels, or fome dryd Mufhrooms cut fmall; boil it all to- gether, take up the Knuckle, lay it in a Diih, pour the Sauce over it, and fend it to Table.

To drefs a Fillet of Veal Mh Collops.

TA KE a fmall Fillet of Veal, cut what Collops yoa want, then take the Udder and fill it with Force-meat, roll it round, tie it with a Packthread a-crpfs, and roaft it, lay your Collops in the Difh, and lay your Uder in the Middle. .
Gainiih your Difh with Lemon.

ro fry Veal.

YOUR Veal, cither raw or roafted, muft be cut.into Slices, flour them, fait them, beat up an Egg, ilrip fome Thyme and put to it, feafon on both Sides; make Sewet boiling hot in a Frying-pan, put in your Slices of Veal,

turn

he L A D Y s C M p A N r o m 2 i

tarn it but once in the Frying-pan; when it is enough, take it up, clear the Fat out of the Pan, and fry thin Slices of Bacon to garnilh the Difh, and ferve them up with Gravy Sauce or Butter.

To farce and roojl a Fillet of VeaL

MINCE Beef-fewet very fmall, an Anchovy, with Iweet Marjoram, Winter-favoury, and Thyme; fea- fon with Salt, Nutmeg, and Mace beaten; add grated Bread, mix all thefe together with the Yolk of an Egg; make little Holes in your Veal, and fluff it very thick with thefe Ingre- dients, or place it behind the Udder, then fpit it and roaft it well: Put a Piece of Paper over the Udder to keep it from burning. Make your Sauce of Butter, and the Juice of Lernon; work the Sauce up very thick, difh your Veal, pour your Sauce over it, and garnifh with Slices of Lemon,

7o roaft a Shoulder or Fillet of Veal nxith farcing Herbs.

WA: H your Veal, parboil it a little; then mince fome Winter-favoury, Thyme, and Parfley very fmall; and alfo mince fome Sewet, and the Yolks of four hard Eggs, and mix with the reil; leafon with Salt, Pepper, and Nut- meg; work all thefe up with the Yolk of a raw Egg or two, and fluff your Veal with them hut fave fome of it; fpit your Veal, roaft it, put the Stuffing you favd in the Drip- ping-pan, or in a Difh under your Meat, and when thoMeat is near roalled enough, put to them a Quarter of a Pint of White Wine Vinegar, and a little Sugar; when your Meat is enough, feive it up vith the Sauce..

To boil a Slioulder 0 Veal.

HALF boil it in Water and Salt, then ilice off the moil Part of it, and fave ihe Gravy; then take the flicd Meat, and put it in aPo, with fome of the Broth that boild it, a little grated Bread, Oyller-liquor, Vinegar, Bacon flicd thin, a Pound of Saufages out of their Skins, made into Balls, and roird in the Yolks of Eggs, large Mace and Nutnieg; let all ll:ew about an Hour, then put in a Pint of Oyllers, fome fweet Herbs and a little Salt; then take the Bone of Veal, and broil it, and difh it; add to your Liquor a Piece of Butter, and fome mincd Lemon, with the Rind of a Sha- lot or two, flicd, and pour it over; they lay on it fome fryd Oyflers. Garnifh your Difh with Barberries and flicd Lemon, and foye it up.

A Shoulder

232 The Ladys Companioi.

A Shoulder of Veal a la Picmontoife.

HAVING a Shoulder of Veal, take ofF the Skin, that it may hang at one End, cut Lardoons of Bacon and Hair-, feafond with Pepper, Salt, fine Spice, fine Herbs, and lard the Shoulder of Veal with it; cover it again with the Skin, and braife it then take Sorrel and Lettuce, pickd and waihd clean, chop it v<,ry well, put it over the Fire in a Stew- pan, with a 1 tde Burter, choppd Parfiey, Onions, and Mulh- rooms. The Kerbs being ftewd tender, put to it fome good Culiis, Bits of Ham, and Sweetbreads, cut in Dice. Vhen the Shoulder of Veal is ready, take it out and drain it, put it in the Dih you intend it for; take off the Skin, put fome of the fwcet Herbs under and over, put the Skin over it again, wet it with melted Butter, and ftrew over it fome Varviijtin j give it a Colcur in the Oven, and ferve it hot.

Neck cf Veal in forced meat Cutlets

BOIL the Neck of Veal in vour Soop; when it is boild take it out, and cut all tlfe Flcfh from off the Bones, and m.ake it into a good Forcd-meat, then form the Forcd- meat like Cutlets, with the Ribs fticking out, put them into a Baking-pan, do ihem over with Yolks of Eggs and Crumbs of Bread; put them in the Oven, give them a good Colcur, then put them in a Diih with Gravy under themiferve them hot.

Tor ragming a Breafl i Veal, fee the Chapter ozgoos.

To hajh a Calfs Head.

OUR CaiPs Head being flit and cleand, and half boird, and cold, cut one Side into thin Slices, fry it in a Pan of Butter; then having a Sauce-pan on the Stove, with a Pint of Gravy, a Pint of llrong Broth, a Quarter of a.
Pint of Claret, and as much ¥hite Wine, a fevv avoury Balls, and a Pint of Oyfters, with Lambs-tlones and Sweet- breads, boiPd and blanched, and flicM, with Mufl.rooms and Truies, two or three Ancliovies, with two Shaiots, and a.
Faggot of fweet Herbs, tolsd up andHewd together; fea- fon It with Nutmeg, Mace, Pepper, and Salt; then fcoteli the other Side a-crois and a-crots; flour, baite, and broil it: The Halh h thickend with brown BuUer, put it in tlie

Pifh

The Ladys Companion. 233

Dlih, lay about it fryd Balls, and the Tongue flicd and larded with iacon and Lemon-peel; then fry, in the Batter of Eggs, fiicd Sweetbreads, card Sippets, and Oyfters; lay in the Head, and place thefe about the Dilh, and gar- nifh it with flicd Orange.

Another Way.

BOIL your Calfs Head till the Meat is near enough for eating, take it up, and cut it into thin Slices; then put to it Half a Pint of White Vine, and three Quarters of a Pint of Gravy; put to this Liquor n-zo Anchovies, Haifa Nutmeg, a little Mace, and a fmall Onion iluck with Cloves; boil this up in the Liquor a Qnartr of an Hour, then flrain it, and let it boil gently again; then put in ycur Meat, v.jth a little Salt, and oine Lemon peel fnred fine, and let it flew a little; mix the Brains with the Yolks of Eggs, and fry them for Garniih; when your Head is ready, fhake in a Bit of Butter, and ferve it up.

An admirable Way to roaji a Calfs Head.

GE T a Calfs Head with the Skin on, and fcald it, anc boil it an Hour and an Half; when cold, lard it with Lenion-peel, and then fpit it j Wi en it is enough, make a good favoury Sauce, as ycu do for a halhd Head, and put into it Fcrc d m.eat Balls, tryd Sweetbreads, Eggs, and Cla- ret, a little Bacon, fome Truft.es and Morels, Mufhrooms and Oyfters, and a little Lemon-juice, and mix it all well together, with the Sauce, and pour over the Head. It may be done as well with the Skin off, as it comes from the Butchers.

Calfs Head rupnfe.

YO U muH bone it, and not fplit it, cleanfe it well, and fill up the vacant Place with Meat, and make it in the fam: Form as before: You may put in the Middle a Ra- goo, and cover it with Force-meat; then wafh it with Egg and crumb it, and bake it; io ferve it.

To drefs a Calfs Head.

BOIL the Head till the Tongue will peel; then cut Half the Head into fmall Pieces, about the Eignefs of Oyfters; lay the Brains by them.felves; then ftew it in flrong Gravy, with a large Ladleful of -Claret, and a Hand- ful of fvveet Herbs, a little Lemon -peel, a Piece of Onion

and

234 Ladys CoMPANiorf.

and Nutmeg flicd; let all thefe flew till they are tender;.
then take the other Half of the Head, fcratch it a-crofs, ftrew over it grated Bread, fweet Herbs, with a little Le- mon-peel; lard it with Bacon, and wafh it over with the Yolks of Eggs, and ftrevv over it a little grated Bread; boil it well Qver Charcoal, or Wood Coal; and when its enough, place it in the Middle of your Diih; then cut the flewd Meat, and put in a Pint of Gravy into your Stew-pan, with three Anchovies, a few Capers, a good many Mulhrooms and a good Quantity of fweet Butter, with a Quart of large Oyflers; flew them in their own Liquor, with a Blade of Mace, a little White Wine; keep the largeft out to fry, and fhred a few of the fmallell; tlien beat the Yolks of Eggs- and Flour, and dip them in; fry them in Hogs Lard make little Cakes of the Brains, and cut the Tongue out into round Pieces, and dip them in, and fry them; then pour the flewd Meat into the Difli round the other Half of the Head, and lay tlie fryd Oyflers, Brains, and Tongue, with little Bits of crifpd Bacon, Force meat Balls, or Sau- fages, on th Top, and all about the Meat j garniih with: Horfe-radiih and Barberries 5 fcrve it up hot..

To roafi a Calfs Head- nvith Oyflers.

CUT it in two as for boiling; take out the Brains and the Tongue, pfl.rboil them, blanch the Tongue, and mince them with a little Sags, Beef- fewet, or Marrow, and a few Oyflers; add to thefe the Yolks of four or five Eggs beaten, Salt, Pepper, Ginger, Nutmeg, and grated Bread: Then parboil the Head, and having dryd it with a. Cloth,, fill the Skull and the Mouth with the above Ingredients; then fluff it with Oyflers, and faflen it to the Spit: As it roafls preferve the Gravy, to which put fome White Wine, a little Nutmeg, a few Oyflers, and fweet H.rbs mincd; fet thefe over a Chafing difli of Coab, put in fome Butter, the Juice of a Lemon, and a little Salt; beat it up thick, and when the Head is difhd, pour in it this Sauce, and ferve it.

To hoil a CalPs Head.

TAKE out the Bones, then have in readinefs Palates boild tender, Yolks of hard Eggs, Oyflers fcalded, and Force-meat; fluff all this into vour Head; and tie it up clofe in a Cloth; boil it three Flours, make a flrong Gravy for. Sauce, and garnifh with fryd Bacon.

T

ne Ladys Companion. 235

To foufe a Calfs Head.

FIRST fcald your Calfs Head, take out the Bones, then lay it in Water to foak feven or eight Hours, changing the Water hvlce in that Time, dry it with a Cloth, and feafon it with Salt, and bruifed Garlick; then roll it up into a Collar, and bind it very clofe, and boil it up in White Wine, Water, and Salt; when it is boild, put your Liquor in a Pan, put in your Head, keep it for Ufe i ferve k up either in the Collar, or in Slices, with Oil, Vinegar, and Pepper..

To farce Calves Tongues.

CU T a Hole in the Tongues with a fmall Knife, at the Throat-end j then thruil your Finger in the whole Length, making, as it were, a Gut, dont break the Skin,.
ir make a Farce of Veal, fome boild Ham, MuDirooms, Parfxey, Cives, Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, a little blanchd Bacon a Bit of Beef-fewet, a little Bread foakd in Cream, the Yolks of three or four Eggs; hafh all thefe Ingredients together, and pound tKem in a Mortar j then farce the Tongues, and fet them to flew; when they are about half ftewd, put in 9 Ladleful of Gravy j ferve them with a Ragoo of Veal Sweet breads .

boil Calves Tongues.

BOIL them tender and peel them; lard them with Le- mon-peel and fat Bacon; then lay them down to the Fire, and half roaft them; then put them into a Sauce-pan, with Red Wine, whole Spice, flicd Lemon, and a little Salt; boil all together, and ferve up upon Toafts. Thus fou may do Sheeps Tongues.

To roafi Calves Tongues.

FIRST flew them a la Braife; then take them up and peel them, then lard them with fmall Slips of Bacon, put them on Skewers, tie them on the Spit, and roaft them till they are of a line brown Colour, ferve them with EiTence 1 of Ham, of Bacon, or with a Poivrade.

drefs Calves Feet,.

BOIL them tender, flit them in the Middle, put them into a Stew-pan, with Butter, Parlley, Onions choppd.
fmall, a little Thyme, Mace, Pepper, Vinegar, and Salt; le::

all:

26 The Ladys Companion.

all thefc ftew together till they are enough; then lay your Feet in a Difli, and pour the Sauce over them; ftew forne ravy Parfley and hard Eggs choppd together over them, with Slices of Lemon and Barberries.

Another Way.

BOIL four Calves Feet, a Eit of Beef, a Bit of Veat, and the Bottom of a white Loaf; put in vSalt, three or four Blades of Mace, and a Natmeg flicd; after you- have ftraind the Broth from the Bo-es and Skir.s, have fomeRice- ready boild to ftir in it; put a boiid Chicken in the Mid- dle, and Sippets in the Difh,

To rocfl Calves Feet.

BOIL your Calves Feet very ter.der,_blanch them, itt them hy till they are cold, then lard them thick with fmall Lardocns of Bacon, then put them on a fmall Spit, and roaft them; then mr.ke a Sauce of Butter, Vinegar, and fome Cinnamon beaten up thick, pour it on your Feet, and fcrve them up.

To ft- Veal Sweetbreads.

HAVING larded them with fmall Lardoons, run a kewer thro them, faften them to th Spit, and roaft them f-ill they are very brown; then lay them in a Dih, in which you have put fome EiTence of Ham, or good Gravy; fe ferve them.

To fy Veal S wee breads.

AFT EB. having blanchd and cut each Swe-tbread in- three or four Pieces, lay th m in a Dilh with an Onion cut in Slices, fome whole Cies, and a Bay-leai, Salt, Pepper, two or three Cloves, and Juice of Lemon; let then, marinate in this for two Flours; mean while, make a Batter as follows: Put into a Pan one Handful of Flour, and a little Salt, beat it into Batter with fair Vater, and on« Egg, melt as big as a Walnut of Butter, and add to it: Take care it be not too thick, nor too thin: Take the Sweetbreads out or the Marmade, and having dryd them weU between two Napkins, put them into the Batter; heat fome Hogs Lard in a Frying-pan, and put in your Sweet- breads, one by one, draining them well from the Batter; when they are fryd brown, take them up and drain them; then vy foipe Parfley i lay a Napkin in a Difli, place your Sweet-

The La D ys Co M p A N ION. 27

Sweetbreads upon it, and the fryd Parlley in the Middle; fo lerve them in tiates, or little Difhes.

Sn.veetbieaJi of Veal a la Dauphine.

TAKE the largell Sweetbreads you can get, order them as for a Ragoo, open them and flit em round, then £11 them with StuiRng made of Chickens: Put Slices of Veal and Bacon in a Stew-pan, feaibn them with Salt, Pep- per, fweet Herbs, fine Spices, whole Lhibbols, and an Onion cut in Slicc3. Then put in the Sweetbreads, feafon and co- ver them with Slices of Veal and Bacon -, cover the Stew- pan, ilew them vith Fire under and over: The Sweetbreads being done, take them out, take out the Slices of Bacon, put ] a Ladleful of good Broth, let it ftew, llrain the Broth thro a Silk Strainer, take off the Fat, then put the Broth in a cle:;n Stew-pan till it turns to a Jelly, put in the Sweetbreads to glaze; being glazd, put an Ellence in your Diili, with your Sweetbreads laid upon it.

Tc farce Veal Snx-ecibreads a la Dauphine.

SCALD the Sweetbreads a little, and lard them with boiPd Gammon; having prepared a very delicious Farce, cut a Hole in the Sweetbreads, but not quite through, and fluff them with your Farce; then bake em in a Pan between two Fires; in the mean Time, prepare for them a Ragoo of Mufhrooms, Truffles, and Artichoak Bottoms, Cocks-combs, ftuftd with fome of the fame Farce, and a little Chicken Cullis; then clear your Sweetbreads from the Fat, and pat them into the Ragoo, let them ftew a liccie, difh them, fqueeze in tl.e Juice of an Orange, and ferve them up to Table hot.

Other Ways of drejjing Veal SiveelbrgaJs.

YO U m.ay either lard them with thin Slips of Bacon, and roaft them, and order them with a goad Ragoo or Sauce pourd upon them, or you may marinate them; cut them into Slices, flour them fry them, and ferve them up with fryd Parfley and Lemon juice.

Fricandoes cf Veal.

HAVING a Leg of Veal, cut off fome Slices, beat them well with a Knife, lard them, lay them on a Table, the larded Sid€ downwards, cover them the Thick- nefs of a Crown Piece, with a Farce made of Veal, Beef- Mar row.

238

ne La d ys Companion.

Marrow, a little Bacon, and Tome Eggs, feafond with Salt, Pepper,:.nd favour Herbs. Having thus farcd them, dip your Hand in beaten Eggs, and imooth the Edges of them Lay them in a Stew-pan with a little Bacon under them, co- ver the Pan, and fet it over the Stove; put likevvife a little Fire upon it. You mull keep them thus till they are brown on both Sides, then take them up, let the Fat drain from them, and put them again into a Stew-pan, with fome Gra- vy; let them fimmer a-while in it; take oft all the Fat, put in a Drop of Verjuice; then lay them in a Difh; pour on them a Ragoo of Mufhrooms, Truffles, and Sweetbreads, and ferve them hot.

When FricandowS are ufed for Garnifhing, they are drefsd the fame Way, but not larded.

To drefs a Calfs Liver, a la Baife.

LARD the Liver with Lardoons high feafopd: Lay thin Slices of Bacon over the Bottom of a Stew-pan, and Slices of Beef; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Spice: Add an Onion llicd, a whole Leek, Parfnips, Carrots, fome hred Parlley, and fwcet Herbs. Put in your Liver, and lay the fame Seafoning and Roots over it, that you did under it, alfo Slices of Beef and Bacon; cover the Pan, and put Fire both over and under it. Then make a Ragoo of Muihrooms, Artichoak-b0ttoms,vand Afparagus-tops, Cocks-combs, and Veal-fweetbreads; tofs thefe up in a Sauce-pan with melted Bacon; take off the Fat, and thicken it with a Cullis of Veal and Ham. When the Liver has ilewd enough, difh it,, pour the Ragoo upo-n it, and ferve it hot for a firil Courfe.

You may alfo ferve it with Slices of Ham, prepared as fol- lows: Lay Slices of Ham in the Bottom of a Stew-pan, cover it, and fet it over a Stove to fweat; when it begins to ftick to the Pan, put in fome Gravy, and when it has fimmerd little, thicken it with a Cullis of Partridges, or fome other Cullis. Lay your Liver into your Saiigaraz, pour it on your Liver, and ferve it hot.

Or you may ferve yo-jr Liver with a Ragoo of Succory, or of Cucumbers, or with a hafhd Sauce.

To roaft a Calfs Liver.

LARD your Liver well with large Slices of Bacon, fallen it on the Spit, road it at a gentle Fire, and ferve it up with good Veal Gravy, or a Ptivrak.

Calves

The L A D ys Companion.

Calves Chitterlings tr Andouilles.

TAKE fome of the biggell Calfs Guts, cleanfe them, cut them in Pieces proportionable to the Length of the Puddings you defign to make, and tie on-e End of thele Pieces, then take fome Bacon, with a Calfs Udder, and Chaldron blanchd, and cut in Dice or Slices then put them in a Stew-pan, and feafon with fine Spice pounded, a Bay-leaf, fome Salt, Pepp.r, Shalot, cut fmall, and about half a Pint of Cream; tofs it up, then take off the Pan, and thicken jour Mixture with four or five Yolks of Eggs, and fome Crumbs of Bread; then fill up your Chitterimgs with the Stuffing, keep it warm, -then tie che other Ends with Pack- thread, blanch and boil them like Hogs Chitterlings, let them grow -jold in their own Liquor. Before you ferve em up, boil them over a moderate Fire, and feive them up pretty- hot. This Sort q Andouilles, or Puddings, muil be made in Summ.er, when Hogs are feldom killd.

Calves Chitterlings another Way,

CU T a Calfs Nut in Slices of its I ength, and the Thicknefs of a Finger, together with ibme Ham, Ba- con, and the White of Chickens cut after the fame Manner; put the Whole into a Stew-pan, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, Tweet Herbs, and Spice; take Guts .cleansd, cut and divid-e them in Parcels, fill them with your Slices; then lay in the Bottom of a Kettle fome Slices of Bacon and Veal, place jthem over your little Chitterlings, feafon them with Iweet Safil, Bay-leaves, Salt, Pepper, Slices of Onion, and Cloves of Garlick, and make another Laying with Slices of Bacon and Veal over them, pour in it a Pint of White Wine, and let it ftew with Fire under and over; being done, broil your Puddings on a Sheet of Paper, and ferve them up hot.

To do a Leg of Pork Ham FiJhion.

TA K E a Leg of Pork, and let it be cut like a Ham; then take a Quart of ordinary Salt, and a Quart of Bay -fait, and heat it very hot, then mix it with a Pound of coarfe Sugar, and an Ounce of Salt-petre beaten fine, and rub the Ham well with it, and cover it all over with what is left, for it mud all go o i, fo let it lie three Days; then turn it every Day for a Fort light; then take it out, and fm.oak it as you do Bacon or 1 ongues: The Salt mull4e put on as hot as you can.

240 The L A D ys C M P A N I O N.

Ti; alt Hams to tafie like Weftphalia ones.

GET Salt-petre, fait your Ham with it very well, let it lie therein for a Week j take clean Afhes of Aih-wocd, boil them in fair Water, to a ftrong Lee, let it iland and fet- tle y then take off the clean Water, and boil it again, make- ing it a Urong Broth with ordinary Salt; when it is cold, put in the Ham, let it lie a Month in Brine; then dry it well, without fmoaking, and they will have the right Tafle of Hefiphaiia Hams.

Anther Way,

Li E T the Ham be hot, being jufl killd, and prepare two Ounces of Bay -fait, and two Ounces of Salt-petre; then cover it, and let it Hand nineDays; then fait it with thefe two Salts, and hang it up in a Chimney of Wood-fmoak for three Days; then hang it in the Kitchen, where it may have a little Warmth of the Fire.

0 pickle fix Hams of Pork.

ON E Peck of Bay-falt, Half a Pound of Salt-petre, and five Pounds of brown Sugar, being put to as much hot Water as will heathe Hams Blood-warm, miix it well toge- ther; if Our Hams are large, they muil lie three Weeks in Pickle, or more; but if fmall, two will do: Keep them un- der the Pickle, and ilir your Pickle twice a Week wli to them. If you love the right JVeftphalia Tafle, let them hang in the Smoak three Weeks or a Month.

The fame Time will do for a Tongue in the Pickle and Smoak, and is the right Way for 7. Piece of Beef of the fame Subftance.

To pickle Pork.

BONE your Pork, and cut them into Pieces, of a Size to lie handfomely in the Tub or Pan you intend to pickle it in; then rub every Piece well with Salt-petrft, and take common Salt, and Bay-falt, of the laH Half the Quan- ti.ty of the other, and rub the Pieces well again with thefe; ut Salt at the Bottom of the Vefiel, and lay in the Pieces one upon another, as clofe as you can; cover every Piece with Salt, and fll the hollow Places on the Sides with Salt likewife; and as the Salt melts on the Top, llrew on naore j thus order 4, it will keep a great while.

7he L A D ys Companion. 241

To pickle Pork another Wn-.

SALT the principal Pieces of Pork lightly with ordinnrr Salt; then lay them hollow, that the Blord may drain from it, with the flefhy Side downwards; let it lie two or three Days amongft: the Salt; put foniC beaten white Pepper, and a few Cloves bruisd; fait it well, and pack it very clcfe in the Thing you keep it in, with the Rind downwards, co- ver it with Salt, and when it has flood near three Weeks, put in fo much Salt and Pickle as will cover it; and then iay a falfe Bottom on the Top, to keep it under Pickk. W;; put the ordinary and bony Pieces by themlelves.

Another Way.

TAKE one Gallon of Spring Water, Haifa Pound of Bay-falt, the like Quantity of coarfe Sugar, three Ounces of Sait-petre, which nuift be boiPd all together, and you mufl flcim it when cold; the Pork is to be cut into what iizd Pieces you think moft proper, which muft be laij down clofe, and then pour the Liquor i.pon it; it muft be kept from the Air; it will be fit for Ufe in about eight Days. If your Pickle dont keep well, it nmft be frefh boiPd flcim it when cold, as before, and then put it to the Meat again.

Another Way to c!o a Leg of Pork Ham Yojjrcn

MAKE your Pickle ftrong enough with common Sa;t to bear an Egg, and enough to cover two Hams, the;;, put in fix Ounces of Salt-perre, three Quarters of a Pound oF Bay-falt, and a Pound of brown Sugar; then boil them al! together, and kim it; let it be cold, then put the Hams in» turning them every Day till they are fait enough, which will, be near three Weeks; t;en take them out, and put melted Butter over them, and hang them up.

Another Way to fait Hams.

AFTER yoiir Ham has beenkept about twenty-four Hours, or double that Time, according to theWeathcr, then fait it well with common Salt, and take care to rub it well about the Knuckle: To a Ham ol between 20 or o Pounds,take threeOunces of Salt-petre pounded very fine; take Half of it, mix it with aHanuful of common Salt, an drub that well into the Ham again; then take the Remainder of the Salt petre, and mix it with one Pound of coarfe Sugar, and two Pounds of common Salt, and then rub the Ham well -witi Vol. I. M it

242 he Lad ys C o m p a n ion.

5t as before: Let it lie in this fci three V- teks, but be furc to turr it every Bay, rubbing it well with the Brine it lies in; after which hang it up to dry.

To make Beef Hams.

TA K E a fmall Leg of Beef, cut Ham Fafhion; an Ounce of Bay-falt, the like Quantity of Salt-petre, one Found of con n on Salt, ana a Found of cc«ile Suar, which Quantity will ferve lOr near twenty Fcuids of Eeef tiie Meatmuft be well rubb d with the above Ingredients, and turnd every Day; when it has laid a IVionth, at icaft, take it out, roil it in Bran, and hang it in cog Smoak Ior a Month, but not too near the Fire; when ou have cone thus, it may be removed into a Place for Uie, but dcnt let it hang too hot.

7o trch Veal Hams.

GE T a Leg of Veal cut like a Ham; then take a Pint of Bay-falt, two Our.cei of Salt petre, andcne Pound of comn.on Salt, mix them together, wiih one Ounce of Ju- niper berries, beat; rub the Ham well wi:h thefe Ingredi- dients, and lay it in any Thing of a fit Size, with the Skin downwards; it mufl be rubbd eveiy Day with the Pickle, for at leall fixteei. Days; aftewards, hang it in Wood-: nioak for as many Days. 1 hefe Hams are lometimes boiPd, and fometimies roalled; either Way they are tiy good. The Pickle that is left will do four or five Tongues.

fo make Mutton Hams.

E T a large, fleiliy Leg of Mutton, cut like a Ham; JT take one Ounce of Salt-petre, a Pound of coarle iugar, the like Quantity of common Salt, mix them, and lub your Ham tncrewith; lay it in any Thing you have lare enough to hold it with the Skin-fide downwards, and mind to rub it every Day, for fixteen Days; then roll it in Bran, and hang it in Wood- Smoak for a Fortnight; it may then be hung by for Ufe; it eats beft broiPd in Rafliers.

You may omit: the Salt petre in doing Hams of all Kinds, as it is well known it makes them hard; the red Colour it procures, may be had by ufing a fmall Quantity of Cochineal to tindure the Pickle withal; nor is the Cochineal amifs, notwithllanding the Salt-petre be ufed.



The Ladys Companion; 245

To drefs a Ham a la B aife.

CLEAN the Knuckle, take oiFthe Swerd, and lay it in Water to freihen; then tie l about wich a String i take Slices of Bacon and Beef, beat and leabn them vveil -.vith.
Spice, and fweet Herbs, lay them in the Bottom of the Ket le with Onions, Parinips, and Carrots ilicd, alio Tome Cives and Pariley; lay in your Ham the fat Side uppermoft, lay over it Slices of Beef, and upon ihem Slices of Dacon, iXiid cover them with the fiicdPv03ts and rlerbs as under i;, cover the Kettle with its own Cover, a:id clofe it up wich Paile; put rire both over and under it. and let it fiew with a gentle Fire for twelve Hours; then fet it by to cool; when it is cold, untie it, put it into a Pan, drudge it well with grated Bread, and brown it wkh a hot Iron j then ferve it up, gar- mfhd with raw Pariley.

If it is to be eat hot, lay it in a Difh, and pour over it the Ragoo following: Take Veal Sweetbreads, Livers of Fowls Cocks-combs, Mufhrooms, and Truffies; tpfs thefe up in a little melted Bacon, moiften then with Gravy, and fet them on the Fire a fimmering for Half an Hour, then take Oii the Fat, and thicken it with a Cullis of Veal and Ham. Serve it thus for a firft Ccurfe.

So.A.etimes it is fervd up with a Ragoo of Crawfifti, and fometimes with a Carp Sauce.

To rcafi a Ham or Gammon.

TA K E off tQ Swerd, and lay it a freHienlng in luke- warm Water; then lay it in a Pan, pour upon it a Qu rt of Canary, and let it fleep in it for ten or twelve Hours.
When you hae fpitted it, put ibme Sheets of white Paper over the fat Side, pour the Canary, in which it was foakd,.
into the Dripping pan, and ba;l:e it with it all the while it is roafting; when it is roafted enough, pull off theF:.per, and drudge it well with crumbled Bread and i arfley fhred fine; make the Fire brilk, brovvm it well, and ict it by to ccoii ferve it with green Pariley for a fecond Courfe.

To make Effence of Ham.

GE T the Fat off a Ham, and cut the Lean in Slices; beat them well, and lay them in the Bottom of the Stew-pan, with Slices of Carrots, P.-nhips, and Onions; cover your Pan, and fet it over a gentle Fire; let them Hew till they begin to ftick, then fprinkle on a little Flour, and

M 2 tarn

244 Ladys Companion.

turn them; then moiflen them with Broth and Veal Gravy; feafon them with three or four JVlulhrooniS, as many 1 rrffics, a whole Leek, IbmeBafil, Parfley, and Half a Dozen Cloves, or inllead of the Leek, you may put a Clove of Garlick: Put in feme Cruils of Bread, and let them fimmei over the Fire for three Quarters of an Hour; llrain it, and fet it by for Ufe.

To ronji Pork without the Skin.

TAKE any Joint of Pork, not falted, and lay it down to the Fire till the Skin may be taken off; then take it up, and take off the Skin; then fait it and roaft it; make Sauce for it of Red Wine, Crumb of Bread flicd thin, and a little Water; boil all thefe together, put to it feme Salt, a Piece of Butter, and the Juice of a Lemon, orVineg,ar; when your Fork is roailed enough, flour it, lay it in a Difh, and pour your Sauce over it.

To roafi a Brcafi of Pork.
n A KP a Fore-quarter of Pork, cut ofF the Knuckle, X. leave as much Skin on the Breaft as you can; divide the Neck from the Breaft, leaving the Breail as large as you can; take the Bones out of the Breaft, and rub it well over with Salt; then having fhred Sage and Thym.e fmall, and beaten a Nutn eg, Cloves, and Mace fmall, mix the Spice and Herbs together, and ftrew them thick all over the Meat, and rub it well in; then roll it up tight with the Flefti in- ward, tie it faft together, fpit it length-ways, and roaft it.

Te broil Pork Steaks.

TA KE a Loin of Pork, cut off the Skin, and fome of the Fat; then cut oft the Steaks very thin, and beat them with your Cleaver, as broad and as thin as you can; ieafon them with Salt and Sage flired fine; then lay them on your Gridiron, and feafon the other Side; let your Sauce be drawn Butter, Xmegar, and Muftard; when they are ready difh them up, and put the Sauce over them.

Another Way.

TAKE a Loin, or Neck of Fork, cut off the Skin, and cut it into Cutlets, feafon them with Sage, Parfley, and Thyme, cut fmall. Pepper, and Salt, and Crumbs of Bread; mince all together, and broil them; fauce them with Jviuft- ard. Butter, Shalot, Vinegar, and Gravy j fo ferve them away hot.

To

ne Ladys Companion. 245

To drefs a loin of Pork nxilth Onions.

TA KE a Fore-loin of Pork, and roaft it, as at another Time, peel a Quarter of a Peck of Onions, and dice them thin, lay them in the Dripping-pan, which muft bs very clean, under the Pork, let the Fat drop on them; when the Pork is nigh enough, put the Onions into a Sauce pan; let them fanmer over the Fire a Quarter of an Hour, fhaking them well, then pour out all the Fat as vell as you can, fnake in a very little Flour, a Spoonful of Vinega-, and three Tea-fpoonfuls of Muiiard, hake all well together, and inr in the Muftard, fet it over the Fire for four or five IVlinutes, lay the Pork in a Dilh, and tne Onions in a Bafon.

A Hogs Head Cheef fahi on.
ONE it, and lay it to cleanfe tvventy four Hours in Wa- ter and Salt, and fcrape it well, and white, lay Salt on the Infide, to the Fhicknefs of a Crown Piece, and boil it very tender, then lay it in a Cheefe-prefs, cover it vith a Cloth, and when coid it will be like a Cheefe. You may fauce it.

Chine or Leg of Pork roajled and ftuffed.

TA K E a Leg, or Chine, and make a Stuffing with Sage, Parfley, Thyme, and the fat Leaf of the Pork, Eggs, and Crumbs of Bread; feafon with Pepper, Salt, Nut- meg, and Shalot, and Huff it thick, then roall it gently, and when a quarter roailed, cut the Skin in Slips; make yoiir Sauce with Lemon peel, Apples, Sugar, Butter, and IViu.l- ard.

To drefs a Leg of a Wild Boar.

YOUR Leg being larded with thick B .con, v.v Te-- fond with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, fine Spices, Parf- ley, and Chibbol, cut fmall, let it be pickled witn Vmcs; r.
Juniper-berries, Salt, Pepper, Onions, fome Sprig: of Pariley, fweet Bafd, Thyme, and Bay -leaves; and, being pickic enough, put it on the Spit, bafting it with your pickled Li- quor; when it is enough roafted, difli it up, and, putting a Pepper and Vinegar Sauce over it, ferve it up for the nni: Courfe. A Fore- quarter, or a Shoulder, may be drefsM ths fame Way.

TV broil Melts.

TA K E the largeft and frefheft Hogs Melts, few them up on each Side, and at one End, Ibff them with Sage and Onion cut fmall, feafond with Salt and Pepper; t n

M 3 few

24 Ladys Companion.

few up the other End, and lay them on to broil over a mo- derate Fire: Serve them up with drawn Gravy, with or with- out Claret, having firfl drawn out the Thi;eads.

Another Way.

R E P A R E them as above, and fluff them with the fame

Ingredients you ufe for Veal.

Hogs Ears forced.

TAKE four Kogs Ears and half-boil them, or take em fousd; make a Force- n.ea: thus . Take Half a Pound of Beef-fevet, as much crumbled Bread, an Anchovy, fome Sage, boil and chop very fine a litcic Panley, mix all toge- ther with the Yolk of an Egg, a little Pepper, fiit your Ears very careiuUy to make a Place for your Stuffing, fill them, Hour them, and fry them in frefn Butter, till they are of a fine light Brovn; then pour out all the Fat clean, and put to them Half a Pint of Gravy, a Glafs of White Wine, three Tea-fpoonfuls of Muilard, a Piece of Butter as big as a Nutmeg rolld in Flour, a little Pepper, a fmall Onion whole; cover them cloie, and let them ftew foftly Half an Hour, Ihaking your Pan row and then. When they are enough, lay them in your Difli, and pour your Sauce over them; but firfl: take out the Onion. This makes a very pretty Difh; but if you would make a fine large Dilh, take the Feet, and cut all the Meat in fmall thin Pieces, and Hew with the Ears. Seafon with Salt to your Palate.

To drefs Hogs Feet and Ears.

H E N you have cleand them well, put them into a Eaking-pan, with a Bay-leaf, a large Onion, and as n uch Water as will cover them, fealbn with Salt and Pepper, r.rd bake them; keep them in this Pickle till they •are ••.anted; then take them out, and, cutting them in hand- foiue Pieces, fry them; and take for Sauce three Spoonfuls cf the Pickle, hake in fome Flour, a Piece of Butter, and a Spoonful of Muftard: lay the Ears in the Middle of the Difh, tlie Feet round, and pour the Sauce over.

To pick!e Pigs Feet and Ears.

TAKE your Feet and Ears iinglc, and wafh them well, fplit the Feet in two, put a Bay-leaf between every Foot; put in almoft as much Water as will cover them.
When they are well foakd, add to them. Clove, Mace,

whol<-

TT L A D ys Companion, 247

whole Pepper, and Ginger, Ccriander-feed, and Salt, accord- ing to your Dircretion; put to them a Bottle or two Oi Rhe- nijh Wine, according to the Quantity you do, Half a Score Bay-leaves, and a Bunch of fweec Herbs: Let em boil foftly, till they are very tender; then take them cut of the Liquor, lay them in an earthen Pot, then hain the Liquor over em; when they are cold, cover them down ciofe, and keep them for Ufe.

You hou!d let them ftand to be coM; fkim off all the Fat, and then pa: in the Wine and -pice.

They eat well cold; or at a;iy Time heat them in the Jelly, and thicken it with a little Piece of iJutter roUd in Flour, and it makes a very pretiy Dih; or heat the Ears, and takj the Feet clean out of the Jelly, and roll it in Yolk of Egg, or melted Butter, and then in Crumbs of Bread, and broil them; or fry them in frefh Butter; lay the Ears in the Middle, and the Qzt round, and pour the Sauce over; or you may cut the Ears in long Slips, which is better: And if you chu e it, make a good brown Gravy to mix with them, a Glafs of White Wine, and fome Muitard, thickend with a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour.

In Imitation of Brawn.

BO I L two or three Pair of Neats Feet very tender, then take a Piece of Pork, boii it near enough; then pick the Flefh oH° the Feet, roll .t up in the Pork, as they do Brawn, very tight; then take a ftrong Cloth, wi.h fome coarfe Tape, roll it tight round, and tie it up in a Cloth, and boil it till it is fo tender you may run a Straw through it; le: it be hung up in a Cloth till it is quite cold; after vhich, put it into fome foufing Liquor, and it is fit for Ufe.
Soufe for Brawn.

BOIL half Beer and half Water, and Wheat-bran and Salt vvell together, and fo ftrain it; and when it is cold, add more Salt, and in a Fortnight new boil it.
A Pig roapd,

PU T in the Belly a Piece of Bread, fome Sage and Parf - ley chopped fmall, and fome Salt j few up the Belly, and fpit it, and roafl it; when warm thorough, rub it all over with a Feather dipt in Oil, to prevent its bliilering, or a Piece of Butter on Paper; when enough, cut off the Ears and the Under- jaws, and lay round yourDilh, and make a Sauce with the Brains, thick Butter, Gravy, and Vinegar, and lay under: Make Currant-Sauce in a Cup.

M 4 , Pig

248 The Ladys CoNfPANiON.

J Pig three Ways.

Y I R S T fldn your Pig up to the Ears, and then cut it in J Quarters, and draw it, with Thyme and Lemon, as you do Lamb, or roall it plain as Lamb; fend it to the Table with Mint-fauce, and garniili with Water crelTes; then take the Skin, and make a good thick Plumb- pudding Batter with good Sewet, Fruit, and Eggs -, fill up the Skin to the Ears, which few up, and put it in your Oven, and bake it, and it will appear as a roall Pig. Another Way: When you go to kill your Pig, whip him about the Yard till he lies down, vhen flick him, fcald him, and roat]: hi r, and he will eat well; or you may bone him, and fluff him with goodfavoury Force-meat, or roall: him plain with Sage, Salt, and Bread, in his Belly, and ferve with Currant-fauce, and favoury Sauce under.

- Fig Lamb Tajhion.

SKIN it, and leave the Skin whole with the Head on, then chine it down as Mutton, and lard it with Lemon- peel and Thyme, and roaft them in Quarters as Lamb; the other Part fill full with a good Country thick Plumb-pudding; few up the Belly, and bake it; the Pig will look as if roaft- cd.

To roaft the Hind-quarter of a Pig Lamb Fojhion,

T the Time of the Year when Houfe-lamb is very dcnr, take the Hind quarter of a large Pig; take off the Skin and roaft it, and it will eat like Lamb with Mint- fauce, or with a Sallad, or Se-vUle Orange. Half an Hour vsill roart it.

A Pig RoUiard.

O U muft bone it, leaving the Head whole, and vvafli it over with Eggs; feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and TNutmeg, and lay over fome Force-meat, then roll it up, and either roall: it, or bake, or ftove it: You may cut it in fix Pieces, and fend the Head in the Middle; make Sauce with the Brains and Sage, Butter, Gravy, and inegar; fo ferve av.ay hot.

A Pig in Jdly.

CUT it in Quarters, and lay it in a Stew-pan: To one Calfs Foot, and the Figs Feet, put in a Pint of Rhtrijh Wixic, the Juice of four Lemons, ard one Quart of Water;

feafon

ne Ladys Companion. 249

feafon with Nutmeg and Salt; flove it gently two Hours, let it Hand till cold, and fend it up in its Jelly.

To drefs a Pig the French Way.

SPIT your Pig, lay it down to the Fire, and let it roaft till it IS thoroughly warm, then cut it oiF the Spit, and divide it into about twenty Pieces, Tet them to flew in White Wine and ftrong Broth, feafond with grated Nutmeg, Pep- per, two Onions cut fmall, fbme ftnppd Thyme, Gravy, Butter, Vinegar, and two or three Anchovies; tvhen it is enough, difh it in the Liquor it was iiewd in, with fiicd Orange and Lemon upon it.

To drefs a Pig au Pere-douilct.

CU T ofF the Head, cut the Pig in Quarters i lard them with large Lardoons well feafond: Lay a Napkin in the Bottom of a Kettle, and put ibme Bards of Bacon upon it J upon them place the four Quarters of the Pig, and the Head in the Middle of them; feafon it with Cloves, Nut- - meg, Mace, and Cinnamon, with Bafil, Bay-leaf, Salt, Pep- per, two Rocamboles, a fiicd Onion, and Lemon, Carrots, Parfnips, Parfley, and Cives, then cover it with Bards of Bacon; and having laid them in a Stew pan, cover it, and fet it over a Stove; when it begins to flick, as when y cm make Veal-gravy, moiflen it with good Broth, but take care to keep it from browning; pour it into the Kettle, with a Bottle of White Wine, and flew your Pig in it: When it is enough, take it oiFthe Fire, and if you vould ferve it cold, in Plates and little Difnes, let it fiand till it is cold in its own Liquor; then take it out, and drain it well, wipe it with a Linen Cloth to make it as white as you can, and ferve it en a Napkin laid in a Dilh, the Plead in the Middle, the four Quarters round it, and garnifhd with Parfiey. You may like- wife ferve it hot, for a Dilh of the firfl Courfe as follows: When your Pig is almoil ready, take fome Veal Sweetbreads, Mulhrooms, and Truiiies, tofs them up in a Stew-pan, with a little melted Bacon; moillen them with good Gravy, and when they have funmerd till they are ready, take off the Fat, and thicken them with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; or wiih the Yolks of Eggs, or a Piece of Butter rolPd in Flour; hav- ing thus prepard your Ragoo. and the Fig being ready, taiie it up, drain it well, lay the Head;n the xVIiddleof the Dilh, the four garters round it, fo pour the Ragoo upon it, ai d ferve it hot,

M 5 To

250 The L A D ys C o m p a n I o 3.

To arefs a Pig the German Way.

C E T a Pig, cut it in Quarters, and tols them up in y nici.ed Bacon, then boil them in good Broch, feafond wicn an Cn.on ituck with Cloves, a Faggot of Herbs, Salt, Pepper, rnd Nutmeg; when it is almoit boild, put in Half a Bmt of VVnite Wine: 1 hen tofs up in the fame melted Ba- con, in which you tofsd up your Fig. fome Oyllers, and a little Flour, a biice or two of Len.on, fome Capers, and ilon d Olives: Vv hen you a e ready to itive. away, fqueeze in he Juicof a Lemon, and garniiii the Brims of yourDifk with the Brams of your Pig Iryd, and fome fryd Farlley.

y tig Metelot.

GU T and fcald your Pig, and cut off the Head and Petty- toes, then cut your Pig in four Qcarters, put them, with the Head and Toes, in cold Water; cover the Bottom of a Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon, and place over them the faid Quarters with the Petty-tees, and the Ktaci cut in two: Seafon tlie Whole vith Salt, Pepper, fweet Baffi, T.,yme, Bay-leaves, Onions cut in Slices, with a Bottle of White AVine; lay over more Slices of Bacon, pour over it a little Water, let it boil j take two large Eels, Ikin, gut, and wafh them; cut them into Pieces of hve or x In<_hes long, and when your Pig is half boiPd, put in your Eels; then boil a Dozen of large Crawfifii, cut off the Claws, and take off the Shells of the Tails. When your Pig and Eels are enough, lay firft your Pig, with the Petty-toes, and the Head, into the Diiii you def gn to ferve them up in; then place over them your Eels and Crawfilh, with lome Ham Gravy, and fome CuUis of Crawfiih, if ycu have any; or take the Liquor they, were boiPd in, fkim off all the Fat, then add to it Half a Pint of ilrong Gravy, thickened with a little Piece of burnt Butter, and pour over it j then garnifh with Crawiifh and Lemon; fry the Brains, and lay round the Difn.

To foufe a Pig.

CUT off the Head of a large Pig, then ilit him througli the Middle, then take out his Bones, then lay him in warm Water one Night, then collar him up like Brawn; then boil him tender in Water, and when he is boild, put him in an Earthen Pan, in Water and Salt, for that will make him white, and feafon the Flefia, for you muft not put Salt in the Boiling, for that will make it black j then take a Quart

of

The Ladys Companion. 251

of the fame Broth, and a Quart of White Wine, boil them together to make fome Soufe for it; put into it two or three Bay-leaves: When it is cold, uncloath the Pig, and put it into the fame Soufe and it will continue a Quarier of a Year.
It is a RccefTary Difn in any Gentlemans Houfe Wlien you feive it in, ferve it with green Fennel, as you do Stur- geon, with Vinegar in Saucers.

To roaft a Pig nJtth the Hair on,

DRAW your Pig very clean at the Vent, taking out the Guts, Liver, and Lights; cut oiF his Feet, and truis him; prick up the Bel!, fpit him, lay him down to the Fire, take care not to fcorch him: When the Skin begins to rife up in Bliilers, pull off the Skin and Hair: When you have cleared the Pig of both, Icotch him down to the Bones, balle him with Butter and Cream, being warm; then take Salt, Sugar, and grated Bread, mingled together, and drudge him with it, till It is covered Half an Inch or an Inch thick: When it is roafted enough, ferve it up Whole, with Sauce made of Vine Vinegar, whole Cloves, whole Cinnamon and Sugar, boild to a Syrup.

To roaji a Pig:ith the Skin off,

LE T your Pig be newly killd, draw him, flea him, and wipe him very dry with a Cloth; then lay him by, and make a hard Meat with Cream, the Yolks of Egge, grated Bread, Salt, Beef-fewet, Cloves, beaten Mace, and Thyme Hired; make of thefe a pretty ftift Pudding, fluit the Belly of the Pig with it, few it up; then fpit your Pig, flick it full with Sprigs of Thyme; lay it down to the Fire, fet under it a Difh with Claret, Salt, Vinegar, a Nutmeg- grated, and Thyme: As the Pig roails, bafle it with thefe, and when it is enough, froth it up with Butter; then tak the Sauce into which it dropped, and put to it a Piece of Butter, and fome Le on mincd j and having beat it up thick, diiOi your Pig with it.

To hcil a Pig.

