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Oyster Sausages
Fish - Shellfish
Historic

Minced oyster meat with beef suet, breadcrumb, egg and spices. Formed into sausage shapes or patties. Fried (Acton 1845)


Original Receipt from 'Modern Cookery for Private Families' by Eliza Acton (Acton 1845);

OYSTER SAUSAGES. (A most excellent Receipt)
Beard, rinse well in their strained liquor, and mince but not finely, three dozens and a half of plump native oysters, and mix them with ten ounces of fine bread-crumbs, and ten of beef-suet chopped extremely small^ add a saltspoonful of salt, and one of pepper, or less than half the quantity of cayenne, twice as much pounded mace, and the third of a small nutmeg grated: moisten the whole with two unbeaten eggs, or with the yolks only of three, and a dessertspoonful of the whites. When these ingredients have been well worked together, and are perfectly blended, set the mixture in a cool place for two or three hours before it is used; make it into the form of small sausages or sausage-cakes, flour and fry them in butter of a fine light brown; or throw them into boiling water for three minutes, drain, and let them become cold, dip them into egg and bread-crumbs, and broil them gently until they are lightly coloured. A small bit should be cooked and tasted before the whole is put aside, that the seasoning may be heightened if required. The sausages thus made are extremely good: the fingers should be well floured in making them up.




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