The Foods of England | Cookbooks | Diary | Index | Magic Menu |
Twitter email Foods of England


Random Page
Cookbooks
Diary
Index
Magic Menu
Really English?
Timeline
English Service
Food Map of England
- Lost Foods
- Accompaniments
- Biscuits
- Breads
- Cakes
- Cheeses
- Classic Meals
- Curry Dishes
- Dairy
- Drinks
- Egg Dishes
- Fish
- Fruit
- Fruits & Vegetables
- Game & Offal
- Meat & Meat Dishes
- Pastries and Pies
- Pot Meals
- Poultry
- Preserves & Jams
- Puddings & Sweets
- Sauces
- Sausages
- Scones
- Soups
- Sweets and Toffee



Hackin or Hack Pudding

Meats - Sausages
Endangered
North West

A sweet haggis-type pudding of minced beef with oats, sugar and fruit, boiled in a large gut bag.

William Dickinson's 'Cumberland Glossary' of 1878 has, "a pudding of mincemeat and fruit used till lately for the family breakfast on Christmas day." Bradley 1728 has; "'There are some Counties in England, whose Customs are never to be set aside; and our Friends in Cumberland, as well as some of our Neighbours in Lancashire, and else-where, keep them up. It is a Custom with us every Christmas-Day in the Morning, to have, what we call an Hackin..."

'Cassell's Dictionary of Cookery' (Cassell 1883) gives, as 'Sweet Haggis'; "a pound of picked currants, a pound of stoned raisins, and half a pint of sherry are added to the ingredients of the English haggis, and the haggis is then boiled in a calf's bladder. When it is made in this way, sugar should be sent to table with it. Time to prepare, three hours. Sufficient for eight or ten persons."

See also: Haggis and compare with Christmas pottage


Original Receipt in 'The Country Housewife and Lady's Director' by Prof. R Bradley, 1728 (Bradley 1728)

To make a Hackin. From a Gentleman in Cumberland.

Sir,

There are some Counties in England, whose Customs are never to be set aside; and our Friends in Cumberland, as well as some of our Neighbours in Lancashire, and else-where, keep them up. It is a Custom with us every Christmas -Day in the Morning, to have, what we call an Hackin, for the Breakfast of the young Men who work about our House; and if this Dish is not dressed by that time it is Day-light, the Maid is led through the Town, between two Men, as fast as they can run with her, up Hill and down Hill, which she accounts a great shame. But as for the Receipt to make this Hackin, which is admired so much by us, it is as follows.

Take the Bag or Paunch of a Calf, and wash it, and clean it well with Water and Salt; then take some Beef-Suet, and shred it small, and shred some Apples, after they are pared and cored, very small. Then put in some Sugar, and some Spice beaten small, a little Lemon-Peel cut very fine, and a little Salt, and a good quantity of Grots, or whole Oat-meal, steep'd a Night in Milk; then mix these all together, and add as many Currans pick'd clean from the Stalks, and rubb'd in a coarse Cloth; but let them not be wash'd. And when you have all ready, mix them together, and put them into the Calf's-Bag, and tye them up, and boil them till they are enough. You may, if you will, mix up with the whole, some Eggs beaten, which will help to bind it. This is our Custom to have ready, at the opening of the Doors, on Christmas -Day in the Morning. It is esteem'd here; but all that I can say to you of it, is, that it eats somewhat like a Christmas -Pye, or is somewhat like that boil'd. I had forgot to say, that with the rest of the Ingredients, there should be some Lean of tender Beef minced small.





Sitemap - This page updated 02/10/2016 - Copyright © Glyn Hughes 2016


  BUILT WITH WHIMBERRY  

matrixstats