TA KE a young fucking Pig, and lay him round with hisTail in hisMouth, and put him into a Pot of Water, throw in a good Handful of Salt j put in a Bunch of fweet

Mar-

21 Th L A D Y S C M P A N I O NT.

Marjoram, Winter-favoury, Thyme, and Rofemary; when the Pig is half boild, take it up, and ilea off his Skin, then cut him into Quarters, and hy him in a Stev-pan with Cur- rants, and Mace: When he is ilevvd enough take him up, lay Sippets in the Dilh, the Pig on them, and pour the afore- laid Ingredients over him.

pother Way.

CU T your Pig in Quarters, and boil them in good Broth, feafond with an Onicn fluck w ith Cloves, a Bundle of Pot-herbs, Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; when they are near boild put in a Pint of White Wine, • let your Sauce be Oy- llers, ome Slices of Lemon, and Capers; garnifh your Dilh with the Brains of your Pig fryd, and fome fryd Parlley, laying a little Heap of Brains, and .nother of Parfley.

Q mah a Pig tajle like a Wild Boar.

TA K E a living Pig, and let him fwallow the following Drink, i;s. boil in a Stew-pan a little Water and Vinegar, with fome Rofemary, Thyme, fvveet Bafil, Penny- royal, Bay-leaves, Sage, and Marjoram: This being boild, and then cold, make the Pig fwallow it, and whip him to Death; let him lay to cool aLout two Hours, and, when cold, gut him, and put a Bunch of the fame fweet Herbs, ufed in the Draught, into his Belly; then fkin all the Pig but the ilead,.- which mui be finged; cut the Ears clofe off; trufs it, and lard it with middling Bacon, put it on the Spit, and, v.-hen roailcd, ferve it up hot with Pepper and Vinegar Sauce ever it. f

Dljerent Sorts of Sauce for a Fig..

OME dont love any Sage in the Pig, only a Cruft of Bread; but then you fhould have a little dryd Sage xudgd, and mixd with rfGravy and Butter. Some love Erw-fauce in a Bafon, nRde thus: Take a Pint of Water, put in a good Piece of Crumb of Bread, a Blade of Mace, and a little whole Pepper; boil it for about five or fix Mi- nutes, and then pour the Water off; take out the Spice, and beat up the Bread with a good Piece of Butter. Some love a few Currants boild in it, a Glafs of Wine, and a little Sugar; iut that you muft do juft as you like it. Others take Half a

Pint

s

The L A D ys ompanio!. 255

Pint of good Beef gravy, and the Gravy which comes rut of the Pig,with a Pievcor Butter roUd in Flour, two Spoonfuls of Catchup, and boil them all together; then take the Brains: of the Pig and bruife them fine, with two Eggs boiPd hard and chopped; put all thefe together, with Sage in the Pig, and pour into your Difh. It is very good Sauce. When you have not Gravy enough comes out of your Pig with the But- ter for Sauce, take about Half a Pint of Veal -gravy, and add to it: Or flew the Petty-toes, and take as much of that Li- quor as will do for Sauce mixd with tke other.

To drejs Pigs Petty-toes a la Sante Menthout

AFTER having drefsd your Petty-toes, divide them into Halves, and tie every Petty toe together; then lay into a Stew-pan, or Pot, Bards of Bacon in the Bottom, and upon them lay a Layer of Petty-tots and fweet Herbs, and upon them lay a Layer of Pe.ty toes and Bards of Ba- con, and do the fame till you have laid in all your Petty torf; .
then put to them a Quart of White Wine, a Bay-leaf or t .
a little Coriander and Annifeeds, then cover all over with; Bards of Bacon; line the Edges of the Stew-pan, or Pot, with ftrong Paper, fo that the Lid may be exadly fitted, and ftop it up very clofe j then fet them to ftew a la Braife or be- tween two Fires, the one under, and the other over, but let not your Fire be too biilk, that the Petty toes may ftew lei- furely for ten or twelve Hours; then take rhem out, cool them, and bread them neatly, then lay them on a Gridiron, and broil them, to be fervd up hot among the Intermefies.

To make Royal Saufages.

CET fome Flefh of Partridges, Quails, Snipes, and Pi- - geons, fome of a Chicken, with Veal, and Fat of Ham; all mull be raw, and mix thefe with Cives, Parjey, MufhrooiiiS, and Truffles, five Eggs, the White:, of but two, and two Spoonfuls of Cream; feafon all this with Pepper,:Salt, Mace, Nutmeg, and Cinnamon, and a little Onion, and roll it up in large Rolls; and cut Slices of Veal, and roll round each Saufage, being about fix Inches in Length, and three in Thicknefs, ftew them in your Pan upon Slices of Bacon, and cover them with thm Slices of Beef, over a clear Fire, not too ferce, and cover your Fan very dole; they will take up fome Time in doing; and when done, fet them by to be cold, and

take

254 5y& La D ys Com PA N I o N.

take them from the Fat, and the Veal, and cut them in what Size you will, and ferve them. Garnifh with Lemon-peel.

Oyfter Saufages

TA K E a Pound of the Lean of a leg of Mutton, and two Pounds of Beef-fewet Ihred very fine, take a Pint and Half of Oyfters, ihred them likewiie, then take a Hand- ful of Sage chopped very fmall, mixthefe with the Liquor of the Oyiters, feafon with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, and Mace, break three Eggs amongfl it, and work them all up together, make them up as you ufe them, and fry them in Butter.

Oxford Saufages.

CHOP the Lean of a Leg of Pork or Veal, fmali, with foui Pounds of Biaer or Beef-fewet; then feafon the Meat v-ith Salt, three Quarteis of an Ounce of Pepper. Half the Quantity of Cloves;:!,c Mace, and a goou Hundful of Sage chopped fmall: l.lingle all thele well together; then take the Yolks of ten Eggb, and the Whites but of fevea, and tempe: ihem well with the Meat; and as ycu ufe them roll them one, with Flour, if you plcafe; make Butter boiling hot in a Frying-pan, and fry them brovvn then eat them with Muftard,

To r ake common Saufages.

TAKE three Pounds of nice Pork, Fat and Lean toge- ther, without Skm or Griftles; chop it as fine as pof- fible, feafon it with a Tea-fpoonful of be.iten Pepper, and two of Salt, fome Sage hred fine j about three Tea-froon- fuls; mix it well together; have the Guts very nicely cleand, and fill them, or put them down in a Pot, fo roll them of what Size you pleafe, and fry them. Beef makes very good Saufages.

To make fine Saufages.

TAKE fix Pounds of good Pork, free from Skin, and Griilles and Fac, cut it very fmall, and beat it in a Mortar till it is very fine; fhred fix Pounds o Beef-fewet very fine, free from all Skin; ihred it a.-, fine as polfible; take a good deal of Sag::, wafh l very clean, pick off the Leaves, and Ihred it very fine. -Iprena your Meat on a clean DrefTerj or Table, and hake jie Sage all over, abojt tliree large Spoonfuls; flired the thin Rind of a middlii.g Lemon very fine, and throw over, with as many iweet Herbs, wnen Ihred

fine.

The Ladys Companion. q.

fine, as will fill a large Spoon; grate two large Nutmegs over, throw overtwoTea-ipoonfulsof Pepper, a large Tea-fpoonful of Salt, then throw over the Sewet, and mix all well »-ogether, put it down clofe in a Pot j when you ufe them, roil tiiem up with as much Egg as will make them roll fmooth. Make them the Size ot a Saufage, and fry them in Butter, or good Dripping. Be fare it be hoc before you put them in, and keep rolling them about. When they are thorough hot, and of a fine light-brovvn, they are enough. You may chop this Meat very fine, if you dontlike it beat. Veal eais well done thus, or Veal and Fork together. You may clean fome Guts, and fill them.

7o fry Saufages.

TAKE Half a Pound of Saufages, and fix Apples; ilice fcur about as thick as a Crown, cut the other two in Quarters, fry them with the Saufages of a finelightBrown, lay the Saufages in the Pviiddle of the Difh, and the Apples round. Garnilh with tiie quaricrd Apples.

Stewd Cabbage and Saufages fryd is a good Dilli, then heat cold Peas-pudding in the Pan, lay it in a Diih, and the Saufages round, heap th budding in the Middle, and lay the Saulages all round thick, up Edge-ways, and one in the Mid- dle at Length.

7o make Bolognia Saufages.

TA K E a Found of Bacon, Fat and Lean together, r Pound of Beef, a Pound of Veal, a Pound oif Pork, and one Pound of Beef-fewet, cut them fmall, and chop them fine i take a fmall Handful of Sage, pick oft the Leaves, chop it fine, with a few fweet Herbs; feafon pretty high with Pepper and Salt: You muft havj a large Gut, and rill it; then fet on a Sauce-pan of Water, and when it boils, put it in, prick the Gut for fear of burfcing. Boil it foftiy an Hour, then lay it on clean Straw to dry. They will be good a Year.

Another Way,

TA KE three Pounds of Buttock of Beef, and as much of a Leg of Pork; of the Fat of Pork or Bacon, two Pounds or better; of Beef-fewet a Pound and Half; parboil the Meat over a fiack Fire for an Hour; then fared it fmall, each by itfelf; afterwards fhred the Pork-fat an Sjwet by themfelves; then take red Sage, Savoury, Thyme, and

Penny-

256 The Ladys Companion.

Penny-royal, of each an equal Quantity, and the Weight of two Ounces in the Whole; fhred thele very fine, mix them with Nutmeg, Cinnamon, Cloves, and Mace, grofly pow- derd, ail together fix Drachms. Mix Meat, Herbs, and Spices all well together, with a iufRcient Quantity of Salt; then add theYolks of twelve Eggs, and four Ounces of Flour, made into a foft Pafte: Mix thefe all well together, and pound them in a Mortar, and having cleansed and prepared Ox-guts, fill them with the Meat, tie them up; then fmoak and dry them in a Tin Stove over a Fire made of Saw dufl, for three or four Days. Eat them with Oil and Vinegar.

Cleanfe the Ox-guts from their Filth, cut them into proper Lengths; lay them in Water and Salt, let them lie for three or four Days, turning them.infide cut, and waih them well till they are clean and white.

0 roaji e. Havnch of Venifon.

MAKE up a fubftantia! Fire before you lay it down, then bafte it and fioar it, and wich very £ne Skewers fallen a Piece of Veal Caul over the fat Fart; if that cannot be had, the White of an Egg, or Paper well butterd, will ferve. A Haunch of tvelve Founds Weight wid take up - three full Hours to be well roafted. Your Sauce muft be Gravy, with a great deal of Claret in it. The falhionablc fweet Sauce is jelly of Currants ii.ade hot; what was for- merly ufed was Pap Sauce, made of White Bread boiPd in Claret, with a large Stick of Cinnamon, and when boiFd till fmooth, take out the Cinnamon.

Another Way.

LARD it with Bacon; then roaft it with a brilk Fire, but let it not lie too near it; bafte it vvth frefh Butter, then boil a Pint of Claret, with a littl - beaten Ginger, Cinna- mon and Sugar, with Half a Dozen whole Cloves, and fome grated Bread: and when they nave boiPd enough, put in a little Salt, Vinegar, and freih Butter; dilh your Venifon, Hrew Salt about the Difh, and ferve it with this Sauce.

Another Way,

YOUR Haunch being larded with thick Bacon, and feafond with Salt, Pepper, Ivveet Heibs, fine Spices, Parfiey, and Chibboi, cut fmall, pickle it witn Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, Onions, fome Sprigs of Parfiey, fvvset Bafii, Thyme, and Bay-leaves; being pickled enough put it on the Spit,

bafiin g

he Lad vs Com PAN ION. itj

bafting it with your pickled Liquor; being taken off, difli it up, and putting feme Pepper and Vinegar over it, with thick Sauce, lerve it up hot.

Another lVa

SP IT it, then rub it over with Butter, then butter a Sheet ofWriting-paper, and put over it; then make a Pafle of Flojr and Water, roll it oat to the Size of the Haunch, and put it over the Paper; then get another Sheet of large Paper, butter it, and put over the Pafte; then tie Packthread over all; when enough, ferve it with Gravy-fauce and Currant- jelly.

Another iVay.

SPIT and cover it with thick butterd Paper, and roail it, bailing it with a Quart of Water and a Pound of Fat in the Fan till it is all dry; then take off the Paper, and drudge it with grated Bread and Flour, and bafte it with almofl a Pound of Butter; when it is roaftcd, lay it in the Difli with Gravy, and let your Gallendine iri Chirja Bafons.

You may make Olives, or Kicotch Collops, of a Haunch of Venifon, as of Veal.

To roajl a Shoulder or other Joints of Venifon.

LARD it with large Lardoons of Bacon, feafond with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and Cloves beaten; then lay it for three or four Hours in a Marinade of White Wine, Salt, Verjuice, three or four Bay-leaves, Slices of Lemon, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs; then fpit it, roaft it at a gentle Fire, bafte it with its own Pickle; put fome good Cullis into the Dripping to bind it, and add white Pepper, Verjuice, or Juice of Lemon, Vinegar, and Capers; juft before you ferve it, lay your Venifon into this Sauce, and ferve it.

A Civet of Venifon.
O I L a Breafl: or Neck, cut it in Cutlets, and when it is almofl boiPd take a Stew-pan, and brown in it half a Pound of Butter, and as it browns, add a Quarter of a Pound of Flour, little and little, till the Brown be of a good Colour; be fure not to burn it: Then add Half a Pound of Sugar, and as much Claret as will make it of the Thicknefs of a Ragoo. When you are going to ferve it up, put in the Ve- nifon, and tofs it thiec or four times, and fo ferve it with the Juice of Lemons.

2§S be Ladys Companion.

To keep Venifon all the Ttar.

A Haunch of Venifon being parboird, feafon it with two Nutmegs, a Spoonful of iepper, and a good Qu ntity of Salt, mingle them all together, then pat two Spoonfuls of White; Winvi Vinegar, and having made the Venilon full of Holes, as you do when it is larded, put in at the Kales the Spice and Vinegar, and feafon it therewith i chen pat the Venifon in a Pot, with the fat Side downwardscover it with two Pounds of Butter, then cloie up the Pot with coarie Pafte, and bake it; when you take it out of the Oven take away the Pafte, and lay a round Trencher, with a Weight on the Top of it, to keep it down, till it be cold, then taky off the Trencher, and lay the Butter flat upon the Vcniion, then cover it clofe with ftrong white Paper; if your Pot be narrow at the Bottom it is better, for it mull be turned upon a Plate, and ftuck with Bay leaves, v];en you pleafe to eat it.

Another Way to drefs Venifon.

IT muft be blanchd on a Gridiron, then larded and mari- nated accordi-g to the Seafon; fpit it with Slices of Ba- con and Paper round, befprinkle it with your Marinae: When roafted enough, it muft be fervd up hot either with a Pepper Sauce or fweet Sauce.

To make artificial Venifon for a Pafy.

GE T a Sirloin of Beef, or a Loin of Mutton, bone it, beat it with a Rolling-pin, and feafon it with Pepper and Salt; then lay it twenty-four Hours in Sheep Blood, then dry it with a Cloth, and feafon it a little more, and it is lit to fill your Party.

Boiled Venifon.

HA VING a Haunch of Venifon, fait it well, and let it remain a Week; then boil it, and ferve it with Cauli- flowers, Cabbages, fome Turnips cut in Dice, and boird in a Net, and tofsd up with Butter and Cream; or elfe have ibn.e of the yellow French Turnip cut in Dice, and boird like the former; or you may add fome red Beet-roots cut in Dice, and butterd in the fame Manner. Place thefe regu- larly, and they will afford apleafant Variety both to the Eye aad to the Tafte.

Another

The La D ys Com p ANi ON, 59

Another Way,

YOUR Venifon being falted two or three Days, ilufFit in Holes with Beef-iewet, fwtet Herbs, and Spice, hard Eggs, grated Bread, and a raw Egg when boiPd, lay it in the Diih with Cauliflowers, or CaLbage, Carrots, or Tur- nips.

Anothfr Way.

WHETHER your Venifon be a Haunch, or other Pieces, fait it a little, and boil it; in the n.ean Time, boil half a Dozen Cauliflowers in Milk and Water: When they are boild, put them in a large ~tew pan with drawn Butter J fet them fo as to keep them warm: Then take Half a Dozen Handfuls of Spinach, wafn it, and boil it in ftrong Broth; then pour off the Broth, and put fome Vinegar to it, fome drawn Butter, and Nutmeg grated, lay Sippets in a Difh, lay your Spinach on them round towards the Sides of the Difli, lay the Veniibn in the Middle, and the Cauliflowers all over it, pour your drawn Butter over all: Garnifli with Barberries, and the Difli with your Pariley mincd.

If you pleafe, you may farcfe your Venifon before you boil it, with fweet Herbs, and Parfley, mincd with Beef-fewet, and the Yolks of hard Eggs, feafond with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg.

To hroil Venifon.

CUT Haifa Haunch of fat Venifon into Slices, about Half an Inch thick, fait them, and broil them over a brifk Fire; when they are pretty well foakd, bread them, and ferve them up in Gravy.

You may broil a Chine raw the fame Way, or a whole Haunch or Side; or you may firft boil it in Water and Salt, then broil it, and drudge it with Bread, and ferve it up with Gravy, Vinegar, and Pepper.

To make Venifon Semey.

AFTER having boild your Venifon, take it up, and having alfo made a fweet Pafte of a brown Loaf, grated fine, a Pint of White Wine, two Pounds of Sugar, and and an Orange-peel mincd fmall, feafon it with Salt and Nut- meg; and having m.ixd all well together with your Hand, wrnp your Venifon up in it, fet it into the Oven for about an Hour, and when it is bakd, ferve it up with Rhe7iJh or White Wine, boild up vith Sugar and Spice, and fcrape Su- gar over it

26q be Ladvs Companion,

To foufe Venilon.

BOIL your Venifon in Water, Beer, and Vinegar, fkim it, put in Fennel, Rofemary-tops, Savoury, Thyme, and Bay-leaves; then put in your Venifon, parboil it, then prefs it, and feaibn it with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg.

To Jhdo Venifon.

WHEN your Venifon is cut into Slices, put it into a Stew pan, with a little Claret, a Sprig or two of Rofemary, Haifa Dozen Cloves, a little Vinegar, Sugar, and grated Br. ad; Vvhen thefe have ftewd fome tim.e, grate in iome Nutmeg, and ferve it up.

Venifon may be harricod after the fame Manner as Mut- ton, for which, fee Page icS of this Vol,

Venifon in Blood.

YOUR Shoulder, Keck, or Breail, muft be bond, and laid in Blood, feafond with Winter-favoury, fwecc IViarjoram, and Thyme, having a little Sewet in it choppd fmall, and ftirrd on the Fire to be thick; then roil up your Neck or Brealt with fome of the fet Blood, and fweet Herbs, and roaft, or Hove it gently in good Broth and Gravy, with Shalots, and Liaret, and fo ferve away hot.

To drefs Venifon a la Rojr.le in Blood.

SPIT your Venifon, lay it down to the Fire till it is Half roafted j then take it up, and ftew it, and make for it a Ragoo of Cucumbers, Sweeiibreads, and Afparagus. Gai- nifn with Petits and crifpt Parfley, and ferve it up.

To reconter Venifon vohen it pinks.

TAKE as much cold Water in a Tub as will cover it a Handful over, and put in a good deal of Salt, and let it lie three or four Hours; then take your Venifon out, and let it lie as long as before in hot Water and Salt; then have a Cruft in readinefs, and take it out, and dry it very well, and feafon it with Pepper and Salt pretty high, and put it in your Pafty. Do not ufe the Bones of your Venifon for Gravy, but get frelli Beef, or other Bones,

Venifon

fhs L A D yii Companion. 261

Venlfon in A-vet

GE T yonr Veaifon cut into Pieces tlie Bignefs of a Shoulder of a Hare, lard them with thick Bacon, Tea- fond with Salt and Pepper; then put them in a Stew-pau with Broth, White Wine, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, Salt, Pep- per, Nutmeg, Bay-leaves, and green Lemon-flices; the Whole being ftewd, thicken your Sauce with Cullis, put in a Daih of Vinegar, and ferve it up for a f.rfl Courfe.

To make a petty Dijh of a Breajl of Venlfon.

TA K E Half a Pound of Butter, flour your Venifon, and fry it of a fine Brown on both Sides; then take it up, and keep it hrt coverd in the Difh: Take fome Flour, and ftir it into the Butter till it is quite thick and brown, but take care it dont burn llir in Haifa Koand of Lunip-fngar beat fine, and pour in as much B.ed Wine as will make itof the Thicknefs of a Ragoo; fqueeze in the Juice of a Lemon, give it a Boil up, and pour it over the enifon. Dont gar- nifli oar Dilh, but fend it to Table.

_ To drefs Tripe.

_T A V I N G made a Sauce with beaten Butter, Gravv,

JX Pepper, Mallard, and Vinegar, rub the Difli witha

Clove of Garlick; and after your Tripe is fryd put it in,

and run the Sauce over it, with a little bruifed Garlick

amongft it, and fprinkle a little Vinegar on the Tripe.

To rocjl Tripe.

C U T your Tripe in two fquare Piece, fomewhat long, having a Force-iveat, made of Crumbs of Bread, Pep- per, Salt, Nutmeg, fweet Herbs, and the Yolks of Eggs, fpread it upon one Piece of your Tripe on the fat Side, and lay the other Piece upon that, the fat Side upon the Force- meat; then roll them both up together tight, and tying your Roll on the Spit, flour it, and bafre it with Butter, and the Liquor that drops from it. Serve it with melted Butter, and garnifti with flicd Orange and Rafpings.

Double Tripes, the Poliih v.

TAKE fome Tripes, let them be well boiPd, and very white and clean, put in a Stew-pan a Lrmp of good Butter, green Onions, and Parfiey cut fmail, Pepper, ShIc,

fweet

262 The La d ys Companion.

fweet Herbs, and fine Spice; put in your T ipes in Pieces, the Eignefs of a Hand, put then-; ovu a btovi, and let .hem Hew fofdy to have a TaiLe; then ftrew them with Cruri.bs of Bread, broil them on both Sides, let the.ii have a good Co- lour, dih them up, put brown nielted Butter over tnem, with Lemon-juice, and Ierve it up hot.

Other Double Tripes, the Polifh Way luith Saffron and Rice.

TAKE Tripes that are well cleaned, ard very white, let them be blanch d, and put them i..to a btew-pan lea- fond with Salt, a Bui.ch ci fweet Herbs, and iomc Onions, moiften them ih Water, and let them a toiling; take a large Gut well cleaned and wafhd, take Rice well pickd, the iuantity you think fit, und wafh it; being wafh d, leafon it with a iiLtle Salt, beaten Fep per, Parfley-roots cut into fmali iquare Pieces, Pariley cut fmall, and a little pounded IViace, mix all together, and fluff therewith yout Gut; but let the fat Side be alway inmoft, and bind it up with Pack- thread on both Ends: When your Tripes are half boiPd, put them a iiewing with it: They commonly boil thefe Tripes a Day before: When you make Ufe of them, take Half a Dozen of Onions, cut them into Slices, put them into a Stew- pan with Water over the Fire; feafon them with a little Pep- per and Salt, let them boil till they are very foft, and pafs them through a Sieve, like a Cullis; this done, keep them hot, take your Tripes, and cut them into Slices, the Length of a Finger, and the Breadth the fame; put them in a Stew- pan with a Lum.p of good Butter, and give them fomeToffes upon the Fire; then moiilen them with a little Broth, feafon it with a little Salt, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; put in your Culiis of Onions, and two Pieces of your Guts of Beef lluiFed with Rice, each Piece being of the Length from five to fix Inches, and let them ftew foftly a-while. Take a little pounded Saffron, foakdin a little Broth; let your Tripes be of a good Tafte, put in it your Saffron, till you fee it be of a fine Colour, difh them, and ferve them up.

To fry Tripe.

AFTER having cut your Tripe into fmall Pieces, three or four Fingers long, dip them in the Yolk of an Egg, with fome fine Crumbs ot Bread; fry them of a brown Co- lour; when done, lay them in a Difh to drain; have ready an- other Difh to fend them to Table, and ferve them with Butter alone in one Bafon j and Butter with Multard in another.

7i

Tl L A D ys Co MP A N I O N. 26 j

To boil Tripe.

CUT yoar Trif.e as before; fet on feme Water in a fecew pan, aaa put to it two or three Onions cut fmall, a . - lome SaiC; put in the Tripe ioon after it boils, and let it bcii near a garter of an Hour. It is generally fent to Table with the iiquor in the Difh, .ogether with the Onions; foine throw a Lunch of iwxet Herbs into the Water, and a Piece of Lemon -peei. Send it to Tabie wick Buuter, Iffc. as witii tae fryd Tripe.

To make Cotks-combs cf Tripe.

TAKE lean Tripe, and pare away the fiefhy Part, leaving only the horny Fart about chei hickneis cf a Cock-comb i then with a jgv-ing-iron cut Pieces out of it in tne Shape of Cocks com bb.

Sauces for Butchers Meat.

Sauce or h.Ld Mutton.

TA K E a Piece of Liver as big as a Pigeons Egg, and boil It tender, with Haifa Handful of Parfley, nd a few Sprigs of Pot-thyme, with the Yoiks of three or four Eggs boiPd hard, bray them with a Spoon till they are dif- foivd; then add one Anchovy waihd and ftrippd from the Bone, Thyme, beaten Pepper, and grated Nutmeg, with a little Salt; put all thefe toge-rher in a Sauce-pan, with aGlafs of White Wine, and the Gravy that has draind from your Leg of Mutton after it is taken out of the Pot, or a Quarter of a Pint of the Liquor the Mutton is boiPd in: Mix it all together, and give it a Boil, then beat it up with three Ounces of Butter: You may add a Tci-fpoontul of Vinegar, which takes off a Sweetneis it is apt to have; make the fame thick, or it will be too thin when the Mutton is cut.

Tojlenfj Cucumbers for Sauce, fee Pages 69, 70, of Vol. IT,

Another Sauce for boiled Mutton.

TAKE two Spoonfuls of the Liquor the Mutton is boild in, two Spoonfuls of Vinegar, two or three Sha- lots cut fine, with a little Salt, put it into a Sauce-pan, with a Piece of Butter as big as a Walnut rolPd in flour; ftir it to- gether, and give it a Boil, then ferve it with your Mutton.

Sauce

2 6 The Lady s Companion.

Sauce in Ravjgotte,

YOU muft take Terragon, Pimpernel, Mint, Parfley, green Onions, a litcle of each, blanch the Whole in boiling Water, then put it into cold Water; take it out again, and fqueeze it, and cut it very fmall, then put it in a Stew-pan w th a Rocambole bruisd, a little Gravy, a little Cullis, and the Juice of a Lemon, Salt, beaten Pepper, an Anchovy cut fmall, and a little Oil; put all this a Moment over the Fire, and let it be well relilhd. This kind of Sauce may be uied with all Sorts of roalled Pvleat, putting it in a Saucer.

Another Wa l A K E the fame Sort of Herbs prefcribM in the X Ravigotte above, waih them well, cut them fmall, and pound them, putting into the Mortar a little Gravy, a Couple of Rocamboles, a little Pepper, and a little Cullis; put all together in a Stew-pan, heat it, and ftrain it off; being llraind otf, add to it a Spoonful of Oil, keep it warm, and ferve it up in a Saucer with roail Meat j you may alfo ufe it with Chickens.

Tt wake a Sauce calLd Povirade.

PU T feme Vinegar into a Sauce-pan, with a little Acal- gravy, one whole i eek, an Onion cut in Slices, and two or three Slices of Lemon; fcafon it with Pepper and Salt, and when it is boiPd, ftrain it thro a Sieve, pour it into a China Bafon, and ferve it hot with the feveral Difhes diredled in the Receipts.

Saure for BoiPd-Beef, after the P.uflian Manner.

SCRAPE a good Quantity of Horfe-radiih grofly, tie it in a Cloth, and boil it with your Beef, or by itfelf in Butter: When enough, ferve it in the Butter it was boiPd in, or Vinegar, along with the i.
hJincea Sauce.

CU T Onions, Mufhrooms, and Truffles, if you have any, very fmall, with Capers, and Anchovies, and keep them feparately; put into a Stew-pan a litcle Butter with yoar Onions; put your Stew-pan over a briCc Fire; give it two or three ToiTes; then put in your Mulhrooms and Truf- fles, ilrewing over them a Dull of Flour, and moiften them with good Gravy, then put in it your Capers and Anchovies, widi a Glais of White Wine; thicken your Sauce with a Spoonful of Cullis. Let it be of a good Talk, and you may ufe it with all Didies with a mincd Sauce.

Another

ne L A D ys Companion!

Another Way.

TAKE fome green Onions, Capers, Anchovies, and Parlley, cut fmall, each by itlelf upon a Plate, with a Clove of Garlick, and a Clove of bhalot; put all this into a Stew-pan together, with a few fweet Herbs, two Spoonfuls of Oil, as much of good Mullard, the Juice of a Lemon, with a little Cuilis: Stir all well together, and you may ufe it vvitb £.11 Sorts of Fowls, and broiPd Meat; and with roafied Meat, in a Saucer.

A thick Sauce, vclth Pepper,

PUT into a Stew pan Slices of Onion, Thyme, fweet Bafil, a Bay-leaf, two or three Cloves of Garlick, a T.adlcful of Gravy, and as much Cuilis, fome Slices of Le- mon, with a Glafs of Vinegary put it over a Stove, let it be of a good Taile, and take oif the Fat; llrain it off. and ferve it up in a Saucer Vvith roail:ed Meat; .the fame Sauce may be ufed with all Sorts of Meal that requires a thick Pepper Sauce, and may alfo be made without Cuilis.

Another Sauce, itvV Pepter,

PU T inegar in a Stew-pan, vith a little eal Gravy, green Onions whole, an Onion cut in Slices, with a Slice of Lemon, feafond with Pepper and Salt; after a Boil or two, taile ic, ilrain it on, pour it into a Saucer, and ferve it up hot.

Caper Sauce,

PU T in a Stew-pan fome Cuilis of Mam, with Capers, to which give three or four Chops with a Knife; feafon it With Pepper and Salt; let it be relifaing, and nQ it up hot.

Sauce ith Trvfies.
~AKE TrufKes, pare, walh them in Water, and cut X them very fmall; this done, put them in a Stew-pan, With a thin Cullic of Veal and Ham; feafon it with Salt and Pepper; let it flew foftly; let it be of a good Tafle, and ferve it up hot.

Onion Sauce.

TAKE a Stew-pan, put into it fome Veal Gravy, with a Couple of Onions cut in Slices; feafon with Pepper and Salt, let it Hew foftly, then flrain it off; put it in a Saucer, and ferve it up hot.

Vol. L

266 Tbe Ladys Companion-.

Green Onion Sauce.

YO U muft put into your Stew-pan green Onions, pared and cut fmall, with a little melted Bacon, feafond with a little Pepper and Salt; moiften it with Gravy, and let it ftew a Moment; thicken your Sauce with Cullis of Veal and Ham; let your Sauce be of a iharp Tafte and good Relilh, and ferve it up hot.

Sauce ivith frcjh Mujhrooms.

TAKE Mufhrooms, pare and mince them with a little green Onion and Parfley; put in a Stew-pan a little melted Bacon, and having given it four or five Toffes, moiflen it with Gravy; let it flew Ibftly over a flow Fire, fkim the Fat well off, and thicken your Sauce with Cullis of Veal and Ham; let it be relilhing, and ferve up hot.

Carriers Sauce.

TAKE green Onions, pare and cut them very fmall, put them in a Sauce-boat with Pepper, Salt, and Wa- ter; ferre it up cold. This is Sauce for roaft Mutton.

ke fame nvith Oil.

WE take a few green Onions and Parfley chopped fmall.
and put them in a Saucer with Oil, Pepper, and Salt: you may add to it a little Vinegar, and ferve it up cold.

Sauce-Robart.

TAKE Onions, cut them into Dice, put them into: Stew pan with a little Butter, and keep them flirring being half brown, drain off the Fat, ilrewing lome Flour ove them; moiften it with Gravy, and let it Hew foftly over flow Fire; feafon it with Pepper and Salt, then thicken: with Veal and Ham CuUis, putting in a little Muftard; mak it relifhing, and ufe it upon Occafion.

Ham Sauce.

BE A T flat three or four Slices of Ham, put them a fwea ing over a Stove; being clammy, ftrew over them a litt! Flour, and Jieep them ftirring; moiften them with Grav; and feafon them with Pepper, nnd a Bunch of fweet Herbs let it ftew gently; if it is not thick enough, add to it a litt CuUis of Veal and Ham; let it be ot a high Relifh; lira: it off, and ufe it for all Sorts of white Meat reafted.

Gre«

C

ihe Ladys Companion; 267

Green Sauce.

AFTER having got the Grafs of Wheat, or of other Grains, pound it in a Mortar with a Cruft of Bread j take out the Grals thus pounded, put it in a Sieve, and fea- fon it with Pepper and Salt; moiilen it a little with Veal- gravy and Vinegar, then ftrain it, and ferve it up cold with Lamb or Fowl.

Sauce fjr a Shoulder of Mutton.

WHEN the Meat is three Parts roalled, put a Plate under it with a little Spring Water, and two or three Spoonfuls of Claret, foire O.uon llicd, or Shalot, a little grated Nutmeg, one Anchovy wafnd and mincd, and a little lit of Butter; let your Meat drop into it, and when you take it up, run the Sauce through a Sieve, and put it under the Mutton; then cut the Inlide of the Shoulder acrofs feveral Ways, and ftrew on fome fryd Crumbs of Bread, and pour a little Elder, or other Vinegar, into your Sauce.

Sauce for Steaks.

TA KE a Glafs of Ale, two Anchovies, a little Tliym, Savoury, Parfley, an Onion, and fome Nutmeg, ihred all thefe together, adding a little Lemon-peel j when your Steaks are ready, pour the Liquor from them, then put your Ale and the other Things into the Pan, with a Piece of But- ter roird in Flour, and when hot, llrain them thro a Sieve over your Steaks.

Another Way.

FR Y your Steaks almoft enough, then pour off the Li- quor they were fryd in, 3nd put them into the Pan again, then pour on them boiling Water; ftir them about a little, then put in a liece of B. tter roll d in Elour, and when melted, ferve the Steaks up with the Sauce over them.

Stuffirg for a Calfs Heart.

CUT off the deaf Ears, and all the Strings, then take a little fat Bacon, the Fat of three Oyftcrs, Parlley, rhyme, and Winter -fa voury, a little Onion, and Lemon- 3eel, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and grated Bread, mix all thefe vith Butter, and wet them with an Eg or two. The fame stuffing docs for Hare or Veal. For Hare you muft add

N 2 ks.

26S Kv Lad ys Co M p A N ION.

the Liver, tvOxA.nchovIes, and a fmall Goldin Pippen if voa like it.

Stuffing for Veal.

A Little Beef fewet, a little fat Bacon, the Yolk of an hard Egg, a little lean Veal or Mutton fcraped, fome Rafpings of Bread, a little Thyme, Parfley, and green Onions, Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, a little Bit of fweet Bafil, and a little Cream.

Dutch Sauce for Meat cr Filh.

MELT your Butter with Water and Vinegar, and thicken it with the Yolks of a Couple of Eggs; put to it Juice of Lemon, and run it through a Sieve.

To Jiuff a Sirloin or Rump of Beef.

TAKE Thyme, Vinter-favoury, Parfley, and Penny- - royal, to Anchovies, and a little eal, and fome grated Bread, and Half a Pound of Beef-fewet, with fome Pepper, Salt, and Half a Nutmeg grated, a little Lemon-peel finely ihred; mince thefe very fmall, and then roll it up in the Yolks of two Eggs, and with this fluff your Beef, which muilfirft be half roalted; then put it to the Fire again, and put a clean Diih in the Dripping-pan, and bafbe it with Half a Pint of Claret, and as much Gravy; then take up the Diih, and be furc to fkim off all the Fat, then put into this Liquor fom.e of the aforefaid Herbs, with two Anchovies waihd and mincd, and a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, the Juice of Haifa Lemon, fome grated Nutmeg, and let it have one Boil up upon a Chafing-dilh, keeping it ftirring; then thicken it up with the Yolks of four Eggs, and take care it does not curdle; fo ferve it up hot.

Sauce yr roaied Tongues or Venifon.

TA K E a French Roll, and boil it in a Gill of Water, with a Piece of Cinnamon; fweeten it very well, and add to it Half a Pint of Claret; let it boil till it is pretty thick, then run it through a Sieve; you mull cut off the Cruft ol your Roll, and fiice the reft.

Venifon Sauce.

BOIL Claret, grated Bread, whole Cinnamon, Ginger Mace, Vinegar and Sugar, up thick.

the L A D ys Companion. 269

Another Sauce far Venifon.

TA KE Claret, Water, and Vinegar, of each a Glaf, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, and fome Anchovies; put m Salt, Pepper, and Cloves, of each one Spoonful: Boil all thefe together; tiien itrain the Liquor through a Sieve, and ferve it in the Difh.

yfrYw Sauces iir Venifon.

YO U may t.ice either of thefe Sauces,
Sauce for a Shoulder of Veal.

WHEN the Veul is roaded, cut fome Pieces of Flefh oft the Infide, and then beat the Yoiks of eight Egg, with rather more than a Quarter of a Pint of Wliite Wine, and a little fmall Broth, or Water, with the Gravy of the Veal, fome Thyme and Nutmeg, and Half a Clove of Gar- lick bruisd; put the Pieces of Veal into this Liquor, and tois it up all with a Piece of Butter and Flour, and pour it under the Veal; a little Anchovy, or Oyiler-liquor, adds to it very much y fqueeze Lemon to your Talle.

Sauce for Veal Cutlets.

FR Y your Veal, and when fryd take it out, and put in a li tie Water, an Anchovy, a few fweet Plerbs, a little Onion, Nutmeg, a little Lemon-peel fhred fmall, and a little Wine or Ale, then thicken it with a Bit of Butter rolPd in Flour, with fome Cockles and Capers, and then pour it over the Cutlets.

Sauce far any roajled Meat,

TAKE an Anchovy, and wafn it very clean, and put to it a Glafs of Red Wine, a little ftrong Broth or Gravy, fome Nutmeg, one Shalot flicd, and the Juice of n Sennit Orange; ftew thefe together a little, and pour it to the Gravy that runs from your Meat.

N 3 Hot

270 The Ladys Compan ion.

Hot Sauce in Ramolade.

PU T into a Stew-pan fome Onions cut in Slices, witk one or two Spoonfuls of Oil; fet this a Moment over the Fire, and put into it fome Gravy and Cullis, a Glafs of Wine, two or three Cloves of Garlick, Half a Lemon cut into Slices, a little fveet Herbs, Cloves, Capers cut fmall, and Parfley: Let it be of a good Talle; put into it a fmall Spoonful of Muftard, and flrain it off; make ufe of thi« Sauce with all Difhes with hot Ramolade.

Sauce ov Mutton Gravy and Shahts,

TAKE your Shalots, pare them, cut them very fmall, put them in a Difh with Pepper and Salt, and Mut- ton-gravy, or Veal-gravy; you may ufe this Sauce for Legs of Mutton, or with Fowls.

Anchovy Sauce.

TAKE two or three Anchovies, waih them well, take out the Bones, cut them fmall, and put them in a Stew- pan, with a thin Cullis of Veal and Ham, feafond with Pep- per and Salt; you may add a little Vinegar if you like it, let ir be hot and relilhing; you may ufe this Sauce witli roafled Meat.

J general Sauce.

MI N C E a little Lemon-peel very fmall, a little Nut- meg, beaten Mace, and Shalot; flew them in a little White Wine and Gravy, fo m.elt your Butter therein; if it be for Hafhes of Mutton or Fifh, add Anchovies, a little of the Liquor of flewd Oyflers, and Lemon-peel.

7o tnuke Muflard.

HA VING made Choice of good Seed, pick and wafh it in cold Water j it mull alfo be draind, and rubbd dry in a clean Cloth; then pound it fine in a Mortar, with ilrong Wine Vinegar j flrain it, and keep it clofe coverd: Othcrwife, your Seed may be ground in a Muftard-sjuern, or in a Bowl with a Cannon- bullet.

Muflard Balls.

GRIND the Seed very fine, then make a Pafle with Honey, and a little Canary; make it int« Balls, and fet them to dry in the Sun, or a gentle Oven; and keep them for Ufe.

When

Titf L adys CoMP A Ni ON. 271

When you would ufe it, fhave rome of it very thin, and pat to k Vinegar, and a little Salt.

Muftard in Cakes.

YO U muft get four Ounces of Seamy, an Ounce of Cin- namon, and beat them with Vinegar and Honey very fine in a Mortar, make it into Pafte, and then into little Cakes; dry them in an Oven, or in the Sun; when you would ufe them, diilolve them in Vmegar, Verjuice, or Wine.

Another Sort of Muilard,

DR.Y fome Horle-radilh Roots in an Oven very dr then beat the.n to Powder, and fift it. and when you would ufe any, vet it with Wine Vinegar, and it is by fom efleemd better than the other Sort.

he hefi Way to heat up Butter, r Spinach, Green Peafe, or Sauce yir Fifh.

TAKE two or three Spoonfuls of Water, and put it into a Pipkin or Sauce-pan; there mull be no more than what will jull cover the Bottom of the VefTel; let this boil by itfelf; as foon as it does fo, flip in Half a Pound of Butter; when it is melted, remove your Pipkin from the Fire, and holding it up by the Handle, fhake it round flrongly, for a good while, and the Butter will come to be fo thick, that you may alnioll cut it with a Knife. I: will ever after be thick, and never grow oily, though it be cold and heated again twe;ty Times

Having put this Butter to boiPd Peafe in a Difh, cover it with another; then fhake them very flrongly, and a gocd while together: This is by far the beft Method that can be ufed to butter Peafe, without putting in as is commonly done Butter, to melt in the Middle of them, for that will turn to Oil if you heat them again; whereas this Sort will never change. Therefore it is mofl expedient to make ufe of fuch thickend Butter upon all Occafions; when it is neceflary you may put in the Juice of Lemon, Orange, Vinegar, or Ver- juice.

To hum Butter yjr any Sauce.

SE T the Butter over the Fire in a Stew-pan, and let it boil till it is as brown as you like it; then hake in Flour, flir it all the while till it is thick; fo ufe it with any Sauce that is too thin.

N 4 Anothtr

272 The L A D ys C M p A n ion.

Another Way.

SH A K E foiTie Flour upon two or three Ounces of But- ter, put it into a hot Stew-pan that it may hifs; let it uoil, and do not ftir it, when it turns brown put in the Liquor you intend to thicken and keep it quick Hirring; boil it well, or it will talle raw.

To clarify Butter.
IT AV IN G melted the Butter in a glazd earthen Veffel _ _ J, vith a very flow Fire, put vater to it, working them v,ell together, and when it is cold take away the Curds and Whey at Bottom; do this the fecond Time, and the third Time; if you pleafe, you may add Damaf-c-rofe Water, al- ways working them well together; the Butter, thus purify d, will be as fweet as any Marrow, and will keep a long Time.

To dranjj Butter.

PU T Half a Pint of ftrong Broth into a Pipkin, break into it two Pounds of Butter; then fet it over the Fire, and keep it ftirring with a Ladle j then break in two or three Pounds more, as you have Occafion, and add Liquor propor- tionable, ilir it continually till it be all diljolvd, and that it looks v.hite: If it turn3 yellow, it is curdled, and you will hardly recover it.

To recover Butter Ijhen it is turned to Oil.

U T a Ladleful of llrong Broth into a Pipkin, break Half a Pound of Butter into it; when you have drawn it white, put your oily Butter to it, pouring it in leifurely, and ftirnng it at the fame Time, but do not overcharge your other Butter with that which is oily.

Another Way .

WHEN you have no other Butter but what is turned oily in melting, fet it in fome cool Place to fettle; then pour out the moft oily Part, leaving the Whey and Dregs behind then put a little Broth to the Dregs, and fet them on the Fire; ladle it vell, till it becomes drawn Butter in a Body; then take it off, and keep it ftirring: In the mean Time pour oit the oily Butter very foftly, then fet it on the Fire again, ilirring it till it becon.es Itrong, thick, and white.

To

The La D ys CoMPAN ION. 273

To preferve Meat without Salt.

WE T a Napkin in White Wine Vinegar, wring it out, and wrap the Meat in it. It will keep a Fortnight, or loneer, ifi hot Weather.

T

CHAP. IV.
Of P O U L T R r.

lo rofifl a Turky.

HE beft Way to roaft a Turky is, to loofen the vSkin on the Breall of the Turky, and fill it with Force- meat made thus: Take a Quarter of a Poand of Becf-fewet, as many Crumbs of Bread, a little Lemon-peel, an Anchovy, fome Nutmeg, Pepper, Parfiey, and a little Thyme; chop and beat them all well together, mix them with the Yolk of an Egg, and ftufF up the Bread • when you have no Sewet, Butter will do: Or, you may make your Force-meat thus: Spread Bread and Butter thin, and grate fome Nutmeg over it; when you have enough, roll it up, and ftuff the Breaft of the Turky; then roail it of a fine brovn, but be fare to pin fome white Paper on the Breaft till it is near enough. You muil have good Gravy in the Dilb, and Bread-fauce made thus: Take a good Piece of Crumb, put it into a Pint of Water, with a Blade or two of Mace, two or three Cloves, and feme whole Pepper; boil it up five or fix Times; then with a Spoon take out the Spice, and pour off the Water, you may boil an Onion in it if you pleafe then beat up the Bread with a good Piece of Butter and a little Salt; or Onion-fauce made thus, Take fome Onions, peel them, and cut them into thiu Slices, and boil them Half an Hour in Milk and Water, then drain them, and beat them up vith a large Piece of Butter, fliake in a little Flour, and ftir it ail to- gether v.ith a little Cream, if you have it, or Milk will do put the Sauce into Boats, and garnlfh with Lemon.

Another Way to make Sauce: Take Llaif a Pint of Oy- Hers, lirain the Liquor, and put the Oyfiers with the Licucr into a Sauce-pan, wiih a Blade or two of Mace; let them juH plui.p; then pour in a Glafs of White Wine; let it boil cnce» and chicken it with a Piece of Butter rolid in Flour -, ferre this up In a Bafoii b itfeif, with good Gravy in the, Dilh; foi- N 5 every

74 L A D Ys Companion,

eyery-body dont love Oyfter-lauce. This makes a pretty Side-diih for Supper, or a Corner-difhof a Table for Dinner.
If you chafe it in the Difh, add Haifa Pint of Gravy to it, and boil it up together. This Sauce is good either with boild or roafted Turkies or Fowls; but you may leave the Gravy out, adding as much Batter as will do for Sauce, and garniihing with Lemon.

A youTtg Turky ith Oyfiers,

PICK your Turky, draw it, and finge it neatly; cut the Liver of it into Bits, and put it into a Stew-pan, toge- gether with a Dozen Oyfters and a Bit of Butter, feafond with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, All-fpice, Mufhrooms, Parf- Ity and Chibbol; let it be a Moment over the Fire, then- mince the Whole, and llufF your Turky with them, and let it be blanchd a little; fpit it, and tie Bards of Bacon, and Paper over it; mean while have a Ragoo ready for your Turky; make it thus: Take three Dozen of Oyfters, and blanch them in boiling Water, drain them, take off the Beard, then put in your Stew-pan fome Effence of Ham, and let it a boiling; fkim oiFthe Fat, tafte it, and put this, with your Oyfters, into another Pan. When your Turky is roafted, diih it up, and put your Ragoo over it, with the Juice of a Lemon; let it be reliftiing, and ferve it up hot for a firft Courfe.

To drefs a Turky forced nvtt Herbs.

LOOSEN the Skin on the Breaft of the Turky, and ftuff it with a Farce of raw Bacon, moft Sorts of fweet Herbs, Patiley, and Chibbol, chopped fmall, pounded in a Mortar, and well feafond; alfo put fome of this Farce into the Body, and roaft it; when it is enough, dilh it; pour on a good Ragoo of all Sorts of Garnitures, and ferve it up to Table hot.

