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The Complete Confectioner, 1807

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TITLE: The Complete Confectioner: or, The whole art of confectionary made easy
AUTHOR: Frederick Nutt
PUBLISHER: London printed: New York: reprinted, for Richard Scott and sold at his bookstore, no. 243 Pearl-street
DATE: 1st edition 1789, this edition 1807
THIS VERSION: Based on the online edition at archive.org, digitized by Boston Public Library. This is an Optical Character Recognition scan, it has been partly edited, but still contains very significant errors.


THE
COMPLETE
CONFECTIONER,
OR,
THE WHOLE ART OF
CONFECTIONARY
MADE EASY:
CONTAINING, AMONG A VARIETY OF USEFUL MATTER, THE ART OF MAKING THE VARIOUS KINDS OF
Biscuits, Fruits preserved in Brandy,
Drops, Preserved Sweetmeats (wet)
Prawlongs, Dried Fruits,
Ice Creams, Cordials,
Water Ices, &c. &c.
AS ALSO THE MOST APPROVED METHOD OF MAKING
CHEESES, PUDDINGS, CAKES, etc IN 250 CHEAP AND FASHIONABLE RECEIPTS.
The result of many years experience with the celebrated « Negri and Witten.

'Wi FREE^EPJ;C;..N)LJTT;,;;E,SQ.
Fourth F.d'tion, \fith cp.niderable additions.
;'L(^id.ch Printed:,; J\''eiv-York Refirinted^ FOR RICHARD SCOTT,
AND SOLD AT HIS BOOKSTORE, NO. 243 PEARL-STREET. '
A 1807.


ADVERTISEMENT.
THE flattering reception which this work has experienced, from a discerning Public, calls forth a tribute of gratitude from the Author, and merits his warmest thanks. With the assistance of several intelligent friends, this edition is considerably enlai*ged.
It is very extraordinary, that only one work, except the present, was ever presented to the world, on the Art of Confectionary; that produc- tion has already met with the contempt which it justly deserved.
As the Author had the honour to occupy a dis- tinguished situation in this particular department, he has availed himself of several years' experience and application, in compiling this performance, which he again submits to the indulgence and can- dour of his readers.

CONTENTS.
BISCUITS, 8cc.
No. 1 . Fine Savoy Biscuits.
2. Fine Spunge Biscuits.
3. Orange Heart Biscuits.
4. Naples Biscuits.
5. Syringe Biscuits.
6. Robe de Chambre Biscuits.
7. Common Savoy Biscuits.
8. Sweetmeat Biscuits.
9. Monkey Biscuits.
10. Spice Biscuits.
1 1. Tode in a Hole Biscuits.
12. Millefruit Biscuits
13. Masapan Biscuits.
14. Judges Biscuits.
15. Queen's Cukes.
16. Yarmoutii Biscuits,
17. King's Biscuits.
18. Choclate Biscuits.
19. Italian W.iter Biscuits.
20. Water Cakes with Carraway Seeds.
21. French Rusks.
r 22 Fine Sweatmeat Gingerbread Nuts.
23. Turtulongs, fine, for Breakfast.
24. Fine Shrewsbury Cakes.
25. Lemon Biscuits.
26. The Way to Blanch Almonds.
27. French Maccaroons.
28. Eng. Maccaroons, generally called Common.
29. Ratifia Biscuits.
30. Orange Biscuits.
31. Filbert Biscuits.
32. Pistachio Nut Biscuits. 35. Orange Flower Biscuits.
A 3

CONTENTS.
34. Fine Almond Fagots.
35. Fine Ginger Cakes.
36. French Apricot Biscuits.
37. French Barberry Biscuits.
38. French Damson Biscuits, or Refined Cheese.
39. A small fine Almond Cake
40. A large Rich Two Guinea Cake.
41. A Small Rich Seed Cake.
42. A Small Rich Plumb Cake.
WAFERS.
43. Lemon Wafers.
44. Barberry Wafers.
45. Orange Wafers.
46. Bergamot Wafers.
47. Violet Wafers.
48. Peppermint Wafers.
DROPS.
49 Bergamot Drops.
50. Black Currant Drops.
51. Chocolate Drops.
52. Damson Drops.
53. Seville Orange Drops.
54. Lemon Drops.
55. Orange Drops.
56. Peppermint Drops.
57. Violet Drops.
58. Barley Sugar Drops.
PRAWLONGS, &c.
59. Lemon Prawlongs. 60 Orange Prawlongs.
61. Pistachio Prawlongs, Red.
62. Burnt Filbert Prawlongs, Red.
63. Orange Flower Prawlongs.
64. Seville Orange Jumbles.
65. Burnt Almonds, Red.
66. Burnt Almonds, White.

