The Foods of England | Cookbooks | Diary | Index | Magic Menu |
Twitter email Foods of England


Random Page
Cookbooks
Diary
Index
Magic Menu
Really English?
Timeline
English Service
Food Map of England
- Lost Foods
- Accompaniments
- Biscuits
- Breads
- Cakes
- Cheeses
- Classic Meals
- Curry Dishes
- Dairy
- Drinks
- Egg Dishes
- Fish
- Fruit
- Fruits & Vegetables
- Game & Offal
- Meat & Meat Dishes
- Pastries and Pies
- Pot Meals
- Poultry
- Preserves & Jams
- Puddings & Sweets
- Sauces
- Sausages
- Scones
- Soups
- Sweets and Toffee



Common Fritters

Eggs
Historic

Pouring batter fried in lard, "when lightly coloured on one side, turn the fritters, drain them well from the lard as they are lifted out, and serve them very quickly. They are eaten generally with fine sugar, and orange or lemon juice"

A more modern version of the ancient Cryspels


Original Receipt from 'Modern Cookery for Private Families' by Eliza Acton (Acton 1845);

PLAIN COMMON FRITTERS.
Mix with three well-whisked eggs a quarter of a pint of milk, and strain them through a fine sieve; add them gradually to three large tablespoonsful of flour, and thin the batter with as much more milk as will bring it to the consistence of cream; beat it up thoroughly at the moment of using it, that the fritters may be light. Drop it in small portions from a spouted jug or basin into boiling lard; when lightly coloured on one side, turn the fritters, drain them well from the lard as they are lifted out, and serve them very quickly. They are eaten generally with fine sugar, and orange or lemon juice: the first of these may be sifted quickly over them after they are dished, and the oranges or lemons halved or quartered, and sent to table with them. The lard used for frying them should be fresh and pure-flavoured: it renders them more crisp and light than butter, and is, therefore, better suited to the purpose. These fritters may be agreeably varied by mingling with the batter just before it is used, two or three ounces of well cleaned and well dried currants, or three or four apples of a good boiling kind not very finely minced. Double the quantity of batter will be required for a large dish.

Eggs, 3; flour, 3 tablespoonful; milk,½ to 1 pint.




Original Receipt from 'Pot-luck; or, The British home cookery book' by May Byron (Byron 1914)

576. COMMON FRITTERS (Eighteenth Century)

Take half a pint of ale and two eggs, beat in as much flour as will make it rather thicker than a common pudding, with nutmeg and sugar to your taste, let it stand three or four minutes to rise, then drop it in tablespoonfuls into a pan of boiling lard; fry them a light brown, drain them on a sieve; serve them up with sugar grated over them, and wine sauce in a boat.




Sitemap - This page updated 02/10/2016 - Copyright © Glyn Hughes 2016


  BUILT WITH WHIMBERRY  

matrixstats