After the fame Manner you Hiay drefs Pullets, Pigeons, and other Sorts of Fowls.

A young Turky ivith Oyjiers, after the Dutch Fafioion.

TA K E a young Turky orderd as that above, put it to roaft; make a Ragoo with Oyfters as followeth: Blanch as many Oyfters as you pleafe, take off the Beards j then put Butter in a Stew-pan, with about half a Spoonful of fine Flour, and a Drop of Gravy; feafon the Whole with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and a little Vinegar; as foon as your Sauce is thickend, put in your Oyfters, and let it be relilhing.

Whea

The Ladys Companion. 275

When your Turky is roafted, dilh it up with your Ragoo over it; ferve it up hot.

Toung Turky roajled ivith Shalots.

OPv D E R your Turky as thofe before, except only, that you put a tew Shalots into the Forcd-meat. Your Turky being roailed, make a Sauce thus: Warm fome Sha- lots, cut iinall, in a Stew-pan, with Gravy and Cuilis, fome Juice of Lemon, and pounded Pepper, and fervc up your Turky hot, pouring this Sauce over it.

A youvg Turky roajled vith MaTigoes.

TAKE your Turky, and order it as before, the Ragoo only making the Difference. Take fome Mangoes, the foftell you can get; take off the Flefh by thin and fmall Slices; take out the Infide, and blanch them in boiling Wa- ter; then put them in frefh Water; put them in a Stew-pan with fome EfTence and Gravy, and let them have a BoiL When your Turky is ready, dilh it up with your Mangoes over it, and ferve it up for a firft Courfe.

Eniry of Turky Wings.

HAVING the Wings of Turkies, fcald them; being well pickd and fcalded, blancli them; when blanchd, cut oiT the imall End, and break the Bone with a Knife in the Middle of the Wing: Put them in a Srew-pan, put in it fome Champignons, a Bit of Butter, a Bunch r.iade of Parf- ley, green Onions, and a Branch of fweet Bafil, with three Cloves i the Bunch being tyd together, put it, with your Wings, over the Fire, and tofs them up; now and then ftrew aDuft of Flour over them, and moiften them with Broth or Water: Being moillend, feafon them with a little Salt and Pepper, and let them boil very foftly; being boiid, make a thick Sauce vith five Yolks of Eggs, and beat them up with Cream or Milk; put in it a little Nutmeg, a Couple of Sha- lots, cut very fmaii: Let your Frixiafey be of a good Tafte, and thicken it; being thickend, put in a little Pariley cut fmall, with a little L-mon-juice: Ic being diihd, ferve it up for Entry, or Hos dOuvres.

You may make your Fricafey with a brown Sauce, in moiilening it with Gra7 i and being doae, thicken it with Cullis.

Koapd

tyS The Ladys Companion.

Roaled young Turkies
GE T young Turkies, pick and craw them, then lay the Liver on the Drelier, with Icraped Eaccn, fome rarlley,,Chibbol,Muriirooms, Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, and £ne Spice; and being mincd, put it in the Bellies of your Turkies, then blanch them with a Bit of Butter, ibme Parfiey and Chibbols; when blanchd, put them on the Spit, with Slices of Bacon and Paper round them; keep your Cardoons ready, let them be very white, and cut half a Fingers Length, and put them in a Stew-pan, with Kalf a Ladleful of Veal Gravy, and Half a Ladleful of Ham Cullis; let them have a Boil, and having taken oft the Fat, add to them the Juice of an Orange. Your Turkies being done, and the Bacon and Paper taken away, difh them up with your Cardoons over them, and ferve them up hot for the firit Courfe.

7c carlonado a Turky.

RO A S T a Turky till it is near enough; fcotch it with your Knife long-ways, crofs it over again, that it may lock like Cheque-work; then waih it over with Butter, drew Salt over it, then fet it in the Dripping-pan to have a Heas, turning it two or three Times, then lay it on a Gridiron over a gentle Fire of Charcoal; vhen it is broild enough, take it up, difn it, pour over it a Sauce made of Gravy and llrong Broth, boild up with a Ladleful of dravvn Butter, anAnchovy a little flicd Nutmeg, and fome grated Bread; ftrew it over with Earberi its, and garnifn with Orange or Lem.on. Ci you may boil Manchet fiicd, and foakd in llrong Broth, with Onions, in Gravy, Nutmeg, Lemon cut in Dice, and drawn Butter, and put this under the Turkey.

Turky--uM Onion EJfence.

SLICE Onions, and fry them with Lard in a Stew-pan; drain the Fat a little from them, and tofs them up again with a Pinch of Flour; add fome Gravy, Cloves, Pepper, Salt, and the ufual Seaibniags; when they are fcewd, ftrain them through a Flair-fleve, with a little Bread Cullis, and a few Drops of Verjuice or Vinegar. In the mean Time, let the Turky be roafung: When it is enough, difh it, pour the Sauce over it, garnifh, and ferve it up.

The Ladys Companion. 277

To foife Turkies.

BONE your Turkies, tie up the Flefh in the Manner of Sturgeon; put in a Fan two Quarts of Wine Vinegar, and a Quart of Water; make it boil, feaibn it with Salt; put in your Turkies, boil them till they are tender; if you find tQ Liquor is not fharp enough, put in more Vinegar, and boil them a little longer; let it be cold, put them in an earthen Pan, cover them with the Liquor, let it fland three or four Weeks; when you ufe them, ferve them up as you do Sturgeon, with Elder, or other Vinegar, and garnifli with Fennel.

After the fame Manner you may pickle Capons, but then you mull firll lard them with great Ladoons.

To p-tv a Turky.

TA K E a young Turky, fill the Skin on the Ereaft with Forcd-meat, and lard it on the Sides with Bacon; put into the Belly Half a Shalot, and two Anchovies, and a little Thyme fhred fmall; brown it in a Pan with a little Butter: When it is very brown put it in a Stew pan, with Itrong Gravy, fome White Wine or Claret, two or three An- chovies, fome Mace, fvveet Herbs, a little Pepper; and let it Hew till it is thoioughly enough, then thicken the Liquor with Butter an-d Eggs; fry fom.e French Loaves dippd in Cream or Milk, after the Top and the Crumb is taken out; then fill them with ftewd Oyllers, or Shrimps, or Cockles, and Vvith them garnifh the Dilh, or with ilicd Lemon.
A Fowl, Goofe, or Duck does well this Way.

Another Way,

BO N E it, and fill it with Forcd-meat made thus: Take the Flefh of a Fowl, Half a Pound of Veal, and the Flcfn of two Pigeons, with a well pickled or dryd Tongue, peel it, and chop it all together, then beat it in a Mortar, with the Marrow of a Beef-bone, or a Pound of the Fat of a Loin of Veal, feafon it with two or three Blades of Mace, two or three Cloves, and Half a Nutmeg, dryd at a good Diftance from the Fire, and pounded, with a little Pepper and Salt; mix all this well together, fill your Turky, fry i: of a fine Brown, and put it into a little Pot that will juft hold it: lay four or five Skewers at the Bottom of the Pot, to keep the Turky from ilicking; put in a Quart of good Beef and Veal Gravy, wherein was boiPd Spice and fweet Herbs,

cover

2yS Tke Ladys Companion.

cover it clofe, and let it ftew Half an Hour; then put in a Glafs of Red Wine, one Spoonful of Catchup, a large Spoon- ful of pickled Mufhrooms, and a few frefli ones, if you have th§m, a few Trufiles and Morels, a Piece of Butter as big as a Walnut, rolld in Flour; cover it cloie, and let it ftew Half an Hour longer; get fome little French Rolls ready fryd, take fome Oyfiers, and ftrain the Liquor from them, then put the Oyllers and Liquor into a Sauce-pan, with a Blade of Mace, a little White Wine, and a Piece of Butter roUd in Flour; let them Itew till it is thick, then fill the Loaves, lay the Turky in the Dilh, and pour the Sauce over it. If there be any Fat on the Gravy, take it off, and lay the Loaves on each Side of the Turky. Garnifh with Lemon when you have no Loaves, and take Oyflers dipt in Batter, and fryd.

Teuvg Turkies uiith Cream.

HAVING a young Turky or two, according to the Bignefs of your Difh, and being Huffed as before di- refted, and roailed, let them be cold; then take a Bit of a Nut of Veal, take off the Skin, and cut it into Bits with iov. i Bacon well blanched, fome Beef-iewet, a Calfs Ud- der, fome Mufhrooms, Parfley, Chibbol, fweet Herbs, fine Spice, Salt, and Pepper; pat the Vvhole on the Fire in a Stew-pan, and when done take it out, and mince it upon a Dreffer j then take the White of your Turky, put it into a Mortar, with a Piece of Bread boild in Milk, together with iix Yolks of Eggs, and Half the Whites beat up to Snow; pound all together, then take a Difh or Baking-pan, and put in the Bottom of it fome of the mincd Meat, and lay your Turky over it, and fill up your Difh with the reft of your Meat; leave a hollow Place in the Middle of your Difh, to put in it a Ragoo of Sweetbreads, Cocks-combs, and Mufh- rooms; lay alfo fome mincd Meat over the fame; let your Turky be round and plump; rub your Turky over with beaten Eggs, and having ftrewd fome Crumbs of Bread over it, put it in the Oven, or let it be done under the Cover of a Baking-pan, wich Fire under and over. Your Turky being enough, and of a good Colour, take it out. and clean the Border of your Difh well, put a little Efience or CuUis over your Turky, and ferve it up hot for a firft Courfe.

Fowls may be drefsd the feveral Ways that Tuikies arc, and Turkies the fame as Fowis.

Fowk

The Ladys CoMPAKiON. 279

Vovfh farced ivith Crawfifh.

YOUR Pullets being pickM clean, gut and finge them; put the Livers upon the Dreffcr, with a little fcraped Bacon, Parfley, green Onions, Pepper, Salt, fvveet Herbs, fine Spice, with Champignons and Truffles, if you have any a Bit of Butter; mince all together, and put it into the Bel- lies of your Fowls; then put them into a Stew-pan, with a Lump of Butter, Branches of Parfley, green Onions, Pepper, Salt, and fweet Herbs; let your Fowls be well blanchd be- fore you put them to the Spit; wrap them up in Slices of Bacon, v.ith a Paper round them; when they are done, difli them, and ferve them with a Ragoo of Crawfifh Tails, or elfe in a Cullis of Crawfifh.

Another Time, inilead of mincing the Livers of your Fowls, cut them in four or fix Pieces, with fome other Livers and Crawfifn Tails, fcraped Bacon, Parfley cut fmall, green Oni- ons, Pepper, Salt, fveet Herbs, and fine Spice, all being well mincVi together, put it in the Bellies of your Fowls, and let them be blanchd the fame Way as thofe above j after they are done, difh them, add to them Crawfifh Cullis, and ferve them up hot.

Fowls with Oyilers.

SINGE and pick your Fowl-s, and gut them i cut the Livers into Bits with a Dozen Oyfters, and a Bit of But- ter, feafond with Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs, fine Spice, Champignons, Parfley, and green Onions, put all into a Stew- pan for a Moment over the Fire, then put all together into the Bellies of your Fowls, and do them again, as above, and in fpitting them, cover them with Slices of Bacon, and a Sheet of Paper; keep a Ragoo of Oyfters in readinefs for the Time your Fowls be drefsd, and make your Ragoo thus:.
Take three Dozen of Oyfters, blanch them in boiling Water, put them in a Colander to drain, and take off the Beards and Hard in the Middle; put in a Stew-pan a Ladleful of Ham- CuUis, or as much of the Liquor the Oyflers were blanchd in as you think fit: If you have but one Fowl, there need not be fo much of it; put it over the Fire, fkim off the Fat, and tafte it; then put your Oyflers in, changing your Stew- pan: When your Fowh are done, put yourRa,oo over them, with the Juice of a Lemon, and kt it be relilbing, and fervc your Fowls up for an Entry.

Fowli

a8o The L A D YS C AI P A N I N.

Fowls iviih Oyflers, the Fleii ifii Way,

DRESS your Fowls as before, and make your Ragoo as follows; Blanch your Oyflers in their Liquor, which lay by, and pick them as before; put Fart of their Liquor in a Stew-pan, with four Yoiks of Eggs, fome Butter, Parfiey, Terragon, all together, well bUnchd, and cut fmall, Lemons cut in Slices or Imall Squares, an Anchovy cut fmall, Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg; then put your Oyflers over the Fire, and take care the Sauce dont turn; when your Fowls are roafl- ed, take them off the Spit, and take the Wings and Legs from the Body, flice them upon the Breaii, and crufh them between tv;o Difhes, then put your Ragoo of Oyflers over them; let it be of a goodTafle, and ferve it up hot for an Entry.

Baajied Fowls tvith Anchovies.

7 OUR Fowls being drefsd as before, put them on the Spit; then take fome Anchovi:, wafh them, cut a Couple of them fmall, and the other ii r les; put ihofe that are cut fmall in a Stew-pan, with goou Uullis and Gravy, a Bit of Butter, and the Juice of a Lemon: Your Fowis being loafred, take them off the Spit, and difh them up, put your Anchovy CuUis over them, and your Anchovies in Slices, and ferve thern up hot for an Entry.

A Fowl a la Braife.

WHEN you have pickd and gutted a Fowl, trufs the Legs infide the Belly, and lard it vith thick Bacon, the Bignefs of the Half of a fmall Finger; feafon it with Pepper and Salt, fweet Herbs, and fine Spices, then lard your Fowl, and bind it with Packthread; take a long deep Stew- ing-pan, andput in it fome Slices of Bacon and Veal, then put your Fowls into it, feafond with Pepper and Salt, feet: Bafi!, Thyme, Bay-leaves, Onions, and aCsumb of Gar- lick; continue to cover it with Slices of Bacon and Veal, and moiller: it with a Glafs of Wine, and one or two Ladles full of Broth J fiew it, Fire under and over; being done, difh it up, putting a mincd Sauce over it, or a Ragoo of Sseet- breads of Veab Cocks -combs, and Champignons, or a Cullis of Ham, or a Ragoo of Oyilers: All which depends on the Fancy of the Cook, if only it hath a goodTafte j then fejve it up hot for an Entry.

The LADYsCoMPANiojf. 281

Roajid Fowl n-vith Chefnuts.

GU T your Fowl, cut the Liver fniail, together with Parfley, green Onions, fcraped Bacon, Butter, Pepper, Salt, fweet Herbs, and fine Spice; take Chefnuts, peel thei-n, and put them into a Braife, to take off the fmall Skin; thn mix them with Forca-mcat, put all together into the Belly of your Fowl, and blanch it in a Stew-pan with a Bit of Futte:.
Spit your Fowl, wrapped up in Bards of Eacon, with Paper tyd round it. Take your peePd Chefnuts, put them in a Baking-pan, Fire under and over, and take off the fmall Skin, then put them in a Stew-pan with Broth, and let tliem be done thoroughly; pour out the Broth, and put in Half a Ladleful of Elience of Ham, a little Cullis, and a little Gravy; your Powi being done, draw it off the Spit, and take off the Eard of Bacon; difh k up, put your Chefnuts over it, with the Juice of a Lemon, and ferve it up hot for an Entry.

Pullets u la Sainte Menehout.

AF T F R having trufsd the Legs in the Body, Hit them along the Back, fpread them open on a Tat le, beat them, take out the Thigh-bones. Take a Pound and a Half of Veal, cut it in Slices, lay it in a Stew-pan of a convenient Size to hold your Pullets; cover it, and fet it over a Stove: When it begins to cleave to the Stew-pan, put in a little Flour, and keep moving your Pan over the Fire to brown it, moiften it with as much Broth as is neceffary to ftew the Pul- lets; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, favoury Fierbs, and Spices, foir.e fhred Parfley, a Bunch of Herbs, and fome Onions; lard your Pullets with large Lardoons well feafond, place them in the Stew-pan, lay fome Bards of Bacon on the Pullets, cover the Stew-pan, and fet them over a flack Fire. When they are alout half done, uncover the Stew-pan, put in Half a Pint of Milk, and a little Cream; then cover your Pan again, and continue to ftew them. When they are done enough, take off the Stew-pan, and let the Pullets cool in their Liquor; when they are cool, take them out, rub them over with the Fat of the Liquor in which they were rtewd, drudge them vveil with Bread crumbd very f ne, place them in a Pafty-pan, and brown them in an Oven, or under a Bak- ing cover: When they are come to a fine Colour lay them in a Difh, pour on them fome Effence of Ham, and ferve them up for a iiril Courfe.

You

282 he Ladys Compaiioj.

You may broil them on a Gridiron over a little Fire, in- flead of putting them into the Oven j or elfe,

You may fry them; but in this Cafe, before you drudge, you muft dip them in beaten Eggs, then drudge them with Bread, as above, and fry thvm in Hcgs-Lard till they are brown; then take them up, and fet them a draining. Fold a Napkin in the Dilh in wnich you intend to ferve them, lay them handfomely upon it with fryd Parlley, and ferve them for the firil Courfe.

Pullet, cr Chicken Surprize.

ROAST them off; if a fiaall Bifh, two Chickens, or one Pullet, will be enough. Take the Lean of your Pullet, or Chickens, from the Bone, cut it in thin Slices art Inch long, and tofs it up in fix or feven Spoonfuls of Milk or Cream, with the Bignels of Half an Egg of Butter, grated Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt; thicken it with a little Dull of Flour, to theThicknefs of a good Cream, then boil it up, and fet it to cool; then cut fix or feven thin round Slices of Bacon, place them in i Patty-pan, and put on each Slice fome Forcd- meat, then work them up in form of a French Roll, with raw Egg in your Hand, leaving a hollow Place in the Mid- dle; then put in your Fowl, and cover them with fome of the fame Forcd-meat, rubbing it f.-nooth over with your Hand, and an Egg, make them of the Height and Bignefs of a French Roll i throw a little fine grated Bread over them, bake them three Quarters of an Hour in a gentle Oven, or under a Baking Cover, till they come to a yellow Brown, place them on your Mazarine, that they may not touch one another, but fo that they may not fall flat in the Baking: But you may form them on your Kitchen-table, with your Slices of Bacon under them; then lift them up with your broad Kitchen-knife, and place them on that which you in- tend to bake them on. Let your Sauce be Butter and Gravy, and fqueezd Lemon, and your Garnilbing fryd Parfley, and cut Orange. You may put the Legs of one of your Chickens into the Sides of one of your Loaves that you intend to put in the Middle of your Difh. This is proper for a Side-diih, for a firft Courfe, either in Summer or Winter, where you can have the Ingredients above -mentioned.

ir

7he Lad yTs C o m; a j;r i o n, sSr

!r« fJ Pullets t la Warfare.

AFTER you have ciufsd a Couple of Pullets as for boiling, flit them along the Back, fpread them open upon a Dreffer, and beat them. Put in a Stew-pan of the Size of the Pullets, fome Parfle, Gives, and favour Herbs, fhred very fmall, and feafond with Salt and Pepper: Lay the Pullets into the Sttw pan with the Breaili downwards; put fome of the above Seafoning upon them, then pour in fome melted Bacon, ftir them aboat,.and let them lie in this Mixture two Hours, to give them the Talie of it. Then fee the Stew-pan over the Fire, to melt the Bacon again, and keep the Pullets moving in it for Half a Quarter of an Hour j after which take them out, drudge them well with Bread crumbd very fine, and lay them to broil on a Gridiron over a flack.
Fire, till they are grown brown: Prepare a hafhd Sauce, lay it on the Bottom of a Diih, and the Pullets upon it.

Hen or Pullet roajled.

TAKE either a Hen or Pullet, full of Eggs, draw it, and roaft it; being enough, cut it up, and fhred the brawny Part in fmall Slices, leave the Wings, Legs, and Rump whole, ftew all in the Gravy, with fome Salt, add thereunto a mincd Lemon j being enough, let the Meat lie in the Middle of the Difh, with the Legs, Wings, and Rump about it j garnifh the Difh with Oranges and Lemons quartered.

Fat Hen,

GET a fat Hen, drefs it, cut off the Wings and Legs, and lard with fmall Lardoons; after it is flourd, pafs it in the Pan with Lard, then foak it with good Broth, and feafon it: When it is almofl enough, fry it with Mufhrooms, fat Livers, a little Flour, and an Onion ftuck with Cloves: After all is well flewd, and the Sauce well thickend, you may ferve it garnifhd with Pomegranates.

Another Way,

FARCE it with Oyfters, or with young Pigeons, ftew it the fame Way, and garnifh as you like; then ferve.

Another Way,

WHEN it is fluck or coverd with a Paper over the Bard, roafl it: When it is well roafled, powder it with Crumbs of Bread, and Stit; then ferve it with Poor ManU Sauce, Verjuice, or Orange, and in Winter with D-cffes.

Eawls

«54 The Ladys Companion-.

Fowls in Fi-Uets nvith Piitachoes.

SPIT your Fowls, and let them roafl; they being don, take them off, and cut ofr:Le Wing and the White of the Breafi; keep a fmall Sauce readyin a S:ew-pan, made with fweet Herbs, a httic good Butter, fmall Champignons cut in Slices; put it ove. the Fire w th a Dufi of Flour in it, ftir and moiften it vith a Ladlcful of good Broth; fee it be of a good Tafte: The Piftachoes being fcalded, and cut into Slices, put them in, and make a thick Sauce with four or five Yolk of Eggs, beat the fame up with Cream -, then put in the White and Legs of your Fowls, with the Juice of a Le- mon; you mull cut your Wings only in two, then place the Slices of your Fowls in the Bottom of the Difh, with, your Sauce over it, and let there be no Sauce remaining; make it as reliihing as poiTibly can be, and lerve it up hot for an En- try.

A Fowl, Chicken, or Capon a la Bourgeoife.

GE T a Fowl, fmge, pick, draw, and trufs it; take a Kettle, or Earthen Pot, put Water in it, enough to foak your Fowl i put your Pot over the Fire wilh a Handful of Salt; and when the Water boils, put in your Fowl, but let it not boil too much: Put a I ump of Butter in a Stew- pan, with a Duft of Flour, Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and Oy- fters, if any are to be had j put your Stew-pan over the Fire, and thicken your Sauce; which being thickened, and pretty reliihing, take out your Fowl, and dilh it up with Oyller- fauce over it.

At another Time you may take a little Parfley, fome green Onions, a little Mint, and a little Terragon, if you have any; but you may make ycur Sauce with Parlley only: But if you can get Anchovies, cut a Couple fmall, and put them into it; cut inalf a Lemon, after having taken off the Rind, into fmall fquare Pieces, and fqueeze in th.e other Half, then put in a little Butter, with a Dull of Flour, and a little Water, Pepper, and Salt, and fet your Sauce a fcewing. Your Fowl being done, difh it up with your Sauce over it.

At another Time, put forne Endive with your Fov.l; and when it is done, give ic two or three Cuts wdth a Knife, and put it into a Stew-pan with a little Butter, and a Duft of Flour, and fet it over the Fire; then moiiten it with a little of the fame Broth your Fowl hath been boiPd in; if it be not tliick enough, thicken it with Eggs.

At

Jbe Lad ys Companion. 2 85

At another Time, you may dreis your Fwl with Onions, in boiling thm with your Fowl; you may put them in a Stevv-pan or Earthen D.lh, with a Lump of cutter rolld in Flour, Feppv-T, and Salt; put it over the Fire with fome of ti Broth your Fowl was boiid in; thicken your Sauce, and ferve it up hot for an Entry.

y Fowl in Hafh,

E T fome Fowls ready drefsd, then take the Flefh, and y cut it very fir.all; take the Carcaies, put them in a Stew-pan with good Broth, an Onion cut into Slices, Parflcy, and hveet Herbs; when it is boiPd enough, ftrain it off; then pat in it a Bit of Butter roird in Flour, and let it ftew a Mo- ment again; then put in it your Haili of Fowls; let your Haul be relifhing, thicken it with three Yolks of Eggs, or more, according to the Quantity of Hafii you make; it be- ing thick, put in it the Juice of a Lemon, and ferve them up hot for Hon aOuvre,

A Hah cf Fowls ibe Englifli Way.

LE T your Fowls be ready drefled, take ofF the White, cut the fame into fmall fquare Pieces, and put it in a Stew-pan; boil the Carcafes in a ii-ttle Broth, then ilrain it through a Strainer; take this Broth, and put in it your Pieces of Fowl, cut into fmall Squares, and put it over the Fire; add to it a Bit of Butter rolled in Flour, a little Pep- per and Salt, and if there is Occafion for it, the Juice of a Lemon; difh it up, garnifli it with fmall Pieces of Bread liied, and ferve it up hot for Hors dO.uvre.

Fowls a la IJommorenry.

SINGE, gut, and trufs a Fowl, and blanch it over a Charcoal Fire; then lard it with tliin Bacon; being larded, fplititin the Back, put into the Belly a fmall Ragoo, with Sweetbreads of Veal, Champignons, Truffles, and fome Bottoms of Artichoaks; put it in a rtewing in a Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon, Ham, and Veal; being liewd, take it off, and put in it a little Broth; let it have a Boil, then ftrain it off, and fkim the Fat well off; then fet it on again, and let it ftew till it turns to Caramel, then put it in your Fowls, and put your Bacon-Slices into the Caramel, put it upon hot Cinders, that it may glaze as it ihouLd: Being ready to ferve up, put a CuUis of Ham, or a Sauce made the Italian Way, into your Dilh, then your Chickens over it, and ferve if up hot jcr an Kntr.

nr

zS6 The Ladys Companioi

To boil Pullets ivith Oyflers.

BOIL three Pullets in Water and Salt, with a Piece of Bacon; for Sauce draw up a Pound of Butter, with a little White Wine, firong Broth, and a Quart of Oyilers, then put the Pullets in a Dilh, cut the Bacon, and lay it about them with fome fryd Saufages -, garnilh with flicd Lemon,

Chickens nvith Mujhrooms and fix ee Herbs roajled-, A K E Chickens, clean them well, and draw them » rafp fome Bacon, and put a few Mufhrooms, Parfley, and young Onions, and a little fweet Bafil, with the Livers of your Chickens f.afond with Pepper and Salt. Hafh all and mix it together; put it in the Bodies of your Chickens j then put them in a Stev-pan, with a Piece of Butter, Parfley, young Onions, Salt, and fweet Bafil. Being done, packthread them, and fpit them, and put them to the Spit wrappd with Bards of Bacon, and let them roaft fiowly. lake a Ragoo of Mufhrooms, after this Manner: If they are dryd Mufh- rooms, fleep them in lukewarm Water for one Hour or two, then take them out, and put them in a Stew-pan with fome Gravy, and let them flew on a flow Fire. Having llewd a Quarter of an Hour, thicken them with fome Cullis. When your Chickens are done, take them from the Spit, unbard them, and drefs them handfomeiy in their Difh; fee that your Ragoo of Mufhrooms be of a good Tafte, and fharp, put it upon your Chickens, and ferve it hot for a firll: Courie.

Chickens nxilh fvjeet Herbs roajlrj.

YOUR Chickens being neatly drefsd, rafp fome Bacon and a little Ham, hafh them well with Parfley, young Onions, and the Livers of Chickens hafhd, feafond with Pepper and Salt; mix it all together, and put it in the Bodies of your Chickens. You mull obferve to fallen them always at both Ends; let them do in a Stew-pan with a Bit of But- ter, whole Parfley, and young Onions whole; fpit them, and wrap them with Bards of Bacon, and covered with Sheets of Paper, and put them to roafl flowly. When they are done, take them off, and unbard them, and drefs them neatly in their Difh, throw an Effence of Ham on them, and ferve theai up hot for a iirfl Courfe.

Chickens

57jf L A D ys Companion. 287

Chickens roajled nvith Force meat and Cucumbers,

DRESS your Chickens neatly, take off the Breafls and bone them, put the Flefh upon the Table, with fome Ham and blanched Bacon, and a Calfs Udder blanchd, fome Champignons, a httleParfley, and young Onions, a few fweet Herbs, fine Spices, three cr four Yolks of Eggs, fome Crumbs of Bread ioakd in Cream or Milk, and boil the Bread, then leave it to cool; being cool, pui it with the Farce, and hafh all well together, and iluff your Chickens with it. Clof« them at both Ends, keep a little of the Farce, let them Hew as before, run a Skewer through their Legs, and fpit them, wrapped with Bards of Bacon, and covered with Sheets of Pa- per, and let thein do flowly. Take four middling Cucumber, pare them, and empty their Infides; being well emptyd, blanch them in fome Broth; being blanchd, put them in cold Water, then fluff them wi:h the Farce, and flour them at each End. Take a Stew-pan, and put fome Bards of Bacon in it, and lay your Cucumbers over; feafon them, and wet them with a Ladleful of Broth, and let it boil; take Half a Spoon- ful of your Cullis, and put it in a Stew-pan j let your Cullis be of a good Talle. When your Chickens are done, take em out, drefs them in your Difh, and put your Cucumbers to drain, then put them round your Chickens, and put your Cul- lis over them, with the Juice of a Lemon, and ferve it hot.
You m drefs Capons the fame Way.

Chickens a la Braife,

HAVING the fatteil Chickens you can get, parboil them; lard them with large Lardoons of Bacon and of Ham, both very well feifond; when they are larded, tie them about with a Packthread: then put at the Bottom of a fmall Kettle Bards of Bacon and Slices of Beef, well beaten, and fcafond in the fame Manner as for the other Braifes already mcntiond; put the Chickens into the Kettle, the Breafls dovv»- wards, feafon them above as underneath; lay over them Slices of Beef and Bards of Bacon, cover the Kettle, and fet them to flew, with Fire over the Kettle as well as under it. Then make aKaoo as follows: Take fome Veal Sweetbreads and cut theui in Moifels, add to them fome Cocks-combs, fome Mufhrcoms and Truffles cut in Slices; feafon all this with Pep- per, Salt, ard a Bunch of favoury Herbs; put it into a Stew- paa, and tofs it up over a S::ove with fome melted Bacon.
Then put fome Gravy amongfl jt, and fvt it to fimmer over a

gentle

283 he Lad ys C o m p a n ion.

gentle Fire; when it is half done, put to it Tome Afparagias- Tops, and Artichoke-Bottoms, cut in Quarters, and blanched j then continue to prepare your Ragoo, and when it is enough, be careful to take oix all ih;; Fat, and thicken it with a Cul- lis of Veal and Ham; take up your Chickens, let them drain, and then put them into a Stew-pan amongft your Ragoo; and wlen you are ready to ferve, take them cut, unbind the Packthread, and lay them handlbmely in the Dih you intend to ferve them m: Take care your Ragoo be well relilned, and the Fat be well taken off; then pour it on the Chickens, and ferve them warm for the firil Courfe.
We ferve Chickens a la B aifu fomecimes with a Ragoo of CrawfiTi, cr of Oyxlersj as likewifewjth all Sorts of Ragoos of Legumes.

To face Chickens uh Anchoius.

RAISE the Skn from the Breails of your Chickens with your Finger; then grate fome fat Eacon, feafon it with Pepper, Salt, two Anchovies, fome Cives, and Iar- iley Hired fmall; mix thefe together, and liuiF the Chickens Breaib wirh it; then tie them with Packthread, wrap them up in Bards of Bacon and Sheets of Paper; fpit them and roail them. In the mean Time, vvath and bone two Ancho- vies, mince them very fmall, and meit them in a Stew pan with a clear Cullis of Veal and Ham. Keep the Cullis warm, and, when the Chickens are roalled enough, take off the Bards, put them in a Difh, pour the Cullis upon them, and izm them up for the firfl Courfe.

After the fame rviaineryou iiiay drefs Capons, Pullets, Partridges, Quails, Fillets cf cai, and Mutton with An- chovies.

drfp Chickens <.ilth Gravy.

TA K E as many Bards of Bacon as you have Chickens, and of the fame Size; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Parfley, Cives, andfavoury Herbs, all Ihred together very fine; then loofen the Skin from the Chickens Brealh, and tbruR: one of thefe feafoned Slices of Bacon between the Skin and Breall of each; then bind thein in with Packthread, then wrap them up inBards of Bacon, put them on the Spit to roail them, when they are done, take off the Bards, diih thern, and pour on them fome Veal-Gravy, and ferve them up in little Difhes.

ne Ladys Companion! a89

Another Way.

YO U muft take Pullets, Chickens, or Sweetbreads, Mufhrooms, Oyfters, Anchovies, Marrow, and a little Lemon-peel, a little Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, and a little Thyme, Marjoram, Savoury, and a few Gives; mingle all thefe together with the Yolk of an Egg, then raife up the Skin of the Breafls of your Fowls, and Ituff it; and flick it up again, and lard them, fill their Bellies with Oyllers, and roail them; make llrong Gravy Sauce: So you may do Pheafants, Turkies, or what Fowl you pleafe.

To broil Chickens.

SLIT them down the Back, and feafon them with Salt and Pepper, lay them on a very clear Fire, and at a great D ftance, and let the Inlide lie next the Fire, that the iiefhy Side be notfcorchd nor difcolourd: when they are half done, you may turn them often, and bafte them very often; ftrew on fome Rafpings of a French Roll; that it may be crifp, it muft be finely grated; flired Parfley and melted Butter is 2t good and ready Sauce; or you may take a large Handful of Sorrel, dip it in fcalding Water, then drain it, and have ready- Half a Pint of llrong Broth or Gravy, a Shalot fhred fmall, a little Thyme, a little Parfley, a Bit of burnt Butter tc thicken it; lay the Sorrel in Heaps, and pour the Sauce over it: Garnilh with flicd Lemon.

Puird Chickens.

BOIL fix Chickens near enough, then flea them, and pull the white Flefh all from the Eones, put it in a Stew- pan withHalf aPintof Cream, which mufl be firft made fcald- ing hot, the Gravy that runs from the Chickens, a few Spoon- fuls of that Liquor they were boiPd in; to this add fome raw Parfiey fhred fine, give them a Tofs or two over the Fire, and duft a little Flour upon fome Butter, and fhake up with them.
Chickens done this Way muft be kilPd the Night before, and little more than half boiPd, and pulPd in Pieces as broad as your Finger, and Half as long; you may add a Spoonful of White Wine.

Chickens hafhed.

BOIL them in Water and Salt; then take Turnips, cut them in Slices, and after cut them like Lard an Inch long, but fmall, a good Quantity, putting them into a Stew-pan with a Pound of Butter, three or four Spoonfuls of ftrong Broth, V©L. I. O witk

290 he L A D Ys Companion.

With a little Wine Vinegar, fome Pepper and Ginger, Sugar and Salt; thus let them ftew leifurely, with fome Mace, about two Hours; being enough, put them on Sippets, run- ning them over with Butter, Cream, and Yolks of Eggs beaten up together.

To farce Chickens Bur lion blanc.

AFTER you have mincd the White of their Breails with fat Bacon boiPd, the Crumb of a Fret.ch Roll boild in Milk, and a little Marrow, take the Yolk of one Egg boild hard, and the Yolk of another raw; mince all thefe to- gether, and feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and the Juice of Lemon; lay this up in your Chicken=, and bake them: Of the Forcd-meat you m.ay make Patties to garnifn your Chickens, but put neither Bread nor Eggs to your Forcd-m.eat.

To drefs Chickens the Barbary Way.

TRUSS them, break their Bones with a Rolling-pin; farce the Bodies of them with a very high Farce, then boil them in Milk, but put them not in till it boils; feaibn with high Seafoning and favoury Herbs: When they are enough, broil them on a Gridiron till they are brown, then fervc them up with a Ramolade.

To boil Chickens and Afparagus.

TAKE fome Chickens, force them with a good Forcd- meat, and boil them white: Cut your Afparagus about an Inch long, parboil them in Water, into which put a little Butter and Flour; and, vhen it is parboiFd, drain it, then diilolve a little Butter and Salt gently in a Stew-pan, being careful that it does not become brown; then put a little m r.cd Parfley and Cream, fome Salt, Nutmeg, Pepper, and a Faggot of Fennel to the Afparagus; ftew it over a gentle Fire, fqueeze a Lemon over the Chickens, and pour over them the Afparagus taking the Fennel away with the Butter they were Ilewd in.

J particular Manner ofjleing Chickens or Rabbits.

GE T two, three, or four Chickens, about the Bignefs of a Partridge, and boil them till they are half done; then take them off, and cut them into little Pieces, feparating the joint.bones o.ie from another; let not the Meat be mincdy but cut into great Slices, not fo exadly, but more or lefs; the Breail-bones are not fo proper to be put in: However, put the Meat, together with the other Bones upon which there muft

alfo

Tha L A D ys C O M P A N I O N. 29 I

alfo be fome Meat remaining into a good Quantity of that Water or Broth wherein the Chickens were boild; and fet it over a Chafing-difli of Coals, between two Difhes, that fo it may ftew on till it be fully enough; but firft feafon it with Salt and grofs Pepper, and afterwards add Oil to it, more or lefs, according to the Goodnefs thereof: A little before you take the Meat from the Fire, put in fuch a Quantity of Juice of Lemons as may befi agree with your Tafte. This makes an excellent Dilli of Meat, which is to be fervd up in the Li- quor; and though, for a Need, it may be made with Butter inftead of Oil, and with Vinegar infiead of Lemon-juice, yet the otherls incomparably better for fuch as have not an Aver- fion for Oil. The fame Difh may be alfo made of Veal, or Partudge, or R-abbits; and indeed the beft of them all isRab- •bits, if drefsd before iMicbadmas for afterwards they grow rank; fmce though they are fatter, yet the Flelh is more harcJ and dry.

Chickens farced ivith Oyfters.
A R D them, then mince fom.e fweet Herbs, ParfleyV Truilies, Mufhrooms, and Onions, with Oyfters; after being parboild, feafon it with Salt and Pepper, put to it the Yolk of an Egg and a Piece of Butter; with this farce your Chickens, then tie them at both Ends and roaft them; when done, fcrve them up with a Ragoo, garnifn with flicd Le- mon.

Chickens ~,.vith Sellery.

BOIL them off white with a Piece of Ham, then boil ofF two Bunches of Sellery; cut them two Inches along the white End, and lay them in a Stevpan; put in fome Cream, Butter, and Salt; Hove them a little and thickilh;.
then lay your Chickens in your Diih, with your Sellery be- tween. Garniih with fiicd Ham and Lemon.

Chickens Chiriv
o

CU T off their Feet, break the Breaft-bone flat with a Rolling-pin, but take care, you dont break the Skin; flour them, fry then of a f ne brown in Butter, then drain all the Fat out of the Pan, but leave the Chickens in; lay a Pound of Gravy-beef cut very thin over your Chickens, and a Piece of Veal cut very thin, a little Mace, two or three Cloves, fome whole Pepper, an Onion, a little Bundle of fweet Herbs, and a Piece of Carrot, and then pour in a Quart of boiling Water; cover it ciofe, let it Hew for a Quarter of an Hour,

O 2 the»

92 The Ladys Companion.

then take out the Chickens and keep them hot; let the Gravy boil till it is quite rich and good, then Ibain it off, and put it into your Pan again, with two Spoonfuls of Red Wine, and a few Mulhrooms; put in your Chickens to heat, then take them up, lay them into your Difh, and pour your Sauce over them. Garnifh with Lemon, and a few Slices of cold Ham warmd in the Gravy.

You may fill your Chickens with Forcd-meat, and lard them with Bacon, and add Truff es. Morels, and Sweetbreads cut fmall, but then it will be a very high Difh.

Chickens nKith Tongues, Cauhfiters, and Greens.

TAKE fix Hogs Tongues, bo J them, and fkin them, fix Chickens boiPd off white, one Cauliflower boiFd, and fome Spinach J put your Cauliflower in the Middle of your Difh, your Chickens about it, and between, a Tongue with Heaps of Spinach round, and Slices of Bacon.

Chickens oyal.

LARD them, and force the Bellies, and pafs them ofFj then Hove them in good Gravy and Broth, Gold Co- lour: Make a Ragoo of Mufhrooms, MoreLs Truffles, and Cocks- combs, and when your Chickens are enough, difh them up, lay your Ragoo over, and garnilh with Petty- patties and fjyd Sweetbreads.

Scotch Chickens.

CUT your Chickens in Quarters; finge them, and wafh them well, and then put as much Water as will jufl cover them j put them on a gentle Fire, and when they boil Ikim them well, and put in fome Salt, Mace, and Nutmeg, a Faggot of Thyme, Parfley, and a little Pepper -, and when your Chickens are tender, chop half a Handful of Parfley, and put it in them then beat up fix Eggs, Yolks and Whites together; and as your Chickens boil up, put in your Eggs atop, and fo ferve them all together, the Broth will be very clear.

7o drejs Chickens njith Slices of Ham.

TAKE Chickens, and trufs them, but dont blanch them; then cut a Slice of Ham for each Chicken, and feafon your Ham with Cives and Parfley fhred fmall; then with your Finger loofen the Skins from your Chickens Breails, and put the Slices of Ham between the Breaft and Skin J then blanch them before the f ir<, wrap them up in

Bards

ne Ladys Companion; 293

Bards of Bacon, tie them about with Packthread, put them on the Spit, and roaft them: When they are enough, take off your Bards, difh your Chickens, and pour on fome Eflence of Gammon of Bacon, and ferve them up hot for the lirftCourfe.

To marinate Chickens.

TAKE Chickens, quarter them, and lay them for two or three Hours to marinate in Vinegar or Verjuice, and Juice of Lemon, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Bay-leaves, and Cives; then make a Batter with Flour, White Wine or Wa- ter, the Yolks of Eggs, Salt, and melted Butter; beat all thefe well together, drain your Chickens, and dry them with a Cloth, dip them into it, and fry them in Hogs Lard; and, when they are well coloured, dilh them up in the Form of a Pyramid, and ferve them up with fryd Parfley and Slices of •Lemon.

We fometimes drudge them with Flour inftead of dipping them in Batter j but then the Hogs Lard mud be very hot before you put them into the Pan.

70 Ms Chickens the Polifh Way.

K[ A VI N G larded your Ciiickens with Half Bacon and [ Half Anchovies, feafori them with favoury Herbs and Spices I then take fome blaiiched Bacon, the Chickens Li- vers, raw Spic:i, fvveet Herbs, and the Yolks of three Eggs, hafh them all very fmall, and make a Farce; then fill your Chickens, fpit and roall them: When they are fomething better than half roafted, heat a Fire-fhovel almofl red hot, put thereon fome Bards of Bacon, and balle the Chickens with it, but take care not to black them: When they are roailed, ferve them up with a warm Ramolade.

To Jieiv Chickens.

WHEN you have quarterd your Chickens, put them into Wine and Vater, but let there be more Wine than Water, fi:ev them till they are tender; then add a good Quantity of Butter, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and large Mace, and raip in it a Manchet to thicken it; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, and put in fome Parfley and Sage if you pleafe; beat fome Yolks of Eggs well with the Juice of a Lemon in the Sauce, and lay Marrow on the Top of your Chickens; garnifli with Parfley and licd Lemon, and ferve them up.

03 T»

294 he L A D ys C Af p a N 3 n.

7o fry Chickens.

TAKE four Chickens, and boil them almofl enough l- then cut them in Pieces, and take the Juice of Spinachj.
and put it into the Yolks of eight Eggs, put to it fome fhred Parfley, and a grated Nutmeg; your Stew-pan being hot with Ciaiifyd Butter, dip in your Pieces of Chickens into the green Batter, and fry them gently on both Sides; then put to them a Sauce o Rhenijh Wine, beaten with, three Yolks of Eggs, and Parfley boild and mincd, with a Lemon cut in Dice; keep them ftirring till they boil; then cut Sippets, and put the Pieces of Chickens upon it, and pour the Sauce over.

Ducklings a la Mode.

CUT them in Quarters, and lard one Half, and browa them off; ilove them in Half a Pint of Claret, a Pint of Gravy, and two Shalots, one Anchovy, and a Faggot of Herbs; ftove them tender, Ikim off the Fat, take out the Fag- got, and fqueeze in a Lemon -, fhake it together; the Sauce mull be thick as Cream, fo ferve away to Table hot. Gar- iiiih with Lemon.

Stoved Ducks the Dutch Way.

YO U muft trufs two Ducks clofe without the Legs, and lard one; feafon with Pepper and Salt, and fill the Bel- lies with fmall Onions; then lay at the Bottom of your Stew- pan Half a Pound of Butter, and put in your Ducks, and cover them with flicd Onions, then another Half Pound of Butter; ftove this two Hours gently, keeping it covered all the while: When you find all difcolourd, and your Ducks tender, difh them, Ihaking a little Vinegar amongft them. Garnilh with Lemon.

Duck or Teal ivlth Horfe-radifh.

TRUSS them to boil, if two, lard one, and pafs them off in brown Butter, then put to them a Pint of clear Broth, and two Plates of Horfe-radifli; feafon with Salt, and Hove thefe together till tender; then ftrain off your Horfe- radifn from your Ducks, and put in a good Piece of Butter; you may fcrape your Horfe-radifh ery fine, which is the befl Way; then lay your Ducks in our Difn, and your Horfe- radifli all over, and garniih with fcrapd Horfe-radTlh and ilicd Lemon, and ferve away hot.

the Ladys Companion; 295

To drefs a Wild Duck nxiith Lemon-juice.

GE T a Duck, half roail it, then take it off the Spit, yA lay it in a Dilh; carve it, but leave the Joints hanging together: In all the Incifions put Salt, and beaten Pepper, and fqueeze the Juice of Lemons; turn it on the Breaft, and prefs It hard vith a Plate, put to it two or three Spoonfuls of Gravy, and fet it a little to ilew; turn it again, and ferve ic hot in its own Gravy .

You may do it the fame Way with Juice of Orange.

7c jlenM a Duck nj:ild or tame.
E T a Stew-pan, put at the Bottom of it Slices of Ba- con and Beef; add fome Parfnips, Carrots, and Oons flicd, and fome Slices of Lemon, a few favoury Herbs, with Pepper, Salt, and Cloves; then put in your Duck, cover it; when it is ilewd enough, take up the Duck, and make a Ra- goo of Lambs Sweetbreads, with Cocks-combs, Truffles, Mufhroom.s, and Artichoak Bottoms: Tofs up all this ia melted Butter, and pour on the Ducks.

Another Way.

A L F road them, then put them into a Stew-pan; put in a Pint of Claret, and a Pint of ftrong Broth, two Onions quartered, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, with a littls beaten Pepper; ftew them in a Pan covered, and when they are enough, garnilh. with fryd Bacon.

Another Way.

TAKE your Ducks and feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and a few Cloves, a Shalot or two, with a Piece of Butter in the Belly of each of them.; put them in an earthen Pan that will jult hold them; then put Haifa Pint of Claret, and as much ftrong Gravy, and Haifa Pound of Butter un- der and over your Ducks, and Plalf aPint of Water, aBunch of fweet Plerbs, fome whole Cloves, then cover the Pan clofe; let them ilew two Hours and a Half, then ilrain the Liquor, and pour it over your Ducks; ferve them hot, and garnifn with Lemon flicd, and Rafpings of Bread j in thi Manner you ilew Eafterlings, Widgeons, or Teal.

To boil civild Ducks.

DRAW and trufs your wild Ducks, parboil them, and ha;f rcail them; then carve them, and fave their Gravv; put the Gravy in a Stew-pan with Pepper, flicd Ginger, Par-

O 4 flev.

296 Tbe Ladys Compan ion.

fley, and a good Store of Onions, a Quart of Claret, Barber- lies, large Mace, and wafhd Currants; boil all thefe toge- ther, fkim it clean, put in Butter and Sugar; difh your Ducks in the Sauce, and ferve them up

To hoi I a tame Duck.

PARBOIL the Duck, chop an Onion and a Handful of Parfley together; put them into a Stew-pan with ftrong Mutton-Broth, a Turnip cut and parboild till the Ranknefs is taken away, Endive pickd and wafnd, and Barberries: Then put in Half a Pound of Butter, and a little Verjuce: Boil ali together, ftirring it till it is enough; and ferve it up with the Turnip, large Mace, Pepper, and a little Sugar.