CONTENTS. r
67. Pistachio Prawlongs, White.
68. Burnt Filberts, White.
69. Merings in the Form of Eggs.
70. Almond Paste.
71. Orgeant Paste.
72. Orgeant Syrup.
73. Lemon Syrup.
74. Orange Syrup.
75. Seville Orange Syrup.
76. Pine Apple Syrup.
77. Capillaire Sprup.
JELLIES, Sec.
78. Currant Jelly, Red and V/hite.
79. Rasberry Jelly, for Ices.
80. Apple Jelly, to put over your Fruit, or what
you like.
81. Hartshorn Jelly.
82. Calvesfoot Jelly.
83. Black Currant Jelly.
84. To make Blomonge.
85. Goosberry Jeliy.
JAMS, &c.
86. Rasberry Jam.
87. Apricot Jam.
88. Strawberry Jam.
89. Barberry Jam.
90. Peach Jam.
91. Black Plumb Jam.
92. Rasberry Cakes.
93. Seville Orange Paste Cakes.
94. Millefruit Rock Candy.
95. Rock Sugar of all colours.
96. Barley Sugar.
97. The way to make all sorts of Carrav/ay Comfits.
98. Cardamom Comfits.
99. Carimel Crocont. iOO. Whip, for a Triste.
101. Everlasting Whipsyllabub to put into Glasses.

CONTENTS.
102. Floating Island.
103. Iceing for a Rich Cake.
104. To Clarify Sugar for Sweatmeats.
ESSENCE FOR ICES.
105. Cedraty Essence.
106. Lemon Essence.
107. Orange Essence.
WATERS, Sec. FOR ROUTS.
108. Lemonade.
109. Orangeade.
1 10. Currant Water made of Jelly.
111. Fresh Currant Water.
112. Cedraty Water.
1 13. Rasberry Water, of Rasberry Jam.
114. Fresh Rasberry Water.
115. Bergamot Water.
1 16. Apiicot Water.
1 17. Strawberry Water, of Strawberry Jamo
118. Fresh Strawberry Water.
119. Barberry Water.
120. Peach Water.
121. Pear Water.
122. Cherry Water.
123. Orgeat.
ICE CREAMS.
124. Barberry Ice Cream.
125. Rasberry Ice Cream.
126. Strawberry Ice Cream.
127. Apricot Ice Cream.
128. Pine Apple Ice Cream.
129. Currant Ice Cream.
130. Pistachio Ice Cream.
131. Biscuit Ice Cream.
132. Plain Ice Cream.
133. Brown Bread Ice Cream.
134. Royal Ice Cream.

CONTENTS.
135. Ginger Ice Cream.
136. Fresh Strawberry Ice Cream.
137. Fresh Rasberry Ice Cream.
138. Fresh Apricot Ice Cream.
139. Coffee loe Cream.
140. Chocolate Ice Cream.
141. Seville Orange Ice Cream. 152. Lemon Ice Cream.
143. China Orange Ice Cream.
144. Burnt Filbert Ice Cream.
145. Burnt Ice Cream.
146. Millefruit Ice Cream.
147. Fresh Currant Ice Cream.
148. Cedraty Ice Cream.
149. Burnt Almond Ice Cream.
150. Parmasan Cheese Ice Cream,
151. Damson Ice Cream.
152. Prunello Ice Cream. i53. Peach Ice Cream.
154. Black Currant Ice Cream.
155. Cherry Ice Cream.
WATER ICES, OF ALL SORTS.
156. Barberry Water Ice.
157. Rasberry Water Ice.
158. Strawberry Water Ice.
159. Apricot Water Ice.
160. Pine Apple Water Ice.
161. Chocolate Water Ice.
162. Seville Orange Water Ice.
163. China Orange Water Ice.
164. Lemon Water Ice.
165. Punch Water Ice.
166. Peach Water Ice.
167. Currant Water Ice.
168. Fresh Currant Water Ice.
169. Fresh Rasberry Water Ice.
170. Damson Water Ice.
171. Prunello Water Ice.
172. Blackcurrant W^ater Ice.
173. Grape Water Ice.

10 CONTENTS.
174. Cherry Water Ice.
175. Pear Water Ice.
176. Millefruit Water Ice.
177. Ber£>'ainot Water Ice.
178. Cedraty Water Ice.
179. Fresh Strawberry Water Ice.
FRUITS PRESERVED IN BRANDY.
180. Apricots, in Brandy.
181. Peaches, in Brandy.
182. Morella Cherries, in Brandy.
183. Mo[^ul Plumbs, in Brandy.'
184. Green Gages, in Brandy.
185. Green Orange Plumbs, in Brandy.
186. Grapes in Brandy.
PRESERVED SWEATMEATS WET.
187. Green Apricots, Wet.
188. Apricots Ripe, Wet.
189. Preserved Pine Apple Chips, Wet.
190. Angelica, Wet.
191. Barberries in Sprigs, Wet.
192. Rasberries Whole, Wet,
193. Currants in Bunches, Whole, Wet. 104. Cedraties, Whole, Wet.
195. Cherries Sweet, in Syrup.
196. Cherries not Sweet, Wet or Dry.
197. Cucumbers or Gerkins, .Wet.
198. Comport Golden Pippins, Wet.-
199. Comport French Pears, White, Wet.
200. Comport French Pears, Red, Wet.
201. Damsons, Whole, Wet.
202. Grapes in Bunches, Wet.
203. Goosberries in the Form of Flops, Wcl.
204. Green Goosberries, "Wet.
205. Lemons, Whole, Wet.
206. Seville Oranges, Wet.
207. Orange Peels, Wet.
208. Orange Chips, Wet.
209. Lemon Chips, Wet.

CONTENTS. 11
210. Lemon Peels, Wet.
211. Pears, Wet.
212. Green Orange Plumbs, Wet.
213. Mogul Plumbs, Wet.
214. Pine Apples, Whole, Wet.
215. A Small Yellow Plumb, Wet.
216. Strawberries Whole, Wet.
217. Apricot Chips, Wet.
218. Green Gages, Wet.
DRIED FRUITS.
219. Damsons, Dried.
220. Mogul Plumbs, Dried.
221. Green Orange Plumbs, Dried.
222. Green Gages, Dried.
223. Pears Candied, or Dried.
224. Cherries, Sweet, Dried.
225. Cherries, not Sweet, Dried.
226. Apricot Chips, Dried.
227. Orange or Lemon Chips, Candied or Dried.
228. Angelica Knots, Dried.
229. Barberries in Bunches, Dried.
230. Lemon Peels, Candied or Dried.
231. Cucumbers, Dried.
232. Green Apricots, Dried.
233. Apricots full Grown, Dried.
234. Grapes in Bunches, Dried,
235. Pine Apple Chips, Dried.
236. Cedraties Whole or in Quarters, Dried. 337. Paste Knots, Red or White.
MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS,
238. Perfetto Amore.
239. Persico.
240. Anniseed.
241. Cornelia or Cinnamon.
242. Coffee.
243. Chocolate.
244. Damson Cheese.
245. Apple Cheese

12 CONTENTS.
246. Lemon Pudding.
247. Carrot Pudding.
248. Citron Pudding.
249. Rice Cake.
250. Rice Cheese Cake.


COMPLETE CONFECTIONER.


No. 1. Fine Savoy Biscuits.

BREAK twelve eggs and put the yolks in abason,tlieu put in twelve ounces of powdered sugar with the yolks, then rasp the rind of four lemons, and mix and stir the rind up with the yolks and sugar, and beat them with a wooden spoon ten minutes, then whisk the whites in a copper pan, but do not leave whisking them till they are almost strong enough to bear an ^^^', or they will go to water and be spoiled, and Avhen you think you have whisked them enough, then mix the yolks with them, with a wooden spoon as light as possible, when it is mixed well, take ten ounces of line flour as dry as possible, and stir it up with the eggs and sugar, but not too much only till it mixes with the eggs; then take a small tea-spoon and take out a spoonful of the batter and pull it along the paper, and as you pull the spoon along the paper push the batter down with your linger, so as to make the biscuit about three inches long, and about half an inch wide; then sift some sugar over them before you put them in the oven, which must be very hot, but be careful they are not burnt, for they soon scorch if you do not watch them; and when they are done cut them off the paper whilst they are hot. No. 2. Fiji:; Sfiunge Biscuits.

TAKE three quarters of a pound of powdered sugar, and put it in a bason, and take twelve eggs and break the whites into a copper pan, and put the yolks in with sugar, and beat the sugar and yolks together with a wooden spoon, till you see the. sugar and yolks blow up in bladders of wind; then whisk the whites well till they are almost fit to bear an t,%S!^ on them; then mix the yolks and the sugar v,'ith the whiles, with a large spoon very lightly, and stir them as little as possible, only till you see the whites and yolks are just mixed; then take ten ounces of fme flour and mix well with the eggs; then butter the tin moulds well, before you put B


14 THE COMPLETE

the batter in them, otherwise you will not get them out •when they are baked, and when you have filled the tins, sift a little powdered sugar on the top of them, before you put them in the oven; it makes them a very fine ice: let your oven be moderate, and when baked take them out of the tins while they are hot, for they will come out the better when hot.

No. 3. Orange Heart Biscuits.

TAKE three quarters of a pound of powdered su- gar, and put it in a pewter bason, and put in thirty yolks of eggs with the sugar, and take seven preserved o- range peels and pound them in a morter very fine quite to a past, then take a handful of sweet and half a handful of bitter almonds, and pound them very fine, and mix them with a little orange flower water; then put four eggs, yolks and whites together, and put them in the bason with the sugar, eggs, and peel, and mix them well together with a wooden spoon in each hand, and beat them till you see the batter rise very much, though you can hardly beat them too light, beat them till it turns quite white, and puffs up in bladders; then put in half a pound of sifted flour, and mix it with the batter very lightly; then butter the hearts, fill them, and sift a lit- tle powdered sugar over them, before you put them in the oven, which must be rather quick, but not too hot, otherwise they will not be light, and take them out of the tins while they are hot.

No. 4. J\^aples Biscuits.

TAKE one pound and a half of Lisbon sugar, put it into a little copper saucepan, and three quarters of a pint of wine measure of water in with the sugar, and one small cupful of orange flower water, and boil the sugar with the water till it is all melted; then break twelve eggs, whites and yolks together, whisk them well, then pour the Lisbon syrup boiling hot in with the eggs, and whisk them as fast as you can at the time of pouring in the syrup, or the eggs will spoil, and ^vhcn yon have poured it all in, keep wl.isking it till it is quite cold and set, and when it is cold, take one pound and a half of flower, and mix it as light as possible; then put two sheets of paper on the copper plate you bake on, then take one sheet of paper, and make the


CONFECTIONER. 15

edges of it starid up about an inch and an half high, and pour your batter in it, sift some powdered sugar over it, carefully, to prevent its burning on the top; do not leave the oven one minute when you think it is near baked enough; and when baked, take it out in the pa- per, and let it stand till cold, then turn it over, and wet the bottom of the paper, till the paper comes off with ease, then cut it to what size you like: you may bake it in small tins if you please.

No. 5. Syringe Biscuits.