To drefs Ducks njjith Olives,

TAKE Ducks, and drefs them a h Braifs or roaft them; then tofs fome M ulhrooms up in a Stew-pan, jind moiften them with Gravy, and bind it with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; Then ftone fome Olives, and put them into fcaldirg Water, take them out, drain them, and put them into the Ragoo; give them a Boil, difh your Ducks, pour the Ragoo over them, and ferve it up.

To drefs Ducks with Sellery,

FIRST drefs your Ducks a la Braie, then boil fome Sellery in Water and Salt, putting it in when the Water boils; when it is a little more than half enough, take it out, drain it, tofs it up in a Stew-pan with fome thin Cullis of Veal and Ham; and when it is enough, thicken it with a Bit of Butte,-, as big as a Walnut, workM up with a little Flour J keep moving it over the Fire, put in a few Drops of Vinegar, dilh your Ducks, put your Ragoo over them, and ferve them up.

A Duck with Cardoons is drefsd the fame Way the Cardoons being done as we do Sellery.

To hoil a Duck or Rabbit ivith Onions.

BOIL your Duck or Rabbit in a good deal of Water, be fure to Ikim your Water, for there will always rife a Scum, which if it boils down will difcolour your Fowls, tjc They will take about half an Hour boiling; for Sauce, your Onions muft be peePd, and throw them into Water as you peel them, then cut them into thin Slices, boil them in Milk

and

7 L A D ys Co MP A N I ON, 297

and Water, and fkim the Liquor. Half an Hour will boil them. Throw them into a clean Sieve to drain, put them in- to a Stew-pan, and chop them Irnall; fhake in a little Flour, put to them two or three Spoonfuls of Cream, a good Piece of But er, ftew all together over the Fire till they are thick and fine; lay the Duck or Rabbit in the Difh, and pour the Sauce all over. If a Rabbit, you mufl cut off the Head, and cut it in two, and lay it on each Side the Difh.

Or you may make this Sauce for Change: Take one large Onion, cut it fmall. Half a Handful of Parfley clean wafhed and pickd, chop it fmall, a Lettuce cut fmall, a Quarter of a Pint of good Gravy, a good Piece of Butter rolld in a littlfr Flour; add a little Juice of Lemon, a little Pepper and Salt, let all ftew together for half an Hour, then add two Spoon- fuls cf Red Wine; this Sauce is mofl proper for a Duck; lay your Duck in the Difli, and pour your Sauce over it.

To drefs a Duck ith Green Teas,

PUT a deep Stew-pan over the Fire, with a Piece of frefli Butter, fmge your Duck and jflour it, turn it in the Pan two or three Minutes, then pour out all the Fat, but let the Duck remain in the Pan; put to it Half a Pint of good Gravy, a Pint of Peas, two Lettuces cut frnall, a fmall Bundle of fweet Flerbs, a little Pepper and Salt, cover them clofe, and let them flew for Half an Hour; and then give the Pan a Shake; when they are juft done, grate in a little Nutmeg, and put in a very little beaten Mace, and thicken either with a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, or the Yolk of an Egg, beat up with two or three Spoonfuls of Cream; fhake it all together for three or four Minutes; take out the fweet Herbs, lay the Duck in the Difh, and pour the Sauce over it; You may garnilh vith boild Mint choppd, or let it alone.

To drefs a Duck ith Cucumbers.

TAKE three or four Cucumbers, pare them, take oat the Seeds, cut them into little Pieces, lay them in Vinegar for two or three Hours before, with two large Onions peePd and flicd, then do your Duck as above; then take the Duck out, and put in the Cucumbers and Onions, firft drain them in a Cloth, let them be a litde brown, Ihake a little Flour over them, in the mean Time let your Duck be ftew- ing in aStewing-pan with Llalf a Pint of Gravy, for a Quarter of an Hour; then add to it the Cucumbers and Onions, with Pepper and Salt to your Palate, a «:oud Piece of Butter rolled

O 5 in

29S The L A D ys C m p a n I o n,

in Flour, and two or three Spoonfuls of Red Wine; fiiake all together, and let it ftew together for eight cr ten Minutes, then t.ke up the Duck, and pour the Sauce over it.

Or you may roaft your Duck, and make this Sauce, and pour over it, but then a Quarter of a Pint of Gravy will be enough.

To drtfs- a Duck a la Braie.

TA K E a Duck, lard it with little Pieces of Bacon, fea- fon it, infide and out, with Pepper and Salt, lay a.
Layer of Bacon, cut thin, in the Bottom of the Stev pan, and then a Layer of lean Beef cat thin; then lay on your Duck, vith fome Carrot, an Onion, a little Bundle of fweet Herbs, a Blade or two of Mace, and lay a thin Layer of Beef over the Duck, cover it clofe, and fet it over a flow Fire for eight or ten Minutes; then take off the Cover, and Ihake in a little Plour, give the Pan a Shake, pour in a Pint of frnall Broth or boiling Water; give the Fan a Shake or two, cover it clofe again, and let it fievv Half an Hour; then take oiF the Co- ver, take out the Duck, and keep it hot, let the Sauce boil till there is about a Quarter of a Pint or little better, then ftrain It, and put it into a Stew-pan again with a Glafs of Red Wine; put in your Duck, fnake the Pan, and let it Hew four or five Minutes, then lay your Duck in the Diih, and pour the Sauce over it, and garnifh witii Ltmon. If you love your Duck very iigh, you may fill it with the following Ingredients: Take a Veal Sweetbread cut in eight or ten- Pieces, a few Truifies, fome Oyfters, a little fweet Herbs and Parfley choppd fine, a little Pepper, Salt, and beaten Mace; fill your Duck with the:above Ingredients, tie both Ends tight, and diefs as above; cr you may fill it with Force-meat made thus: Take a little Piece of Veal, take ail the Skin and Fat off, beat it in a Mor- tar with as much Sewet, and an equal Quantity of Crumbs of Bread, a few fweet Herbs, fome Parfley choppd, a little Le» mon-peel, Pepper, Salt, beaten Mace and Nutmeg, and mix k up with the Yolk of an Egg.

You may Hew an Oxs Palate tender, and cut it into Pieces, with fome Artichoak Bottoms cut in four, and tofsd up in the Sauce; you may lard the Duck, or let it alone, jufc as yci» pleafe.

7o roaft a Sea-Duck.

BASTE It as it is roafting with Butter and Salt, and make the Sauce for it with the Liver mincd very fmall, and put into the Dripping, with Salt, Pepper, Jsuuneg, MuihrooHiS; and Juice of Orange,

ne Ladys Companion. 299

To drefs Ducks n.mth Oyflers.

TAKE wild Ducks, trufs them, make a Ragoo with Veal Sweetbreads, Muflirooms, Truffles, and Oyfteis, feafond with fine Herbs, Gives, and Parfley; when iu is al- moil ready, farce the Ducks with it; tie them up well, and roall them; a little afterwards make a Muftiroom Cullis, fuch as is ufually made for Partridges, pour it upon them, and ferve them up hot for a Side-dilh.

Or thus,

DRESS your Ducks a la Braife j then tofs up Mufh- rooms and Truffles in melted Bacon, and moiften them with Gravy; then bind it with a good Cullis of Veal and Ham; then put fome Oyflers into a Stew-pan, give them three or four Turns in their own Liquor over the Fire, clean them well, and put them into the Ragoo, and fet it over the Fire again for a Moment or two, but let them not boil; lay your Duck in the Difh, pour your Ragoo upon it, and fei-ve it up.

To drefs a Duck nh-ith Succory.

GE T a Duck, and drefs it a la Braife; fcald your Suc- cory, fqueeze out the Water, give it two or three Cuts with a Knife, tofs it up in a Stew-pan wdth Gravy, thicken it with fome Cullis of Veal and Ham; difli your Duck, pour the Ragoo over it, and ferve it up.

To boil Ducks afier the French Manner, ET the Ducks be larded, fphted, and half roafted; then draw them, and put them into a Stev-pan, as alfo a Quart of Claret Wine, fome Chefnuts, firlt roafted and peeld, a Pint of great Oyfters, the Liquor fhraind, and the Beards taken off; three Onions mincd very fmall, fome Mace, a little beaten Ginger, and a little Thyme llrippd: Then puc in the Cruft of a French Roll grated, to thicken it, and fo difu it upon Sippets, with the Sauce pourd over them: This may be diverfifyd. If there be llrong Broth, there need not be fo much Wine put into it; and if there be no Oyflers, or Chefnuts, you may put in Artichoak Bottoms, Turnips, Cauli-- ilowers, Bacon;n thi» Slices, Sweetbreads, crV.

Ducks

300 The Ladys Companiok.

Ducks a la Braife nvlth turnips.

GE T a Duck, and lard it with large Lardoons well Tea fond; take a Stew-pan of a conAenient Size, and gar- nifh the Bottom of it with Bards of Bacon and Slices of Beef, to which add fome Onions, Carrots, and Parfnips flicd, fome Slices of Lemon, fome favoury Herbs, Pepper, Salt, and Cloves; then put in your Duck, cover it in the fame Manner as under it, and put Fire likewife under and over it. This is a Difh for the flrfl Courfe, which is fervd in feveral Manners.
When it is with Turnips, they are to be cut in Dice, or round them in the Shape of Olives; they mull be tofsd up in Hogs Lard, to give them a brown Colour j then fet them to drain, and, after that, put them to fimmer in good Gravy, and thicken them with a good CuUis. When the Duck is ready to be fervd up, drain it well, then lay it in the Difh, por u-pon it a Ragoo of Turnips, and ferve it hot. If you will be at the Charge of ftewing it a la Braife; when you have larded your Duck, drudge it well with Flour, and tofs it up in melted Bacon to brown it; then put it into a Pot and make a Brown, cither with melted Bacon, or Butter and Flour, to which put fome good Broth, and near a Pint of Vhite Wine, feafoning the Whole with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Onions, Slices of Le- mon, Pariley, and favoury Herbs j fo fet the Duck to Hew, and when it is done, ferve it with the following Ragoo.

It is made either with Veal or Lambs Sweetbreads, with fat Livers, Cocks-combs, Muflirooms, Truffles, Afparagus- Tops, and A rtichoak- Bottoms: Tofs up all this in melted Bacon, moiften it with good Gravy, bind it with a CuUis of Veal and Ham; and when you have difhd up your Duck, pour the Ragoo upon it.

Ducks tongues.

TA K E as many Ducks, or Geefe Tongues, as you can get J fifty Tongues will fill up a fmall Difh. Blanch them, put them in a Stew-pan over fome Slices of Bacon, with Onions cut in Slices, and fome Sprigs of fweet Bafil; feafon it with Salt, Pepper, and fome Slices of Bacon, moiften 5t with a Spoonful of Broth; let it ftew together. The Tongues being done, drain them, and put them in fome Ef- fence of Harn, or an Italian Sauce; put them, for a Minute, over the Fire to take a Relifh. Being ready to ferve, let your Tongues be relishing, and add the Juice of a Lemon; ferve them up hot for a dainty Dilh.

At

Tht Ladys Companion. 301

At another Time you may garnifh them with Mufhrooms Truffles, Cocks-kidneys, and Cocks-combs,

To farce a Duck.

FARCE the Bread of your Duck with the Flefh of the Bread of a Capon, Beef-marrow mincd fmall, and the Yolks of raw Eggs, feafond with Salt, Pepper, and a little Nutmeg; then ftew the Duck a la Braife, and make a Ragoo of Sweetbreads of Veal, or Lamb, fat Livers, Cocks-combs, Truffles, Muihrooms, Artichoak-Bottoms, and Afparagus- Tops; tofs up all thefe in melted Bacon, moillen it with Gravy; thicken with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; pour this Ragoo upon it, and ferve it up.

A Cullis of Ducks.

RO A S T a Duck, and pound it in a Mortar, then caufe fome Gammon to be fryd brown, and put them into a Pot with a Handful of Lentiles; feafon them with a Clove of Garlick, three or four Cloves, fome Cives and Savoury; let them flew all together; when they have ftewd fome Time, pound them vvith the Flefh of the Duck, and tofs them up in a Stew-pan with melted Bacon; put in fome Veal-Gravy to give it a pale Colour, and drain it for Ufe.

Geefe larded and fonjed.

HAVING trufsd your Geefe clofe, lard one Side, put in the Bellies fome Sage and Onion choppd fmall, roird up with Eggs, Crumbs of Bread, Pepper, Salt, and But- ter; then pafs them, and dove them gently in good Broth or Gravy till tender: Make a clean thick Lear, fqueeze in an Orange, and ferve hot.

Green Geefe a la Daule,

LARD your Green Geefe with large Lardoons, feafon with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Nutmeg, Bay -leaf, Cives, Lemon-peel, and wrap them up in a Napkin; boil them in Broth and White Wine; when the Eroth is pretty well waded away, and you judge them to be enough, take them off, and fet them to cool in the Liquor in which they are boiPd; then take them out, and ferve them dry on a clean Napkin, and garnifti with green Parfley: We fometimes boil with them fome Slices of Veal and Bards of Bacon, to drengthen them and keep them white.

We drefs Turkies, Capons, Partridges, and Other Fowls in the fame Manner,

302 Tht Lad ys Companion-.

To brJ m Goofe lAJith Cabbage or Sauages,

SALT your Goofe two or three Days, then trufs it to boil; cut Lardoons as big as the Top of your Finger, as much as will lard the Flelli of the Breafi, and feafon your Lardoons with Pepper, Mace, and Salt. Afterwards, fet all a boiling in Beef-broth, if you have any, or Water, feafoning your Liquor with a little Salt, Pepper groily beaten, an Ou ce or two, a Bundle of Bay-leaves, Rofemary, and Thyme, tyd all together: In the mean while, having prepard your Cab- bage or Saufages boild very tender, fqueeze all the Water from them, put them into a Stew-pan, with a little ftroiig Broth or Claret Wine, and an Onion or two; feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and Mace, to your Tafte; add fix Anchovies diflblvd, and let all Hew a good while on the Fire: Put ia a La. leful of thick Butter, with a little Vinegar; when your Goofe is boild enough, lay your Cabbage on Sippets of Bread, the Goofe on the Top of your Cabbage, and fome of the Cabbage on the Top of your Goofe.

hoil a Goofe,

PUT it into a Pot with Water or flrong Broth; let it boil, and Ikim it clean; then put in Salt, Pepper, three or four flicd Onions, and three or four Cloves, fome White Wine, Mace, Raifms, and Currants, a little grated Bread, and a Bundle of fweet Herbs: When it is done enough, difh it up on Sippets; flalh it on the Breall, and garnifh with Slices- of Lemon and Barberries.

Ta foufe a Goofe.

BONE your Goofe, cut the Flelh fquare, lay it a keep- ing in White Wine, Salt, Pepper, Cloves and Mace,, for twelve Hours; then take it out, and lay Pieces of An- chovies over it, and Wejlphalia Ham mincd fmall; then roll it up hard, and boil it in flrong Broth, and a little White Wine, whole Pepper, and fome Blades of Mace j put it in a Pan, let it ftand in this Liquor till you ufe it: When you ferve it, cut it inKalf, and garnifh the Dilh with mincd Wefi- phalia Ham.

To dry a Goofe.

GET a fat Goofe, take a Handful of common Salt, a Quarter of an Ounce of Salt-petre, a Quarter of a Pound pf coarfe Sugar, aajc all together, and rub youj Goie very

velL

he Ladys Com panic k. 50 J

well, let it lie in this Pickle a Fortnight, turning and rubbing it every Day, then roll it in Bran, and hang it up in a Chim- ney where Wood-fmoak is for a Week. If you have not that Conveniency fend it to the Bakers, the Snioak of the Oven will dry it, or you may hang it in your own Chimney, not too near the -Fire; when it is well dryd, keep it in a dry- Place; you may keep it two or three Months, or more: When you boil it, put it in a good deal of Wateii, and be fure to ikim it well.

Note, You may boil Turnips, or Cabbage boild andllewd in Butter, or Onion-fauce.

To drefi a Goofe ttv Onions or Cabbage.

SALT the Goofe for a Week, then boil it; it will take an Hour; you may either make Onion-fauce, as we do for Ducks, or Cabbage boild, chopped, and ftewd in Butter wiih a little Pepper and Salt; lay the Goofe in the Difli, and pour the Sauce over it. It eats very good with either..

Gqqq a la Modi.

TAKE two Geefc, and raife their Skins on the Breads, and making a Stuffing of Pullet, Chicken, or Veal Sweetbrea s, Mullirooms, Anchovies, Oyllers, Marrow, and a little Lemon-peel, a little Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Thyme, Marjoram, and a Clove of Garlick, mingle all thefe with the Yolk of an Egg; put a little under the Skin on the Breails, and fome in their Bellies. Lard your Geefe with Lemon and Thyme, then put as much Butter in your Stew-pan as wiU brown them on both Sides; then put them in the Butter with firong Gravy, feafond very high; and when they are ftewd enougl. take them out; thicken the Sauce with Butter rolld tip in Flour, and the Yolks of Eggs, with Half a Pint of Claret, and let them boil to be thick; then fry Oyfters and Force-meat EaUs, and crifpd Sippets to lay round your Difh, and ferve it. Garnilli with grated Bread and Flowers round your Diiii.

Another Way.

TA K E a large fine Goofe, pick it clean, kin it, and cut it down the Back, bone it » icely, take the Fat off, then take a dryd Tongue, boil it, and peel it: Take a Fowl, and do it in the fame Manner as the Goofe, feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and beaten Mace, roll it round the Tongue, fipafon the Goofe vyith the faxne; put the Tongue and Fowl

504 he Ladys Companion.

in the Goofe, and few the Goofe up again in the fame Form it was before; put it into a Stew-pan, put to it two Qjiarts of Beef-Gravy, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, and an Onion; put feme Slices of Ham, or Bacon, between the Fowl and Goofe, cover it clofe, and let it flew an Hour over a good Fire: When it begins to boil, let it do very foftly, then take up your Goofe, and fkim off all the Fat, ftrain it, put in it a Glafs of Red Wine, two Spoonfuls of Catchup, a Veal Sweet- bread cut fmall, fome Truffles, Morels, and Mufhrooms, a Piece of Butter roUd in Flour, and fome Pepper and Salt, if Ivanted; put in the Goofe again, cover it clofe, and let it flew half an Hour longer, then take it up, and pour the Ra goo over it. Garnilh with Lemon.

You mull mind to fave the Bones of the Goofe and Fowl, and put them into the Gravy when it is firft fet on, and it will be belter if you roll fome Beef-marrow between the Tongue and Fowl, and between the Fowl and Goofe, it will make them mellow, and eat fine You may add fix or feven Yolks of hard Eggs whole in the Difh; they are a pretty Addition

7o boil Gibblets.

PI C K and fcald your Gibblets clean, boil them in Water and Salt, with two or three Blades of Mace, and ferve them up on Sippets, with melted Butter, fcalded Grapes, or Goofeberries, Barberries, and flicd Lemon.

To fienx Gibblets.

LET them be fcalded and pickd, break the two Pinion- bones in two, cut the Head in two, and cut off the Nollrils; cut the Liver in two, the Gizzard in four, the Neck in two; flip off the Skin of the Neck, and make a Pudding with two hard Eggs choppd fine, the Crti:i b of a French Roil fleepd in hot Milk two or three Hours; then mix it with the hard Egg, a little Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and a little Sage choppd fine, a very little melted Butter, llir it together, tie one End of the Skin, and fill it with the Ingredients, tie the Other End tight, and put all together into a Stew-pan, with a Quart of good Mutton -Broth, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, an Onion, fome whole Pepper, Mace, tvo or three Cloves tyd up loofe in a Muflin Rag, a very little Piece of Lemon peel; cover them clofe, and let them ilew till quite tender; then take a firall French Roll toaLied brown on all Sides, and put it into the Stew pan, give it a Shake, and let it flew till there is jull Gravy enough to eat with;hein; then take out the

Onion,

The Ladys Companion. 505

Onicm, fweet Herbs, and Spice; lay the Roll in the Middle, the Gibblets round, the Pudding cut into Slices and lay round, then pour the Sauce over ail.

Another Way.

TAKE the Gibblets clean pickd and waflid, the Feet fkinnd, and Bill cut oiF, the Head cut in two, the Pinion-bones broke into two, the Liver cut in two, the Giz- zard cut into four, the Pipe pulld out of the Neck, and the Neck cut in two; put them into a Pipkin with Half a Pint of Water, fome whole Pepper, Black and White, a Blade of Mace, a little Sprig of Thyme, a fmall Onion, a little Crull of Bread, cover them, clofe, and fet them on a very flow Fire.
Wood Embers is beft. Let them ftew till they are quite tender; then take out the Herbs and Onion, and pour them into a little Diih. Seafon them with Salt.

Another Way,

WHEN you have parboild your Gibblets, then tofs them up in a Stew-pan, as a Fricafey of Chickens; then fet them over a gentle Fire in a Stew-pan, with good llrong Broth; cover it clofe, and let them ftew till Half the Broth is confumd; in the mean Time fet a Couple of French Rolls to fimmer in ftrong Broth, and place them in the Mid- dle of the Difh, lay your Gibblets round and upon them; pour Mutton-Gravy upon them, and ferve them up hot.

To roajl Pigeons.

FILL them with Parfley clean walhd and choppd. Pep- per and Salt roUd in Butter; fill the Bellies, tie the Neck-end clofe, fo that nothing can run out; put a Skewer through the Legs, and have a little Iron on Purpofe, with fix Hooks to it, on each Hook hang a Pigeon, fallen one End of a String to the Chimney, and the other End to the Iron this is what we call the poor Mans Spit flour them, and bafte them with Butter, turn them gently for fear of hitting the Bars, they will roalt nicely, and be full of Gravy: Take care that you do not lofe any of the Liquor; you may melt a very little Butter and put into the Difli; your 1 igeons ought to be quite frefli, and not too much done; this is by much the beil Way of doing them, for then they will fwim in their own Gravy, and a very little melted Butter will do.

When you road them on a Spit all the Gravy runs out, or if you fluff them, and broil them whole, you cannot fave the

Gravy

3o6 he Lab y s C o m p a n i o rr.V

Gravy fo well, tho they will be very good with Parlley and Butter in the Difh, or fplit and broird with Pepper and Salt,

To boil Pigeons.

BOIL them by themfelves for fifteen Minutes, then boil a handfome fquare Piece of Bacon and lay in the Mid- dle; Hew feme Spinach to lay round, and lay the Pigeons on the Spinach. Garniih your Difh with Parley laid in a Plate before the Fire to crifp. Or you may lay one Pigeon in the Middle, and the reft round, and the Spinach between each Pigeon, and a Slice of Bacon on each Pigeon. Garnifh with Slices of Bacon, and melted Butter in a Cup.

To a la Daube Pigeons,

TA K E a large Stew-pan, lay a Layer of Eacon, then a Layer of Veal, a Layer of coarfe Beef, and another little Layer of Veal, about a Pound of Veal, and a Pound of Beef cut very thin; a Piece of Carrot, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, an Onion, fome Black and White Pepper, a Blade or tvyo of Mace, four or five Cloves, a little Cruft of Bread toafted very brown; cover the Stew-pan ciofe, fet it over a flow Fire for five or fix Minutes, fhake in it a little Flour j then pour in a Quart of boiling Water, Ihake it round, cover it cloie, and let it flew till the Gravy is quite rich and good, then ftrain it off, and fkim off all the Fat. In the mean Time fluff the Bellies of the Pigeons with Force-meat made thus: Take a Pound of Veal, a Pound of Beef-fewet, beat both in a Mortar fine, an equal Quantity of Crrmbs of Bread, fome Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, beaten Mace, a little Lemon- peel cut fmall, fome Parlley cut fmall, and a very little Thyme ilrippd, mix all together with the Yolk of an Egg, fill the Pigeons, and flat the Breaft down, flour them, and fry them in frefli Butter a little brown; then pour all the Fat clean ©ut of the Pan, and put to the Pigeons the Gravy, cover them clofe, and let them ftew a Quarter of an Hour, or till you think they are quite enough; then take them up, lay them in a Dilh, and pour in yeur Sauce on each Pigeon, lay a Bay -leaf, and on the Leaf a Slice of Eacon. You may garnifh with a Lemon notched, or let it alone.

Note You may leave out the Stuffing, they will be very rich and good without it, and it is the befl Way of dreffing them for a fine made Diih.

Pigeons

The L A D ys C o m p a n I c h. 307

Pigeons au Pcir,

MA K E a good Force-meat as before, cut ofF the Feet quite, ftuiFthem in the Shape of a Pear, roll them in the Yolk of an Egg, and then in Crumbs of Bread, iHck the Leg at the Top, and butter a Difti to lay them in; then fend them to an Oven to bake, but dont let them touch each other; when they are enough, lay them in a Dilh, and pour good Gravy thickened with the Yolk of an Egg, or Butter roird in Flour; dont pour your Gravy over the Pigeons.
You may garnifli with Lemon. It is a pretty genteel Difh v Or, for Change, lay one Pigeon in the Middle, the reft rounds and ftewd Spinach betv.een; poachd Eggs on the Spinach,.
Garnifn with notched Lemon and Orange cut into Quarters and have melted Butter in Bafons..

Pigeons Jioved.

TA K E a fmall Cabbage Lettuce, juft cut cut the Hearty and make a Force meat as before, only chop the Heart of the Cabbage and mix with it; fill up the Place you took out, and tie it acrofs with a Packthread; fry it of a light Brown in freOi Butter, pour out all the Fat, lay the Pigeons round, flat them with your Hand, feafon them a little with Pepper, Salt, and beaten Mace take great Care not to put too much Salt pour in Half a Pint of White Wine, cover it clofe, and let it ftew about five or fix Mmutes; then put in Half a Pint of good Gravy, cover them clofe, and let them ftew Half an Hour. Take a good Piece of Butter roUd in Flour, fhake it in; when it is fine and thick take it up, untie, it, lay the Lettuce in the Middle, and the Pigeons round; fqueeze in a little Lemon-juice, and pour the Sauce all over them. Stew a little Lettuce, and cut it into Pieces for Gar- nilh, with pickled red Cabbage.

Note, Or for Change you may ftiiif your Pigeons with the fame Force-meat, and cut two Cabbage Lettuces into Quar- ters, and ftew as above; fo lay the Lettuces between each Pigeon, and one in the Middle with Lettuce round it, and.
pour the Sauce all over them.

Pigeons furioui

FORCE your Pigeons as above, then lay a Slice of Ba- con on the Breaft, .ind a Slice of Veal beat with the Back of a Knife, and feafond with Mace, Pepper, and Salt,

tie

3o8 The L a d ys Companion;

tie it on with a fmall Packthread, or two little fine Skewers is better; fpit them on a fine Bird-fpit, roaft them, and bafte with a Piece of Butter, then with the Yolk of an Egg,, and then bafte them with Crumbs of Bread, a little Nutmeg and fweet Herbs; when enough, lay them in your Difh, have good Gravy ready, with Truffles, Morels, and Mufhrooms, ta pour into your Difli. Garnifli with Lemon.

Pigeons a la Crepoaudtne.

WHEN you have pickd and gutted your Pigeons, trufs them with their Leg;s within their Bodies; then cut up the Breaft, and throw the fame over their Heads, and beat them flat; put them in a Stew-pan with melted Ba- con, or Putter, foine Parfley, green Onions, Pepper, Sa t, and fweet Herbs; put all over the Fire to make it have a Tafte; then ftrew then with fine CnuTibs of Bread, and let them be broird, and ferve them up with Gravy, a Shalot cut fmall. or green Cnio-s, and the Juice of a Lemon over them, and ferve them up hot for an Entry.

Pigeons en Compote,

FIRST pull and draw your Pigeens, trufs them hand- fomely, the Legs in the Bodies, and parboil them; then lard them with large Lardoons, feafond with Salt, Herbs, Pepper, Spices, mincd Gives and Parfley, and ftew them a la Baife. While they are a Hewing, make a Ragoo of Cocks-combs, Fowls Livers, Truffles, and Mufhrooms. tof- iing them up in a little melted Bacon, then moiften your Ra- goo with Gravy, et it to fimmer over a gentle Fire, take ofF the Fat, and thicken it with a CuUis of Veal ard Ham, Take up your Pigeons, and drain them, then rut them into the Ragoo, and let them fimmer in it to give them the Tafle of it: Lay them in a Difh, pour the Ragoo upon them, and ferve them for the iirft Courfe.

Pigeons en Compote, nvtth nvhite Sauce.

LE T your Pigeons be drawn, pickd, fcalded, and flead; then put them into a Stew-pan with a little melted Ba- con, Veal Sweetbreads, Cocks-combs, Mufhrooms, Truffles, Morels, Pepper, and Salt; after they have ftewd a little put in a Pint of thin Gravy, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, an Onion, and a Blade or two of Mace; cover them clofe, let them ftew Half an Hour, then take out the Herbs and Onion, then beat up the Yolks of two or three Eggs, and fome choppd

Parfley,

be Ladys Companion. o<

Parfley, in a Quarter of a Pint of Cream, and a little Nutmegs mix all together flir it one Way till thick; lay the Pigeons m the Difli, and the Sa ce all over. Garniih with Lemon.

J PuptoJi of Pigeons.

TAKE favoury Force-meat rolld out like Pafle, put ie in a buttered Difi, lay a Layer of very thin Bacon, fquab Pigeons Diced, a Sweetbread, Afparagus-Tops, Muih- rooms. Cocks-combs, a Palate boiled tender, and cut intq Pieces, and the Yolks of hard Pggs; make another Force- meat, and lay over like a Pye; bake it, and when enough turn it into a Difh, and pour Gravy in it.

Pigeons boiled ijoith Rice.

TA K E fix Pigeons, llufF their Bellies v»ith Parfiey, Pep» per and Salt rolPd in a very little Piece of Butter; put them into a Quart of IVIutton- Broth, with a little beaten Mace, a Bundle of iweet Herbs, and an Onion; cover them clofe, and let them boil a full Quarter of an Hour; then take out the Onion and fweet Herbs, and take a good Piece of Butter rolled in Flour; put it in, and give it a Shake, feafon it with Salt, if it wants it; then have ready Half a Pound of Rice boiled tender in Milk; when it begins to be thick, but take great Care it dont burnt too take the Yolks of tvo or three Eggs, beat up with two or three Spoonfuls of Cream and a little Nutmeg; llir it together till it is quite thick; then take up the Pigeons, and lay them in a Difh; pour the Gravy to the Rice; ftir all together, and pour over the Pi- geons. Garnifh with hard Eggs cut into Quarters.

Pigeons tranfmogrijied.

TAKE your Pigeons, feafon them with Pepper and Salt, take a large Piece of Butter, make a PuiF-paile, and roll each Pigeon in a Piece of Parte; tie them in a Cloth, io that the Pafte dont break j boil them in a good deal of Water. They will take an Hour and Half boiling; untie them carefully that they dont break; lay them in the Difh, and you may pour a little good Gravy in the Difh. They will eat exceeding good and nice, and will yield Sauce enough of a very agreeable Relifh.

Pigeons

3IO s Ladys Companion.

Pigeons Fricandoes,

AFTER having trufsd your Pigeons, with their Legs iit their Bodies, divide them in two, and lard them witk Bacon; then lay them in a Stew-pan with the larded Side downwards, and two whole Leeks cut fmali, a Couple of Ladlefuls of Mutton-Broth, or Yeal-Gravy; cover them clofe over a flow Fire, and when they are enough, make your Fire very brifk, to walle away what Liquor remains; when they are of a ftne Brown take them up, and pour out all the Fat that is left in the Pan; then pour in fome good Broth or Veal Gravy to loofen what ilicks to the Pan, and a little Pepper; ftir it about for two or three Minutes, and pour it over the Pigeons. This is a pretty little Side-diih..

To roajl Pigeons n.vxth a Fares.

MAKE a Farce with the Livers mincd fmaU, as much fveet Sewet or Marrow, grated Bread, and hard Egg, an equal Quantity of each; feaion vxkv beaten Mace, Nut- meg, a little Pepper, Salt, and a little fweet Herbs; mix all theie together with the Yolk of an Egg, then cut the Skin of your Pigeon between the Legs and the Body, and very care- fully vith your Fingers raife the Skin from the Flefh, but take care you dont break it; then force them with this Farce between the Skin and the Flefh; then trufs the Legs clofe to keep it in; fpit them and roafl them, drudge them with a little Flour, and balle them vitk a Piece of Butter; fave the Gravy which runs from thexii, and mix it up with a little Red Wine, a little of the Farce-meat, and fome Nutmeg; let it boil, then thicken it with a Piece of Butter rolPd in flour, and the Yolk of an Egg beat up, and fome mincd Lemon; when enough, lay the Pigeons in the Difh, and pour in the Sauce. Garnifn with Lemon.

To dref Pigeons a SoklL

FIRST flew your Pigeons in a very little Gravy till enough, and take diFerent Sorts of Flefh, according to your Fancy, ic. both of Butchers Meat and Fowl; chop it fmall, feafon it with beaten Mace, Cloves, Pepper, and Salt, and beat it in a Mortar till it is like Pafte; roll your Pigeons in it, then roll them in the Yolk of an Egg; fhake Flour and Crumbs of Bread thick all over; have ready fome Beef- Drippmg or Hogs-Lard boiling; fry them brown, and lay them in your Diih. Garnifh with fryd Parfley.

Pigeons

fke L A D ys C O M P A N I M. 11

Pigeons in a Hole.

TAKE your Pigeons, feafon them with beaten Mace, Pepper, and Salt; put a little Piece of Butter in the Belly, lay them in a Diili, and pour a light Batter all over them, made with a Quart of Milk and Eggs, and four or five Spoonfuls of Flour; bake it, and fend it to Table. It is a good Dilh.

Pigeons in Fimlico.

TAKE the Livers, with fome Fat and Lean of Ham or Bacon, Mufhrooms, TrufHes, Parfley, and fweet Herbs; feafon with beaten Mace, Pepper, and Salt; beat ali this together with two raw Eggs, put it into the Bellies, roll them in a thin Slice of Veal, over that a thin Slice of Bacon; wrap them up in white Paper, fpit them on a fmall Spit, and roalt them: In the mean lime,make for them a Ragoo of Truffles and Mufhrooms chopped fmall, with Parfley cut fmall; put to it Half a Pint of good Veal Gravy, thickend Aith a Piece of Butter rolld in Flour; an Hour will do vour Pigeons; bafte them: When enough, lay them in yourDifh, take off the Paper, and pour your Sauce over them. Garnifh with Patties made thus: Take Veal and cold Ham, Beef- fewet, an equal Quantity, fome Pviufnrooms, fweet Herbs, and Spice; chop them fm.all, tt them on the Fire, and moiften ivith Milk or Cream; then make a little Putf-palle, roll, aud make little Patties about an Lich deep, and two Inches lone-; ill them with the above Ingredients, cover them clofe, and bake them.; lay fix of them round a Difh. This makes a fine Difn for a firil Courfe.

To jugg Pigeons.

PULL, crop, and draw Pigeons, but dont wafli them; fave the Livers, and put them in fcalding Vater, and fee them on the Fire for a Minute or two; then take them out, and mince them fmall, and bruife them with the Back of a Spoon; mix with them a little Pepper, Salt, grated Nutmeg, and Lemon-peel fnred very fine, chopped Parfley, and two Yolks of Eggs very hard; bruife them as you would do the Liver, and put as much Sewet as Liver fhaved exceeding £ne, and as much grated Bread; work thefe together with raw Eggs, and roll it in freih Butter; put a Piece into the Crops and Bellies, and few upr the Necks and Vent; then dip your Pigeons in Water, and feafon them with Pepper and Salt as i . lor

312 The Ladys Companion,

for a Pic; then put in your Jugg, with a Piece of Sellery, Hop them clofe, and fet them in a Kettle of cold Water; firft.
cover them clofe, and lay aTile on the Top of the Jugg, and let it boil three Hours; then take them out of the Jugg, and lay them in a Difh, take out the Sellery, and put in a Piece of Butter, rolled in Flour; fhake it about till it is thick, and pour it on your Pigeons. Garnilli with Lemon.

To fitnxi Pigeons.

SEASON your Pigeons with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, and fome fv;eet Herbs; wrap this Seafoning up in a Piece of Butter, and put in their Bellies; then tie up the Neck and Vent, and half roall them; then put them into a Stew-pan, with a Quart of good Gravy, a little White Wine, fome pickled Muflirooms, a few Pepper-corns, three or four Blades of Mace, a Bit of Lemon peel, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, a Bit of Onion, and fome Oyfters pickled; let them ftew till they are enough, then thicken it up with Butter and Volks of Eggs. Garmfh with Lemon.

Do Ducks the fame Way. You may put Force-meat into their Bellies, or into both.

Another Way,

STUFF them with Forcd-meat, then fry them in But- ter till they are brown, then drain the Butter from them, and put boiling Water to them, with Gravy-Beef, and Sea- foning, and let them flew over a flow Fire; when they are tender, ftrain off the Liquor, and thicken it with the Yolk of an Egg, and put to it a little Walnut-pickle: Garnifh with Lemon, and thin Slices of Bacon.

Another Way,

TAKE fix Pigeons, with four butterd Eggs, fome grated Bread, with fome Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper, a little Mace, and fome fweet Herbs; mix this all together, and put it in the Bellies of the Pigeons; few them tp Top and Bottom; ftew them in flrong Broth, with Half a Pint of White Wine; then put a little Bundle of fweet Herbs, and a Bit of Lemon-peel and an Onion: When they are a] moil done, put in fome Artichoak-Bottoms boild and fryd in brown Butter, or Afparagus-Tops boil- ed; thicken up the Liquor with the Stuffing out of the

Pigeons,

The L A D Ys Companion, 313

ligeons, and a Bit of Butter rolled in Flour; flrain the Sauce; garnilh the Diih with Diced Lemon and thin Bits of Bacon toalted before the Fire.

Another Way.

ME L T a good Quantity of Butter, mingle it with Parf- ley, Sorrel, and Spinach, chopped fmall, which you muft rtew in fome Butter; and, when it is cold, put it into fome of their Ciaws with a Bay-leaf; fave fome of it for Sauce: Then flew the Pigeons in as much ftrong Gravy as will cover them, Vvdth fome Cloves, Mace, Salt, Pepper, and Winter favoury, a little Lemon-peel, a Shalot or two, • then brown fome Butter and put in; and when they are flewed cnough, put in a little Bit of Butter rolled up in Flour, and the Yolk of an Egg, vith fome of the Herbs you left out j Ihakc it up all together, and ferve away hot.

Another Way,

GE T young Pigeons and parboil them j then chop fome raw Bacon very fm.all, with a little Parlley, a little fweet Marjoram, or fweet Bafil, and a fmall Onion; feafon this with Salt and Pepper, and fill the Bodies of the Pigeons with it. When this is done, ilew the Pigeons in Gravy, or llrong Broth, with an Onion lluck with Cloves, a little Ver- juice and Salt; when they are enough, take them out of the Liquor, and dip them in Eggs that have been well beaten; and, after that, roll them in grated Bread, that the may bs covered with it. Then make fome Lard vxy hot, and fry them in it till they are brown, and ferve them up with fome of the Liquor they were itewd in, and fryd Parfley.

Another Way.

TAKE fix Pigeons, and take out the Livers, Gizzards, and Hearts, then cut the Pinions at the firll Joint, and flew your Pigeons gently, putting Pepper and Salt into the Bellies; then cut a Quarter of a Pound of Bacon in thin Slices, and put it into a Stew-pan, and fry it crifp, then take it out, and fet it before the Fire i then flour the Pigeons Iery well, and fry them in the Bacon Liquor till they re brown, adding to it a Bit of Butter; then take out your Pigeons and wipe your Pan, and ftew them in their lirll Liquor, adding to Vol. L P it

14 he Ladys Companion.

it fome good Gravy, till they are quite tender; then take Sellery, and boil it tender, and drain it out of the Water, and after you have cut it into Bits, let it flew with your Pigeons; and, when it has flewd enough, roll up fome Butter in Flour, and make it of a good Thicknefs, and dilh your Pigeons, and garnilh with the Bacon and flicd Lemon. Some put in French Seans inltead of Sellery.

Pigeons a la Braife,

PICK, gut, and trufs large Pigeons, lard them with thick Bacon well feafond; then take a Stew-pan, and garniih it with Slices of Bacon, Veal, and Onions place in it your Pigeons, and feafon them with Pepper, Salt, fine Spices, and fweet Herbs, and cover them under and over, and let them flew; being ftevved, let them drain: Keep your Ragoo ready made with Sweetbreads of Veal, Truffles, and Champignons; your Sweetbreads of Veal being blanched, put them into the Stew-pan, together with your TrufHes and Champignons, adding to them a Ladleful of Gravy, and a little Cullis, and let it flew. All being done, and of a good Tafte, difh up your Pigeons, pour your Ragoo over them, and ferve them up hot for an Entry.

0 drefs Pigeons fvcith fweet Bnfil.

YOUR Pigeons being well fcalded, flit them a little on the Back -, then make a fmall Farce of raw Bacon, minced fmall, with fvveet Bafil and Chibbol well feafoned; put this into the Slit in your Pigeons, and put them into a Stew-pan with good Broth, a little Salt, Verjuice, and an Onion luck with Cloves; then take them out, roll them in beaten Eggs, drudge them well with grated Bread, fry them brown in hot Lard, then fry them again with Parfley, with which you mufl garnifli them; when you ferve them up, they will ferve for a Side-difh.

7«7 fry Pigeons.

BLANCH them, then cut them in two, beat them flat, and put them in a Stew-pan with Onions, Parfley, Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Bafil, a Piece of Butter, a Ladleful of Broth, or the Liquor they were blanched in, and fome Vine- gar; all thefe having flawed a little while, take them out and «iip them in Whites of Eggs, and then in Flour, and fry them

immc-

ne Ladys Companion, 315

immediately; difh them handfomely, and pour over them the Liquor they were flewed in, after being llrained. Garnifh with fryd Farfley.

Pigeons au Gratin.

TAKE young Pigeons picked dry, blanch them over a Charcoal Fire, then pick them very clean; and wilen they are well picked, fplit them in the Back; then take the Livers, which you mince with fcraped Bacon, Parfley, green Onions, Champignons, and Truffies, feafoned with Pepper, Salt, £ne Spice, and fweet Herbs; but all moderately: Then put in a Difh Slices of Bacon, of Veal, and of Ham; after that place in it your Pigeons, and your Forced-meat, men- tioned before, in their Bellies; and lay over each Pigeon a fmall Slice of Ham and Veal: There is no need to put Seafoning, by reafon of the Ham: Cover them with another Difh, Half as fmall again as the other, and take a white Napkin moiftend, which put all round the Difh, to hinder it from taking Vent; then put it a flewing over a fmall Stove; it being done, difh it up with EfTenceof Ham in another Difn and ferve it up hot for a fmall Entry, or Hors d Oeuvre.

Another Way of drcjjlng Pigeons au Gratirt.

GE T fome Pigeons as above, pick and order them very clean j put fbme Slices of Bacon and Veal in a Stew- pan; alfo fome Slices of Ham and Onions; then place in your Pigeons: Make a fmall Seafoning with Parlley, fcraped Bacon, green Onions, Salt, fweet Herbs, fome fat Liver, Champignons, and TrufRes; the Whole being well minced together, put it in the Bellies of your Pigeons, and let the Seafoning be as it fhould, but take care not to m.ake it too fait; then cover it with a Layer of Veal and Slices of Ba- con; and when they are done, make a little Cullis of Par tridges, which you mull put into your Difh about the Breadth of two Fingers deep; then put your Pigeons into it, and fo put your Difh upon a Stove, to make them iiick to the Bot-, torn of it; keep the Border of your Difh clean; then put in it a little EfTence of Ham, or elfe an Italian Sauce, and ferve up hot.

To hroil Pigeons nvhale.

SEASON and fluff them with the fame Stuffing as juggti Pigeons; broil them, or put them in an Oven; wher; they are enough, take the Gravy from them, and take oft the Fat j then put to the Gravy two or three Spoonfuls of

P 2 Water,

n i6 Wf Lad ys Com p A N ION.

i Water, a little boiPd Parfley fhred; then thicken your Sauce.
Garnilh your Difh with crilp Pariley.

Another Way.

SLIT them down the Back, fprinkle them with Salt and Pepper, lay them on the Gridiron, broil them gently, turning them often; balle them with Red Wine; make a Sauce of frelh Butter, a Shalot, and the Juice of Lemons, and fo ferve them up hot.

0 drefi Pigeons nxith Fennel.

AFTER having Pigeons of the bell: Sort, trufs them, and only fmge them before the Fire; then take their Livers, with fome Bacon, Cive, Pariley, and Fennel, and mince them fmall; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Nut- meg; fluff the Bodies of your Pigeons with this Farce, and roaft them, and ferve them up to Table with a good Ragoo pourd over them.

To hoil Pigeons Ith Capers and Samphire.

AFTER your Pigeons are trufsd, put them into a Stew- pan with fome Broth, or for Want of it, warm Water, White Wine, and a Bundle of fweet Herbs; when ftewd enough, take them out; then take fome of the Liquor, and put into a Stew-pan, with fome minced Capers and Lemons iliced, and a Piece of Butter; let all ftew together a little while, and pour over them j then lay upon them fome thin Slices of Bacon fryd crifp, and fome Samphire wafhed from the Salt, and Slices of Lemon; garnilh the Dilh with the lame.

Another Way.

WHEN you have drawn, and trufsd them up, break the Breaft-bone, and lay them in Milk and Water to make them white; tie them in a Cloth, and boil them in Milk and Water: When you difli them up, put to them a white fricafey Sauce, only adding a few flired Mufhrooms.
Garnilh with crifp Pariley and fryd Sippets.

7b drefs Pigeons a la Saifigaraz.

ROAST them, but firft lard them; in the mean Time, cut Slices of Gammon of Bacon, beat them well, put them in a Stew-pan, tofs them up with melted Bacon and a little Flour; put in fome good Gravy without Salt, and a

Faggot

The Ladys Companion, giy

.Faggot of fweet Herbs: When thefe have fimmerd a-while, put in a little Vinegar, and fome good Cull is to bind it .; quarter your Pigeons, difti them, take the Fat ofF, lay the Slices of Bacon on the Pigeons, pour the Sauce upon them, and ferve them.

A Bifque cf Pigeons,

PARBOIL them, then put them into llrong Broth, and let them Itevv j make for them a Ragoo, with Gravy, Artichoke-Bottoms, Potatoes, and Onions, feafon with la voury Seafoning, Lemon-juice, and dryd Lemon, andBacou cut as for Larding, Mufhrooms, Truffles, and Morels; pour the Broth the Pigeons were Hewed in into a Diih, having puL carved and dryd Sippets at the Bottom, then place the Pi- geons, and pour over them the Ragoo, with a Pint of hot Cream; gamilh with fcalded Parlley, Beet-roots, and Lt- mon.

7a drefs Pigeons a la Sainte Menehout.

IRS T get large Pigeons, then trufs them, divide them into two, and lard them with large Lardoons of Bacon well feafond; cut Slices of Bacon, and alfo of Veal, or Beef; feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Spices, fweet Herbs, Cives, and Parfley, Ihred fmall, and lay your Slices of Bacon over the Bottom of a Stew-pan, lay Slices of Veal upon them, and fome Onions and Carrots iliced. Then lay in your Pigeons, lay on them the fame Seafoning that you did under them; lay Slices of Veal over your Sealbning, and Slices of Bacon over your Veal. Cover your Stew-pan clofe, and fet them -to llevv a la Braife i. e. with Fire both over them and under them: When they are about half itewd, moillen them with a Pint of Milk, and a Couple of Spoonfuls of good Broth, and let them Hew till they are enough; then take them off the Fire, fet them by till they are cold, letting them Hand in their own Liquor; then take them up, and drain them, .then dip them in beaten Eggs, and drudge them well with Crumbs of Bread, and fry them brown in Hogs Lard, and ferve them up hot.