TAKE one pound of sweet almonds, and pound them in a marble morter very line with whites of eggs, but be careful not to make them too wet with the eggs, only just wet enough to prevent the almonds from getting oily, and when you hnd they get rather dry, then put another white of an egg in them, and pound them so fine, till you can scarce feel the least lump of an almond in it, then rasp the rind of six lemons very fine, and put in two pounds and a half of powdered sugar, and mix the sugar, almonds, and the peel al- togetlier as a past; then take a syringe mould made of copper, adout twelve inches long, and about two inches %vide, made round, and to screw off at the bottom, with a little round copper plate, the size of the inside of the syringe with a little hole cut in the middle of it, in the shape of a star, and the mould must have two handles, about the middle of it; then roll your paste to half fill your mould; then take a rammer tl^.e thickness of the mould, put it over the past and squeeze it out against your breast upon the dresser, which must be floured a little, so as not to stick, and it will come out at the bot- tom of the mould, then cut it in pieces about three inches long, and join them in rings, and put three sheets of paper under them, before you put them into the oven, otherwise they will burn, for your oven must be very brisk.

No. 6. Robe cle Chambre Biscuifs.

TAKE syrup of sugar, and boil it over a brisk char- coal fire, till it comes to carimile, then have some Jor- dan almonds ready, and put them into the carimile su- gar, stir them up with a large wooden spoon over and over, till you see they are covered with sugar and dry,


16 THE COMPLETE

then throw them into a wooden sieve, and pick them that stick together and break them off, then make some iceing with whites of eggs and powdered sugar, and a lit- tle orange flower water, and put the almonds into the iceing, and see them well covered with it, then put two sheets of paper upon the plate, and put your biscuits at a convenient distance from each other, so as not to touch; let the oven be moderate to colour finely the ice- ing, and when they come out, let them stand till they are cold, before you take them off the papers. No. 7. Common Savoy Biscuits.

BREAK six eggs in a little copper saucepan, with half a pound of powdered sugar, whisk the eggs and su- gar very light, keep whisking them half an hour; then mix half a pound of sifted flower with the eggs and su- gar w^ith a wooden spoon; then take a tea-spoon, and one spoonful of batter, and pull it along the paper, and as you pull the spoon along the paper, push the batter down with your finger, so as to make the biscuit about three inches long, and about half an inch wide; then sift some sugar over them before you put them in the oven, which must be very hot, but be careful that they are not burnt, for they soon, scorch if you do not watch them, and when they are done cut them off the paper whilst they are hot.

No. 8. Sweetmeat Biscuits,

TAKE some Naples biscuits that have been baked, and cut them in small pieces, about an inch and a half square, and about an inch thick, and lay them on youi: wire, and put them in the oven just to crisp them, then make some iceing with whites of eggs, and sugar and t)rangc flower v/ater, and dip one side of the biscuit in it; then cut some sweetmeats in small pieces, such as le- mon and orange peel, and angelico, and just throw over the top of them, put them on your wire: you need no ])aper under them, then put them in the oven to harden the iceing, and they are done.

No. 9. Alonkey Biscuits,

TAKE six eggs and break the whites and yolks sepa- rate, and mix the weight of six eggs of powdered sugar with the yolks, and beat them well together, then put,;;e whites in a copper pan, and whisk them well, and put a little cinnamon pounded in with the yolks and su* gar, then mix the yolks and sugar with the whites; then take four eggs and the weight of them of sifted flour, then mix and stir them all together; then lay three or four sheets of paper on the plate you bake on; and take a tea-spoonful of batter, and put it on the upper sheet of paper, then make them round and about the size of a half crown piece, and join two of them together with the spoon; and sift a little powdered sugar over them, and put them in the oven, watch them for they are not long a baking, and when they come out, cut them off the paper while they are hot, and put the two under sides of them together.

No. 1 0. Sjiice Biscuits,

TAKE three pounds of flour; and three pounds of sweet almonds cut in half, and put them with the flour and three ounces of spice, such as cinnamon and mace pounded, and one pound of powdered sugar, and mix them together on your dresser, then take three pounds of Lisbon sugar, and put it in a saucepan with some water and just boil it, and then mix it with the rest of the ingredients on the dresser, and when it is all mixed to a paste, heat your oven very hot, and put three pa- pers next your plate, then roll your paste to the size of a large rolling pin; then put it on your paper and flat it down with your hand about three inches v/ide, but higher in the middle than at the ends, then put them in the oven, and when thy are baked take them out while hot, cut them with a sharp knife, about the eighth part an inch thick, in the form of a rusk, and you will see the almonds look very v/ell cut in them.

No. 11. Toad-in-a-Hole Biscuits.

TAKE one pound of sweet, and one ounce and a half of bitter almonds, and pound them in a mortar very fine with water, then oae pound and a quarter of Lisbon sugar, and mix it very well v/ith the almonds: do not make it too thin, and remember there are no eggs in this; then put one sheet of paper on your wire, and some wafer paper on that, then take a spoon and make your biscuits round on the wafer paper, about the size of a half-crown piece; then put one or two dried cherries in the middle of them; and sift some powdered sugar over them, and put them in the oven, which must have a moderate heat, and when they come out, cut the wafer paper round them, but leave the paper at the botom of them.