If you would have them broild, then dip them in the Fat in which they were Hewed, and drudge them well with grated Bread, and lay them on a Gridiron, and broil them, and ferve them up with a Ramolade made of Oil, Salt, Pepper, Anchovies, and a little Muilard mingled well together, with a little Cives and Parfley, ihred fmall, and the Juice of a Lemon.

P3 Yoa

fS 5ii Lad vs Com p A N I o N.

Vou may ferve them up cold without being either fryd or broild, in Plates or little Difhes.

7o drefs Pigeons a la Tartare, vith cold Sauce,

WHENyou have fmged your Pigeons, and trufsd them as for boiling, flat them with a Cleaver as thin as you can, v.ithout breaking the Skin on the Backs or Breafls-; then feafon them pretty well with Salt, Pepper, and Cloves, dip them in melted Butter, and dradge them well vith grated Bread, then lay them on a Gridiron, turn them often: If your Fire be not very clear, you may laythem on a Sheet of Paper well buttered, to keep them from being fmoaked. While they are boiling, prepare your Sauce thus: Take a Piece of Onion, or a Shalot, an Anchovy, and a Couple of Spoonfuls of Pickles, and mince them veryfmall, €very one by themfelves; as alfo a Spoonful of Parfley minced. Then add a little Salt, a little Pepper, five or fix Spoonfuls of Oil, a Spoonful of Water, and the Juice of one Lemon. Mix all thefe well together; and when you are going to ferve, put in a Spoonful of IVIuftard; pour this Sauce; cold into the Diih; your Pigeons being broild enough, lay them on the Top of it, and ferve it for a firll Courfe.

To drefs Pigeons ith Truffles.

LOOSEN the Skin of their Breafls; then mince your Pigeons Livers with fome Lean of Ham or Bacon, and iome Fat, Mufhrooms and Truffles, Cives and Parfley, and fweet Herbs; feafon with Pepper and Spices, and pound all thefe together, with the Yolks of two raw Eggs: Then farce the Breafls of your Pigeons with this Farce, Ipit them, wrap them up in thin Slices of Veal, cover the Veal with thin Slices of Bacon, wrap them up in Sheets of Paper, and roafl them. In the mean Time, make for them a Ragoo pf Truf- fles in the Manner following: Peel your Truflles, wafn them tlean, cut t-hern in Slices, and put them into a Stew-pan, put £0 them fome good Veal-Gravy, and t them a fimmering over a Stove. When they are enough, put in a Cullis of Veal and Ham to thicken it. Vhen your Pigeons are roafted enough, take off the Bards, difli them., pour yourRaGC over thenij and lerve them hot for firit Courle.

d OJlii

Ti La D ys Co M p A N I o N. 519

A Cullis of Pigeons,

TA K E a Couple of Pigeons at their full Growth, road them, and pound them in a Mortar; then fhred a Couple of Anchovies, fome Mocds and TrufRes, a Couple of Rocamboles, a few Capers, fome Parfiey and Cives together very fmall; mix thele with the pounded Pigeons, put them into a Stew-pan with Veal-Gravy and Ham, let them fim- mer a while, then ftrain it through a Sieve for Ufe.

Cuckows may be dreiTed the feveral Ways that Pigeons are.

To drefi Partridges a la Braife.

PULL and draw your Partridges, trufs their Legs inio their Bodies, parboil them, and lard them with large Lardoons of Bacon, feafoned with Salt, Pepper, Spices, fweet Herbs, Cives, and Parfley ihred. Take a Stew-pan with a Cover, lay Bards of Bacon over the Bottom of it, lay thin Slices ©f Beef upon them, lay upon your Beef-llices Carrots and Onions, and lirew over them fhred Parfley feafon with Salt, Pepper, Spices, and fweet Herbs; then lay in the Par- tridges with the Breails downwards; then feafon them above, as you did underneath, and then lay over them Slices of Beef, and upon them Slices of Bacon; cover your Stew-pail, and let them flew with Fire over and under them. While they are Hewing, make a Ragoo of Cocks-combs, fat Livers, Veal Sweetbreads, Truffks, Mufhrooms, Artichoak-Bottoins, and Afparagus-Tops, according to the Seafon, in the fol- lowing Manner: Tofs up in a Stew-pan, with a little melted Bacon, the Sweetbreads, fat Livers, Cocks-combs, Mufh- rooms, and TrufRis -, moillen them vvith Gravy, and let them fmimer in it Half an Plour; then fkim off the Fat clean; and having blanched your Artichoak-Bottoms and Afparagus- Tops in Vyater, put them into the Stew-pan, and thicken it with a Cullis of teal and Ham. When your Partridges are fhevvd enough, take them up, drain them, and put them into your Ragoo. Diih them handfomely, pour the Ragoo upon them, and ferve them up for a f rft Courle.

You may alfo ferve them up with a hafhd Sauce, or a Ragoo of Cucumbers.

To

320 The Ladys Companion.

7o drefs Partridges a Biherot.

AFTER ycu have roafted your Partridges, take the Meat of the Breafts, and if that is not enough, take the Breafts of fat Pullets roafted; then flour a Board well, and mince it. Pound the CarcafTes in a Mortar, and ftew them with Gravy; ftrain them through a Sieve; then put them i:ito a Pipkin with your minced Meat, let it ftew over a gentle Fire, but fee that it does not flick to the Bottom; then put in a Spoonful of Gammon EfTence; take care not to let it be either too thin, or too fat. When it is enough., difh it OD Plates, and ferve it up to Table hot to be eaten with a Spoon.

You may drew over it Chippings of Bread grated fine, and brown it with a red-hot Iron; then you may eat it with a Fork.

make Partridge Pains,

TAKE roafted Partridges, and the Flefh of a Pullet or Capon, fome parboiled Bacon, fryd Sewet, Mufh- rooms, and Morels chopped; alfo Artichoke-Bottoms, Truf- fles, a little Nutmeg, Salt, and fweet Herbs, all feafoned and cut very fmall; and add the Crumb of a Loaf foaked ia Gravy, and fome Yolks of Eggs to bind it. Then make your Pains upon Paper of a round Figure, and of the Thicknefs of an Egg, at a proper Diftance one from another. Dip the Point of your Knife in beaten Eggs, in order to ihape them, ibread them neatly, and bake them a Quarter of an Hour in a quick Oven: Obferve that the Truftles and Morels be boiled tender in the Gravy you foak the Bread in. Serve them up for a Side-difh. Thefe will ferve to garnifti the large Side- difties.

7o diefs Partridges vlih ftveet Herbs.

RA I S E the Skin of the Partridges from their Breafts with your Finger; then mince fweet Herbs andParfley fine, fcraped Bacon, feafond with Salt and Pepper, ftuft this in between the Skins and Breafts of tlie Partridges; then bard them with Bacon all round, fpit them, and lay them at the Fire to roaft; when they are enough, take off the Bards, difh them handfomely, pour on them fome Eflence of Ham, or Cullis, and ferve them up to the Table for a firft Courfe.



37 La D ys Companion. 321

To drefi Partridges a PEJioffade.

FIRST road your Partridges, take off their Skins, and cut them intoSlices; then put Mufhrooms into a Stew- pan, tofs them up with melted Bacon; put to them a little Veal Gravy, let them fimmer over a gentle Fire, rim off the Fat, and thicken with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; put your Partridges into this Ragoo, and give them a Heat; feafon all with Salt and Pepper, and ferve them up for an Outwork.

To Jfeo Partridges.

GE T Half a Dozen Partridges, parboil them; then cut them into little Pieces, feparating the Joint-bones one from the other, cut the Meat into as large Slices as you can, but do not cut it clear off from the Bones; put both Meat and Bones except the Breaft-bones into a Stew-pan, with feme of the Liquor vherein they were ftcwd, feafon it with Salt and Pepper, fet it on the Fire to flew, afterwards put in a little fweet Oil. When it is near enough, fquecze in the Juice of a Lemon. Pour it all out into a large Dilh, and ferve it up hot.

7o ronjl Partridges.

DRAW your Partridges, trufs them; then roaft them, but not too .dry; then fauce them with Salt, Water, grated Bread, and a whole Onion boiled together; When it is boiled, take out the Onion, and put in minced Lemon in its Stead; put in alfo a Piece of Butter: Difh your Par- tridges, and ferve them up with this Sauce.

Another Way,

LE T them be nicely roafted, but not too much, drudge them with a little Flour, and bafte them moderatefy, let them have a fme Froth, let there be good Gravy fauce in the Difh, and Bread fauce in Bafons made thus: Take a Pine of Water, put in a good thick Piece of Bread, fome whole Pepper, a Blade or two of Mace, boil it five or ilx Minutes till the Bread is foft, then ta e out all the Spice, and pour out all the Water, only juft enough to keep it moiil, beat it with a Spoon foft, throw in a little Salt, and a good Piece of frefli Butter, Ibr it well together, fet it over the Fire for a Minaie or two, then put it into a Baron.

P 5 -r.

322 X Ladys Companion.

0 boil Partridges.

BOIL them in a good deal of Water, let them boil quick, and fifteen Minutes will befufiicient: For Sauce, take a Quarter of a Pint of Cream, and a Piece of frefh But- ter as big as a large Walnut, iHr it one Way till it is melted, and pour it into the Diih.

Toung Partridges in Gallimaufry.

YOU muft pick, finge, and draw your Partridges, put them on the Spit, vith a Bit of Butter in the hifide of each, wrapping them up with Bards of Bacon in Paper; when they are done enough, cut them as you would your Chickens for a Fricafey, then put them into a Stew-pan with a little Broth, a little flired Cives, and a Shalot, a little Parfley, Salt, and Pepper, a Rocambole well minced, a An all Hand- ful of Crumbs of Bread, fome Zefts, with the Juice of an Orange; heat them a little on the Fire, and give them two or three Tofles without boiling, and ferve them up hot for a firfl Courfe Dilh.

Toung Partridges voith Olives.

GE T of Partridges the Number you think proper, ac- . cording to the Bignefs of your Diih, pick them well, draw them clean, but do not cut their Hole in the Backfide, take away their Gall, and mince them with fome Parfley, Chibbol, Mufhrooms, fweet Herbs, All-fpice, Salt, Pepper, fcraped Bacon, with a Bit of Butter; put the Whole in the Inlide of your Partridge, putting the Rump in the Hole of their Backfide, do not take off their Feet, and let them take a Fry in the Stew-pan, with a Bit of Butter, fome Sprigs of Parfley, a little Chibbol, with fome Salt; after which, fplit them, wrap them up in Slices of Bacoin, and fome Sheets of Paper; then get fome Olives, and having taken their Stones away, blanch them in boiling Water, then put them in a Stew-pan with a Cullis, fome ElTence of Ham, and fome Gravy, let them boil, ajid take off the Fat; let the Whole be pretty relifhing: Your young Partridges being done, take them up, and the slices of Bacon, with the Paper, being taken oif, lay them in your Difh with your Olives over them, and ferve them hot for the firft Courfe.

Toung

he L A D yS C O M P A N I N. 323

Toung Partridges xith Oyflers

YO U muft pick fome young Partridges, draw them, but do not cut the Backfide Hole of them; mince their Li- vers, and having got fome Oyfters, blanch them, and take out the Hard; after which, put them in a Stew-pan, with a Bit of Butter, the minced Livers, fon.e Parfley, Chibbol, Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, andAll-fpice; then give it two or three Toiies, iind fluff your young Partridges with it, after which, put each Rump into its Hole, and let your Partridges fry a little, and put them on the Spit, wrappd up in Slices of Ba- con and Paper; then get fome more Oyfcers, blanched as the ethers, put them in a Stew- pan, with Half a Spoonful of good Eifcnce of Ham, and a little of your Cuilis, which having boiPd as much as is neceflary, to fhorten it at Plea- fure, put the Juice of a Lemon therein. Your young Par- tridges being done, draw them off, taking off the Bacon and Paper; after which, lay them in their Difh, with your Ra- goo of Oyiters over them, and ferve them up hot for a firfl: Courfe.,

A Hafh of Partridges.

AFT E R having roafted your Partridges, cut the Wings and Legs off, and take all the Meat, which you muM: mince well, then take and pound their Carcaffes, which be- ing well pounded, muft be put in a Stew-pan, with a little EiTence of Ham; let them waroi a little, and ftrain them through a Sieve: Then take your minced Partridges, and put them in a fmall Stew-pan; after which put in fome Cui- lis fcrained, the Quantity you think fit: Being ready to ferve, keep your Hafh hot, but take care it doth not boil; put in it fqueezed Rocamboles, and the Juice of an Orange i after which, ferve it up for a firft Courfe.

At another Time, put therein the White of a Fowl, and your Hafli will be fo much the nicer,

7o roaji Pheafants.

PICK and draw your Pheafants, blanch and lard them with fine Bacon, fpit them with Paper round them to be done before a flow Fire. When almoft done, take the Paper off to let them get a Colour, and difh them up hand- fomely.

Another

;4- Ladys Companion.

Another Way.

PICK and draw your Fheafants, and finge thein, lard one with Bacon, but not the other, fpit them,roaft them, and pepper them all over the Breaft, • when they are iuft done flour and bafle them with a little Butter, and let them hare a iine white Froth; then take them up, and pour good Gravy in the Difn, and Bread-fauce in Plates,

Or you may put Water-crefTes picked and wafhed, and juft icalded, with Gravy in the Diih, and lay the CrelTes under the Pheafants.

Or you may make Selleiy-fauce ftewd tender, flraind and anixed with Cream, and poured into the Dilh.

If you have but one Pheafant, take a large fine Fowl, about the Bignefs of the Pheafant, pick it with the Plead on, draw it, and trufs it with the Plead turned as rou do a Pheafants, lard the Fowl all over the Breaft and Legs with a large Piece of Bacon cut in little Pieces; when roafted, put them both in a Dilh, and no-body will know it: They will take an Hours coing, as the Fire muft not be too briik.

To dreji Pheafants with Carp-fauce.

ARD your Pheafants, roaft them, and take care they _ do not dry. To make the Sauce, lay in the Bottom of a Stew-pan fome Veal Slices, as you do when you make Gravy; add to this Veal fome Slices of a Gammon of Bacon, fome iliced Onion, fome Parfley -roots, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs. Then gut a Carp, wafh it in one Water only, with- out fcaling it, cut it in Pieces, as if you were to ftevv it, and lay thcni in the fame Stew-pan, brown this a little over the Stove, as if you would make Gravy of it; then vet it with good Gravy, pour in a Bottle of Champaign or other White Wine, and add a Clove of Garlick, fome minced Truffles, and Mulhrooms, and iom.e fmall Crufts of Bread: Boil all this together, and take care it be not too fait. When it is well boiled, ftrain it in a Sieve, forcing it through, that the Sr.uce may be pretty thick; if it be not, put to it fome Par- tridge Cuilis, and pour it into a Stew-pan: Before you ferve, bind your Pheafants with Packthread, put them into this Sauce, and keep them warm: When you would ferve, unbind them, lay them in a Difh and pour the Sauce upon them.

Jheafants

The Ladys Companion, 325

Pheafants nvith Oyfters the Italian Way, nuith a lohite Sauce,

GE T fome Pheafants, pick them clean, and draw them, cut the Livers fmall, take Ibme Oyfters, wx. to each Pheafant Half a Dozen will be enough; blanch them, and put them in a Stew-pan with their Livers, and a Lump of Butter, fome Parfley, green Onions, Pepper, and Salt, fweet Herbs, fine Spice; put all together a Moment over the Fire, and put it afterwards into your Pheafants. Blanch them in a Stew-pan with Oil, green Onions, Parfley, fweet Bafd, and Lemon-juice: Then put them on the Spit, covered with Slices of Bacon, and Paper tyd round; take fome Oyfters, and blanch them in their own Liquor; then prick them, • take a Stew-pan, put in it four Yolks of Eggs, the Half of a Lemon cut into fmall Dice, a little beaten Pepper, a little fcraped Nutmeg, a little Parfley cut fmall, a Rocambole, an Anchovy- cut fmall, a little Oil, a fmall Glafs of Champaign, or other White Wine, a Lump of Butter with a little Ham Cullis; then put your Sauce over the Fire, and thicken it: Take care the Sauce does not turn, put in it your Oyfters.; fee that your Sauce be relifliing. Your Pheafants being done, draw them off, take off the- Bacon, and difh them up with the Oyfter Ragoo over them, and ierve them up hot for an Entry.

Pheafants nvith Olives.

TA K E as many Pheafants as you think will make up your Difli, pick, finge, and draw them clean; but dont cut the lower Part o the Belly, or Vent. Take ofF the Galls from your Livers, and cut thefe fmall, with fome Parf- ley, green Onions, Champignons, fweet Herbs, fine Spice, Pepper, Salt, fcraped Bacon, and a Bit of Butter, and put all this into the Belly of your Pheafants, and thruft the Rump into the lower Part of the Belly, or Vent, to prevent your Forced-meat from coming out; blanch them in a Stew-pan, with Butter, Parfley, green Onions, Salt, Bafll, all in Branches; put your Pheafants on the Spit, wrappd up in Slices of Bacon, and Paper tyd round. Take fome Olives, take out their Stones, blanch them in hot Water; they being blanchd, put them in a Stew-pan, with Cullis, EflTence of Ham and Gravy; put them a boiling, ikimming the Fat w ell ofF; fee that all together be reliftiing: Your Pheafanti being roafted, draw them off, and take off the Slices of Bacon; difli thern up, put your Olives over them, and ferve them hot for an Entrv Iqv fecond Courfe,

To

22.6 Tbe Ladys Companion,

To boil a Pheafant.

FL E A off the Skin, but leave the Rump and Legs whole with the Pinions; theo mince the raw Flelh with feme- Beef-fewet; feafon it With Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and fweet Herbs, hred fmall -, take alfo theEottoms of three Artichokes boird, fome Chefnuts roafted and blanchd, fome Skirrets boiPd and cut pretty fmall; incorporate all thefe together with the Yolks of three or four raw Eggs, according to the Quantity of your Ingredients; then fill the Skin of your Phea- fant, and prick it up in the Back, then boil it in fome ftrong Broth, Quarters of boild Artichokes, Marrow, White Wine, Salt, large Mace, Chefnuts, Grapes, Barberries, and Pears quarterd, and alfo fome of the Meat made up into Balls, cover it clofe, fet them over the Fire, and let them itew; when they are enough, ferve them up on fine carved Sippets, broth it, and lay on the Garnifh, with whole Lemon- peel and Slices of Lemon; run them over with beaten Butter; garniih the Difh with large Mace, the Yolks of hard Eggs and Chefnuts.

Another Way,

BO I L it in a good deal of Water, keep your Water boil- ing, Half an Hour will do a fmall one, and three Quar- ters of an Hour a large one; let your Sauce be Sellery ftewd and thickened with Cream, and a little Piece of Butter rolled in Flour; take up the Pheafant, and pour the Sauce all over.
Garnifh with Lemon. Obferve to flew your Sellery fo, that the Liquor will be all wafled away before you put your Cream in; if it wants Salt put in fome to your Palate.

ooPheafants, Woodcocks, Partridges, Chickens, or Quails.

TAKE three Pheafants, or other Birds, put them into a Stew-pan with as much Water as will cover them; like- vife take two Blades of Mace, a Nutmeg cut in Quarters, three or four whole Cloves, a Piece of Butter, three or four Manchet Toafls toafted brown, foak them in Sherry or Sack, ilrain them through a Sieve with fome of the Liquor you flew the Pheafants in, then put them in your Stew-pan to your Pheafants, flew them foftly, turning them very often till the Liquor be half walled, then put in a little frefh Butter and Salt; when it is enough, garnifh your Difh with fliced Lemon and the Yjlks of hard Eggs fhred fine, laying little Heaps be- tween your Slices of Lemon j lay Sippets in the Bottom of

your

he Ladys Companion. 327

ydur Difti, and then lay on them your Pheafants, and pour your Liquor very hot upon them, lay on their Breads fome round Slices of Lemon.

A Jierved Pheafant.

STEW it in Veal Gravy, take Artichoke-Bottoms par» boiled, fomeChefnuts roafled and blanched -, when your Pheafant is enough it mufl flew till there is juft enough for Sauce fkim it, put in the Chefnuts and Artichoke Bottoms, a little beaten iVi ace, Pepper, and Salt, jaft enough to feafon it, and a Glafs of White Wine, and if you dont think it thick enough, thicken it with a little Piece of Butter rolld in Flour, and fqueeze in a little Lemon j pour the Sauce over the Phea- fant, and have feme Force-meat Balls fryd to put into theDilh.
Note, A good Fowl will do full as well, trufsd with the Head on like a Pheafant j ycu may fry Saufages inllead of Force-meat Balls.

To dnfs a Pheafant a. la Braife.

LA Y a Layer of Beef all over your Pan, then a Layer of Veal, a little Piece of Bacon, a Piece of Carrot, an Onion ftuck with fix Cloves, a Blade or two of Pvlace, a Spoonful of Pepper, black and white., and a Bundle of fweet Herbs; then lay in the Pheafant, lay a Layer of Veal, and then a Layer of Beef to cover it, iet it over the Fire five or fix Minutes, then p ur in two Quarts of boiling Water; cover it clofe, and let it itew very foftly an Hour and Half, then take up your Pheafant, and keep it hot, and let the Gravy boil till there is about a Pint, then ftrain it off, and put it in again and put in a Veal Sweetbread, firll being Hewed with the Pheafant, then put in fome TrufRes and Morels, fome Livers of Fowls, Artichoke-Bottoms, Afparagus-Tops, if you have them; let all thefe fimmer in the Gravy about five or fix Mi- nutes J then add two Spoonfuls of Catchup, two of Red Wine, and a little Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, ihake all together, put in your Pheafant, let them flew all together with a few Mufhrooms about five or fix Minutes more, then take up the Pheafant, and pour yeurRagoo all over with a few Force-meat Balls. Garnifh with Lemon; you may lard it if you chufe it.

To boil a Peacock.
L E A off the Skin, but leave the Rump whole with the Pinions, then mince the Flefh raw with fome Beef-fewet, ieafon with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and favoury Herbs hred

fmall

F

Q28 ne Ladys Companion.

fmall, and Yolks of Eggs raw j mingle with thefe fome Mar- row, the Bottoms of three Artichokes boild, Chefnuts, roafted and blanch d, and Skirrets boiFd pretty fmall; then fill the Skin of the Peacock, and prick it up in the Back, fet it to flew in a deep Difh in fome flrong Broth, White Wine, with .Salt, large Mace, Marrow, Artichokes boiled and quartered, Chefnuts, Grapes, Barberries, Pears quartered, and fome of the Meat m.ade into Balls, cover it with another large Difh; when it is ftewd enough, ferve it up on carvd Sippets, broth it, and garni£h with Slices of Lemon, and Lemon-peel whole, run it over with beaten Butter. Garniih the Difh with the Yolks of hard Eggs, Chefnuts, and large Mace.

J Ruddock

IS a Water Bird, much like a Duck, but the Flefh of it is much more delicious than that of Ducks. Drefs it all the Ways you do Ducks.

ro fry Thruihes.

FR Y them in Lard, with a little Flour, a little White Wine Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a Faggot of fvveet Herbs and Capers, and when you ferve them up, fqueeze in a Lemon, jkim off the Fat, and llrain the Sauce over the Thruihes, and garniih with fiicci Lemon, chopped Capers, and Beet-root.

To roaji Thruihes.

PICK them clean, trufs them, and put them upon an Iron Skever, which tie to the Spit, and roaft them -, take a Piece of fat Bacon, as big as your two Fingers, which wrap up in Paper, ftick it to the End of a Toafting-fork, and hold it to the Fire, and let it drop upon the Thruihes i when the Bacon drops no longer, fling fome Salt and Crumbs of Bread upon them; then take a few Shalots, or Onions, cut them fmall, and put them into a Stew-pan, with a little Salt and Pepper, and a little Gravy; but if you have none, a little Water, ar.d a little Butter, the Juice of a Lemon, Verjuice, or Vinegar; let all Hew together for a little while; then pour . it into the Difl-i you intend to ferve; your ThruHies being roailed, put them to it, and ferve them up hot, garnilhing with fliced Lemon.

You may ferve them with Juniper-berries for Sauce, after the following Manner; wrap them up in Slices of Bacon and Paper, and while they are roafling, put in a Stew-pan a little

Gravy

ne Ladys Companion; 32

Gravy and Cullis, with a Glafs of White Wine, boil it, let it be of a good Tafte, and put in it the Juice of a Lemon; then take a Dozen of Junipei -berries, and blanch them, then put them into your Cullis. Your Thrulhes being ready, take off the Slices of Bacon and Paper, and put them to fimmer a little while in your Cullis j take off the Fat, and put them into your Difh with the Cullis, pour it over them and ferve them up hot for a firft Courfe.

To Jfeiv Lapwings.

PICK, fmge, draw, and cut them in two, and put them in a Stew-pan with melted Bacon, a Bunch of Herbs, two fmall Onions cut fmall, fome Muihrooms, Truffies, if you have any, and Veal Sweetbreads, give all a few Toffes over the Fire, then put to it a Couple of Glaffes of White Wine, a little Gravy and Cullis, and let all fimmer j being done, Ikim off the Fat, let it be of a good Tafte, put in it the Juice of a Lemon, pour it in your Difn, and ferve it hot for the firft Courfe.

You may roail or fry Lapwings after the Manner of Thruihes.

To roafi Snipes,

DRAW them or not, as you like them; but if they are drawn, put fmall Onions into the Bellies, and while they are roalling put Claret, Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, and An- chovy, into the Dripping-pan J to which, when they are roafted, add a little grated Bread and fome Butter, fhaking the Whole well together, and fo ferve them up: If you do not draw them, then only take out the Guts, mince them very fmall, and put them into Claret, with a little Salt, Gravy, and Butter; or you may make the Sauce thus: Having boild fome Onions, butter them, and feafon them with Pepper and Salt, and put to them the Gravy of any frefli Meat.

To r 57 Snipes or Woodcocks.

SPIT them on a fmall Bird-fpit, flour them, and bafte them with a Piece of Butter, then have ready a Slice of Bread toafted brown, lay it in a Difh, and fet it under the Snipes, for the Tail to drop on, to know when they are enough; take them up, and lay them on the Toalt; have ready, for two Snipes, a Quarter of a Pint of good Beef- Gravy, hot, pour it into the Difh, and fet it over a Chafing- difh two or three Minutes. Garnifh with Lemon, and fend thejn hot to Table.

Scopes

530 The Ladys Companion.

Snipes in d Surtouty or Woodcocks.

TAKE Force-meat, made with Veal, as much Eeef- fewet chopped and beat in a Mortar, with an equal Quantity of Crumbs of Bread; mix in a little beaten Mace, Pepper, and Salt, fome Parfley, and a little fweet Herbs, mix it with the Yolk of an Egg, lay fome of thii Meat round the Difli, then lay in the Snipes, being iirit drawn and half roafted; take care of the Trail, chop it, and throw it ail over the Difli.

Take fome good Gravy, according to the Bignefs of your Surtout, fome Truffles and Morels, a few Mulhrooms, a Sweetbread cut into Pieces, Artichoke-Bottoms cut fmall, let all ftew tog: ther, fhake them, take the Yolks of two or three Eggs, according as you want them, beat them up with a Spoonful or two of White Wine, and llir all together one Way; when it is thick take it off, let it cool, and pour it into the Surtout; have the Yolks of a few hard Eggs put in here and there, feafon with beaten Mace, Pepper, and Salt, to your Tafte; cover it with the Force-meat all over, rub the Yolks of Eggs all over to colour it, then fend it to the Oven. Half an Hour does it; fend it hot to Table.

To boil Snipes.

BO.I L Snipes either in ftrong Broth, or Water and Salt take out the Guts, and chop them fmall with the Liver add fome grated Bread, a little of the Broth, and fome whole Mace, ftew them together m fome Gravy; then difiblve the Yolks of a Couple of Eggs in Wine Vinegar, add Nutmeg, grated; and when you are ready to ferve it up, put in the Eggs, and ftir them among the Sauce with fome Batter; dih them on Sippets, and run the Sauce over them with fome beaten Butter and Capers, or minced Lemon, Barberries, or pickled Grapes.

To boil Snipes cr Woodcocks.

BOIL them in good ftrong Broth, or Beef-Gravy, made thus: Take a Pound of Beef, cut it into little Pieces, put. it into two Quarts of Water, an Onion, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, a Blade or two of Mace, fix Cloves, and fome whole Pepper; cover it clofe, let it boil till about Half is wafted, then ftrain it off, put the Gravy into a Stew-pan with Salt enough to feafon it, take the Snipes and gut them clean

but

ne Ladys Companion. gr

but take care of the Guts put them into the Gravy, and let them boil, cover them clofe, and ten Minutes will boil them, if they keep boiling: In the mean Time, chop the Guts and Liver fmall, take a little of the Gravy the Snipes are boiling in, and flew the Guts in with a Blade of Mace; take fome Crumbs of Bread, and have them ready fryd in a little frefn Butter crifp, of a fine light Brown; you muft take about as much Bread as the Infide of a Roll, and rub them fmall into a clean Cloth; when they are done, let them fland ready in a Plate before the Fire.

When your Snipes are ready, take about Half a Pint of the Liquor they are boiled in, and add to the Guts, two Spoonfuls of Red Wine, and a Piece of Butter, about as big as a Walnut, rolled in a little Flour, fet them on the Fire, ihake your Stew-pan often but dont flir it with a Spoon till the Butter is all melted; then put in the Crumbs, give your Stew-pan a Shake, take up your Birds, lay them in the Difh, and pour this Sauce over them. Garnifh with Le- mon.

To Jieiv or fry Snipes.

TAKE Snipes, and flit them in two, but take nothing out of their Bellies; then put them into a Stew-pan, or fry them with melted Bacou, and tofs them up, feafonirvg them with Salt and Pepper, Gives, and the Juice of Muih- rooms; when they are done, fqueeze in the Juice of a Lemon, and ferve them up hot, garnifhed with Slices of Lemon.

Ortolans roajied.

BARD them, or let them be plain, putting a Vine-leaf betwixt them; when they are fpitted, fome Crumbs of Bread may be ufed as for Larks; when you roall them, let them be fpitted Side-ways, which is the beft.

Ortolans fried.

PASS them in the Pan with Butter, or melted Lard; after they are fryd, foak them with a little Broth, and feafon them well; to thicken the Sauce, mix v ith it fome Sweetbreads, the Juice of Meat and Mufhrooms; and when all is well flewd, ferve -, garnifh wich Piftachoes and Pome- granates.

1o

322 be Ladys Companion;

To drefs RufFs and Reifs.

THEY are Lincolnhire Birds, and you may fatten them as you do Chickens, with white Bread, Milk, and Su- gar; they feed faft, and will die in their Fat if not kilPd in Time; trufs them crofs-legged as you do a Snipe, and fpit them the fame Way; but you muil; gut them; put Gravy, thickend with Butter, and a Toaft under them, and ferv€ them quick.

Curlews potted.

TRUSS them crofsleggd, and cut off the Heads, or thruft them through like a Woodcock; feafon them with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg; gut them firft, then put them in a Pot with two Pounds of Butter; cover them, and bake them one Hour; then take them out, and when cool, fqtieeze out all the Liquor, and lay them in your Pot, and cover them with clarified Butter.

Potted Wheat- Ears.

TH E Y are Tunbridge Birds: Pick them vtty clean, feafon them with fepper and Salt, put them in a Pot, cover them with Butter, anc bake them one Hour; take thena and put them in a Coianaer to drain the Liquor avay; then cover them with clarified Butter, and they will keep,

To roaji Quails.

E T Quails, trufs them, fluff their Bellies with Beef- X fewet and fweet Herbs, chopped well together; fpit them on a fmall Spit, and when they grow warm, bafte firft with Water and Salt, but afterwards with Butter, and drudge them with Flour. For Sauce, diffolve an Anchoyy in Gravy, into which put two or three Shalots, flicd and boild; add the Juice of two or three .SrwVf Oranges and one Lemon; difh them in this Sauce, and garnilh with Lemon-peel an4 grated Manchet: Be fure to ferve them up hot.

Another Way to drefs Quails.

SLIT yor.r Quails along the Back, make a Farce with fcraped Bacon, a little of the Lean of a Ham, one Truffle, feme Fowls Livers, and the Yolk of a raw Egg; the Whole mincd and pounded together, and feafond with Salt, Pepper,

Nutmeg,

TEt L A D yS Co MP A N I O N, 333

Nutmeg, and favour Herbs; farce your Quails with it, then garnifh the Bottom of a Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon, and fome of Veal over them j then lay in your Quails, the Breails downwards; cover them with Slices of Veal and Ham, both feafond, as well thofe under them, as thofe upon them, with Salt, Pepper, favoury Herbs, and Spices. Lay a Plate over the Meat, fo as that it may touch it, and a Napkin all round the Plate; then cover the Stew-pan with its own Cover j fet it over a gentle Fire, and Hew it very foftly two Hours: The Moment before you ferve, open the Stew-pan, take out the Slices of Veal and Bacon, and fet your Quails over the Stove to brown them; when they are fine and brown, and the Liquor iticks to the Stew-pan, take them up, and lay them in the Dilh in which you intend to ferve them; take out all the Fat that remains in the Stew-pan, moiflen that which flicks to it with half Broth, and half Gravy, to looibn it; ilrew in a little jounded Pepper, fqueeze in the Juice of a Lemon, ilrain the Whole through a Sieve upon the Quails; fo ferve them.

A Pupton of Quails,

YO U muft take, according to the Quantity you would make, fome Veal, Beef-fewet, and Bacon, with a little Parfley and Liver, a little of the Lean of a Ham, and a few Mulhrooms; feafon this with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Nutmeg, favoury Herbs, and a Dozen Coriander Seeds pounded; add to this the Crumb of a French Roll foaked in Cream, and the Yolks of four or five raw Eggs; hafh the Whole together, and pound it in a Mortar. Garnilh the Bottom and Sides of a large Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon, and then farce, rubb- ing your Hand with beaten Egg, to make the Farce lie the fmoother. Then having made a Ragoo of Quails, lay them into the Stew-pan, cover them with the fame Farce, for fear the Sauce of the Ragoo fhould get out, and rub the Farce over with beaten Egg; lay over fome Bards of Bacon, then fet it to bake with Fire under and over it. When it is enough done, turn it upfide down into the Difn in which you intend to ferve it; make a Hole in the Top of it of the Size of a Crown Piece, pour in fome Cullis or other, fo ferve it up for the firfl Courfe, either with Garniiliing or without.



334 La d ys Companion.

To dres Quails a la Braife.

FARCE the Bellies of your Quails with a good Farce made of the Breaft of a Capon, Beef-marrow, and the Yolks of raw Eggs, feafoned with Salt, Pepper, and a little Nutmeg, ftew them in a Stew-pan, having firll garnifhed the Bottom of it with Slice: of Bacon and Beef, both beaten; place your Quails upon them, and put in a Piece of raw Ham, minced and feafoned with Salt, Pepper, and a Bunch of fa- voury Herbs: Lay over them in like Manner fome beaten Slices of Beef and Bacon: Cover your Stew-pan very clofe, and put Fire over and under. Whilfe this is thus ftewing, make a Ragoo of Veal or Lamb Sweetbreads, tofsd up in Butter with Muftirooms, TrufHes, and Cocks-combs, put in the Quails a little before you ferve, and bind your Ragoo with a good white Cullis, or with the Yolks of Eggs beaten up in Cream: When you would ferve them brown, moiften the Ragoo with Gravy, and thicken with a Cullis of a good Ham and Veal, if you have not -any Cullis of Partridges.
Take the Quails out of the Ragoo, lay them in a Difli, pour your Ragoo upon them, and ferve them.

A Bifque of Quails and other Tofwh,

YO U muft trufs your Quails, and tofs them up in your Stew-pan till they are of a fine brown Colour. Then put them in a little Potwith good Broth, Bards of Bacon, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, fome Cloves, and other Spices, with a oood Slice of td well beaten, and another of lean Bacon, and two or three of Lemon, and boil all together over a gentle Fire. Garnifh your Bifque with Veal Sweetbreads, Artichoke- Bottoms, Mufhrooms, TrufHes, Fricandoes, and Cocks-combs, with the Finifh of which laft make a Rim round your Bifque, and pour a little Veal Cullis upon it.

To roajl Woodcocks.

DR A W, walh, trufs, and fpit your Woodcocks; roaft them, baile them with Butter; when they are almofl roafted, drudge them with grated Bread; preferve the Gravy, and make buttered Toafls, and put into it, or you may roaft the Guts with the Woodcocks, and mince them, and put them into the Gravy, with a little Claret.

The Ladys Companion. 3

To roaft Woodcocks the French Way.

GET fome Woodcocks, pull them, draw them, wafh them, trufs them, then lard them with broad Pieces of Bacou over their Breads; road them, and ierve them upon Toafts dipped in Verjuice, or the Juice of Oranges, with the Gravy, and made warm.

Another Way.

ROAST them, take out their Guts and Livers, bruife them in a Stew-pan, put in feme Salt and Pepper, to feafon them, and fome Red Port Wine to moiflen them. If the Sauce is not thick enough, thicken it with a little Cullis of Veal and Ham, or Butter rolled in Flour; make it hot, fiueeze in the Juice of an Orange or two, cut up your Wood- cocks in it, and ferve them.

To make a Surioutf Woodcocks.

MA K E a Farce for your Woodcocks of boiled Ham and raw Bacon, Veal Sweetbreads, Mufhrooms and Truffles, Gives, Farfiey, and a little Garlick, all fhred fmall, well fealbnd, and bound together, with the Yolks of Eggs; with this Farce duff the Bellies of your Woodcocks, and alfo their Breads, between the Skin and Fiefh -, put a large larded Fricando on the Bread of each Woodcock, tie them about with a Packthread, wrap them up in Paper, and road them; while they are roading, prepare for them a Ragoo; when they are enough, take off the Paper, dilh them with the Fri- cando on their Breads, pour the Ragoo over them, and ferve them up. 9

To boil Woodcocks.

THEY mud be boiled either in drong Broth, or in Wa- ter and Salt J when they are boiled, take out the Guts, and mince them with their Livers; put to them fome grated Bread, a little of their Broth, and fome large Mace; iktw thefe together with fome Grsvy j then diifolve a Couple of Eggs in fome Wine Vinegar and a little grated Nutmeg; and when you are ready to ferve them up, put the Eggs into the Sauce, and dir them in with a little Butter; didi them on Sip- pets, run the Sauce over with beaten Butter and Capers, or Le- mon, mincd Berries, or white pickled Grapes; fometimes boil fliced Lemon with this Sauce; and boil fome Currants in Broth

by

53 Tbc Ladys Companion.

by itfelf, and when you boil it with Onions rub the Fottom of the Dilh with Garlick.

Another Way.

THEY muft be boiPd with their Guts in them, in ilrong Broth or Water, and three or four whole Onions, Salt, and whole Mace; when they are boilM, make the Sauce of fome thin Slices of Manchet, or grated Manchet, in another Stew-pan, and fome of the Broth of the Woodcocks, put to it a Bit of Butter, the Guts and Liver mincd; and having the Yolks of fome Eggs diflblvd in Vinegar, and fome grated Nutmeg, put it to the other Ingredients, and ftir them to- gether y difli your Woodcocks on Sippets, pour the Sauce over them, with Slices of Lemon, Grapes, or Barberries, and run it over with beaten Butter.

To drefs Woodcocks another Way.

WHEN your Woodcocks are divided into four Pieces, lay by the Entrails to make a Thickening for your Sauce; then put your Quarters of Woodcocks into a Stew- pan, with Muflirooms and Truffles flicd, and Veal Sweet- breads; let thefe all be tofsd up together with melted Bacoi, and moiftend with Beef-Gravy, and a Glafs or twoof VVine, with Salt, white Pepper, and Gives: Let thefe ftew together, and when they are almoft enough, take off the Fat; put the Entrails you favd into the Sauce to thicken it; or elfe you may thicken it with a CuUis of Woodcocks, or fome other good Cullis. If you plcafe you may put in a little EfTence of Ham. Then difh your Woodcocks, pour your Ragoo upon them, fqueeze in the Juice of an Orange or Lemon, and ferve them up to Table hot for firft Courfe.

You may drefs Woodcocks as Snipes; fometimes with a Ragoo of Oyllers, and fometimes with Olives.

To drefs Plovers,

TO two Plovers take two Artichoke -Bottoms boiid, fome Chefnuts roafted and blanchd, fome Skirrets boiPd, cut all very fmall, mix it with fome Marrow or Beef-fewet, the Yolks of two hard Eggs, chop all together, feafonwith Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, and a little fweet Herbs, fill the Bodies of the Plovers, lay them in a Stew-pan, put to them a Pint of Gravy, a Glafs of White Wine, a Blade or two of Mace, fome roafted Chefnuts blanchd, and Artichoke Bottoms cut in Quarters,

two

The L A D ys C o M p A N I ON. 537

two or three Yolks of hard Eggs, and a little Juice of Lemon; cover them clofe, and let them ftew very foftly an Hour. If you find the Sauce is not thick enough., take a Piece of But- ter rolled in Flour, and put it into the Sauce, fhake it round, and when it is thick take up your Plovers, and pour the Sauce over them. Garnifh with roafted Chefnuts, and the Yolks of hard Eggs. Ducks are very good done this Way.

Or you may roaft your Plovers as you do any other Fowl, and have Gravy Sauce in the Difh.

Or boil them in Sellery Sauce, either White or Brown, jult as you like. The fame Way you may drefs Widgeons.

Plovers Capuchin, or Larks.

1 A K E four Hogs Ears, boil them tender, put a Piece i of Force-meat in the Ears, and likewife your Birds, with the Heads outwards; fet them upright, the Tips of the Ears falling backwards; wafli them with Eggs, and crumh them, and bake them gently; haih four others with Saucj- Robart, fo ferve them.

To bjii Widgeons.

HAVING fleaM off their Skins, take out the Bones, mince the Fleh with Beef-fewet, feafon with Gives, Mace, and Nutmegs beaten, fweet Herbs, and Oyfters par- boiled; mix all thefe together, fill their Skins, prick them upon the Back, ilevv them in llrong Broth, Claret, or White Wine, with Salt, wliole MacC; three or four Cloves, a Faggot of fweet Herbs, Marrow, and Oylier-liquor. Stew fome Oyfters by themfelves, with an Onion or two. White Wine, Pepper, Butter, a d whole Mace; alfo prepare Artichokes in beaten Butter and boiled Marrow. Diih the Widgeons on fine carved Sippets, froth them, lay on theOyfters, Artichokes, Marrow, Barberries, Slices of Lemon, Grapes, or Goofe- berries: Garnifh the Difh with grated Manchet, fome Oyfters, Slices of Lemon, Mace, and Artichokes, and run thera oyer with Butter beaten up, and ferve them up hot,

fo Jlenjc Larks, or other Jmall Birds.

TAKE Lark, or other fmall Birds, after being drawn, tofs them up in a Stew-pan, with Butter, or melted Bacon, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, fome Muffirooms, and the Livers of Fowls; tofs up altogether with a little Flour; moiften them with Gravy, and when a little waftied, beat an Egg in a little Cream or Milk, vith fome fnred Parfley amonirft Vol. I.
33

The Ladys Companion

it; pour it into your Stew-pan, and give it a Stir or two, fqueeze in the Juice of Half a Lemon, then ferve it.
To roafi Larks.

TRUSS them handibmely on the Back, but neither draw them, nor cut oft their Feet. Lard them with fmall Lardoons, or elle fpit them on a wooden Skewer, with a fmall Bard of Bacon between two; when they are near Toailed enough, drudge them with Salt powderd fine, and £ne Crumbs of Bread. When they are ready, rub the Dih you dengn to ferve them in vIth a Shalot, and ferve them with Salt, Pepper, Verjuice, and the Juice of an Orange, and Crumbs of Bread fryd, and ferve in a Plate by themlelves.

Or with a Sauce made of Claret, the Juice of two or, three Oranges, and a little flired Ginger, fet over the Fire a little while, and beat up with apiece of Butter.

You may uie the fame Sauce for broild Larks, which you muft open on the Breafts, vhen you lay them on the Gridiron.
T drefi Larks Pear Fafiuon.

YOU muft trufs the Larks clofe, and cut ofF the Legs, fcafon them with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, make a Force-meat thus: Take a Veal Sweetbread, as much Beef- fewet, a few Morels and Muftirooms, chop all fine together, Ibme Crumbs of Bread, and a few Uveet Herbs, a littleLemon- peel cut fmall; mix all together with the Yolk of an Egg, wrap up every Lark in Force-meat, and fhape them like a Pear, ilick one Leg in the Top like the Stalk of a Pear, rub them over with the Yolk of an Egg and Crumbs of Bread, bake them in a gentle Oven, ferve them without Sauce; or they make a good Garnifh to a very fine Diih.
You may uie Veal if you have not a Sweetbread.
Larks in Shells.

BOIL twelve Hen or Duck Eggs foft; take out all the Infide, making a handfome Round at the Top; then fill Half the Shells with palled Crumbs, and roaft your Larks; put one in every Shell, and fill your Plate with pafTed Crumbs brown; fo ferve as Eggs in Shells.
Larks nj.ith Sage.

AFTER your Larks are pickd and drawn, take a little Piece of Bacon, a little Piece of Ham boild, the White of a Fowl, and fome Sage; mince thefe all together, and put them into the Bodies of your Larks; take as many Slices of JBacon as you have Larks, and put a little of the fame Stuffing

over

ne Ladys CoMPANieN. 339

over the Bacon, with your Larks over them: Being wrapped up in the faid Slices, place them in a Baking-pan, and put them in the Oven, or under a Cover: Being done, diih thera up with Gravy.

To roafl a Hare.

ONE Side being larded, fpit it, without larding the other, and while it is roafting, bafte it with Milk or Cream j then Terve it with thick Claret-fauce.
Another Way.

TAKE fome Liver of a Hare, fome fat Bacon, grated Bread, an Anchovy, Shalot, a little Winter-favoury, and a little Nutmeg; beat all thele into a Pafte, and put them into the Belly of the Hare; bafte the Hare with ftale Beer; put a little Bit of Bacon in the Pan; when it is half roafted, bafte it with Butter. For Sauce take melted Butter, and a little Bit of Winter- favoury.

Another Way .

AFTER having larded him with Bacon, make a Pud- ding of grated Bread, the Heart and Liver parboiled, and choppd fmall, with Beef-fewet, and fweet Herbs, mixd with Marrow, Cream or Milk, Nutmeg, Salt, Pepper, and Eggs, few up his Belly, and roaft him. When it is done, for Sauce, draw up your Butter with Cream, Milk, or Gravy, and Claret.

Another Way.

IT muft be bafted with ftale Beer, till the Blood is waflied off, then empty the Pan; put into it fome Cream or Milk, a Bit of Anchovy, fome fat Bacon, a little Onion, and bafte it with this till it is enough; then take a little Butter, fome of the Liquor out of the Pan, and mix it for Sauce. You may put the Pudding, as in the foregoing Receipt, in the Belly of it.

To jie a Hare.

CUT it to Pieces, and put them into a Stew-pan, with a Blade or two of Mace, fome whole Pepper, Black and White, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, an Anchovy, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, and a Nutmeg cut to Pieces, and cover it with Water; cover the Stew-pan clofe, let it ftew till the Hare is tender, but not too much done; then take it up, and with a Fork take out your Hare into a clean Pan, ftrain the Sauce all through a coarfe Sieve, empty all out of the Pan, put in the Hare again with the Sauce, take a Piece of Butter as big as a Walnut, rolled in Flour, and put in, likewife one Spoonful of

02 Catchup,

340 9i L A D ys Com p A N ION.

Catchup, and one of Red Wine, ftew all together with a few frefli Mufhrooms, or pickled ones, if you have any till it is thick and fmooth, then difh it up and fend it to Table. You may cut a Hare in two, and flew the Fore-quarters thus, and roail the Hind-quarters with a Pudding in the Belly.
0 make Civet cf a Hare.

BONE the Hare, and take out all the Sinews, cut one Half in thin Slices, and the other Half in Pieces an inch thick, flour them, and fry them in a little freih Butter as Collops quick, and have ready fome Gravy, made good with the Bones of the Hare and Beef, put a Pint of it into the Pan to the Hare, fome Muftard, and a little Elder inegar; cover it clofe, and let it do foftly till it is as thick as Cream, then difh it up with the Head in the Middle.

To mince Hare.

WASH your Hare clean from its Blood, then take fome Parfiey and Onion ard put into the Body, and boil it in Salt and Water till it is about half done, then take the Flelh from the Bones, and mince it fmall, Hired the Parlley and Onions, and put to them a Pint of ilrong Broth, or fmall Gravy, with fome Claret, and a little inegar, Pepper, and Salt, and let it ftew over a gentle Fire; and when you think it is enough, take the Yolks of eight hard Eggs, and mince them as fmall as the reit, and put in a proper Quantity of melted Butter, fo fhake it well together, and ferve it up with Sippets, and Lemon for Garnilb. -

To fry a Hare.

LA Y it on a Gridiron, and when it is hot through, quar- ter it, and fry it with Hogs Lard. For the Sauce, toafl Bread, foak it in Beef-Broth and White Wine, put in fome beaten Ginger and Cloves, and ftrain it; add a little Ver- juice; and ferve it up with Butter, Sugar, Muilard, and the yuice of Lemon. Garnifh the Difh with Greens and Slices of Lemon.

A good IFay to- diefi a Hare.

CU T off the Vings and Legs whole, and cut the refl in Pieces; lard them with Bacon, and tofs them up in Butter, put to them fome llrong Broth and White Wine, fome fweet Herbs, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and flicM Lemon; pound the Liver in a Mortar; and ftrain it through a Sieve, with a VealCullis, and fome of the Liquor the Hare is ile wed in, pour it on the Harp, and ferve it hot.
To

be L A D y s C o m p a n i n. 341

To hajh a Hare.

A S E and draw your Hare, cue it in Pieces, wafh thcni J in Water and Claret, ftrain the Liquor, and parboil your Pieces of Hare: Lay them in a Difri vith the Head, Leg, and Shoulders whole; divide the Chine into feveral Parts; put in fome of the Liquor in which you parboiled it, add to it two or three fliced Onions, fet them a Hewing over a gentle Eire between two Dilhts, till it is tender j add Tome Nutmeg, Mace, and beaten Pepper; lay Sippets, and garnifli with Barberries and Lemon, and ierve it up.

Another Way to roaji a Hare.

SHRED the Marrow of an Ox Marrow-bone, with an Onion, Savoury, Thyme, andPariley, very fmall j feafon with Salt and Nutmeg; roll thefe up in a Piece of Butter, and put it into the Hares Belly; fpit it, and baile it for the firil Time with Cream, but afterwards with Butter; make a Sauce of Claret, with an Anchovy, a Blade of Mace, and melted Butter very thick. When the Hare is roafted enough, take it up, take the Pudding out of its Belly, and waih it all over with Butter, and ferve it up.

To roaft a Hare nx:ith its Skin on.

TAKE out the Bowels, wipe the Infide with a clean Cloth, make a Pudding as directed in any of the fore- going Receipts, and put it into the Belly, few it up, and thrull your Hand round him between the Skin and his Body, and rub over his Flefh Butter and Spice, incorporated toge- ther; then few up the Hole of the Skin, and roall him; bail- ing him with boiling Water and Salt, till it is above half roailed, then let him dry, and the Skin fmoke, pull it off bv Pieces, then balle him with Butter, drudge him with Flour, grated Bread, and Spice. Sauce him with drawn Butter, or Gravy and Claret. Garnifh with flicd Lemon and Bacon.

To roaj a Hare another Wa

LARD the Hare with, fmall Lardoons, take grated Bread, Eggs, grated Nutmeg, Sugar, and Currants, add a little Salt, and beaten Cinnamon; you may add a Hide Cream; make all thefe into a Pudding, put it into the Hares Belly, fpit and roall it; for this Venilbn-fauce is proper.

0.3 To

342 ne Ladys Companion.

To drefi a Hare the Swifs TVay,

YO U may cut the Hare into Quarters, lard them, put them into a Stew-pan with good Broth; and a little Wine, feafon with Salt, Pepper, and Cloves; while they are ftewing, tofs up the Blood and Liver, with a little Flour, in a Stew-pan, put in fome Capers, ftond Olives, and a Drop of Vinegar, and ferve it up.

To fiewo a Hare the French Way.

TAKE a Hare, cafe it, and wafh it, cut Slices of Veal or Pork cf about two Fingers thick, put them, with the Hare, into a Stew-pan, with Onions fryd in Hogs Hard, half cover it with Beef-Broth, and ilew it over a gentle Fire, and as the Liquor waftes, put in more Broth; toaft fome Bread well, parboil the Livers of Half a Dozen Fowls, fteep them in fome Beef-Broth, feafoning it with Salt, long Pepper, Nut- meg, Cloves, and Cinnamon j add to it a little Claret and Vinegar, llrain thefe, and put the Liquor to the Hare as it flews; when they are llewd enough, difh them up.

j -digged Hare.

CU T it into little Pieces, lard them here and there with little Slips of Bacon, feafon them with a very little Pep- per and Salt, put them into an earthen Jug, with a Blade. or two of Mace, an Onion fluck with Cloves, and a Bundle of fwcet Herbs cover the Jug or Jar you do it in, fo clofe that nothing can get in; then fet it in a Pot of boiling Water, kiep the Water boiling, and three Hours will do it: Then turn it out into the Dilh, and take out the Onion and fweet Herbs, and fend i: to Table hct.

To boil a Hare the French Way.
ir A KE a Marrow-bone vith a good deal of Beef upon J[ it, and a Piece of Bacon, boil thefe vitn your Hare, putting in fome Sr.lt; when the Bare is almoft enough, take it up, bruife ib i.e Peafe, and boil them in the Brctli;:ake avav the Bone from the Beef, and put in your Hare again, hmrit till the Peafe are enough, then train the Peafe through a Cloth, and boil the Pulp in a ciTel by ther,felves. I ay llie Hare in the Dilh, and pour the Pulp of the Pee over ii,

and ferve it up.



Rabbits

Ihe L A D ys C m p a n I g n. 343

Rabbits Portuguefe

GET Tome Rabbits, trufs them Chicken-fafhlon, and laid therxi; the Head mull be cut off, and the Rabbit tarnd with the Back upward, and two of the Legs llrippd to the Claw-end and lb trufsM with two Skewers -, then lard them, or roaft or boil them with Spinach, Cauliflowers, and Bacon, as Chickens.

Rabbits vcith Onions.

WHEN you have trufsd your Rabbits clofe, walh them very vell, then boil them oit white; boil your Onions iithemfelves, changing the Water two or three Times; then let them be thoroughly ftraind, and chop them, and butter them very well; put in a Gill of Cream, or Milk, ferve your Rabbits, and cover them over with Onions.

Rabbits Surprize.

ROAST off two or three half grown Rabbits, accordlnj to the Bignefs of your Difh; cut off the Heads clofe by Jthe Shoulders, and the firft Joints; then take out all the lean Meat from the Back-bones, and cut it, and tofs it up in fix or fcven Spoonfuls of Milk or Cream, with the Bignefs of Half an Egg of Butter, grated Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt; thicken it with a little Dull of Flour, to the Thicknefs of a good Cream, then boil it, and fet it to cool; then take the like Quantity of Forcd-meat, and tofs it up likewife, and place it all round each of the Rabbits, leaving a long Trough in the Back open, that you think will hold the Meat you cut out with the Sauce; then cover it with the fameFcrcd meat, fmoothd as well as you can with your Hand, and a raw Egg, fquare at both Ends, throw on them a little grated Bread; then butter a Mazarine or Pan, and take them from the Dreffer, where you formed them, and place them on it. Bake them three Qiiarters of an Hour before you ferve them, till they are of a fine brown Colour: Let your Sauce be Butter, Gravy, and Lemon, and your Garnilhing flicd Orange and fryd Pariley; fo ferve it for the firil Courfe.

To boil Rabbits.

TRUSS them for boiling, boil them quick and white: For Sauce take the Livers, boil and ftred them, and fome Parfley ihred nne, and pickled Nafturtium Buds chopped fine, or Capers; mix thele with Flalf a Pint of good Gravy,

04 a Glafs

344 Lad ys Co m p a n i o n,

a Glafs of White Wine, a little beaten Mace and Nutmeg, a little Pepper and Salt, if wanted, a Piece of Butter as big as a large Walnut rolld in Flo-ur, let it all boil together till it is thick, take up the Rabbits, and pour the Sauce over them.
Garnifh with Lemon and Barberries. You may lard them with Bacon if it is liked.

J not her Tfay.

PRICK the Rabbit down to their Shoulders, gathering up their Hind-legs to their Bellies, lard them with Ba- con, if you pleafe, and boil them white: When they arc boiled, take their Livers, and mince them fmall, with fat Ba- con boiled; then put to it White Wine, ftrong Broth, and V inegar, altogether about Half a Pint; boil thefe with fomc whole Mace, fame Barberries, and a little minced Parfley, put to thefe a Ladleful of drawn Butter; difh your Rabbits on Sippets, pour your Sauce over them; garnifli the Didi with Barberries and Slices of Lemons.

boil Rabbits ivith Saufages.

BOIL a Couple of Rabbits; when almoft boiled, put in a Pound of Saufages, and boil with them; when done enough, dilh the Rabbits, placing a Saufage here and there one, with fome fryd Slices of Bacon. For Sauce, put Muf- tard and melted Butter beat up together in a Cup, and ferve them hot. You may boil a povvderd Goofe the fame Way.

Another IVay.

BO I L a Rabbit in a little Mutton-Broth; put to it two or three Glafles of White Wine, and a Blade of Mace; then take a Lettuce, fome Spinach, Parfley, Winter Savoury, and Sweet-marjoram; and after being waflid, put them in your Stew-pan to the Rabbit; and after ftewing a little while, take the Greens out, thicken the Liquor with a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, feafon vith Pepper and Salt, with u Dafh or two of Vinegar; cut Sippets, and place at the Bot- tom of your Diih; then put the Rabbit on them, and pour the Liquor over it. Garnifh with Barberries, and fome of the boiPd Herbs.

brother May.

AFTER your Rabbit is trufsd, put into the Belly fome Oyfters, after being parboild, and «i Anchovy mincd; then put it into a Stew-pan, with a Pint of White Wine, a laree Han«ful of Spinach, the Yolks of hard Eggs cut in

Quar-

W< Lad vs Companion. 345

Quarters, a Faggot of fweet Herbs, a little Salt, let alUlew together; when near enough, cut open the Belly ot the Rab- bit, and take out theOyllers that they may have aBcil; then dilh your Rabbit with Sippets under it, and lay over it fome fcalded Grapes or Goofeberries; then pour over the Broth, after you have thickend it with Butter roild in Flour, or a Cullis. Garnifh with Lemon fiiced, and fome of theOyfters.

Afi Efclope of Rabbits.

GET oTQ JRabbits, cut them in Quarters, and flew them a la Braife, as you do feveral other Things; then make a Ragoo of Veal Sweetbreads, Fowls Livers, Cccks-com S; M-orels-, Mufhrooms, and Truffies: Tofs tliem all up together in a Stew-pan, with melted Bacon; moiften it with Gravy, and let it fimmer Half an Hour, then take the Fat clean oft, and bind it wiih a Cullis of Veal and Ham; Take up your llevved Rabbits, and put them into yourRagoo, where let them lie till they are cold: Raife a Pye of thin Parte, and put your cold Ragoo and Rabbits in it, cover it with a Lid of the fame Pafte, and turn down the Edges, that the Top may be as plain as the Bottom; fo fet it into the Oven: When it is baked, turn it upfide down into the Difh, make a Hole in it to lee if it be dry: and if it be, poir in fome good Cullis, and ierve it hot for the iirft Courie.

We make Efclopes of all Sorts of Fovvls tame and wild, firft ftewed a la Biaife with Ragoos, in the fame Manner a3 this of Rabbits,

To bake Rabbits.

FIRST lay by the Livers, divide the Rabbits into Quar- ters, lard them with large Lardoons of Bacon well fea- fond, and with lean Ham; lay Bards of Bacon all over the Bottom of a Stew-pan, and upon them Slices of Veal, feafoni with Salt, Pepper, Spices, flicd Onions, fweet Herbs, Cives Parfley, Parfnips, and Carrots; lay your Quarters of Rabbhs uponthefe, and then lay the fame Roots and Seafoning over them, that you did under them; lay Slices of Veal, and cover all over with Bards of Bacon j then either bake them in an Oven, or under a Baking-cover: While they are baking, make a Cullis as follows: Cut Slices of Veal and Bacon, beat them, lay them in theBbttom of a Stew-pan, put to ihem Carrots, Parfnips, nd Onions flicd; let it Hand over a n cde- rate Fire, and whtn it begins to lick to the Bottom of the -l .v- pan, moillen it with a little melted Bacon, drudge it with Flour, 0.5 fti

34 IT La D ys Com p AN I N.

ftir it all together; then put to it a little Gravy, and a little iirong Broth, and three or four Cloves, fome whole Gives, a little Parfiey, Muhrooms and Truffles cut in Pieces, and fome Cruils of Bread; let all thefe fimmer together; then pound the Livers of the Rabbits in a Mortar, and put to them a little of the Liquor of the Cullis, and then put them into a Cullis; when they have fimmer d a little, ftrain all through a Sieve; your Rabbits being baked, drain them, put them into your Cullis, fet them over the Fire, and give them a Simmer or tvvo; then dilTi them, pour your Cullis upon them, and ferve them up hot for a firfl Courfe.

10 hake Rabbits ~viih Slices of Bacon.

HAVIN G laid by the Livers of your Rabbits, cut them into Quarters, and lard them with large Lardoons of -Kacon well ieafond, and with the Lean of a Ham; then lay m the Bottom of a Stew-pan Bacon, and Slices of Veal, fea- fond with Salt, Pepper, flicd Onions, and fweet Herbs; add ulfo Gives, Parfiey, Carrots, and Parfnips flicd; then lay in che Quarters of Rabbits, lay over them the fame Seafoning you did under them, with Slices of Carrots, Parfnips, Veal, laid Bards of Bacon; then either fet them into an Oven, or under a Baking-Cover, with Fire both over and under them; then make a Ragoo called Sauiaaziixs: Cut fome Slices of Gammon of Bacon, beat them well, tofs them up with a little melted Bacon and Flour, put to them fome good Gravy Vvichout any Salt in it, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; let all thefe ikw together; then put in a little Vinegar, and bind the Sauce with a good Cullis: When your Rabbits are baked enough, take them out of the Pan, lay them to drain -, then put to them the Saingaraz, and let them llmmer in it for a little while; diih them, pour the Saingaraz over them, and ferve them up to Table for a firil Courfe.

You may alfo bake Rabbits with Ragoos of Cucumbers, and of Endive.

To hajh Rabbits.

GET fome Rabbits, vvaih them, pick the Flefh from off the Bones, after being half roailed, and mince it fmall, adi to it a little good Mutton-Broth, a Shalot or two, a little Nutmeg Q-rated, and a little Vinegar, llewd together; put in a good Piece of Butter, a Handful of Hired Parfley, ferve it uron Sippets, garnilhd with Slices of Lemon.

To

The Lad ys Com panion. 47

To roajl Rabbits.

DONT fpit them Back to Back, but fkewer thein ur Side to Side: While they are roalHng, boil fome Parr ley, mince it, and likewile the Livers very fmall, and mix them with melted Butter: When they are enough, difh them, pour the Sauce over them, and ferve them up.

Or elfe make your Sauce with the Liver minced with fome Bacon and Beef-lewet, Thyme, Parfley, fweet Marjoram, and inter-iavoury, fhred fmall, with the Yolks of hard Eggs minced; let all thefe be boiPd in firong Broth and inegar then put to it drawn Butter, grated Nutmeg, and a little Sugar; garniih with Slices of Lemon.

To dreji Rabbits in Cajferole.

DIVIDE the Rabbits into Quarters, you may lard them, or let them alone juil as you pleafe, fhake fome Klour over them, and fry them with Lard or Butter, then put them into a Stew-pan with a Quart of good Broth, a Glafs of White Wine, a little Pepper and Salt, if wanted, a Bunch of fveet Herbs, ind a Piece of Butter as big as a Wal- nut rolled in Flour; cover them clofe, and let them ftew Half an Hour, tlien diih them up, and pour the Sauce over them, Garnifh with Se-jillt Orange cut into thin Slices and notched; the Peel that is cut out, lay between the Slices.

To roafi Pabbits ivith a Farce in their Bodies.

TA K £ a Couple of Rabbits, parboil them, cut off their Heads, and tirll: Joints of their Legs; make a Farce for them of their Livers minced with a Mufhroom, aTruflie, a few Cives, and fomo Parfley minced, and feafcred with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg j add a good Handful of fcraped Bacon; then pound all together in a Mortar; and having- lluffed the Bellies of the Rabbits with fome of this Farce, Ikewer them together, and lard them with lean Ham, fat Ba • con, and Slices of Veal, wrap them up in Paper, fpit ami roaft them: When they are enough, put fome CuUis or Ef- fence of Ham in a Dilh, take off the Bards of Baccn, dil;i them, and ferve them up hot for a firft Courfe.

You may ftuff their Bodies with Oyilers, after being blanchd, with an Anchovy minced.

34S ne Ladys Companion.

7 fou Rabbits.

GET two or three Rabbits, boil them till they are half enough, cut them into Pieces in the Joints, and cut the Meat ofFfrom the Bone in Pieces, leaving Ibme Meat on the Bones; then put Meat and Bones into a good Quantity of the Liquor in which the Rabbits were parboiPd; let it over a Chaling-diih of Coals, between two Diihes, and let it ftew, feafon with Salt, and grofs Pepper, and then put in fomeCil; and before you take it off the Fire, fqueeze in fome Juice of Lemon: When it has ftewed enough, ferve up ail together m the Difh.

To ficTv Rabbits the French Wny.

DIVIDE your Rabbits into Quarter, lard them with pretty large Lardoons of Bacon, fry them, Itew them- in a Stew-pan, with ftrong Broth, VvhiteWine, Salt, Pepper, - Faggot of fweet Herbs, fryd Flour and Orange.

To minnhlc Rabbits or Chickens.

PUT into the Bellies of your Rabbits, or Chickens, fome Panley, an Onion, and the Liver; fet it over the Fire in the Stew -pan with as much Water as wall cover them, with little Salt i when they are half boiFd take them out, and h;ed the Pariley, Liver, and Onion, and tear the Flefh from fhe Bones of the Rabbit in .A Flakes, and put into the Stew-pan again, with a very hite of theLiquor it was boiled in, and a Pint of White Wine, and fome Gravy, and Half a Pound or more of Butter, and fome grated Nutmeg: When !t is enough, Ihake in a little Flour, and thicken it up with Butter. Serve it on Sippets.

To roajl Teals nuhh Olives,

MINCE the Livers with Parfley, Onions, fine Herbs, Muihrooms, fcraped Bacon, and a Bit of Butter, mix all together, and put it into the Bodies of your Teal, then

• blanch them with a little Batter, Parfley, and an Onion, then wrap them up in Slices of Bacon and Paper, and roail them j and while they are roafting take fome Olives, take out the

.•Stones, and blanch them: put them in a Stew-pan with a

iittie Veal-gravy and EfTence of Ham, and let them have a Boil. YourTeais being ready, take oi the Paper and Bacon, and difh them up with your Ragoo of Olives over them.

Teals

he Ladys Companion. 34

Teals nvith Shalots.

PREPARE them as before and roaft them, take fome Shalots, mince them very fmall, and put them in a Stew- pan, with wanii Water, and a little Gravy, Salt, and Pepper; let them juft boil. Your Teals being ready, take off the Paper and Bacon, put them into the Difh, pour the Sauce over them, after it is thickened; fqueeze a little Juice of an Orang« into it.

Teals iviih Oyfters.

STUFF their Bodies as before direed, mincing fome blanched Oyflers with the Stuffing; then wrap them up in Slices of Bacon and Paper, and roaft them; then take iome Oyfters, and blanch them in their own Liquor, which ftrainoff; put in a Stew-pan fome of their Liquor, a good Lump of Butter, fome Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg grated, a Dull of Flour, and a Dalh of Vinegar, let it over the Fire to thicken, then put in your Oyllers; let the Wiiole be relifhing. Difh up your Teals, and pour your O fter Ragoo over them.

At another Time ou may ferve them up with fome blanched Parfley minced, and a minced Anchovy, with Le- mons cut in Dice.

7o boil Teal.

LET your Teal be large: When they are drawn and trufsd, ftuff them with the following Farce: Take Oyfters, Sage, Winter-favoury, Thyme, and Parlley, ftrippd and minced fmall; make them up into a Ball with Butter and Pepper, ftifFend with Flour j put this Ball into the Belly of the Teal, and tie up the Neck and Vent clofe: Make your Water boil, put in the Fowl; when they are boiPd ten- der, difh them on Sippet, with Gravy, Anchovy-fauce, and the Herbs; laying blanchd Oyfters, with fome fliced Lemon and Parfley, about the Difh Rim.

To boil Raies.

CUT off their Heads and Legs, trufs them, and put them into a Stew-pan with ftrong Broth, and Half a Pint of White Wine, feafbn with Salt, Pepper, whole Mace and Cur- rants; when they are enough, difh them on Sippets, thicken the- Broth with grated Manchet and Butter, diilolve a little Sugar in Water, Juice of Lemon, and put to the Broth: Garnifh with Slices of Orange or Lemon, and ferve them up.

To

g5o Ladys Companion.

7o roafl a Hern.

LET the Hern be well pickd, parboil it, lard the Breaft and Back, roaft it, barte it with White Wine and Butter beaten up together, drudge it with Iweet Herbs minced very fmall, and grated Bread; make a Sauce of the Yolks of Eggs beaten, Anchovies, a little Claret and Vinegar: When it is roalled, ferve it up i garniih with Lemon and Orange.

To Jie--v a Heath -Cock.

FLEA off the Skin, but leave the Rump, Legs, and Pi- nions whole; then mince the JFlefh with Beef- few et, feafon it with Salt, Pepper, and fweet Herbb minced, and raw Yolks of Eggs, mix thefe all well together with three Arti- choke-Bottoms boird, roafted ar:d blanchd Chefnuts, Mar- row or Beef-fewet, and Skirrets boiPd, and minced pretty fmall; then fill the Skin, and prick it up on the Back, flew it in a deep Stew-pan, with flrong Broth, Marrow, large Mace, White Wine, Salt,. boiPd A.rtichokes quarterd. Chef- nuts, Barberries, Grapes, and Ptars quarterd, and fome of the mincd Meat made up into Balls: When it is done, ferve it up with Sippets, and garnifh with Slices of Lemon, run it over with beaten Butter, garnifh the Difh with the Yolks of hard Eggs, large Mace, and Chefnuts blanchd.

fo hail or Jienv Sea-Fowls.

TA KE a Swan, wild or tame Goofe, Duck, Mallard, Teal, Gulls, Shoveler, Bittern, Widgeon, Hern, Shel- drakes, Pcwets, Barnacles, Whooper, Puffin, Crane, r.
Bone them all but the Legs; then make a Farce of Miuton, Venifon, and Beef-fevvet, mi-.ced fmall with favoury Herbs, feafond vith Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, and Mace; mix the minced Meat with raw Eggs, and add to them Oyfters par- boild in their own Liquor; fill the Body of the Fowl with this Farce, and prick it up on the Back; then put into a Stew-pan flrong Broth, White Wine, and Oyfler- liquor. Mar- row boiPd, Cloves, and Mace, and put in your Fowl, and fee them over a Stove to Hew: In the mean Time, flew CyJlers by themfelves in White Wine, and Butter, with Onions, Pep- per, and Mace, Artichoke-Bottonis, and put beaten Butter and boiPd Marrow to them: When all is ready, difh your Fowls on Sippets, and pour over them the Stew, and garnifh the Difh with fryd Oyflers and grated Bread, • and ferve up hot,

ne Ladys Companion 351

To Jieiv Wild Fowls.

HALF roail them i then cut them into little Bits; when cold put them into a Stew-pan, with a little Claret and Water, a Sprig of fweet Herbs, a little whole Pepper, Nut- meg and Salt, a little of each, one Anchovy, a Slice of Le- mon; let it Hew till tender; then thicken it with burnt But- ter; fo ferve them up on Sippets, and Lemon ilicd, or Hew them only in Gravy.

S A u c E s for Poultry,

Stuffing for broiTd Pigeons.

TAKE the Livers of your Pigeons, and fome Parley and Shalot, and fat Bacon, a Bit of Anchovy, the Yolk of an hard Egg, a little grated Bre.d, and a little Mar- row; Ihred all theie together vQ.ry fine, feafon it with Salt and Pepper to your Tafte, and wet it with a liule Cream; then fluff your Pigeons, and few them up; fry them in fome Butter, and after that turn them on a Gridiron quick.

To jluff the Crop of a Turky.

TAKE two Ounces of lean Veal, two Ounces of fat Bacon, Half the Liver of the Turky, the fat Part of four Oyfters, a fmall Onion, fome Thyme, Pariley, and Le- mon-peel, Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, Half a good Pippin, fome grated Bread, the Yolk of an Egg, and Butter to roll it up in; you may add Cream if you pleafe; beat all thefe in a Mortar till it is as fine as a Paite -, fo fill the Crop of your Turky.

Stuffing for a ftuhhle Goofe.

TAKE Half the Goofes Liver, fome Sage and Parfley, Onion as big as a Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and grated Bread, with fome Butter or Cream to wet it put more Sage than Parfley.

Sauce for boird Chickens.

TAKE two hard Egg, the Yolks only, fhred them as fine as poffible, take the Livers of the Chickens and juft fet them j then fhred them very fine, and put the Eggs and Livers into fome Gravy, and iqueeze in a Lemon to your Tarte, thicken and tofs them up all together with a little fhred Parfley. Garnifh with Lemon.

Jnother

352 The La D ys Com pak i on.

Another Sauce for boiled Chickens or Lamb.

TAKE a little White Wine and a Pint of Claret, a few Sprigs of fweet herbs, a little whole Pepper, and Mace, three Slices of Lemon; let it ftew a little; then put in a little Parfley and Spinach boild green, and choppd a little; then beat it up thick with fiX Ounces of freih Butter, and pour it over the Meat, and ferve it. Garnifii it with Lemon diced, and Barberries, Grapes, and Goofeberries Icalded, in their Seafon. -

Afiothe -Way.

BOIL Artichokes till the Leaves are tender, then fcrape off all the Meat, and leave the Bottoms whole, then boil the Livers of the Chickens fo that they will fpread like Pafte, and put to them a little Parfley boild and minced, then put your fcraped Artichokes, Livers, and Parfley, into a Stew-pan, with fome Butter and Veal-gravy; and when your Sauce is hot, pour it over your Chickens. You muft lay the Ar- tichoke-BottoniS whole under the Chickens. Garnilh with Lemon.

Sauce Jlr Capons.

TAKE the Necks of your Capons, and boil them in a little Water, with a whole Onion and two Anchovies cut fmall, and a little white Pepper, and catch the Gravy that runs from the Capons, and put it to your Liquor, take- ing out the Necks, Onion, and Pepper, put in a little Batter, and fhake it about; fo ferve it up with fliced Lemon.

J Sauce foon made for a Fowl.

OIL the Liver of the Fowl in a few Spoonfuls of Waters _ after which, bruife the Liver in a fmall Quantity of the Liquor it was boiPd in; add a litcle Lemn-peel, very fine; melt fome good Butter, and mix the Liver therein; let it juft boil up, and put it into the Difh, with the Fowl.

Sauce for a Turky.

TAKE a little Claret and ftrong Broth, or Water, An- chovy, one Shalot, a little Pepper, Mace, and Salt, and a Slice of Lemon; fet it to ftew a little, then ftrain it, and pour it through its Belly. Serve it with Onion-fauce. Boil them in three or four Waters, then drain them dry, chop them a little broad; lay them round the Turky; butttfr them, and ferve them only with Gravy.

The

B

The Ladys Companion. 353

The fame for a Capon, only add the Necks, and a few Sprigs of fweet Herbs.

Another Way.

TAKE Haifa Pint of Claret as much llrongBrOth, an Onion, a little whole Pepper, an Anchovy, and a little Btatter; let it Hew a Quarter of an Hour, and pour it through the Body of the Turky. Garnifli the Difli with Lemons and Onions.

Sauce for a boiled Turky.

A Little Water, or Mutton-gravy, if you have It, a Blade of Mace, an Onion, a little Bit of Thyme, a little Bit of Lemon -peel, and an Anchovy; boil all thefe to- gether, ftrain them through a Sieve, melt fome Gutter, and add to them j and fry a few Saufages, and lay round the Difh.
Garnifli your Difh with Lemon.

A Sauce for Turkles or Capons.

HAVING got Half a Pint of White Wine, and a little Gravy, and Oyfter-Iiquor, and a little grated Nutmeg, put to it three or four large Onions, boiPd tender and mafhd fmall, vith a lit le fmall Pepper, and two or three Anchovies minced fmall, boil it a Quarter of an Hour, with a little grated white Bread, and put to it a Piece of Butter, and then put it to the Fowls, being roafted.

A good Sauce for Teal, Mallards, Ducks, ic,

TAKE a Quantity of Veal gravy, according to theBig- nefs of your Difh of Wild-Fowl, feafond with Pepper and Salt; fqueeze in the Juice of two Oranges, and a little Claret: This will ferve all Sorts of Wild-Fowl.

Another Sauce yor Wild-Fowl.

TAKE Half a Pint of Claret, a little Oyfler-liquor, a little Gravy, and three or four Shalots; let it boil a Quarter of an Hour, with a little grated Bread, and put to it two Anchovies minced, and a little Butter, and fhake it well together, and put it to your Fowl, being roafted, and ferve them up.

Sauce

354 !rZ Ladys Companion.

Sauce for Wild Ducks.

GET a little Handful of Sage, one large Onion ftired fmall; feafon it with a little Salt, and roll them up with Butt.r into Balls, then put them in the Ducks, androall them; then take Half a Pint of Claret, diiTolve in it two An- chovies; then take Half as much Butter as Wine, then thicken them with the Yolks of two Eggs, then put your Ducks in your Difii, and pour your Sauce through them, and pull out your Balls j fo ferve them.

Saucey any Sort of Sea Fowl roafted.

PU T Half a Pint of Claret, and a Quarter of a Pint cf Wine Vinegar into a Sauce-pan, with an Ounce of Su- gar, fome grated Bread, fome Ginger and Cinnamon beaten, boil them up, and ftrain them; then put in a Sprig of Rofe- mary, a little red Saunders, and two or three whole Cloves; boil them again till it is pretty thick; put this Sauce in your Difli, lay the Fowls upon it, and fervc it up.

To make Spanifh Sauce.

RO A ST a Partridge, pound it well in a Mortar with good Gravy, with the Livers of Partridges, and fome Pieces of Truffles, but put not in too much Gravy, but let it be pretty thick; let it Hand in a Difh for a while; then pu a Couple of GlaiTes of Burgun or Claret into a Stew-pan, with two or three Slices c Onions, a Clove or two of Gar- lick, and a Couple of G s of the Sauce; then flrain it through a Sieve into the St; -pan, pour the Cullis upon it, kt it all be well feafond, add a little of Gammon EfTence, and let all boil for fome Time; this Sauce is proper for Par- tridges roailed, and cut in Pieces.

Sauce for Snipes.

YOUR Snipes being roafled, take them off, and take cut the Intrails and the Liver, put them in a Stew-pan, fqualh them, feafon them with r erper and Salt, and nioillen them with a little Red Wine,ci.t your Snipes into the Sauce, and if the Sauce be not thick enough, put in it two or three Spoonfuls of Veal or Ham Cullis, or a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour; put it over the Fire, let it be of a good Tafte, and when hot, fqueeze into it the Juice of two Oranges, and ferve it up hot.

The fame will do for Woodcocks.

Sauce

The Ladys Companion. 255

Sauce for Quails.

GET fome Vine Leaves, and dry them before the Fire, then mince them, after which, put them into a Stew- pan with Half a Pint of -Water and a Gill of Wine, either Red or White, a little Pepper and Salt; when ilewd a little put in a Piece of Butter.

This Sauce is alfo for roafted Pigeons.

Sauce yr z Woodcock.

TAKE a very little Claret, fome good Gravy, a Blade of Mace, fome whole Pepper and Shalot; let thefe flew a little, then thicken it up with Butter; roail the Guts Ml the Woodcock, and let them run on Sippets, or aToaft of white Bread, and lay it under your Woodcock, and pour the Sauce in the Difh.

Sauce yT Woodcock or Pheafant.

TA K E a little Claret and Water, one Shalot a little whole Pepper, Mace, a little grated white Bread, and Nutmeg; flice it a little thin, put in a Piece of frefh Butter.
Serve it with Sippets and Lemon llicd. Roafl the Guts in them. The fame Way for Pheafants, with roafted Wild Fowl round them. Put the Fowl-fauce in the Difh with it.
Put the Pheafant- fauce by in a Plate.

Sauce or a Hare.

HA L F a Pint of Red Wine, and a little Oyfler-IIquor and put to it fome good Gravy, and a large Onion ftuck with Cloves, and feme whole Cinnamon, and Nutmeg, cut in Slices; then let it boil till the Onion is boiid tender; then take out the Onion and whole Spice, and put to it three Anchovies, and a Piece of Butter; ihake it up well together, and fend it to the Table.

Another Way.

A Pint of Cream, and Half a Pound of frefh Butter; put them in a Stew-pan, and keep ftirring it with a Spoon till all the Butter is melted, and the Sauce is thick j then take up the Hare, and pour the Sauce into the Difh.

Another

35 ie Ladys Companion,

Another Way.

MAKE good Gra7, thickend with a little Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, and pour it into your Difh. You may leave the Butter out, if you dont like it, and have fome Currant Jelly warmd in a Cup, or Red Wine and Sugar boiPd to a Syrup, done thus: Take Half a Pint of Red Wine, a Quarter of a Pound of Sugar, and fet over a flow Fire to fimmer for about a Quarter of an Hour. You may do Half the Quantity, and put it into your Sauce-boat er Bafon.

Another Way

BASTE it with a Pint of Ale, and when the Liquor is three Parts wafted, and the Blood of the Hare mixd with it, then take up the Dripping-pan, and pour it into a Sauce-pan, and fet it by; then flour your Hare, and bafte it well with Butter, and put into the Pan fome Gravy, and fcrape up all the Brown among the Liquor, and then put to it the Ale, and run it through a Sieve, and thicken it up with Butter roird in Flour. You may ufe Cream inllead of Ale.

Sauce for a boiled Goofe, U S T be either Onions or Cabbage, firll boiPd, and then flewd in Butter for five Minutes.

A Sance jr Green-Geefe, or for young Ducks.

GET Half a Pint of the Juice of Sorrel, and a little White Wine, a little grated Nutmeg, and a little grated Bread, let it boil a Quarter of an Hour, and put to it as much Sugar as will fweeten it; if you pleafe, you may put in a few fcalded Goofeberries or Grapes, and a Piece of Butter, fhake it up thick, and put it to the Geefe, being roafted. This Sauce is proper for Chickens.

French Sauce for a Goofe.

HAVING drawn up fome Butter thick, mix in it a Spoonful or two of Muftard, fome 6ugar, Vinegar, and Barberries.

Sauce for Land-Fowl.

BOIL Prunes, and ftrain a little Pulp into a little of the Blood of the Fowl, then put in a little Ginger and Cin- namon powderd; put in alfo a little Sugar, and boil them to a pretty Thicknefs, and ferve it in a Diih with the Gravy of the Fowl.

Sacce

M

he Ladys Companion. 257

Sauce for hoilid Rabbits injlead of Onions.

BOIL the Livers, and fhred them very fmall, as alfo two Eggs, not boild too hard, a large Spoonful of grated white Bread, have ready fome ftrong Beef-Broth, and fweet Herbs; to a little of that add two Spoonfuls of White Wine, and one of Vinegar; a little Salt, and fome jButter; ftir all in, and take care the Butter does not oil: Shred your Eggs very fmall.

o

Fretich Sauce for Rabbits.

N I O N S mincd fmall, fryd, and mingled with Muflard and Pepper,

Sauce for boiled Rabbits or Ducks,

TO boird Rabbits or Ducks, you muil: pour boiPd Onions over them, which make thus: Take the Onions, peel them, and boil them in a great deal of Water; fhift your Water, then let them boil about two Hours, take them up, and throw them into a Colander to drain; then with a Knife chop them on a Board; put them into a Sauce- pan, juil Ihake a little Flour over them, put in a little Milk or Cream, with a good Piece of Butter; fet them over the Fire, and when the Butter is all melted, they are enough.
But if you would have Onion-fauce in Half an Hour, take your Onions, peel them, and cut them in thin Slices, put them into Milk and Water; and when the Water boils, they will be done in twenty Minutes; then throw them into a Colander to drain, chop them, and put them into .
a Sauce-pan; fhake in a little Flour, with a little Cream, if you have it, and a good Piece of Butter; Ibr all toge- ther over the Fire till the Butter is melted, and they will be very fine.

This Sauce Is very good with roaft Mutton, and it is the beft Way of boiling Onions.

Sauces for Partridges.

TAKE a Bunch of Sellery clean vahd, cut all the White vry fmall; wah it again very clean, put it into a Sauce-pan with a Blade of Mac, a little beaten Pepper, and a very little Salt; put to it a Pmt of Water, let it boil till the Water is jult wafted away; then add a Quarter of a Pint of

Cream,

I

35 s Ladys Companion,

Cream, and a Piece of Butter rolled in Flour; ftir all toge- ther, and when it is thick and fine pour it over the Birds.

Or take the Livers and bruife them fine. Tome Parfley choppd fine, melt a little nice frelli Butter, then add the Li- vers and Parfley to it, fqueeze in a little Lemon, jufl give it a Boil, and pour over your Birds.

Or take a Quarter of a Pint of Cream, the Yolk of an Egg beat fine, a little grated Nutmeg, a little beaten Mace, a Piece of Butter as big as a Nutmeg rolld in Flour, and one Spoonful of White Wine; ftir all together one Way; when fine and thick pour it over the Birds: You may add a few Mufhrooms.

Or take a few Mufhrooms, peel and wafh them clean, put them in a Sauce-pan with a little Salt, put them over a very- quick Fire, let them boil up, then put in a Quarter of a Pint of Cream and a little Nutmeg; Ihake them together with a very little Piece of Butter rolled in Flour, give it two or three Shakes over the Fire, three or four Minutes will do; then pour it over the Birds.

Or boil Half a Pound of Rice very tender in Beef-gravy, feafon with Pepper and Salt, and pour over your Birds: Thefe Sauces do for boiPd Fowls, a Quart of Gravy will be enough, and let it boil till it is quite thick.

Or take grated Bread, Water, and Salt, and an Onion, boil all together, and when boiPd fome Time, take out the Onion, and put in fome minced Lemon and a Piece of Butter, the Bignefs of a Walnut.

To prefernje Cocks-combs.

LE T them be well cleaned, then put them into a Pot with fome melted Bacon, and boil them a little. About Half- an Hour after, add a little Bay Salt, fome Pepper, a little Vinegar, a Lemon fliced, and an Onion ftuck with Cloves. When the Bacon begins to ftlck to the Pot, take them up, put them into the Pan you would keep them in, lay a clean Linnen Cloth over them, and pour melted Butter cla- rified over them, to keep them clofe from the Air. Thefe make a pVetty Plate at a Supper.

Eutterd Crumbs for Larks.

PU T a Piece of Butter into a Stew-pan, and let it run to Oil; then fkim it clean, and pour it off from the Settle- ment, to this clear- Oil put grated Crumbs of Bread, and keep them ftirring till they are criip j when they are draind lay them round your Larks.

Sauces

he Ladys Companion. 359

S A u c E s ffr roaji Pigeons or Doves,

I. f R AVY and Juice of Orange.

JJ 2. Boild Parfley minced, and put amongft fom6 Butter and Vinegar beaten up thick.

3. Gravy, Ciaret, and an Onion ftewed together with a

little Salt.

4. Vine Leaves roafted in the Bellies of the Pigeons, minced, and put in Claret and Salt, boild together, Ibme Butter and Gravy.

5. Sweet Butter and Juice of Orange, beat together and made thick.

6. Minced Onions boird in Claret almoll dry; then puttOf it Nutmeg, Sugar, Gravy of the Fowl, and a little Pepper.

7. Or Gravy-of the Pigeons only.

Sauces for all Marnier of roafi Land Fowl, as, Turk.

JBullard, Peacock, Pheafant, Partridge, l5c.
I.QLICED Onions being boird, ftevv them in fome 1 Water, Salt, Pepper, fome grated Bread, and the Gravy of the Fowl.

2. Take Slices of white Bread, and boil them in fair Wa ter with two whole Onions, fome Gravy, Half a grated Nut- meg, and a little Salt; flrain them together through a Strainer, and boil it up as thick as Water-Gruel; then add to it the Yolks of two Eggs dillblved, with the Juice of two Oranges.

3. Take thin Slices of Manchet, Gravy of the Fowl, fome fweet Butter, grated Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, ilevv all to- gether, and being ftewed, put in a Lemon fliced with the Peel.

4. Onions fliced and boild in Water, and a little Salt, and a few Bread Crumbs, beaten Pepper, Nutmeg, three Spoon- fuls of White Wine, and fome Lemon-peel fi-nely minced, and boiled all together j being almoft boiled, put in the juice of an Orange, beaten Butter, and the Gravy of the Fowl.

5. Stamp fmall Nuts to a Pafte, wih Bread, Pepper, Saf- fron, Cloves, the Juice of an Orange, and llrong Broth, ftrain and boil them together very thick.

6. Quince, Prunes, Currants, and Raifms boiFd mufkified Bifcuit,:; mped and ftrained, with White Wine, Pvofe Vine- gar, Nucmeg, Cinnamon, Cloves, Juice of Oranges, and Su- gar, boil it not too thick.

7. Take

35o

The Ladys Companion,

7. Take a Mancliet, pare off the Cruft, and flice It, then boll it in fair Water, and being fomewhat thick, put in Ibme White Wine, Wine Vinegar, or Elder Vinegar, Sugar, and Butter.

8. Almond Parte and Crumbs of Manchet, ftamp them together with fome Sugar, Ginger, and Salt, llrain them with Grape-Verjuice and Juice of Oranges; boil it pretty thick.

The _Manner of trujjtng a Goofe.

AGoofe has no more than the thick Joints of the Legs and Wings left to the Body; the Feet and the Pinions being cut off, to accompany the other Gibblets, which con- fill of the Head and eck,with tleLiver and Gizzard.
Then at the Bottom of the AproiL oftnGoofe A, cut an Hole, and draw the Rump through it; then pafs a Skewer through the fmall Part of the Leg, through the Body, near the Back, as at B, and another Skewer through the. thinneii Part of the Wings, and through the Body, near the Back, as at C, and it will be right.

he

The Ladys COMPANION.

S6i

fhe Manner of trujjlng a Chicken like a Turky-Poult, or of trujjlng a Turky-Poult.

F T E R you have got a Chicken, cut a long Slit down

the Neck, on the Fore -part; then take out the Crop

and the Merry-thought, as it is called; then twift the Neck, and bring it down under the Back, till the Head is placed oa the Side of the left Leg; bind the Legs in, with their Claws on, and turn them upon the Back. Then, between the Bend- ing of the Leg and tb.e 7high, on the rigli: Side, pafs a Skewer thro the Body of the Fowl; and when it is through, run the Point thro the Piead, by the fame Place of the Leg as you did before, as at A: Yournuil likewife pull the Rump B thro the Apron of the Fowl.

Nate, The Neck is twilled like a Cord, and the bony Prt of it muft be quite taken out, and the under Jaw of the Fowl taken away; neither fhould the Lier and the Gizzard be ferved with it, though the Pinions are left on. Then turn the Pinions behind the Back, and pafs a Skewer through the extreme Joint, between the Pinion and the lower Joint of the Wing, through rhe Body, near the Back, as at C, and it will be fit to road in the falhionable iVIanner.

7 B. Always mind to beat down the Breafc-bone, and pick uie Head and Neck clean from the Feathers, before you.
begin to trufs your Fowl.

A Turky-Poult has no Merry-thought, as it is called; and therefore, to imitate aTurky the better, we take it out of a Chicken through the Neck.

Vol. L

R

THE

362 The Ladys Companion,

THE above FIGURE ihews the Manner how the Legs and Pinions will appear when they are turned to the Back j as alfo, the Pofition of the Head and Neck of the Chicken or Turky-Poult.

fhe

he L A D ys C o m p a n I n. 6

7h£ Manner of trujjlng an Hare.

Cx S E an Hare, and in cafing it, jull: vvlien you come to the Ears, pafs a Skewer jail between the Skin aad the Head, and, byDegrees, raiie it up till the Skni leaves both the Ears flrippd, and then take ofr the reft as ufual. Then give the Head a Twill over the Back, that ix. may Hand as at A, patting two Skewers in the Ears, party to make them iiand upright, and to fecui; the Head in a right Pofition; then puih the Joint of the Shoulder-blade up as high as may be, towards the Back, and pafs a Skewer between the Joints, as at B, through the bottom Jaw of the Hare, which will keep it ileadyj then pafs another Skewer through the lower - Era.nch of the Leg at C, through the Ribs, palling clofe by the Blade-bone, to ke.p that up tight, and another throup;li the Point of the fame Branch, as at D, which iinilhes the upper Part. Then bend in both Legs between the Haunches, fo that their Points meet under the Scut, and Ikewer them fall, with two Skewers, as at O, O.

To irufi a Hare Jhort Jle the Manner of tnjlng a Rabbit for bailing.

R 2

•hi

364 The Lad ys Com p a nion.

The Manner of trujpng a Fowl for Boiling,

YOU mufl, when it is dravn, tvvift the Wings till you bring the Pinion under the Back; and you may, if you will, endofe the Liver and Gizzard, one in each Wing, as at A, but they are commonly left out. Tlien beat down the Breaft-bone, that it does not rife above the flefhy Part; then cut oft the Claws of the Feet, and twift the Legs, and bring them on the Outfide of the Thigh towards the Wing, as at B, and cut an Hole on each Side the Apron, juft above the Sidefman, and put the Joints of the Legs into the Body of the Fowl, as at C; So this is trufsd without a Skewer.

tb

The Ladys Companisn. 3

The Manner of trujjlng an Eailerling.



A Duck, an Eailerling, a Teal, and a Widgeon, are all trufsd in the fame Manner. Draw it, and ]ay afide the Liver and Gizzard, and take out the Neck, leaving the Skin of the Neck full enough to fpread over the Place wher the Neck was cut off. Then cue off the Pinions at A, anA raife up the whole Legs, till they are upright in the Middle; of the Fowl B, and prefs them between the Stump of the Wings and the Body of the Fowl; twift the Feet towards the Body, and bring them forwards, with the Bottom of th Feet towards the Body of tl. Fowl, as at C: Then take a Skewer, and pafs it through ihe Fowl, between the lower Joint, next the Foot and the Thigh, takincr hold, at the fame Time, of the Ends of the Stumps of the Wings A: Thva will the Legs, as we have placed them, ftand upright. D is the Point of the Skewer.