No. 12. Millcfruii Biscidts.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of preserved orange peel and cut it in pieces about half an inch long, and not quite a quarter wide; then take six ounces of angelico, cut it the same way, and a quarter of a pound of preserved lemon peel, and six ounces of sweet, and one ounce of bitter almonds, and let all these be cut the same way as the orange peel, and put some whites of eggs, sugar, and orange fiower water in a bason, and make an iceing; then put all these into it, and paper your plate with three papers, and make them what size you chuse, then take a little brush and touch them here and there with a lit- tle cochineal colour, it will make them look well; let your oven not be too hot, only just to dry the iceing, as it will stick together well, let them be cold before you take them off, and they will be like a piece of a rock, &c.

No. 13. Masahan Eis cults.

TAKE one pound of sweet almonds and pound them very fine, so fine that you can scarce feel the least himp, you may use water to them; then take one pound of powdered sugar, and put the almonds and sugar in a clean saucepan, and have a clear charcoal fire, but not iierce; stir them together over the fire v;ith a wooden spoon, till the paste leaves the pan and keeps itself to- gether, but keep stirring it all the time, and be careful that it does not burn to the pan; put it on a dresser with a little flour under it, and work it up well with your hands till it hangs well together; then roll small pieces of it about three inches long and about half the thick- ness of your little finger, join the ends of them, and make them in round rings; put them on the back of a wooden sieve, and put them in a stove or any dry place where there is some warmth to come to them, let them stay two or three days till they are quite hard, and when you want to bake them, take about eight whites of eggs, and put in a bason, mix some powdered sugar with them, and with a wooden spoon in each hand


CONFECTIONER. 19

beat it well; put a cup full of orange flower water in it, beat well; add more powdered sugar to it if there is oc- casion, to make it a proper thickness, and beat it about a quarter of an hour till you see it puff up and rise; take a wire and put your biscuits in this iceing in the bason, and take them out and turn them inside down with your finger on this wire; and let the iceing run through this wire into another bason until you see your rings quite through, then lay three sheets of paper on the plate, let the oven be very slow, and put them in, only until the iceing is set and they begin to change co- lour, then take them out and let them stand till they are cold before you take them off.

No. 14. Judges Biscuits,

TAKE six eggs and break them into a copper pan, yolks and whites together, whisk them well for about five minutes, mix half a pound of powdered sugar with the eggs, and v/hisk them for ten minutes, put as many carraway seeds as you think proper, and half a pound of sifted flour, mix it well with a wooden spoon, and put three papers on your plates; then take a spoon arid drop them on papers about the size of a crown piece, sift some pov»'dered sugar over them, let them be rather thick in the middle, and the oven rather sharps and when they come out, cut them off the paper while hot.

No. 15. Queen Cakes.

TAKE one pound of the best butter, and rub it well with your hand in the preserving pan until it is as fine as cream, then take twelve eggs, yolks and whites to- gether, and vv'hisk them well in another pan over a gentle fire, mind they do not burn, for they will with- out great care; take twelve ounces of powdered su- gar, and put with the eggs, keep whisking them for three minutes, put the eggs and the sugar over the fire again and whisk them, and be careful it does not burn at bottom, when it is pretty warni take it off and whisk it till it is cold, then mix it well with your hand; take one pound of sifted flour, and twelve ounces of currants, v/ell picked and washed, mix them well M'ith the rest, butter your tin hearts, and put them on your plate, ^vith three or four papers under them, your oven must


20 THE COMPLETE

be quick, but if you find it too hot for the top, put a

sheet of paper over them to keep them from buruing.

No. 16. Yarmouth Biscuits,

TAKE six ounces of currants, wash and pick them very clean, dry them well, rub a little flour among them to make them white, and put half a pound of powdered sugar with the currants upon a clean dres- ser; add twelve ounces of flour sifted, and half a pound of the best fresh butter you can get; break three eggs, and mix all the ingredients together to become a paste, that you can roll it on the dresser, the thickness of an eighth part of an inch, and then cut them out either round or what shape you fancy.

N. B. Your oven must be rather hot, and put two or three sheets of paper under them, do not bake them too much, only just make them brown. No. 17. Kings Biscuits.

TAKE half a pound of butter and work it about in a bason with a wooden spoon, then take six eggs and whisk them well; put half a pound of powdered sugar in them and whisk them about ten minutes; mix the eggs and sugar with the butter, then take six ounces of currants well washed, and put them with the eggs, and six ounces of flour, and mix it well together, put three sheets of paper on the plate, take a tea-spoon and drop the paste on the paper about the size of a shilling, put them in a sharp oven, and cut them off" while they are hot.

No. 18. Chocolate Biscuits.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of chocolate, and put it on a tin, over a stove to make it warm, then put a pound of powdered sugar in a bason, and when the chocolate is quite warm and soft, put it in with the sugar, and mix it well with about eight whites of eggs, if you find it too thin, mix more powdered sugar with it just to bring it to a paste, so that you can roll it in lumps as big as walnuts: let your oven be moderate, put three papers under them, let the oven just raise them and make them crisp and firm, and let them be quite cold before you take them off the paper.

No. 19. Italia?! Water Biscuits.

TAKE six eggs and break them, put the yolks and


CONFECTIONER. 21

whites in a copper pan with the weight of the six eggs, of powdered sugar, whisk them w-ell for half an hour: take six more eggs and the weight of them of sifted flour, mix it with tkem, cut a piece of wood about the size of the top of a large breakfast cup, but not thicker than the eighth of an inch, in the form of a round ring with a piece projecting from it to hold by as a handle; take a table spoonful of the batter, and with a large knife spread it to the thickness of the wood until the nng is filled up; lay your knife on the paper close to the wood, and lift the wood up, and you will see your cake on the paper: put as many of them on the paper as you can without touching each other; let your oven be very hot and they will be baked in five minutes, but take care they do not burn at bottom; when they are done let them stand until they are quite cold, then wet the other side of the paper and they will come off easily, put them in the oven afterwards to dry crisp. No. 20. Water Cakes with Carraivav Seeds.

TAKE three pounds of powdered sugar and four pounds of sifted flour,mix the flour and sugar together on a clean dresser with half water and half w-hites of eggs, and as many carraway seeds as you may think proper, mix all together so as to make it a very fine paste, that you can roll it on the dresser and the thinner the better, eut out the shape you like with a thin cutter; round" and scolloped is the general fashion, but vary the shape to your fancy, roll them very thin and they will be the crisper, for if they are not crisp they are not worth eat- ing; put them on a sheet of paper and rather a slow oven, and if you think it too hot, put as many sheets of paper as you think fit to prevent them from being luirnt, bake them very little so as just to change the colour of them, and butter that sheet of paper you put them on that they may come off* easily. No. 21. French Rusks.

TAKE a clean copper pan and break into it as many eggs as the yolks will make the weight of a pound, use no white in this ingredient, take one pound and a half of pov\^dered sugar and put in with the yolks of the eggs, with a large wooden spoon stir them up well together About ten minutes, put in three handsful of carraway seeds, and two pounds of flour, and mix airtogether, roll your paste on a clean dresser in a roll about four- teen inches long and the thickness of a large rolling pin, paper your plate with three sheets of paper besides the sheets your paste is on, lay the paste in a long roll on the paper and flat it down with your hand, let it be about one inch high in the middle of the paste, and flat it down towards the edges, rather to a point, and after they are baked, wet the paper that they may come off whilst they are warm, and be careful not to bake them too much, or they will not cut witi^out breaking, then with a sharp knife, cut them about a quarter of an inch thick, in the form of a rusk, and lay them fiat on the wire, and put them into the oven so as to make them crisp and dry, and they are done.

No. 22. Fine Svj eat meat Gingerbread Niits.

TAKE two pounds of the best treacle and put it in a large bason; then take half a pound of the best fresh butter, emd carefully melt it, not to oil, pour the butter to the treacle, and stir it well as you pour it in; add three quarters of an ounce of the best pounded ginger, and put in with it two ounces of preserved lemon and orange peel cut very small; and two ounces of pre- served angelica, likewise cut very small; and one ounce of corriander seed pounded, and one ounce and a half of carraway seeds whoie, mix them well together; then break two eggs, yolks and whites together, and mix as much flour as will bring it to a fine paste; make them the size you choose; put them on the bare tin plate, and let your oven be rather brisk.

No. 23. Turtulongs fine for breakfast.

Take a quarter of a pound of butter, three ounces of powdered sugar, one pound and a half of flour, six eggs yolks and whites tcgether, and a very little salt, and mix them all together on your dresser, and having a preserving pan on tlic fire, with clean boiling v»'ater in it, roll your batter out about four inches long, and al- most as thick as your little finger, join it in two round rings the two ends of them, and put them in this boil- ing water, not too many at a time, then on the other side have a bason with cold water, and as the biscuits swim on the top of the boiling water, take them out, put them in the cold water, and let them lie all night; take them out next morning and put them into a sieve, and drain all the water from them; put them on your plate, without any paper under them, let your oven be very hot, and watch them, and you will see them rise very much, the more the better, see they are not burnt, but let them be of a fine brown, and then take them out.

No. 24. Fine Shrewsbury Cakes.

TAKE a pound of butter, and put it in a little flat pan, rub it till it is as fine as cream; then take one pound of powdered sugar, a little cinnamon and mace pounded, and four eggs, yolks and whites together: beat them with your hand till it is very light; then take one pound and a half of sifted flour, work it toge- ther, and roll it on your dresser, to what size you like, only very flat, let your oven be rather slow, and let them change their colour, then take them out.

No. 25. Lemon Biscuits.

TAKE one pound of sweet almonds, and pound them very fine in a mortar, and whites of eggs with them, be careful to temper them properly, to prevent the almonds from turning to oil, and pound them to a very fine paste; put in three pounds of powdered su- gar, and mix it well; take ten lemons, rasp the rinds of them very fine, and mix it with the almonds and sugar; when they are all well mixed, take a knife, and a small piece of board in your hand, and try to drop off the paste on a sheet of paper, about half the size of a nutmeg, and round, put them at a convenient distance from each other, and put them in the oven, which if you find too hot, put three or four sheets of paper, or more at bottom, as occasion shall require under your biscuits, to prevent their scorching, M'hen they come out of the oven, let them stand till they are quite cold, and they will come off the paper very easily.

No. 26. The Way to Blanch Jlmonds.

FOR all biscuits that are made v/ith almonds, the almonds must always be blanched, and for every thing else, except it is particularly mentioned to the con- trary, and the quickest way of blanching them is tris; viz* put a pan of water on the fire and let it boil, then put the almonds in for about ten minutes, drain the water from them, put them on a dresser and rub them as hard as you can with both your hands, and when you think they are almost blanched, take a butcher's tray and put them in, and holding each end of the tray fan them up and down till you see almost all the skins are gone over, then lay them on the dresser again, and those that are not blanched do them with your fingers, and fan them again; and when they are done keep them very dry or else they will get sour.