R3

We

66 fhe Ladys Companion.

lhe Manmr of trujing a Rabbit for hoiUng,

CUT the two Haunches of the Rabbit clofe to the Back- bone, two Inches, and turn up the Haunches, by the Side of the Rabbit, feewer the Haunchts through the Middle Part of the Back, as at A; then put a Skewer through the utmoft Joints of the Legs, the Shoulder-blades and Neck, as at B, truffing the Shoulders high, and bending the Neck backwards that the Skewer may pafs through the Whole.

Vh Manner of trujjing a Rabbit for roafing.

CASE all the Rabbit, excepting the lower Joints of the fore-legs, and thofe you chop off; then pafs a Skewer through the Middle of the Haunches after you have laid them iat, as at A, and the Fore-legs, which are calTd the Wings muil be turnd as at B, fo that the fmaller Joints may be pulVd into the Body, through the Ribs. . This, as a finglc Rabbit, has the Spit pafsd through the Body and Head, but the Skewer takes hold of the J-V Haunches. But to trufs a Couple of Rabbit Skewers, and then the Spit pafles only bet without touching the Rabbits.

You may trufs it fhort as for boiling, and roaii it.

to prefer ve the

re fevea

j.ewers,

fhe Ladys Companion. oy

The Manner of trujjtng a Pigeon.

DR A W it, but leave in the Liver, for that has no Gall; then pufh up the Breaft from the Vent, and holding up the Legs, pat a Skewer juft between the Bent of the Thigh and the Brown of the Leg, firfl having turned the Pinions under the Back; and fee the lower Joint of the biggefl: Pinions are fo pafsd with the Skewer, that the Legs are between thera and the Body, as at A. .


1

o

6S he L A D Ys Companion,

he Manner cftrujjlng a Pheafant or Partridgie.

BOTH the Pheafant and the Partridge are trufsd the fame Way, only the Neck of the Partridge is cut off, and the Head of the Pheafant is left on: The Cut above iliews the Pheafant trufsd. When it is drawn, cut off the pinions, leaving only the Stump -bone next the Breaft, and pafs a Skewer through its Point, and through the Body near the Back; and then give the Neck a Turn; and paffing it by the Back, bring tiie Head on the Outfide of the other Wing- bone, as at A, and run the Skewer through both, with the Head Handing towards the Neck, or the Rump, which you pleafe: B is where the Neck runs. Then take the Legs, with their Claws on, and prefs them by the Joints together, fo as to prefs the lower Part of the Breaft; then prefs them down between the Sidefman, and pafs a Skewer through all, as at C. Remember a Partridge muft have its Neck cut off, or elfe in yx Thing is truffed like a Pheafant.

CHAP.

7he Ladys Companion. 369

CHAP. V.

Of Br effing of E G G S.

To male Eggs eat like Mufhrooms.

GET fix Eggs, and boil them hard, peel them, and cut them in thin Slices, put a Quarter of a Pound of But- ter into the Frying-pan, and make it hot; then put in your Eggs, and fry them quick Half 4 Quarter of an Hour; throw over them a little Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, For Sauce, take Half a Pint of White Wine, the Juice of a Lemon, a Shalot fnred fmall, a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, and ftir it all together, and lay it on Sippets, and ferve it.

Eggs Uiith Endive,

BLANCH fome Endive, prefs it well, give it two or three Cuts with a Knife, and put it in a Stew-pan; wet it with a little Fifh-Broth, and feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; let it ftevv for about Half an Hoyr, and bind it with a CuUis of Fifh; let your Egg h poaclied in Butter, aiid trimmed all round, miud that the Ra- goo of Endive tartes well, drefs it in aDifh, lay your poachd Eggs, well coloured, in Order; upon it, and ferve it hot.

Stuffed Eggs.
AKE a Dozen Eggs, boil them hard, peel them, fpli X thern in two, and take the Yolks out of theiii, put them in a Mortar with a Bit of Butter, young Onions, fhredParf- ley, Mufhrooms, and a Piece of Crumb of Bread boiled in Milk; if you have any Flelh oi Fifh put fome in it, and fea- fon it with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herb, and fine Spices. Pound them all vell together, and fill the Whites of your Eggs with it, and fmooth them by dipping your Knife in Egg. Then take the Difh you defign to ferve them in, put fome Farce at the Bottom of it, then put your ilufred Whites of Eggs in Order upon ic; then bread them, and bake them in an Oven, to give them a Colour. When they are done, put a h de Sauce of any thing you think proper, vithout covering them; and ferve them hot for a fccond Courfe.

R

370 ne Ladys Companion.

Anothsr Wa- to rf Eggs.
OIL fix Eggs hard, peel them, and cut them in thin Slices, put a Quarter of a Pound of Butter into the Stew-pan, then put in your Eggs, and ixy them quick; Half a Quarter of an Hour will do them. You mull be very care- ful not to break ihem; throw over them Pepper, Salt, and JVutmeg; lay them in your Diih before the Fire, pour out all the Fat, ihake in a little Flour, and have ready two Shalots cut fmall; throw them into the Pan, pour In a Quarter of a Tit of White Wine, a little Juice of Lemon, and a litde Fiece 3utter rolled in Flour. Stir all together till it is thick; if you have not Sauce enough, put in a little more Wine, toaft fome thin Slices of Bread cut thus A, and lay round your Dilli, pour the Sauce all over, and fend it to Table hot. You may put Sweet-Oil on the Toail:, if it be agreeable.

A pretiy DiJIj Whites of Eggs.

TAKE the Whites of twelve Eggs, beat them up with four Spoonfuls of Ps-ofe-water, a iitde grated Lemon- peel, a little Nutmeg, fwe ten with Sugar, mix them vell, boil them in four Bladders, tie them in the Shape of an Egg, and boil them hard; they will take Half an Hour. Lay them in your Difti when cold; mix Half a Pint of thick Cream, a Gill of Sack, and Half the Juice of2iS£njie Orange.
Mix all togetlier, and fweeten with f re Sugar, and pour over the Eggs. Serve it up for a Side-diih at Supper, or vhen you pieafe. •

Jncther Way to drefs EggS;

PU T fome Butter, or Hogs Lard, in a Stew-pan, and when it is very hot, break an Egg in it, and let it colour; poach as many as you v ill ferve in your Difli, the fame Way; your Eggs being poachd, knead a little Piece of Butter in Flour, and put in a Stew-pan, with a little Gravy, or Water, Salt, Pepper, and a little Dalh of Vinegar; bind it, and then pat it ill the Dilh you are to ferve in, put your Eggs upon if, and ferve it hot.

Eggs the Piedmont Way.
I L L a Dih almoil: full of Cream, put it on the Fire,

raid when the Cream boils, break as many Eggs in it as

your Difh will hold j ieafon it with Salt, Pepper, and Nut- meg, cover them with another Difh, take care they be no hard; and when enough; firve them hot.

Eggs

The LadysCompanioi 371

Eggs ei Crepi2e,

HAVING fome raw Ham, Veal Sweetbreads, fat Li- vers, Truffles, and Mufhrooms, cut all into Dice, tofs them up in melted Bacon, moiften the Whole with Gray, tt it iimmering for Half an Hour, then bind it with a Cu.His of Veal and Ham. See that vourRagoo be well relifhed, and fet a cooling. Take ten new laid Eggs, and divide the Whites from the Yolks, whip up the Whites to a Froth, and beat up the Yolks, either in a little Culiis or Cream; firain them thro a Sieve, and pour them into your Ragoo, together with the Whites, and mix the Whole well together. Then take a fiat-bottomd Sauce-pan, lay a Veal Caul in the Bottom of it, pour in your Ragoo, fold the Caul down upon it, nd bake ir in an Oven. When it is enough, turn it upfide down into a Dilh, and qtvq it hot.

Another Time, inllcad of ferving it dry, you nir.y throw on it a Culiis of Veal and Ham, or a Ragoo of Muil.rooms.

Eggs a la Tripe.
OIL them hard, takeoif the Shells, and cut them Slices long-ways; take a Bit of frelh But:er, put it in .: Stew-pan, let it melt over a Stove, put in your Eggs, and to:s th-m up with Ihred Parflcy, feafond witli Salt and Pepper.
When they arc enough, pour in a little Cream, and ici v.; them wfirm in Plates or little Difiies.

If you would not ferve them with Crearu, you may, while you are toiTing them up t9 the Stew-pan, add a little fhrei Onion, and inilead of the Cream, beat up two Yolks of Egg in a little Verjuice or Vinegar, and Watev, thicken your Egg..
with it, and ferve them as you do the others with Cream.

Eggs ivith Anchovies.
REP AP. E Eggs, and break Hilf of them into a Butter difii, fet them over the Fire, didblve three Anchovies in three Spoonfuls of White Wine, and pour into the Eggs; beat a Handful of Piftachoes in a Mortar; put Half a Quarter of .
Pint of Mutton-gravy, and your beaten Piilachoes, into the Eggs, dont let the Eggs be too fliifj cut large Sippets, toad- them, lay them in the Difh, and the Eg-vs upon them by Spoonfuls, or you may difh them with the Toalfs about them on the Brims of che Diih.

Eggs

S2 The Ladys Companion.

p

Fggs poachd ijuitb Anchovies.
O A CH your Eggs, lay them in aDilh,trim them round vth a Knife; melt fome Butter with Anchovies, fryd

Flour, Salt, and Juice of Lemon i pour th-s upon them, and

ferve rhem.

To dref Eggs ixith Bresd.

TAK E a Penny loaf, foak it in a Quart of hot Milk for two Hours, or till the Bread is foft j then ftrain it through a coarfe Sieve, put to it two Spoonfuls of Orange- flow erAVuter, or Rofe Water, fweeten it, grate in a little oSutmeg, take a little Difh, butter the Bottom of it, b:eak in as nxany Egg as will cover the Bottom of the Diih, pour in the Bread tnd Milk, fet it in a Tin Oven before the Fire, ar;d Half an Hour will bake it; or it will do on a Chafing-difli of Coals. Cover it clofe before the Fire, or bake it in a flow Oven.

To broil Eggs.

CUT aToall round a Quartern -loaf, toaft it brown, lay it on your Difh, butter it, and vtry carefully break fix or eight Eggs on the Toaft, and taks a red-hot Shovel and hold over theix. When they are dcr.e, fqueeze a Senjille Orange over them, grate a little Nutmeg over it, and ferve it up for a Side-plate. Or you may poach your Eggs, and lay them on the Toaft; or toafl your Toaft criip, and pour a little boiling Water over it; feafon itVith a little Salt, and then lay your poachd Eggs on it.

To drejs Eggs and Crawfifii.

FIRST make a kagoo of Crawiifli-Tails, Artichoke- Bottom.s, TrufRes, and Mufhrooms, cut into Pieces, and tofsd up in a Stev-pan with a little Butter, and moiftened with a little Fifh-Broth; the Whole being feafond with Salt, Pepper, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs, let it ftand fimmering for a Quarter of an Hour j then take oiF the Fat; put to it a Cullis of C- avvfifh; then take Half a Score new-laid Eggs, poach tiiem in boiling Water, lay them in a Difh, pour tlie Kagoo upon them, and ferve them in little Dilhes.

l

he Ladys Companion. 373

Eggs poached vith Cream.

POACH your Eggs with Butter in a Stew-pan -, then take them out upon a Plate, and trim the Whites; then put to them fome Cream with Sugar, and a little Salt; garnilh them as you pleaie, and ferve them up hot.

Or thus.

SW E E T E N a Quart of Cream with Sugar, put In three or four Zells of Lemon, and a Stick of Cinnamon; take Half a Pound of fweet Almonds, and twerty bitter ones, pounded in a Mortar, iprinkled row and then with Milk, till they become a Fafte; then put them into the Cream, with the Yolks of fifteen Eggs; mix all thefe together, and flrain it two or three Times through a Sieve; put it into a Difh, fet it over the Fire, cover it, and put Fire over it; when they arg enough, fet them by to cool, and ferve them cold in Plaies.

Amthir Way to drefs Eggs.

TAKE four or five Eggs, and break them into a Difh, put a Piece of Butter under and over them, and feafon them with Pepper and Salt, and cover them with another Difh; then put them over a Stove, or Chafing-difli of Char- coal, and let them do hard cr foft, according as you like.

Poachd Eggs and Cucumbers.
HEN you have got fome Cucumbers, make a Ragco of them thus: Pare the Cucumbers, cut them in Halves, take out the Seeds, flice them, and marinate them in Vinegar, Salt, Pepper, and an Onion or tvo fiiced; then ftev them in a Pan with frefh Butter, till they are brown; then put to them a little F ih-Broth, and let them fimmer for Half ar Hour; then f- im off all the Fat, and add to them a Culli:.
of Cravvfifh, or other Fifli. When you have this ready, poach j your Eggs, one by one, in Butter, lay them in the Dilh; J trim the Whites round with a Knife; pour your P.agoo upon them, and ferve them up.

Id farce Eggs.

GE T a Couple of Cabbage-Lettuces, fcald them vlth .
few Muih..cms, Pavfley, Sorrel, and Chervil thenchopj them all very fmaii with the Yolks of hard Eggs, feafond vithi §alt and Nutmeg; then itew them in Butter, and when they]

an I r

374 The Iuadys Companion.

are enough, put in a litcle Cream, then pour them into the Bottom of a Difh. Make another Farce with the Whites of your Eggs, fweet Herbs, iffc. giving them a Colour with a red-hot Fiie-a.ovel, and garniih the Brim of your Difii with them.

To dres Eggs ths Burgundian Way.

POUN D a Piece of lean &f with fome beaten Cin- namon, Sugar, Maccaroons, and a Slice of Lemon; then take Half a Dozen Eggs, without the Tread, a little Salt and Milk; mix all well together, and flrain them through a Sieve; put it into a Dilh, fet it over a Fire, and brown it with a red- hot Fire-iliovel.

To dres Eggs after the German JVay.

AFTER you have broke your Eggs into a Difn, put to them fome Peafe-foop, and fet them over a Stove; mix the Yolks of two or three Eggs with a little Milk, and ftrain them through a Sieve; then take away the Broth Jn which the Eggs were drefsd, and put the Yolks upon them, fcrape fome Cheefe on them, and colour them with a red-hot Shovel.

To drefs Eggs a la Huguenotte, or the Proteilant Way,

HAYING broke a Dozen of Eggs, or more, as you pleale, beat them together, and put to them the Gravy of a Leg of Mutton, or road Beef, llir and beat them well together over a Chafing-diih of Coals, with a [little Salt, fqueeze in the Juice of Oranges or Lemons; then put in fome Mufhrooms, well boiPd and feafond; when your Eggs are well mixed with the Gravy, V. take them off the Fire, keep them coverd for fome Time; then grate fome Nutmeg over them, and ferve them up.

To dres Eggs the Italian PVay.

MA K E a Syrup with Sugar and a little Water, and when it is fomething better than half made, put the Yolks of Eggs in a Silver Spoon, one by one, and hold them in the Syrup co poach. Serve them up to the Table, coverd and garnifhd with Piilachoes, Orange-flowers, and Slices of Lemon-peel, boiPd in the fame Syrup, and fprinkle a little Lemon-juice upon them. .

V1

The L A D ys C M p A N I N . 375;

To drefs Eggs n,oith Lettuce.

SCALD foine Cabbage-Lettuce in Water, fqueeze them well; then fiice them, and tofs them up with Butter, fea- iba them with Salt, Pepper, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; then fet theni over a gentle Fire in a Stew-pan with Butter, and let them ftew for Half an Hour; then fldm off the Fat, and add to them a Fih Callis; then lay them in Difhes.
Poach fome Eggs in Butter, lay the Eggs upon the Lettuce, and ferve them upon Plates.

To butter Eggs the Polonian Fahion.

F T E R you have got Half a Score Eggs, beat them, and having ready ibme Bread foakd in Gravy, beat them together in a vIortar, with fome Salt; put this to your Eggs, and then add a little prefervd Lemon-peel, either cut into fmall Slices or Ihred fmall, butter thern, let them over a Chafing-difli of Coals, and ferve them on Sippets.

10 drefs Eggs after the Portugueze Way,

SOME Sugar being diiTolved in Orange-flovver-water, the Juice of two Lemons, and a little Salt, put into it the Yolks of Eggs, fet it on the Fire, and iiir it well with a Spoon.
Let them boil till the Eggs flip from the Side of the Diih; then fet them qw to cool; then drefs them in the Form of a Pyramid, and garniih with March -pane and Lemon-peel.

Another Way.

A K E fome Pariley, Leeks, and Onions, cut them fmall, fry them in frefh Butter; when they are about half fryd, put to them hard Eggs cut into Rounds, a Hand- bl of Mufiirooms, well pickd, wafhd, and llicM, and fome Salt; fry all together, and when they are almoll done, put in a liitle Vinegar; lay Sippets in the Difh, and Slices of Le- mon upon them; then pour in your Eggs, 3V. and grate Nutmeg over them.

m

To drefs Eggs the Spanilli Way.

BR E A K a Dozen and Half of new-laid Eggs, mix them vith a Quarter of a Pound of Sugar, a Quarter of a Pint of Sack, a ittle Salt, and grated Nutmeg, and the Juice of an Orange; beat them all together very well; then let them over agentkf ire, vindkeep thvm continually ilirring till they begin

to

370 he Ladys Companion.

to thicken: Then ferve them up to Table in a Difh, with toalled Manchets dippd in the Juice of Oranges, White Wine, or Claret, and Icraped Sugar; Then fprinkle over them fome Juice of Orange.

To poach Eggs.

BOIL Water and Vinegar mixd together, with fome Cloves and Mace; when it is boiling break in yourEggs, and Itir them about gently with a Slice, till the Whites be hardened.; then take them up, and pare off what is not hand- fome j lay Sippets in a Difii, foaked in the Liquor the Eggs were poachd in, melt fome Butter with a little Vinegar, and pour over them, and ferve them hot.

Another Way.

GET Half a Dozen Eggs, and the Flefh of a Couple of Par ridges, or other Fowl; mince the Flelh as fmail as you can, put it into a Difh with a Ladieful of Mutton- Gravy, in which you have dilTolved a Couple of Anchovies; feafon it with beaten Cloves, Nutmeg, and Mace: Then fet it a flewing over a Stove, or Chafing-dilh j vhen it is half done, break in your Eggs one by one, flipping away the moil: Part of the Whites, and with the End of an Egg-fhell, make a Place in your Meat, in which put your Eggs, which do round in Order; let them Itew while the Eggs are enough, grate in Nutmeg, fqueese in the Juice of an Orange, garnifh with whole Onions, and ferve it up hot.

To focu Eggs jjith Gravy.

T 7 H E N you have poachd Eggs, as before, haying in

Y V readinefs fome good Gravy, heat it over the Fire, fea-

j fond with Salt, I cpper, and a whole Leek, lay your Eggs

in a Difh, ftrain youi Gravy upon them through a Sieve, and

ferve them hot in little Diilies or Plates.

Todrefs Eggs fvcith Oravge juice.
EAT your Eggs vell, fqueezing in fome Orange as you beat them feafon then; with a little Salr; put feme -ravy and Butter into a Stew-pan, ad yourEggs alfo, fet -em over a gentle ljre, and keep thcrn corcinually lining, il they fho.iid ilick to the Pan; When they are done, ferve lem up hot in a Difh.

To

he L A D ys C o m p a I o !. 377

To drefi Eggs in Verjuice.

LE T your Eggs be beat well with a little Verjuice, then put to thems alt and Nutmeg; put them over the Fire with a little Butter; and when they are about as thick as Cream, ferve them up.

0 fry Eggs as round as Balls.

JJ[AVING a deep Frying-pan, and throe Pint of clari- 7i fied Butter, heat it as hot as for Fritters, L.d ftir it with a Stick till it runs round like a Whirl-pool; ther. eak an Egg into the Middle, and turn it round with yoi-r Stick till it be as hard as a foft-poachd Egg, the Whirling round of the Butter will make it as round as a Ball; then take it up with a Slice, put it into a warm Difii, fet it leaning be- fore the Fire to keep hot; they will keep Half an Hour, and yet be foft, fo you may do as many as you pleafc; you may ferve them with fryd or roalled Collops, or ilewd Spi- nach. Garnifh with Orange.

To Tnake artificial Eggs.

BO I L a Gallon of Milk in an earthen Pan till it comes to a Quart, keeping it continually flirring with a wooden Ladle; then put one third Part of it into a Diih, and fet it on the Fire again with fome Rice, Cream, and a little Saffron, till it grows thick and pretty firm; then make it up into the Form of Yolks of Eggs, keeping them lukewarm; then take the Milk you fet by, and with that fill up fome Egg-lhells that you have opened, wafhd, and toppd, and put your arti- ficial Yolks into the Shells, and a little Almond Cream and Orange flower-water on the Top: Thefe are ufually ferved up on a ruffled Napkin, and are eaten in the Time of Lent,

7o make an Egg as big as Twenty,

PA R T the Yolks from theVhites of twenty Eggs, flrain the Yolks by themfelves, and the Whites by themfelves, boil the Yolks in a Bladder, in the Form either of an Egg or Ball; when they are boiled hard, put the Ball of Yolks into another Bladder, and the Whites round about it, and bind it up oval or round, and boil it. Thefe Eggs are ufed in grand Sallads.

If you pleafe you may add to the Yolks of the Eggs Am- bergreefe, Mu&, grated Bifcuits, candyd Piilachoes and Su- gar; and to the Whites, Muik, Almond -palle, beaten Ginger,

and

578 he Ladys Companion.

and the Juice of Oranges, and ferve them up with Butter Almond-milk, Sugar, and Juice of Orange.

Eggs ith Rofe-water.

LET your Eggs be tempered with Rofe-water, Salt, beaten Cinnamon, Maccaroon, and Lemon-peel, boil them with clarify d Butter in a Pan over a gentle Fire; when they are enough, ice them over with Sugar and Orange- ilovver, or Rofe-water; and, when you ferve them up, put feme Lemon-juice and the Kernels of Pomegranates to them.

To drefs Eggs hard,

SOME Butter being put into a Diih with Vinegar and Salt, fet it over a Chaiing-difh; when the Butter is melt- ed, put in two or three Yolks of hard Eggs, diiTolve them in the Butter and Vinegar for the Sauce; then having other hard Eggs ready, cut them in Halves or Quarters, lay them in the Sauce, and grate over them fom»e Nutmeg and Cruii of Bread.

Artificial Eggs au Miroir,

FILL the Bottom of a Plate with Cream, and let it boil with Butter, covered with a Lid, having Fire upon it; when it grows firm take it oiF the Fire, make hollow Places with a Spoon, and fill them with artificial Yolks, for which fee the PN.eceipt to make artificial Eggs; make a Sauce with Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, a little Vinegar, and fome fweet Herbs, chopped very fmall, and pour it in hot upon the

Eggs.

Eggs in Moonfol-ns .

HAVING broke your Eggs into a DIfh upon fome Butter and Oil, either melted or cold, llrevv ome Salt on them, and fet them over aChafing diih of Coals, but make not the Yolks too hard; and, while they are doing, cover them, and make a Sauce of an Onion cut into round Slices, and fiyd in good Oil or Butter; then put a little Verjuice, Salt, and grated Nutmeg to them, and ferve them up

To butter Eggs upon foafis.

HA LF a Score Eggs being beat in a Difh with fome Salt, put Butter to them, tlien cut fome Slices of Bread, and toaft them; vhen the Toafts are butterd lay them in a Difh, lay the Eggs on the Toafts, and garniih the Diih with pepper and Salt.

Eggs

The L A D ys Companion. 379

Eggs after the Swifs Way.

WHEN your Eggs are drefsd, as it were au Miriort bread them with Crumbs; then let them be covered with a Pike Hafli, and fome fcraped Cheefe, and brought to a fine Colour.

Amulet of Eggs.

GET what Quantity of Eggs you want, beat them well, and feafon them with Salt, and whole Pepper, if you like it; then have your Frying pan ready, with a good deal of frefh Batter, let it be thoroughly hot, then put in your Eggs, with four Spoonfuls of ftrong Gravy; then have ready cut Parfley and Gives, and throw over them; and when it is enough, turn it on the other Side, and fqueeze the juice of a Lemon or an Orange over it. Serve it for a Side-difh.

Eggs IV the Juice of Sorrel.

POACH your Eggs in boiling Water; and having pounded fome Sorrel, put the Juice of it in a Difh, with fome Butter, two or three raw Eggs, Salt, and Nutmeg; make all this into a Sauce, and pour it on your poachd Eggs j fo ferve them.

Eggs n,vith Succory.

BLANCH fome Succory, fqueeze it well, give it threC or four Cuts with a Knife, put it into a Stevv-pan» moiften it with a little Fifh-Broth, feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and a Bunch of favoury Herbs, let it fmiiner Half an Hour, and then thicken it with a Fiili Cullis, lay it hand- foniely in the DilTi, and having poachd your Eggs in Butter, and cut them round, as in the foregoing Receipt, lay therr.
upon the Succory, and ferve them in Plates or little Difhes.
or for Hors dOeuvres. U

Eggs aftd Sellery.

TAKE four or five Roots of Sellery, half boil it in white Water, that is to fay, in Water, Butter, Flour, and Salt; then take them up, drain them, cut them in Pieces, and put them into a Stew-pan, with a little Filli Cullis, fet them a fimmering Half an Hour, thicken them with a Crawfilh Cullis, and as big as a Walnut of Butter, u] keeping them always moving over the Fire. See that your I Ragoo be well reliihd, put in a little Vinegar, lay it in a

Dilb,

gSo The Ladys Companion.

Dilh, and your poach d Eggs upon it. Serve it as your Eggs with Succor;.

Inftead of poached Eggs, you may make ufe of hard Eggs cut in Halves, laying them upon the Sellery round your Dilh, and fcive them as above.

Eggs anti Cravviifli to be ferved in Utile Dijhes on Facing Days.

TA KE a little Ladleful of Fifh-Broth, a fmaJi Crufl of Bread, a Mulhroom, a little Parfley, a vhole Leek, and make it fimmer all together: Take it cfF the Fire, and put to it more cr lefs Cuflis of Crav;fiih, according x the Size of the Dilh you intend to make: Set a Dilh on the Table, and a Sieve in it, into which break fix new-laid Eggs, and ilrain your CuUis and them through the Sieve three or four Times. Set ailver Dilh on hot Embers, pour in your Eggs, cover it with a Tart-pan Cover, and put Fire upon it.
Lift it up from Time to Time to fee when the Eggs aie enough, and when you find them to be fo, ferye them warm.

Fcr Flefh Days.

TAKE Veal-gravy and Cullis of Veal and Ham, of each an equal Quantity when you have mixd them together, take one Half of it, and feafon it with Salt, Pep- per, and a litde Nutmeg; put the other Half among fome Crawiilh Cullis, in which beat up eight new-laid Eggs, and ftrain the Whole through a Sieve: Set a Difh upon live Embers, pour your Eggs into the Difh, and cover it with a Tart-pan Cover, lay Fire upon it; look on them from Time to Time, and when you fee that they begin to thicken, ferve them hot in Plates or little Diihes.

CHAP.

fhe Ladys Co MP A Ni ON. 381

CHAP. VL

Of RAGOOS.

A Ragoo of Sturgeon.

YOUR Sturgeon being cut into Pieces and thofe Pieces larded, flour them a little in order to fry them brown with Lard: As foon as they are coir.e to a Colour, ilip them into a Stew-pan with good Gravy, fweet Herbs fome Slices of Lemon, Truffles, Mufhrooms, Veal Sweet- breads, and a good CuUis: Afterwards, the whole Mefs be- ing well cleared from the Fat, put in a Drop of Verjuice, and ferve it hot.

To drefs Frefli Cod in Ragoo.

SCALE your Fifh, and boil it, in Water, with Vinegar, Pepper, Salt, a Bay-leaf, and Lemon; make for it Sauce of burnt Butter, fryd Flour, Capers, and Oyflers; let it be white when you ferve it up,

To ragoo Salt Cod after the Italian Way,

LET it be well fcaled, and foakd for eight or ten Hours, then boil it in a good Quantity of Water, two or three Boils will be enough. Take a Stew-pan, and put in it a large Piece of Butter, fome green Onions cut fmall, Parfley, a Clove of Garlick, or a Shalot or tvo, and Aveet Herbs, then your Cod, put in alfo a Glafs of Oil, a little beaten Pepper, fome Orange-juice; keep it ftirring that it may grov thick; when done enough, difh it up hot, and take care it be well tailed.

To ragoo Salt Cod an t her Way,

CU T your Cod in Pieces, and let it foak from Night till Morning, and boil it with a quick Fire. Take a Stew- pan, put in it a large Piece of Butter, fome green Onions, Parfley cut fmall. Pepper, then your Cod, let all flew fome Time, ftirring it often till it become: thick; you may put fome Filh-Broth, if you like it let all be relifhing, and ferve it up hot, garnifhing vqui Difh with fryd Parfley and Slices of Lemon and Orange.

Aiother

382 The Ladys Companion.

Another Way.

BOIL your Cod as in the above Receipt j put in a Stew- pan a Giafs of Oil, fome Parfley and Onions cut Imall Half a Glafs of White Wine, two Cloves of Garlick, the Juice of a Couple of Lemons, and a few Crumbs of Bread, then put in your Pieces of Cod, let all ilew fome Time, then difh it up, garnilhing your Difh with Slices of Orange and Lemon.

7o nake a Ragoo of Eel-Powts.

CLEANSE them well from their Slime with hot Wa- ter, then four and fry them i then put them into a Diih with burnt Euutcr, Flour, and difiblvd Anchovies; feafo» them with Salt, Gives, Nutmeg, and Verjuice; and Ilew them well. Garnifh with fryd Pariley, and ferve them.

A Ragoo of Milts of Fifh en gras.

HAVING blanchd the Milts of your Fifh in boiling Water, take them out, and throw them into cold: Tofs up in a Sauce-pan, nvith a little melted Bacon, fome fmall Muflirooms, fome Truffles cut in Slices, and a Bunch of Herbs; feafon the Whole with Pepper and Salt, moiilen it with Veal-gravy, and fet it to fimmer as ufual. When they are done enough, take the Fat clean off, bind your Ragoo with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; then put in your Milts, and make them fimmer over a gentle Fire. See that it be well tailed, and ferve it in Plates or little Diihes.

A Ragoo of Milts and Filh en Maigre.

FIRST blanch them, and throw them into cold Water, as in the Receipt nbove, put fome Butter into a Stew- pan, with a very little Flour, and brown it; put into your Brown fome fmall MuOuooms, anti flicd Truffles, and tofs theni up over a Sto£, then moiilen trem with good Filh- Broth, feafoid with Pepper, Salt, and a Faggot of Herbs; let them fimmer over a gentle Fire. This done, take off the Fat, and put in the Milts to fimmer as above; when they are enough, bind your Ragoo with a Crawfiih, or other maigre Cullis, and fmall Dilhes.

A Ragoo of Pike Livers.

HAVING cut off the Galls, blanch the. Livers and throw them into cold Water; then having tofsd up fome Mufhrooms and Truffles, put in your Livers with fome

good

The Lad ys Companion. 383

good Fifh-Broth, and obferve the fame Direaions as in the toregoing Receipt.

To make a Collar of Fifh in Ragoo, to looh like a Breaft of

Veal collard.

•«.

TAKE a large Eel, fkin it, walh it clean, and parboil it, pick off the Fiefh, and beat it in a Mortar; feafon it with beaten Mace, Nutmeg, Pfcppei, Gait, a few fweet Herbs, Parfley, and a little Lemon-peel chonp d fiiiall; beat all well together, with sn equal QuantiLV of Crumbs of Bread, mixicweli togethci, then tke aTurbut, Soals, Scates, orThornback, or any fiat Fift-i, that will roll cleverly 3 lay the fiat Fifh on the Drelfer, take away all the Bones and Fins, and cover your Fifh with the Farce; then roll it up as tight as you can, and open the Skin of your Eel, and bind the Col- lar with it nicely, fo that it may be fiat Top and Bottom, to Hand well in the Biili, then butter an earthen Difh, and fet it in it upright, flour it all over, and flick a Piece of But- ter on the Top, an J round the Edges; fo that it may run down on ihe Filh, and let it be well baked, but take great care it ir. s A-t broke; let there be a Quarter of a Pint of Wa- ter in the Diih.

In the mean Time, take the Water the Eel was boild in, and all the Bones of the Fifh, fet them on to boil, feafon them with Mace, Cloves, black and white Pepper, fweet Herbs, an Onion, cover it clofe, and let it boil till there is about a Quarter of a Pint; then flrain it, add to it a few TrufTles and Morels, a few Muflirooms, two Spoonfuls of Catchup, a Gill of Red Wine, a Piece of Butter as big as a largeWalnut, rolld in Flour. Stir all together, feafon it with Salt to your Palate, fave fome of the Farce you make of the Eel, and mix with the Yolk of an Egg, and roll them up in little Balls with Flour, and fry them of a Light-brown.
When your Fifn is enough, lay it in your Difh, fkim all the Fat off the Pan, and pour the Gravy to your Sauce. Let it all boil together till it is thick; then pour it over the Roll, and put in your Balls. Garnifti with Lemon.

This does beft in a Tin Oven before the Fire, becaufe then you can bafte it as you pleafe.

1q

384 he Ladys Com pan I ok. •

Te make a Ragoo Perches.

GUT your Perches, half broil them on a Gridiron, then take them up, and take ofF their Skins neatly; then take a Sauce-pan, put into it a little Filh-Broth, Half a Pint of White Wine, Salt, and Pepper, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, a Bay -leaf, and Parfiey Ihred; let it boil, then take a Stew-pan, put into it as much Butter as the Quantity of an Egg, a little Flour, and half brown it, and pour into it the Sauce out of the Sauce -pan; then lay in your Perches, and fet them over a gentle Fire to fimmer: When they are llevd enough, dilh tliem, and pour over them any maigre Ragoo, and ferve for a firil Courfe.

To make a Ragoo Perches cut in Slites.

CU T your Perches in Slices the whole Length of the Body, dividing each Perch into four Pieces; tofs up fome Muihrooms in Butter, and put to them a little Cream or Milk; then put in your SHces of Perch, v;ith the Yolks of three Eggs, fome ihred Parfiey and grated Nutmeg: Keep ftirring them very gently, for fear of breaking them, When they are ready, lay them in a Difh, pour a maigre Ragoo upon them, and ferve for a firll: Courfe.

7o ragoo t e Roes of Carps.

TAKE fome foft Rocs of Carps, and blanch them in warm Water; put in a Stew-pan fome melted Bacon, cr Butter, fome Mufiireoms, TrufRes cut in Slices, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; fry them a little, and feafon with Salt and Pepper; then moiften it with Gravy, and let it ftew gently over a flow Fire; when iLevvd, take off the Fat, thickening the Sauce with fome CuUis; and then put in your Roes; let your Ragoo be relifhing, and ferve it hot for a firfl Courle.

A Ragoo of Mufcles.

LET your Mufcles be walhd, and cleand; then put into a Sauce -pan a Piece of Butter, Salt, Pepper, Parf- iey, Chibboi, Rafpings of Bread, and a Daih of Vinegar, to tofs the Mufcles up in it. When your Mufcles are done enough, ferve them up hot.

A Ragoo

c

The Ladys Companiont. 385

j4 Ragoo Mufcles, wih a white Sauce.

AFTER your Mufcles are out of their Shells, blanch them in frelh Batter, with Parfley, and fweet Herbs cut fmall; then leafon them with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg; and when their Liquor is boiPd away much, thicken it with Yolks of Eggs and Lemon-juice, and ferve up with Scate, or by itfelf.

A Ragoo of Mufcles with a brown Sauce is made after the fame Manner, except that we then put in no Eggs, your Mufcles being blanched and moiftend with Gravy.

Jftoiher Ragoo 0 Mufcles.

L E A N S E your Mufcles, and put them in a Stew-pan, _, on a Stove till they are open; take them out of their Shells, and keep their Liquor; then blanch them in Butter, put fome Mufhrooms into a Stew-pan, with a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and Pepper, fome Veal-gravy to moiften the Whole; then ftew it on a flow Fire; your Sauce being done, take off the Fat, and thicken it with Cullis of Veal and Ham; then put in your Mufcles, with fome of their Liquor, and let it do llowly, taking care it dont boil; let it be relilhing, and ferve it up hot for a dainty Dilh. This Ragoo is ufed with all Sorts of Diflies.

jnother Ragoo o Mufcles,

YOUR Mufcles being cleanfed, opend, and taken out of their Shells, tofs up fome Mulhrooms in Butter, put in your Mufcles, with a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and moiften the Whole with Half of their Liquor and as much Fifh- Broth; add fome Parfley Ihred fmall, and fome Pepper; when ready, thicken with a Fifh Cullis, let it be of a high Relifh, and ferve it up hot. This Ragoo may be ufed for Courfes with Fifii.

Cockles may be done the fame Way as Mufcles.

A Ragoo of Oyfters.

OPEN your Oyfters, drain them over a Sieve, and put a Difli under to receive their Liquor. Melt fome frelh Butter in a Stew-pan, put in it a Duft of Flour, keep it flir ring till it is brown; moillen it with a little Gravy, and put in fome fmall Crulls of Bread of the Bignefs of the Top of [your Finger, and next your drained Oyibrs, tofs it up, fea- VoL. L S foa

386 ne Ladys Companion.

on it with Pepper, Parfley, Gives, and fome of the Oyfler- liquor. Your Ragoo being well relilhd, lerve it up for a dainty Diih.

This Ragoo muft be quickly done, becaufe the Oyflers muft boil.

Another Way.

OPEN your Oyfters, put them in a Stew-pan with their Liquor, blanch them, then take them out one after another, cleanfe them well, and put them in a Diih. Blanch fome Mulhrooms and Truffles in Butter, moifien them with Gravy, thicken the Sauce with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; then put in your Oyllers, warm them without boiling, and fqueeze a little Juice of a Lemon; let your Ragoo be palat- able, and ferve it up hot.

This Ragoo may be ufed with ail Sorts of Courfes with Oy iters.

Another Way.

BURN fome Butter, then take fome large Oyfters, well wafhd and dryd, and throw them into a Stew-pan, with a Shalot or two, and a little Salt; fry them a little; then take them out, and let them drain; then boil the Oyfter- liquor with Spices to your Mind, an Anchovy, a little Gravy, and thicken it with Butter roUd in Flour, and burn it in the Pan J then pour this Sauce over the Oyllers; garnilh with fryd Bread and Lemon llicd.

Another Way.

WHEN your Oyfters are opend, blanchd and cleansd, as in the former Receipts, and you have tofsd up Muflirooms and Truffles in frelli Butter, fimmer them in Eilh-Broth inflead of Gravy, thick it with a maigre Cullis, put in your Oyilers, give them a Heat, and ferve them up in little Dilhes.

A njohite Ragoo of Oyfters.

TA K E a Stew-pan, and put therein a good Bit of But- ter roird in Flour, fhredded Parfley, fome Nutmeg grated, pounded Pepper, Half a Lemon cut like Dice, a Ihredded Anchovy, and feveral Oyfters, with their Liquor; put the Whole on the Fire; but take care it does not boil; and when thickend ferve it up hoi; let it be relifhing. You may ufe this Ragoo with Fifh, Chickens, or any fuch other

Fowl you pleafe, for a firft Courfe.

Another

The Ladvs Companio!. 387

Another Ragoo cf Oyflers.

OPEN twenty large Oyfters, take them out of their Li- quor, fave the Liquor, and dip the Oyfters in a Batter made thus: Take two Eggs, beat them well, a little Lemon- peel grated, a little Nutmeg grated, a Blade of Mace pounded fine, a little Parfley chopped fine; beat all together with a little Flour; h ve ready lome Butter or Dripping in a Stew- pan, when it boils, dip in your Oyfters, one by one, into the Batter, and fry them of a fine Brown; then with an Egg-flice take them out, and lay them in a Difh before the Fire. Pour the Fat out of the Pan, and fliake a little Flour over the Bottom of the Pan; then rub a little Piece of Butter, as big as a fmall Walnut, all over with your Knife, whilft it is over the Fire; then pour in three Spoonfuls of the Oyfter-liquor ftraind; one Spoonful of White Wine, and a Quarter of a Pint of Gravy; grate a little Nutmeg, ftir all together, throw in the Oyfters, give the Pan a Tofs round, and when the Sauce is of a good Thicknefs, pour all into the Dilh, and garnifn with Rafpings.

T

Another Way,

A K E a Quart of the largeft Oyfters you can get, open them, fave the Liquor, and ftrain it through a fine Sieve; wah your Oyfters in warm Water, make a Batter thus: Take two Yolks of Eggs, beat them well, grate ia Haifa Nutmeg, cut a little Lemon-peel fmall, a good deal of Parlley, a Spoonful of the Juice of Spinach, two Spoon- fuls of Cream or Milk, beat it up with Flour to a thick Bat- ter, have ready fome Butter in a Stew-pan, dip your Oyfters one by one into the Batter, and have ready Crumbs of Bread, then roll them in it, and fry them quick and brown; fome with the Crumbs of Bread, fome without. Take them out of the Pan, and fet them before the Fire; then have ready a Quart of Chefnuts Ihelld and fidnnd, fry them in the But- ter; when they are enough, take them up, pour the Fat out of the Pan, fliake a little Fiour all over the Pan, and rub a Piece of Butter as big as a Hens Egg all over the Pan with your Spoon, till it is melted and thick; then put in the Oy- fter-liquor, three or four Blades of Mace, ftir it round, put in a few Piftachoe-Nuts Ihelld, let them boil, then put in the Chefnuts, and Half a Pint of White Wine, have ready the Yolks of two Eggs, beat up with four Spoonfuls of Cream;

S 2 ftir

388 he Ladys Companion.

itir all well together, when it is thick and fine, lay the Oyllers 5n the Difh, and pour the Ragoo over them. Garnifh with Chefnuts and Lemon.

You may ragoo MuTcles or Cockles the fame Way. Yoa Tnay leave out the Piftachoe-Nuts if you dont like them; but they give the Sauce a fine Flavour.

A Ragoo of Crawfilh for Fijh Days.

YOUR Crawfifh being boiled, pick out the Tails, and tofs them up in a Stew-pan, with a little Butter, fome fmall Mufhrooms, and Truffles, cut in Slices; put in Fifli- Broth to moillen them, let them fimmer a-while, take ofF the Pat, put in fome CuUis of Crawfifh to bind- your Ragoo, and ferve it up in Plates or little Difhes.

J Ragoo of Crawfifh fir Flejh Days.

PICK feveral Crawfiih, and take their Tails, which put on a Plate with fome little Mufhrooms, feveral Slices of Truffles, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; the Whole being fea- fond vith Salt and Pepper, let it take a Fry with melted Bacon, or Butter, in a Stew-pan, on a flow Fire, moiften it with fome Gravy; being done enough, take off the Fat, and thicken it with fome Cullis of Crawfifh; then put it on hot Cinders, taking care not to let it boil left it turn; you may put, to it feveral Heads of Afparagus and Artichoke-Bottoms, if in Seafon. When your Ragoo is done, ferve it hot for a iecond Courfe.

To drefs Smelts in Ragoo.

PUT them into a Stew-pan with a little White Wine, fcraped Nutmeg, flicd Lemon, and fryd Flour; when they are almofl enough, add fome mincd Capers, and ferv them up.

A Ragoo nvith Palates of Beef.

HAVING boiPd your Beef-Palates, take the Skin ofF and clean them well; cut them in fine Slices, and put them into a Stew-pan with melted Bacon, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and fome Mufhrooms; feafon them with Salt and Pepper, moiflen them with Gravy, and let them flew over a flow File; being done enough, take off the Fat, and thicken with a Cullis of Veal and Ham, or a Cullis of Partridges, which fhould be palatable and high relifhd.

ji Ragoo

The Lad ys Companion. 389

A Ragoo jith Beef-Palates the Italian Way,

LE T your Palates be orderd and cleand as before; then cut them in fmall Slices like Dice, and put them in the Stew-pan with Half a Glafs of Oil, as much of White Wine, a Spoonful of Cullis, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs. Let it Hew flovvly, and when ready talle it, let it be reliihing,jake oft the Fat, and dilh and ferve up for a fecond Courfe.

To ragoo a Piece of Beef.

AFTER larding the hinder Part of the Buttock of Beef with thick Lardoons of Bacon, put it into a Stew-pan with fome Slices of Bacon at the Bottom; feafon wih Salt, Flipper, Nutmegs, Cloves, and fweet Herbs; cover it with.
Bards of Bacon; put in two Pounds of good Lard; cover your Pan, and ftew it gently between two Fires for twelve flours, then put in a little Brandy. Garniih with Pickles, and ferve it up.

Another Way,

TA K E a large Piece of the Flank which has Fat at th2 Top cut fquare, or any Piece that is all Meat, and has Fat at the Top, but no Bones. The Rump does well. Cat all nicely oft the Bone which makes fine Soop then take a large Stew-pan, and with a good Piece of Butter, fry it a little Brown all over, flouring your Meat well before you puc it into the Pan, then pour in as much Gravy as will cover it, made thus: Take about a Pound of coarfe Beef, a little Piece of Veal cut fmall, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, an Onion, fome whole Black Pepper and White Pepper, two or three large Blades of Mace, four or five Cloves, a Piece oi Carrot, a little Piece of Bacon fteepd in Vinegar a little while, a Crull of Bread toafted brown; put to this a Quart of Water, and let it boil till Half is wafted. While this is making, pour a Quart of boiling Water into the Stew-pan, cover it clofe, and let it be ftewing foftly; when the Gravy is done ftrain it, pour it into the Pan where the Beef is, take an Ounce of Truffles and Morels cut fmall, fome frelh or dryd Mufhrooms cut fmall, two Spoonfuls of Catchup, and cover it clofe; let all this ftew till the Sauce is rich and thick; then have ready fome Artichoke-Bottoms cut into Pieces, and a few pickled Muftirooms; give them a Boil or two, and when your Meat is tender, and your Sauce quite rich, lay the Meat into a Dift:, and pour the Sauce over it. You may add a Sweetbiead cue

S3 in

390 The La D ys CoMP AN ION;

in Pieces, a Palate ftewd tender, cut into little Pieces, fomc Cocks-combs, and a few Force meat Balls. Thefe are a great Addition, but it will be good without.

Nf.te, For Variety, when the Beef is ready, and the Gravy put to it, add a large Bunch of Sellery cut fmall and walhd clean, two Spoonfuls of Catchup, and a Gifs of Red Wine.
Omit all the other Ingredients. When the Meat anu Sellery are tender, and the Sauce rich and good, fere it up. It is alfo very good this Way: Take fix large Cucumberr, fcoop out the Seeds, pare them, cut them into Slices, and do them juH as you do the Sellery.

To ragjo a Leg of Mutton.

TAKE all the Skin and Fat off, cut it very thin the right Way of the Grain, then butter your Stew-pan, and hake fome Flour into it; flice Half a Lemon, and Half an Onion, cut them very fmall, a fmall Bundle of fvveet Herbs, and a Blade of Mace; put all together with your Meat into the Pan, flir it a Minute or two, then put in fix Spoonfuls of Gravy, and have ready aH Anchovy mincd fmall, mix it with fome Butter and Flour, ftir it altogether for fix Minutes, and then diih it up.

To ragoo Sheeps Tongues.

BLANCH the Tongues in boiling Water, being well walhd; then put them into cold Water. Cut Slices of a Buttock of Beef, about two Pounds; lay them over the Bot- tom of a Stew-pan with Slices of Bacon, fet the Pan over a Fire, cover it, and let them ftew; when you perceive the Meat begins to fiick to the Pan, put in a Handful of Flour, itir it altogether for a-while; then put in Broth and Water, in equal Quantities, juft as much as will cover the Tongues; then lav your Tongues in a Stew-pan, pour the Ingredients above-mentioned upon them; feafon with Salt, Pepper, Spices, Onions, Cives, Parfley, and favoury Herbs; add Car- rots, Parfnips, and Lemon-peel; let all thefc ftew together-j.
then take up the Tongues, peel them, flit them in two, dip them in fome of the Fat in which they were rtewd, drudge them with grated Bread, broil them, and ferve them with the Effence of Ham in a Dilli, and the broiPd Tongues laid round it; and, at other Times, only with Verjuice, Salt, and Pepper.