No. 27. French Maccaroons.

TAKE one pound of svv^eet almonds and pound them very fine in a mortar, with whites of eggs, and be care- ful they do not oil; then take three pounds of powdered sugar and mix with the almonds and whites of eggs to a fine thickness, so as to come off the spoon well; then put three sheets of paper on your plate, and with a table spoon drop them off a little distance from each other so as not to touch, put them in rather a brisk oven, but mind they do not burn, bake them of a very fine brown colour and crisp; then let them stand till they are cold, before you take them off, but if they are burnt at bot- tom, they will not come off at all, so that you must be very careful of them.

No. 28. English Maccarocns commonly called Common.

TAKE one pound of sweet almonds and pound them in a mortar with a gill of \vater, and the rest whites of eggs according to the pounding of them, not too wet nor too dry, but you need not pound these almonds quite so fine as for the French Maccaroons; then add one pound of the best Lisbon sugar, and mix it well with your almonds; then take a wire, and lay one sheet of paper on the wire, take some sheets of wafer paper, join them, and lay them on the paper that is on the wire, put your paste in a bason, take a table spoonful of the ])aste, and drop it off the spoon; sift some powdered sugar over them; let your oven be pretty quick, but do not bake them much, only till the tops are of a fine brown, for these biscuits must be rather moist when eaten; when tney are done, take then) out; and cut the wafer paper off round them, but mind and leave the wafer paper at bottom of them, and round the sides of tiaem.

No. 29. Rataf.a Biscuits

TAKE half a pound of sweet almonds, and half a pound of bitter almonds, and pound them in a mortar very fine, with whites of eggs; put three pounds of powdered sugar, mix it well with the whites of eggs, to the proper thickness into a bason; put two or three sheets of paper on the plate you bake on; take your knife, and the spaddle made of wood, and drop them on the paper, let tiiem be round, and about the size of a large nutmeg; put them in the oven, which must be quick, let them have a fine brown, and all alike, but be careful they are not burnt at bottom, else they will not come off" the paper when baked; let them be cold before you take them off.

No. 30. Grange Biscuits.

TAKE one pound of sweet almonds, pound them in a mortar very fine with whites of eggs; take ten China oranges, rasp the rind off them very fine, and put it ¦with the almonds; add three pounds of powdered sugar, and mix. it well, if you find it too thick, put more whites of eggs to it and mix it well ) then put two or three sheets of paper under, besides that you have put them on: let your oven have a moderate heat; drop little round pieces of paste on your paper, about half as big as a nutmeg, and put them in the oven: let them have a fine brown, and take them off" when cold.

No. 31. Filbert Biscuits.

TAKE some Barcelona filbert nuts, and put them in a mortar to break the shells, pick all the shells from them clean, pound them in a mortar very fine, and mix whites of eggs with them; take care they do not oil; mix three pound of powdered sugar with the nuts and whites of eggs to a proper thickness, let your oven have a moderate heat, then with the spuddle and knife, drop small pieces, the same size as the orange and le- mon biscuits; and put two or three sheets of paper un- der them, let them be a fine brown and all alike, and let them be cold before you take them off" the paper. No. 32. Pistachio A'ut Biscuits.

TAKE half a pound of pistachio nuts and blanch them, pound them in a mortar very fine; mix whites of eggs, and one pound of powdered sugar in a bason, break sixteen eggs, and put the whiles of them in a copper pan, whisk them very strong, fit to bear an egg on them, put the yolks with the sugar and pastachio nuts, beat them well with a spoon in each hand, mix the sugar, yolks and pistachio nuts with the whites very lightly, then put one pound and a quarter of flour, as lightly as possible: butter your spunge tins, and put the paste in: sift some powdered sugar over them, before you put them in the oven, let the heat be moderate, and put three papers under the tins: do not let your biscuits be burnt, but of a fine colour, and take them out of the tins while hot.

No. 33. Orange Flotver Bi
TAKE powdered sugar, what quantity you choose, and put as much white of eggs, as will make the sugar of a thick paste; pick some orange flowers, and mix as many as you like, in proportion to your quantity of su- gar, and whites of eggs, in a bason, so as to be thick enough to roll in little lumps, about the size of a walnut; let your oven be rather slack or moderate; put three papers between them and the tin plate, put them in the oven, let them rise to a very light brown, and take them off when cold.

No. 34. Fine Almond Fagots.

CUT some sweet almonds in halves, put them and some whites of eggs in a bason together; put a little powdered sugar, to make the almonds stick together, mix them well together in a bason; put some wafer papers on your wire, make the almonds up in little heaps with your fingers, as big as you please; sift a little pow- dered sugar over them, before you put them in the oven; let them be a little brown, and then take them out, and cut the wafer paper off round them, that is ragged, and leave the wafer paper at the bottom of them. No. 35. Fine Ginger Cakes. TAKE four pounds of flour, and put on your dresser, then take a copper saucepan, and break six eggs, and mix them well with a spoon; put one pint of cream in them, and beat them well, put the saucepan over the fire, and stir it till it is just warm; put two pounds of butter into the cream and eggs; and one pound of pow- dered sugar, and stir it over a very slow fire, just to melt all the butter; put in four ounces of pounded gin- ger, and when all the butter is melted, pour it all into the middle of the flour, mix it as well as you can, and when you have made it a fine paste, roll it out with flour under it, on your dresser, cut them to the size of the top of a breakfast cup, and a quarter of an inch thick: put three papers under them, before you put them in the oven, which must be very hot.