Another

ne Ladys Companion. 391

Another Way.

TAKE Veal Sweetbreads, Mulhrooms, Truffles, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, keep thefe ready in a Stew- pan, put in a Spoonful of both Gravy and Cullis, and boil all together; then take fome fmall Sheeps Tongues, flit thetn in two, and let thern foak foftly with the reft; add to it fome Artichoke-Bottoms cut in Dice, a little Lemon-juice, and ferve them up hot; let the Ragoo be of a good Tafte.

To drefs Lamb in a Ragoo.

AFTER having cut a Quarter of Lamb into four Quar- ters, lard it with iTiiddle-fizd Slips of Bacon, and tofs it up a little in a Stew-pan to brown it; then ftew it with Broth, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and Mulhrooms. Make a Sauce for it of fryd Oyfters, with a little Flour, and a Couple of Anchovies; when you are ready to ferve up, add fome Lemon-juice, and garnilh with ir Muihrooms.

Another Way,

TA KE a Quarter of Lamb, roaft It, and when it is near enough, drudge it well with grated Bread. Into the Difh in which you intend to ferve it in, put a Cullis of Ve:i], with Salt, Pepper, an Anchovy, the Juice of a Lemon, and a few Cives; warm it, lay in your Lamb, and ferve it up.

Another Way.

HALF road your Lamb, then cut it in four Pieces, and tois it up in a Stew-pan to brown it; then Irew it in good Broth, with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, a few Mufhrooms, and fweet Herbs; when it is enough put to it a Cullis of Veal, and ferve away.

Another Way.

TA K E a Fore-quarter of Lamb, cut the Knuckle-bone off, lard it with little thin Bits of Bacon, flour it, fry it of a fine Brown, and then put it into a Stew-pan; put to it a Qucvrt of Broth, or good Gravy, a Bundle of Herbs, a little Mace, two or three Cloves, and a little whole Pepper; cover it clofe, and let it ftew pretty fall for Half an Hour, pour the Liquor all out, ftrain it, keep the Lamb hot in the Pan till the Sauce is ready, take Half a Pint of Oyfters, flour them, fry them brown, drain out all the Fat clean that you

S 4 fryd

392 77; Lad ys COM4 A N ION.

fryd them in, fkim all the Fat ofF the Gravy, then pour i into the Oyfters, put in an Anchovy, and two Spoonfuls o either Red or White Wine j boil all together till there is juft enough for Sauce; add ibme frefii Mufhrooms if you can get them and feme pickled ones, with a Spoonful of the Pickle, or the Juice of Haifa Lemon; lay your Lamb in the Difh, and pour the Sauce over it. Garnifh with Le- mon.

A Ragoo of Lambs Stones and Sweetbreads.

WAS H your Lambs Stones and Sweetbreads well, and blanch them in boiling Water; then put them in cold Water; when you take them out, lay them on a Linnen Cloth, dry them well, put them in a Stew-pan with a little melted Bacon, and a Bunch of Herbs; feafon them with Salt and Pepper; add to them fome fmall Mufhrooms, and lliced Truffles. Having toffed up all thefe over a Stove, moiften it with Gravy, and make it fimmer over a gentle Fire: When they are done enough, take off all the Fat, and bind the Ra- goo with a Cullis of Veal and Ham.

Another Way,

TAKE what Quantity you pleafe of Lamb Stones and Sweetbreads, parboil them, and cut them into Slices; Cocks-combs blanchd and flicd; then feafon them all with Pepper and Salt, and other Spices; then fry them in a little Lard, and drain them, and tofs them up in good Gravy, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, two Shalots, fome Mufhrooms, Truf- fles; thicken it with a brown Thickening, with a Glafs of Claret j garnifh with red Beet-roots, and pickled Mufh- rooms,

Ttf ragoo Lambs Stones by themfehes.

TAKE two or three Pair of Lambs Stones, parboil them, take off the Skin, and cut them in four or eight Pieces, firew fome fine Salt over them, and wipe them dry; flour them without touching them with your Hands; fry them immediately in very hot Hogs Lard, and make them crifp; then difh them up, and ferve away.

Another Way.

BEING orderd as thofe before, fry them direftly, but keep in readinefs a Pafte made thus, vs. Mix a certain Quantity of Flour with Wine, or Ale, and add Haifa Spoon-

The Ladys Companion. 39

ful of Oil, and fome Salt; the Stones being half fryd, take them out, put them in this Pafte, and immediately the Whole in hot Hogs Lard, and fry them fome Time; when enough, diih them up hot with fryd Parlley.

Jnother Way, after the Italian Manner,

TAKE off the Skin, cut them in Pieces, and put them in a Stew-pan with fome Slices of Onion, Parlley, Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Vinegar, and a little Gravy; let them marinate fome Time, then take them out to drain, beat up fome Eggs, dip the Lambs Stones in them, ftrew them with Crumbs of Bread, fry them, and ferve them up hot with fryd Parfley. At another Time, flour them, and ivy them the fame Way.

To ragoo a Breafl: of Veal.

STUFF it with Force-meat between the Flefh and the Bones, and lard it with large Lardoons of Bacon, and half roaft it, then put it into the Stew-pan, over a Stove, with Gravy, till it is enough, tofs it up with Force-meat Balis, Mufhrooms, Truffles, Morels, Oyfters, lc. firft ftuffing it all up the Brifcuit with Force-meat j garnilh with Lemon llicd, or Orange.

Another Way.

TA KE a Breaft of Veal, lay it to the Fire, more tliaa half roaft it, cut it into four Pieces, feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves, Mace, a Shalot, and Lemon- peel; put them into a Stew-pan with as much good Gravy as will cover them: put in alio Mufhrooms, Oyfters fryd and ftewd, Svvc cbreads Ikinnd and pulld in Pieces, and let them ftew together; when it is enough, fry your largeft Oyfters with crilpd Bacon and Force-meat Balls; and take the fame Ingredients to make a white Ragoo; only boil the Breaft of Veal in Half Milk, Half Water, with Mace, whole Pepper, a Coaple of Bay-leaves, a little Lemon-peel, and a Faggot of Aveet Herbs; then when it is enough, wafti it over with the Yolks of Eggs, and a little Butter, and put it into a Stew-pan foi a little vhile, juft to give it a yellow Colour, and thicken your Sauce with the Yolks of Eggp. and a Piece of Butcer rolVd up in Flour, with three Spooiifuls of Cicaai thickend up together.

294 5 Lad ys C OM PAN I ON.

Another Way.

TAKE your Breaft of Veal, put it into a large Stew- pan, put in a Bundle of fweet Herbs, an Onion, fome black and white Pepper, a Blade or two of Mace, two or three Cloves, a very little Piece of Lemon- peel, and cover it 3 uil: with Water; when it is tender take it up, bone it, put in the Bones, boil it up till the Gravy is very good, then ftrain it off, and if you have a little rich Beef-gravy add a Quarter of a Pint, put in Half an Ounce of Truffles and Mo- rels, a Spoonful or two of Catchup, two or three Spoonfuls of White Wine, and let them all boil together; in the mean Time flour the Veal, and fry it in Butter till it is of a fine Brown; then drain out all the Butter, and pour the Gravy you are boiling to the Veal, with a few Muihrooms; boil ail together till the Sauce is rich and thick, and cut a Sweet- bread into four. A few Force-meat Balls is proper in it.
Lay the Veal in the Difh, and pour the Sauce over it. Gar- nilli with Lemon.

Another Way.

HALF roaO: it, then cut it in four or five Pieces, and put them into a Stew-pan, pour over them as much llrong Gravy as will cover them, and feafon with Pepper, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Salt, an Onion or Shalot, Lemon- peel, MujTirooms; let all Itew; and when enough,;fry fome large Oyfters with Bacon and Force-meat Balls, and put over the Ingredients j then ferve away, and garnilhwith Slices of Lemon.

Another Way

BONE it, cut oiTa fquare handfome Piece, then cut the other Part into fmall Pieces brown all in Butter, then ilew and tofs it up in ftrong Gravy, feafon with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, a little Nutnieg, an Onion, Mufhrcoms, and fome fryd Oyfters; when near enough thicken it with brown Butter, then pour all in your Dilh, and lay on the fquare Piece dicM, with fryd Sweetbreads, and Bacon fryd in the Batter of Eggs, and garjiiih with Cicd Orajige,

Another

Jhe L AD ysCoMP AN I ON 395

Another Way,

ARD your Breaft of Veal with Bacon; then half boil it in Water and Salt, whole Pepper, and a Bunch of fweet Heri s; then take it out, and dull it with fome grated Bread, fweet Herbs fhred fmall, grated Nutmeg and Salt all mixd together; then broil it on both Sides, and make a Sauce of Anchovies and Gravy thickend up with Butter.
Garnifh with Pickles.

To ragoo a Neck of Veal.

CUT a Neck of Veal into Steaks, feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Mace; lard them with Ba- con, Lemou-peel, and Thyme, dip them in the Yolks of Eggs; make a Sheet of Ibong Cap-paper up at the four Corners, in the Form of a Dripping-pan, pin up the Corners, butter the Paper, and alfo the Gridiron, fet it over a Fire of Charcoal, put in your Meat, let it do leifurely, keeping it bailing, and turning to keep in the Gravy: When it is enough, have ready rtrong Gravy, feafon it pretty high, put in Mufhrooms, and all Sorts of Pickles, fome Force-meat Balls dippd in the Yolks of Eggs and Flour, Oyfiers ftewd and fryd, to lay round and a-I op of your Difh, and ferve it up.

If for a brown Ragoo, put in Claret; if for a white, put in White Wine, with the Yolks of Pggs, beat up with three Spoonfuls of Cream j and you may put in a young Fowl, or a larded Pheafant with Fojce-meat in the Belly, or larded Pigeons; gamilli with Lemon and Barberries, and ferve it up.

A Loin of Veal ragoo d.

LARD your Loin of Veal with thick Slips of Bacon; feafon with Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg;:ind when it is almoU roc-fted enough, put it into a Stew-pan, with good Broth, a Giais or two of White Wine, fome of the Dripping, a Faggut of fwesttlerbs, fryd Flour, and a xiece of a green Lemonj Cover the Pan clofe, and let it fctvva liude; then take f:ft foire of the Fat; fere it np with a uarp Cauce, garniHi r.C larded Veal Sweetbreads, Cutlets, or what elfe you xk-y-:.:::v.

4 P

lagoo

29 The Ladys Comp anion.

j Ragoo of Calves Heads.

TAKE two Calves Heads and boil them when they are cold cut oft all the Lantern Part in Pieces, about an Inch long, and about the Breadth of your little Finger then put the Pieces into a Stew-pan with a little white Gravy, twenty Oyllers cut in two or three Pieces, fome little Mufh- rooms. Truffles, Morels, Sweetbreads and Artichoke-Bot- toms in Slices, if you like it a little Juice of Lemon, fea- fon with Salt, white Pepper, andaPiece of Mace; when all is ftewd a little while, put to it two or three Spoonfuls of Cream or Milk, the Yolks of two or three Eggs beat, and a little fhred Parfley. After the Cream, &c. is put to it, let it ftev flowly, and keep llirring it to prevent its curdling.
When you are ready to fei-ve, garnifh your Difh with toafted Bread cut like Sippets, Lemon, and a few pickled Mulh- rooms.

Another Vay,

BOIL your Head enough, then take Half of it, and cut it in thin Slices; put into a Stew-pan fome Morels, Truffles, Mufhrooms, Force-meat Balls, Veal Sweetbreads, ilicd Artichoke-Bottoms, a Faggot of Thyme and Farfley, an Onion or Shalot Hicd, and the Juice of a Lemon, with as much Gravy as will moiilen the Whole, let all ftew gently for fome Time; then put to it the Slices of your Head, Ikira it well. The other Half Head fcore like Diamonds, crofs and crofs, feafon with Pepper and Salt, and rub it over with the Yolk of an Egg; then llrew fome Crumbs of Bread over it, and broil it, pour the Ragoo into the Difh you intend to ferve, and lay the Half Head in the Middle; fry the Brains, after being boild, in Egg and Flour, and lay round your Difh, with fryd Bacon and flicd Lemon.

0 ragoo Hogs Feet and Ears.

TAKE your Feet and Ears out of the Pickle they arc fousd in, or boil them till they are tender, then cut them into little, long, thin Bits, about two Inches long, and about a Quarter of an Inch thick; put them into your Stew- pan with Half a Pint of good Gravy, a Glafs of White Wine, a good deal of Muftard, a good Piece of Butter rolTd in -ir, and . little Pepper and Salt i ftir all together till it is •t » fell TiuQliiirs, and difli ic up .

ne Ladys Companion. 397

Note, They make a very pretty Dilh fryd with Butter and •Muftard, and a little good Gravy, if you like it. Then only- cut the Feet and Ears in two. You may add Half an Onion, cut fmall.

J Ragoo of Hogs Ears, called the Kings Privy Purfe.

CU T fome Hogs Ears in two, then in long and thin Slices; put in a Stew-pan fome Onions cut fmall, a Piece of Butter, and tofs it up; then put in the Ears, flour it and moiften it with Gravy; let all Hew fiowly; being ready to ferve, put in a little Cullis and Muflard, and ferve it up hot.

A Ragoo of Pigs Ears.

GET a Quantity of Pigs Ears, and boil them in one Half Wine, and the other Half Water i cut themin fmall Pieces; then brown a little Butter, and put them in, and a pretty deal of Gravy, two Anchovies, a Shalot or two, a little Muftard, and fome Slices of Lemon, fome Salt and Nutmeg; ftew all thefe together, and Hiake it up thick.
Garnifh the Difh with Barberries.

Tc ragoo Sheeps Tongues.
•T A S H them in feveral Waters, blanch them in boll- y V ing Water, then throw them into cold. Take two Pounds of Buttock of Beef, cut in Slices, lay them at the Bottom of the Stew-pan, with fom.e Slices of Bacon, cover it, and fet it o»er a Stove. When it begins to ftickto the Pan, throw in a Handful of Flour, and ftir all together for fome Time. Then take your Tongue:, and put them into a Stew- pan, with as much Vvater and Broth, of each an equal Quan- tity, as will cover the Tongues; then pour the above Ingre- dients over them, feafon the Whole with Salt, fepper, fweet Herbs and i:;pices. Onions, Farfley, Gives, Carrots, Farfnips, Jlicd, and Lemon-peel. After havinr itev.d fon:e Time take out your longues, peel oit the S.-in, and flit them in two, dip them in a Htde cf the Fat in which they vvere ftewd, drudge them with Crumbs of Bread, bioil them, and ferve them with the Ragoo pourd over uhem.

Sometir.es we icrve them with fome Ellence of Ham in the Jjctto.a of a Diih, aiid the broild Tongues laid round it; and at other TiiTis ojily with Verjuice or Viiegar, Salt, and Pepper,

398 s Ladys Companion.

A Ragco of Ham.

CUT fmall Slices of Ham, beat them well, garnifli the Bottom of a Stew-pan with them j lay a Difh over them, and fet them over a Stove with a genrle Fire; when they tegin to flick to the Pan, put in a little Flour, and keep them moving over the Stove -, put in a little Veal-gravy, that has no Salt in it, to moillen them: put in fome Pepper, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs, and let them fimmer over a ilack Fire; take care your Ragoo be not too fait, put in fome CuUis of Veal and Ham to bind it. Serve it in Plates, or little Diihes, and ufe it foj: garnilhing of any Dilh of the firft Courfe, wherein there is any Bacon.

To ragoo Ham, or Slices of Gammon of Bacon.

TO S S up fome Slices of raw Ham in a Stew-pan with Butter, ic. and make a Sauce of Red Wine, beaten white Pepper, a pounded Macaroon, Cinnamon, and Sugar.
Put your Slices of Ham to this Sauce, fqueeze in the Jules of an Orange, and ferve it up.

To drefs Venifon in Ragoo,

LA RD a Piece of Venifon with large Lardoons of Ba- con, well feafond with Salt and Pepper; fry it in Lard, or tofs it up in a Stew-pan with melted Bacon; then ftew it three or four Hours in Broth or boiling Water, and fome White Wine, feafond with Salt, Nutmeg, two or three Bay- leaves, a Piece of green Lemon, and a Faggot of fweet Herbs: Thicken the Sauce with Flour, or bind it with a ood Cullis I and when you ferve it up to Iable, add Lemon- juice and Capers.

A Ragoo cf Livers.

T A K E as many Livers as you would have for your Dilh. A Turkeys Liver, and fix Fowls Livers, v;ill make a pretty Difh. Pick the Gails from them, ar.d throw them into cold Water; take the fix Livers, put them into a Stew-pan with a Quarter of a Pint of Gravy, a Spoonful of MuOiroorns, either pickled orfrcHi, a Spoonful of Caihup, a little Piece of Lutter as big as a NTitmeg, r- IFd in tlour, feafon with Pepper and Salt to ycur Palate. Let them ilev loftl;en Minu: s; in the n-. can while broil the Tui keys Liver nicely, lay it in tie Mitw.ie, and the ftewd Livers

round.

he Ladys Companion; 399

round. Pour the Sauce all over, and garnifh with llicd Le jnon.

Another Way.

GET fome fat Fowls Livers, take ofF the Gall, blanch them, and put them into cold Water; put in a Stew- pan fome Mufhrooms, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and Truffles cut in Slices; moiiten it with Gravy, let it ftew over a flow Fire, and being half drefsd, put in the Livers, but let them not be too much done; when ready, take off the Fat, and thicken it with a Cullis, or EiTence of Ham, let it be palat- able and high relifhd. Serve them up hot, with the Ragoo over them, on Plates or little Dillie.

J Ragoo of Cocks -combs.

PICK and clean them well, tofs them up in a Stew-pan, with melted Bacon, Mufhrooms, and Truffles flicd, a Faggot of fweet Herbs, Salt, and Pepper, put in a little Gravy to moiften them, and let them fland over a flow Fire to fimmcr; when they are done, clear off all the Fat, and bind the Ragoo with fome Cullis of Veal and Ham. This is ufed for garnifhing all Diihes of the firfl Courfe that arc Hewd a la Braife.

Another Way.

TAKE fome Mufhrooms, and cut them In Bite, then put them in a Stew-pan with a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and fome Truffles cut in Slices, if you have any, moiflen it with Gravy and Cullis, and let ic ftew flowiy; put in fome Cocks -combs, and the Juice of a Lemon, and take out the Bunch of fweet Herbs. Let it be relifhing, and ferve it hot.

A Ragoo of Cocks-combs nxith a whife Sauce.

PU T in a Stew-pan a Bit of Butter and aBur.ch of fweet Herbs, with fome Mufhrooms cut in Bits, and Truffles, if you have any; tofs it up, put in Half a S .oonful of fine Flour, moillen it with a little Broth, and feafon it with Salt and Pepper, ii t: it ftew over a flov Fire, and after fome Time put in your Cocks- combs, and thicken it with the Yolks of Eggs and Cream, or Ivlilk, mixd with a little Nutmeg; let it be reliihing, and ferve it up hot.

400 The L A D ys Companion.

ji mixd Ragoo of Cocks -combs, Cocks-kidneys, and fair Livers.

GE T a Stew-pan, put it in a Bit of Butter, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, ibme Mufhrooms and TrufRes, • put it, for a Minute, over the Fire, flour it a little, moiften it with Half a Spoonful of Broth, feafon it with Salt and Pepper; let it ftew a little, then put in fome Cocks-combs, Cocks- kidneys, fat Livers, and Sweetbreads; let your Ragoo be palatable, thicken it with the Yolks of Eggs; ferve it up hot for a dainty Dilh.

A Ragoo for a Duck a la Braife,

THE Ragoo is made either with Veal or Lamb Sweet- breads, with fat Livers, Cocks-combs, Mufnrooms, Truffles, Afparagus-Tops, and Artichoke-Bottoms: Tofs up all this in melted Bacon; moillen it with good Gravy, bind it with a Cullis of Veal and Ham; and when you have difhd up your Duck, pour your Ragoo upon it.

7o ragoo a Green Goofe.

CU T your Goofe in two, put it in a Stew-pan of a con- venient Size; put at the Bottom of the Pan Slices of Bacon, and Beef-fewet cut in Pieces, Onions, Savoury, Thyme, and Marjoram, Carrots in Slices, and Lemon, Pep- per, Cloves, and Salt, put i:; over a good Charcoal Fire, llir and turn it often; then make a Ragoo of Green Peas, tofsd up with a little frelh Butter, a Bunch of Herbs, Salt, and Pepper; mciften with Gravy, and when you ferve it, thicken it with the Yolks of two Eggs beat in Cream or Milk: Dilh up your Goofe, and pour the Ragoo upon it.

This Ragoo ferves for a Breail of Veal, or Pigeons ftewd.

70 drefs a Goofe in Ragoo.

FLAT the Breaft down with the Cleaver, then prefs it down with our Hand, kin it, dip it into fcalding Wa- ter, let it be cold, lard it with Bacon, feafon it well with Pep- per, Sale, and a little beaten Mace, then fi jur it all over, take a Pound of good Bcef-fewec cut fmall, put it into a deep Stew-pan, let it be melted, then put in your Goofe; let it be brown or both Sides, when it is brown, put in a Pint of boil- ing Vv a- er, an Onion or two, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, a: Bay-loaf, iome whole Pepper, and a few Cloves, cover it

clofe.

The L A D ys Companion. 46

elofe, and let it fiew foftly till it is tender; about Half an Hour will GO it if fmall, if a large one, three Quarters of an Hour; in the mean Time make a Ragoo, boil fome Turnips almoft enough, fome Carrots and Onions quite enough; cut them all into imall Pieces, put them into a Stew-pan, with Haifa Pint of good Beef-gravy, a little Pepper and Salt, a Piece of Butter rolPd in Flour; let this fcev ail together for a Quarter of an Hour, take the Goofe and drain it well, then lay it in the Difh, and pour the Ragoo over it. Where the Onion is diflikd, leave it out. You may add Cabbage boild and chopped fmall.

To make a Ragoo of Gibblets.

SCALD the Gibblets, and if you have any Cocks-combs, fcald them by themfelves, an,d fkin them; then put them into a Pan with ftrong Broth, feafoning them high with Salt, Spice, and fweet Herbs, and fimmer them; then ragoo them in melted Bacon, with fome Cives and fhred Parfley; then put them again into their own Broth, and fimmer themj then thicken with the Yolks of two Eggs, and ferve them up in Plates.

To ragoo Pigeons,

WHEN you have lardeci your Pigeons, divide fome of them into Hahes, feafon them with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, and dip them in the Yolks of Eggs beaten; then make good Store of Butter hot in a Frying-pan, and brown it with a little Flour; then put in your Pigeons and juft brown them, then take them out, and put them into a Stew-pan, and put to them as much good Gravy as will juft cover them; put in alfo a Faggot of fweet Herbs, and fet them a flewing; when they are moil enough, take out the Herbs, and put in Shalot, fome Oyflers and Anchovies, Mufhrooms and Pickles; then when the Pigeons are llewd enough, dilh them, and having ready-roafled Larks, or other fmall Birds, lay them round the Difh; or, if you have no Birds, lay Pieces of Sweetbreads dippd in the Yolks of Eggs and fryd, and o ferve them up; garnilh with Slices of Orange and Pickles.

ftf

402 he Ladys Companion.

_7i cirefs Larks in a Ragoo.

YOUR Larks being drawn, put them into a Stew-pan with melted Bacon, Mufhrooms, TrufRes, Capons Li- vers, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, and tols them up; put in a little Cullis, or, inftead of that a little Flour; then put in fome Eeef, or Veal-gravy, let them fimmer for fome Time, then beat up an Egg with fome Cream, put it into fome mincd Parfley, pour this into the Stew-pan; let it have a Turn or two over a Stove to thicken it; take off the Fat, fqueeze in fome Juice of Lemon, and ferve it.

J Ragoo of Eggs.

BOIL twelve Eggs hard, take off the Shells, and with a little Knife very carefully cut the White a-crofs long- ways, fo that the White may be in two Halves, and the Yolk whole. Be careful neither to break the Whites nor Yolks; take a Quarter of a Pint of pickled Mufhrooms choppd very fine, Half an Ounce of TrufRes and Morels, boild in three or four Spoonfuls of Water, fave the Water, and chop the TrufHes and Morels very fraall, boil a little Parfley, chop it fine, mix them together with the Truffle-water you faved, grate a little Nutmeg in, a little beaten Mace, put it into the Stew-pan with three Spoonfuls of Water, a Gill of Red Wine, one Spoonful of Catchup, a Piece of Butter, as big as a large Walnut, rolPd in Flour, flir all together, and let it flew. In the mean Time get ready your Eggs, lay the Yolks and Whites in Order in your Dilh, the hollow Parts of the Whites uppermoft, that they may be filld; take fome Crumbs of Bread, and fry them brown and crifp, as you do for Larks, with which fill iip the Whites of the Eggs as high as they will lie; then pour in your Sauce all over, and gar- nilh with fryd Crumbs of Bread. This is a very genteel, pretty Difh, if it be well done.

J Ragoo of Cabbage.

CU T a Cabbage in two in the Middle, blanch it in hot Water, fqueeze it, tie it up with Packthread, and put it into a Scew-pan, and lew it a la Braife; when it is flewd, drain it, untie it, cut it in little Slices into a Stew-pan, and fet it a fmimering with fome Cullis of Veal and Ham to thicken it, and ferve it with Meats roafted, boiPd, or flewd, or all Difhes of the iirft Courfe, to which Cabbage is proper.

ne L A D ys Companion. 403

To ragoo Cabbage Lettuce, or other Lettuces.

TAKE the whitell Cabbage Lettuce, and having blanchd them in fcalding Water, take them out of it, and put them into cold; then fqueeze them as dry as yoa can, take off all the Green, cut them in fmall Pieces, and tofs them up in a Stew-pan with a little melted Bacon, a Bunch of favoury Herbs, and feafon the Whole with Salt and Pepper. Put to it fome Veal-gravy and Elfence oi Ham, and let them fimmer in it; then take off all the Fat, and bind the Ragoo with a Cullis of Veal and Ham. Ufe it to all Sorts of Difhes, either roafled or ftewd, in which you have made ufe of Lettuce, or you may put them under a Leg of Mutton, or any Fowls dreffed a la Braije,

A Ragoo of Cardoons.

PICK and clean your Cardoons, boil them in a large Pot Half full of White Wine, with a Lump of Butter workd up with a little Flour, Salt, an Onion lluck with Cloves, and two or three Slices of fat Bacon, but do not put in the Cardoons till the Vater boils; when they are fome« thing more than half boiPd, take them up, and let themi drain, then fet them a fimmering in a Stew-pan over a gentle Fire, with fome thin Cullis of Veal and Ham; when they are enough, and the Cullis is pretty well rtewd away, put in a Bit of Butter as big as a Walnut, workd up with a little Flour, and keep it moving, till the Butter is melted.

You may make a Ragoo of the Stalks of Cardoons in the fame Manner, as alfo Lettuces.

A Ragoo of Sellery.

BOIL fome Sellery in Water, fqueeze it well, put it into a Stew-pan with feme Cullis of Veal and Ham, and fet it over a Fire to fimmer; when it is enough, put ia a Bit of Butter as big as a Walnut, workd up with a little Flour, then add a Drop of Vinegar, and ferve it up in Plates

or little Dilhes.

1

Another Way,

WA S H it very clean, cut it in Pieces about two Inches long, put them into a Stew-pan, with juft as much Wa- ter as will cover them, tie three or four Blades of Mace, two or three Cloves, about twenty Corns of whole Pepper in a Muflin Rag loofe, put it into the Stew-pan, a little Onion, a

little

44 y Ladys Companion.

little Bundle of fweet Herbs, cover it clofe, and let it flew foftly till tender j then take out the Spice, Onion, and fweet Herbs, put in Half an Ounce of Truffles and Morels, two Spoonfuls of Catchup, a Gill of Red Wine, a Piece of Butter as big as an Egg roird in flour, three French Rolls, feafoa with Salt to your Palate, rtir it altogether, cover it clofe, and let it ftew till the Sauce is thick and good. Take care your Rolls dont break, fhake your Pan often; when it is enough, dilh it up, and garnifh with Lemon. The Yolks of fix hard Eggs, or more, put in with the Rolls, will make it a iine Diih; this for a firft Courfe.

If you would have it white, put in White Wine inllead of Red, and fome Cream, for a fecond Courfe.

Another JVay.

TAKE fome Heads of Sellery, and blanch them, then fqueeze them very dry, and put them in a Stew-pan with a CuUis, and let it flew on a flow Fire; after which, thicken it with a Piece of Butter the Bignefs of a Walnut dippd in Flour, keep flirring it. The Ragoo being relifh- ing, put a little Vinegar to it, taking care to make it look handfome, but not too thick; and ferve it with all Sorts of Meat,

A Ragoo of Cauliflowers.

PICK and clean the Cauliflowers, boil them in clean Water, but do not boil them too tender; take them out and lay them to drain; then put them into a Stew-pan, put to them fome thin Cullis of Veal and Ham; after they have Hmmcrd a-while, fet them over a briiker Fire, then put in it a Bit of Butter about the Bignefs of a Walnut, workd up with a little Flour, to thicken your Ragoo, and a few Drops of Vinegar, and ferve them up on little Difhes or Plates.

A Ragoo of Morels.

CUT them in long Slices, and wafh them in feveral Waters that they may not be gritty; drain them well, and tofs them up in a Stew-pan with fome Butter, or Lard, a little fhred Parfley, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; moiflen them with Veal-gravy, and let them fimmer in it over a flow Fire; when they are done enough, thicken with a proper Cullis, and ferve them hot on Plates or little Diflies.

Ragoo

The L A D ys Companion. 405

J Ragoo 0 Morels, for Tljk Days.

PICK the Stalks ofF your Morels, cut them in two, waih them well in feveral Waters: Put them into a Stew-pan with a Piece of Bulter, Salt, Pepper, a little fnred Parfiey, and a Faggot of favoury Herbs, and tofs them up over the Stove; then moiften them with fome good Fiili-broth. Mean while, make a Thickening with the Yolks of two or three Eggs, beaten up in Cream, or Milk, and put to it, ftirring it till the Ragoo is enough, then ferve them hot in Plates, or little Diihes.

A Ragoo of Morels, the Italian Way,

PREPARE your Morels as in the above Receipt, then cut them in four; then put a Lump of Butter, with a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and the Morels, into a Stew-pan, and tofs them up; then put in a Dull of Flour, and moiften it with Gravy, and a Glafs of White Wine, adding to it a Clove ofGarlick; being ready to ferve up, thicken your Ragoo with a little Cullis, a Spoonful of Oil, and Lemon-juice, which laft muft prevail -, let it be of a good Tafte, dilh it up with a Cruil of Bread under it, and ferve it up hot.

A Ragoo of Mulhrooms.

AFTER having cut your Mulhrooms, tofs them up with Butter, or melted Bacon, feafon them with Salt, Pep- per, and Parfley Ihred fmall: Moiften them with Flefh -gravy, or Fifti-broth; thicken it with a Cullis of Flelh, or Maigre Cullis, or a little Flour, Yolks of Eggs, and Lemon-juice, and ferve them up.

Another Way.

PEEL and fcrape the Flaps, put a Quart into a Stew- pan, a very little Salt, fet them on a quick Fire, let them boil up, then take them off, put to them a Gill of Red Wine, a Quarter of a Pound of Butter rolFd in a little Flour, a little Nutmeg, a little beaten Mace, fet it on the Fire, ftir it now and then; when it is thick and fine, have ready the Yolks of fix Eggs beat, and boiPd in a Bladder hard, lay it in the Middle of your Difti, and pour the Ragoo over it. Garnifli with broild Mulhrooms.

Another

4o6 Ihe Ladys Companiojc,

Another IVay.

FIRST peel your Muflirooms, then put them into Wa» ter and Salt to clean them, and Hew them in a Stew-pan for Half an Hour, in their own Liquor; then pour out all the Liquor but about two Spoonfuls, and put lo them Half a Pint ot flrorg Broth or Gravy, an Onion quartei d, a Bunch of Savoury and Thyme, a Iktle crackd Pepper, a little Nut- meg, and two or three Anchovies: Let all thefe flew toge- ther for a Quarter of an Hour, then put in a good Quantity of Butter, fliake it together, and ferve them up.

Anoihi. r Way, njcith nxjhite Sauce.

PICK and vafh them well, put them into a Stew-pan, with a Lump of Butter, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and tofs them up; this done, Ilrew them with a Dull of Flour, moifien them with Broth, and feafon with Salt and Pepper: Let all limmer, and thicken with four Yolks of Eggs, mixM with Cream, and a little Nutmeg. Your Ragoo being of a good Tafle, dilh it up, putting at the Bottom of the Dilh a Cruft of Bread.

Another TFay.

IF you cannot get any green Mufhrooms, you mufl take dry ones; then put them into a Stew-pan, with a Bunch of fweet Herbs, and a little Veal-gravy, and let them Hew upon a ilow Fire; being llewM, put in a little EiTence of Ham, thicken them with a Veal and Ham CuUis, and ferve it up hot.

J Ragoo of f mall Mufhrooms the Italian Way.

TAKE fmall MuHirooms, pick and wafh them well, then put them into a Stew-pan, with a Ladleful of Oil, and a Bunch of fweet Hibs; tofs them up, put to them a Glafs of White Wine, feafon with Salt and Pepper, and let them fimmsr: Your Ragoo being done, put to it the Juice of a Lemon, and ferve it up hot, with a Crull of Bread uncjler it.
At another TixT.e, do your Muftraooms in Oil, with green Onions, Parlley chopped fmall, witii Salt, Pepper, and the Juic of two Lemons, and tofs them up in their own Liquor; whcr:hey are tender, put in a Glafs of White Wine, and ferve them up with fmall fryd Crulls of Bread.

A Ragoo

fhe Ladys Companion. 407,

J Ragoo rf Sorrel.

HAVING pickd our Sorrel clean from the Stalks, let a Sauce-pan over the Fire Half full of Water, make it boil; then put in your Sorrel, giving it a Scald; then take it cut, fqueezing it as you ao Spinach, and dram it. Put it into a Stew-pan, with fome thin Luilis of Veal and Ham; feafon it with Salt and Pepper, and fet it a £mmering over the Fire: When it has fimnierd enough, put to it fome Ef- fence of Ham. This may be uled in all thofe Dilhes in which you ufe Soirel.

To make a Ragoo of Onions.

STEW forty or fifty Onions a la Brcuje, then peel them, put theni into a Sauce-pan, with fome Cullis of Veal and Ham, and let them fimmer for fome Time; Vvhen they have ilewd enough, put in ibme Cuilis and Muftard to bind, your Ragoo. You may ufe it in all thole Dilhes with which it is proper to eat Onions.

Another Way-

TA K E a Pint of little young Onions, peel them, and take four large ones, peel them, and cut them very fmall; put a Quarter of a Pound of good Butter into a Stew- pan when it is melted, and done making a Noife, throw in- your Onions, and fry them till they begin to look a little brown j then Ihake in a little Flour, and fnake them round till they are thick; throw in a little Salt, and a little beaten Pepper, and a Quarter of a Pint of good Gravy, and a Tea- j fpoonful of Mullard. Stir all together, and when it is well J tafted, and of a good Thicknefs, pour it into your Dilh, and garnifh it with fryd Crumbs ot Bread or Rafpings. They make a pretty little Difh, and are very good. You may flrew line Rafpings in the Room of Flour, if you pleafe.

To make a Rago© of Succory.

SCALD your Succory, cut it, put Lard into a Stew-pan, j make it fomewhat brown with Flour, and good Gravy, j and let all h . well feafond with Salt, Pepper, Spices, and a Faggot of Wwct Hvrbs, with a lutle Vinegar; then p;at in your Succory, let it ilew, but not fo ao tu turn black, but that • it may have a fomewhat firong Savour, and take it up,

A Ragoo

4.oS The Ladys Companion.

J Ragoo 3 Endive.

TA K E fome of the be i white Endive, pick it, and blancii it in boiling Water, then fqueeze it well, and put it on a Dreller to be mined a little. This being done, put your Endive in a Stew-pan, moiften it with a clear Cullis of Yeul and Ham, and let die Whole be itewd on a How Fire. When this is ftewd, ard grown relifning, make ufe of it for every Sort of Difh with Endive; but if this R.agoo h not thought thick enough, put in a little Effence of Ham, or a little Cuilis therein, before you ferve it.

Jnother Ragoo of Endive.

YOUR Endive muft be prepared as before, with the following Difference only, that is to fay, When it is mincd you muil fry it with a good Piece of Butter; then moiften it with Broth inilead of Culli3, and when it is re- lilhing, thicken it with a Thickening of Yolks of Eggs and Cream. You n.ay make ufe of this Endive with all Sorts cf larded Collops, Veal Cutlets, and Fillets of any Meat.

Another Way.

TAKE fome fine white Endive, three Heads, la. them in Salt and Water two or three Hours, take a Hun- dred of Afparagus, cut off the green Heads, chop the reft, as far as is tender, fmall, lay it in Salt and Water; take a Bunch of Sellery, wafh i:, and fcrape it clean, cut it in Pieces about three Inches long, put it into a Sauce-pan, with a Pint of Water, three or four Blades of Mace, fome whole Pepper tyd in a Rag; let it ftew till it is quite tender, then put in the Afparagus, Ihake the Sauce-pan, and let it fimmer till the Grafb is enough. Take the Endive out of the Water, drain it, leave one large Head whole, the other pick Leaf by Leaf, put it into a Stew-pan, put to it a Pint of White Wine, cover the Pan clofe, let it boil till the Endive is juft enough, then put in a Quarter of a Pound of Butter rolld in Flour, cover it cofe, ihaking it often. When the Endive is enough take it up, lay the whole Head in the Middle, and with a Spoon take out the Sellery and Grafs and lay round, the other Part ©f the Endie over that; then pour the Liquor out of the Sauce- prm into he Stew-pan, ftir it together, feafon it with Salt, and ]iave ready the Yolks of two Eggs, beat up with a Quar- ter of a Pint of Cream, and Half a Nutmeg grated in. Mix this with the Sauce, keep it Ilirring all one Way till it is

thick;

ne L A D ys Companion. 409

thick; then pour it over your Ragoo, and fend it to Tabic hot.

A Ragoo of Afparagus,

YOUR Afparagus having their Heads cut ofF, whiten them J when they are blanched enough, put them into a Stew-pan, with fome CulJis, and a little EiTence of Ham, and let the Whole ftew over a flow Fire. When it is ftewecl enough, throw therein a Bit of Butter no bigger than a Nut, dipped in fome fine Flour, and ftir your Ragoo now and then.
Take Care that it be relifhing; pour in a little Vinegar, and ferve it hot. You may make ufe of this Ragoo for all Sorts of Fowls, or other Meat. .

A White Ragoo of Afparagus.

CU T and blanch fome Afparagus as before, put them in a Stew-pan, with a Bit of Butter, fry them a little, powder them with a Spoonful of fine Flour, moiften them with Broth, feafon them with Salt and Pepper, and let them be ftewed. Make a Thickening with feveral Yolks of Eggs, diluted with feme Broth, and put therein a little Nutmeg.
Your Afparagus being relifhing, thicken them with the faid Yolks, and make ufe of this Ragoo to put under fome larded CoUops, or other Sorts of Meat.

Another Way.

SCRAPE an Hundred of Grafs very clean, and throw it into cold Water; vhcn you have fcraped all, cut as far as is good and green, about an Inch long, and take two Heads of Endive, clean wafiied and picked, cut it very fmall, a large Onion peeled, and cut fmall; put a Quarter of a Pound of Bueter into a Stew-pan; when it is melted, throw- in the above Things; tofs them about, and fry them ten Mi- nutes; then feafon them with a little Pepper and Salt, fhake in a little Flour, and pour in Half a Pint of Gravy; keep llirring it till very thick, then pour all into your Difh. Save a few of the little Tops of the Grafs to garnilh the Diih, with Slices of Lemon or Orange.

To ragoo the Stalks of Purflain.

TAKE fome Stalks of Purflain, pick them, cut them as long as your Finger, and let them be Half boiled in fomeWater, as Cardoons -, the Stalks being blanched, fqueeze them, put them in a Stew-pan, with fome Cullis and Grav Vo L. I. T

4ro 27 Ladys Companion.

and let the Whole ftew together; this done, put to it the Eignefs of an Egg of Butter rolled in Flour; keep llirring it and put a little Vinegar therein. This Ragoo is to be ufed with all Firft-courfe Difnes: As for Example, Collops of Veal, Pullets, Pigeons, and Mutton, or other Difhes m which Purilain is proper.

To ragoo Cucumbers.

TAKE two Cucumbers and two Onions, flice them, and fry them in a little Butter; then drain them in a Sieve; and put them into a Stew-pan, with fix Spoonfuls of Gravy, two of White Wine, a Blade of Mace, and let them ftew five or fix Minutes; then take a Piece of Butter as big as a Walnut; roiled in Flour; Ilir all together, and when thick, difh them up.

Another Way.

PARE Half a Dozen of Cucumbers, cut them in two long-ways, and take out the Seeds; then cut them in little Slices, feafon them with Salt, Pepper, and a little Vine- gar; put to them two or three Onions cut in Slices, and let them marinate in this for two Hours; then dry them in a Napkin. Take a Stew-paiJT with a little melted Bacon or Butter, and fet over a Stove, put in the Cucumbers, and when they begin to brown, moiilen them with Gravy, and fet them to fimmer over a flack Fire: When they are enough take all the Fat off, bind your Ragoo with a Cullis of Veal or Ham; fee it be well relilhed, and make ufe of it with all Manner
A Ragoo of f: ufed Cucumbers.

•f-AKE what Quantity you pleafe, and after you have X pared them, and fcooped the Seeds away, blanch them in boilino- Water; take them out, and put them in cold Wa- ter; make your Stuffing after the following Manner: Take of Veal, boiled Ham, Beef-fuet, a Sweetbread blanched, and Bacon, a little Bit of each, and mince them well; fea- fon with Salt, Pepper, fweet Herbs, AU-fpice, fome Muh- .:oms, if you have any, Parfley, fhredded Chibbol, fome . rumbs of Bread boiled in Milk, and twoYolks of Eggs; the Whole being minced, and mixed together, fill your Lucum- bers with it. Then take a Stew-pan, and having put leveral Slices of Bacon in it, put your fluffed Cucumbers over them,

moiften

The Ladys Companion. 411

Mioiflen with fome Gravyy, and feafon with Salt, and fomc Slices of Onions. Your Cucumbers being drefled, take them out, and drain them; after which, put them in another Stew- pan, to Hew a little while, with CuUis and EfTence of Ham.
You may ufe this Ragoo with what Firll-courfe Dilhes you think proper.

7 make a Ragoo of TrufHes.

HAVING peeled your TrufHes, and cut them in Slices, wafh and drain them well j put them into a fmall Stew-pan, with a little EfTence of Ham, and fet them to flew gently over a flack Fire; when they are enough, thicken them with a good Cullis, and fqueeze in the Juice of a Le- mon or Orange fervethem in Plates, or little Difhes.

Another Way.

ORDER them as before, and put them into a Stew- pan, with fome Mufhrooms cut in Slices, and a Bunch of fweet Herbs; feafon it with Salt and Pepper, put in a Bit of Butter, give it a Tofs, and moiflen it with a little Gravy of Veal, Eflence of Ham, and a Glafs of White Wine; be- ing done, and relifhing, fqueeze in the Juice of an Orange er Lemon, and ferve it up hot.

To ragoo French Beans.

TA K E a few Beans, boil them tender, then take your Stew-pan, put in a Piece of Butter; when it is melted, fhake in fome Flour, and peel a large Onion, flice it, and fry It brown in that Butter; then put in the Beans, fhake in a little Pepper and a little Salt, grate a little Nutmeg in, have ready the Yolk of an Egg, and fome Cream - flir them all together for a Minute or two, and difh them up.

Another Way,

TA K E a Quarter of a Peck of French Beans, firing them, do not fplit them, cut them in three a-crofs, lay them m Salt and Water, then take them out, and dry theni ]n a coarfe Cloth, fry them brown, then pour out all the lat, put m a Quarter of a Pint of hot Water, flir it into the Pan by Degrees, let it boil; then take a Quarter of a Pound of frefh Butter, rolled in a very little Flour, two Spoon- fuls of Catchup, one Spoonful of Mufhroom-pickle, and four of White W me, an Onion fluck with fix Cloves, two oi three Blades of Mace beat, Half a Nutmeg grated, a little

T 2 Peppei

412 he L A D ys Companion.

Pepper and Salt; ftir it all together for a few Minutes, then throw in the Beans, hake the Pan for a Minute or two, take out the Onion, and pour them into your Difli. This is a pretty- Sid e-difh, and you may garnifh with what you fanfy, eithef .pickled French Beans, Mulhrooms, or Samphire, or any Thing clfe.

A Ragoo of Beans, ijcith a Force.

RA G O O them as above; take two large Carrots, icrape and boil them tender, then malh them in a Pan, leaion with Pepper and Salt, mix them with a little Piece of Butter, and the Yolks of two raw Eggs; make it into what Shape you pleafe, and baking it a Quarter of an Hour in a quick Oven will do; but a Iin Oven is the bell. Lay it in the jiddle of theDiih, and the Ragoo round. Serve it up lor a .: Courfe.

Beans ragood at- z Cabbage.

A K E a nice little Cabbage, about as big as a Pint _ Bafon; when the outfide Leaves, Top, and Stalk are Cut ofr, half boil it, cut a Hole in the Middle pretty big, take what you cut out, and chop it very fine, with a few of the Eeans boiled, a Carrot boiled and malhd, and a Turnip boiled; mafh all together, put them into a Stew-pan, feafon them with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, and a good Piece of Butter, Hew them a few Mifcites over the Fire, ftirring the Fan often. In the mean Time, put the Cabbage into a Stew- pan, but take great Care it does not fall to Pieces; put to it four Spoonfuls of Water, two of Wine, and one of Catchup, have a Spoonful of Mufhroom-pickle, a Piece of Butter roUd in a little Flour, a very little Pepper, cover it clofe, and let it ftew foftiy till it is tender; then take it up carefully, and lay it in the Middle of the Dilh, pour your malhd Roots in the Middle, to fill it up high, and your Ragoo roun it; you Biay add the Liquor the Cabbage was ftewed in, fend it to Table hot. This will do for a Top, Bottom, Middle, or Side-dilh. When Beans are not to be had, you may cut Car- rots and Turnips into little Slices, and fry them, the Orrots in little round Slices, the Turnips in long Pieces, about two Inches long, and as thick as ones Finger, and tofs them up in the Ragoo. fJ

To

The Lad ys Com p a ni on. 41

0 drefs Beans in Ragoo.

YOU muft boil your Beans fo that the Skins will flip off. Take about a Quart, feafon them with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, then flour them, and have ready fomc Butter in a Stew-pan, throw in your Beans, fry them of a fine Brown, then drain them from the Fat, and lay them in your Dilh. Have ready a Quarter of a Pound of Butter melted, and Half a Pound of the blanched Beans boiled, and beat in a Mortar, with a very little Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg; then by Degrees mix them in the Butter, and pour over the other Beans. Garnilh with a boiled and fried Bean, and fo on, till you fill the Rim of your Dilh. They are very good without frying, and only plain Butter melted over them,

J Ragoo or W!ade Dijhes.

TAKE Claret, Gravy, fweet Herbs; and favoury Spice - what Quantity you think proper, to tofs up with Lamb- ftones. Cocks-combs, boilend blcii:ched firft, then iliced, with Veal Sveetbreads, Oyflers, MuHirooms, irufHes, and Morels. Thicken thefe with brown Butter, and keep it for Uff.



INDEX - [OMITTED]





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