N. B. These are very good for the stomach in cold weather.

No. 36. Fresh Apricot Biscuits.

TAKE some of the ripest apricots, and put them in an earthen jar, in a copper pot; fill the pot up with wa- ter round the jar, cover the jar over very close, put it over the fire, and let it simmer for four or five hours, and then take the apricots, cut and put them in a sieve till next morning, pass them through the sieve with your hand: to every two pounds of jam, put five pounds of powdered sugar, and beat it well together with two spoons; then break into it eight whites of eggs, whisk them very strong, and mix them with the jam; fill your paper moulds, and put them in the Iiot stove, and do the same as you will see in the receipt of the barberry biscuits, and put them in a dry box.

No. 37. Fresh Barberry Biscuiis.

TAKE your barberries, and put them in the oven; pass them through a sieve, and allow to every tvv'o pounds of barberries, five pounds of povidered sugar, sifted through a lawn sieve; mix the sugar with the barberries; break four eggs, put the whites in a copper pan, and whisk them very strong, mix them with the jam; glaze some thick white paper, cut it in small pieces, and make them in small square bezes, common- ly called coffins; put the jam in as smooth as possible, and put them in a sieve; then put them in your stove, and let them be in six or eight days; when they are dry, tear the paper off" them, put them in your papered box, and keep them dry.

No. 38. Fresh Damson Biscuit^ or refined Cheese.

TAKE some fine damsons, and put them in a brown earthen pan; put them in the oven, and let them be till you find that all the skins will come off, and that the damsons are quite baked through; then take them out, skin and stone them, pass them through a sieve with a spoon; put five pounds of powdered sugar to every two pounds of jam, add five whites of eggs whisked very- strong, mix them well with the jam and sugar; put them in paper moulds, as you do the barberry biscuits; let them be in the stove five or six days, when dry take the paper ofi', and put them in your dry box. No. 39. ^i small fine Almond Cake.

TAKE six ounces of powdered sugar, and put it into a bason; then take five eggs, and put the yolks with the sugar; and six ounces of almonds, half bitter, and half sweet, pound the almonds very fine in a mortar with the white of an e^^ or two, put them in with the yolks and sugar, beat them well with a wooden spoon, whisk the Avhites very strong in the copper pan, mix the yolks and the rest with the whites, as light as possible, and take two ounces of flour, sifted very fine, and mix it with the rest: paper the heap that you mean to bake it in, with three papers double on the inside of the heap, and four at bottom; let your oven be very brisk, and before you put it in, sift a little powdered sugar over the top of it; if you find after it has been in the oven a little time, that it is too hot for it on the top, put one or two sheets of paper on the top of the cake, to prevent its scorching. They vrill not take above half an hour baking, if your oven is proper for them.

No. 40. A large rich two Guinea Cake.

TAKE a large flat copper preserving pan; then take four pounds of the best fresh butter and rub the butter very fine; take another large copper pan and break fifty-four eggs, whisking them ten minutes; put four pounds of powdered sugar, and whisk the eggs and su- gar together over the fire, till you find it pretty warm, take it off", and whisk it till cold, mix it well with th<3 butter, with your hand, and put in an ounce of mace and cinnamon pounded, and two glasses of brandy: cut two pounds of lemon and orange peel, and citron, and one pound of sweet almonds; take five pounds and three quarters of flour, and sift it, put in half of it, then take four pounds of clean currants and put in.

JS/''. B. When you have put half you flour in, then add a qiira-ter of a pound of bitter almonds, pounded with a little powdered sugar, just to keep them from oiling, put the rest of the fiour in, and paper your large heap, putting four sheets withinsidc, and at bottom, and let your oven be very brisk.

No. 41. A small rich Seed Cake,

BREAK fourteen eggs into a copper pan, whisk them ten minutes; then take one pound of butter, and rub it well with your hand to a cream; put one pound of powdered sugar to the eggs, and whisk them over the lire three minutes, then whisk them till they are cold, afterwards mix them with the butter, with your hand as light as you can; put two or three handsful of car- raway seed in, and some sweet almonds cut; and a little cinnamon and mace; mix one pound and a quarter of ilour, as light as you can with your hand: put three pa- pers inside your heap, and four or five at bottom, and let your oven be rather brisk; when you find your cake has risen, and the oven too hot at the top, cover it with a sheet of paper, and it will be done in about an hour and a half, or two hours at farthest.

No. 42. A small rich Plumb Cake.

TAKE one pound and six ounces of currants, wash and pick them very clean, then dry them, and rub a lit- tle flour with them, to make them all white; take one pound of butter, and put it into a copper preserving pan, rub it with your hand quite to a cream; take another pan, and break sixteen eggs, yolks and whites together, whisk them about ten minutes; take one pound of pow- dered sugar, put it in with the eggs, whisk them well over the fire, and be careful it does not burn at bottom ^ make the v^'hisk go to the bottom, and when you feel they are warm, take it off; whisk them till they are quite cold before you put them to the butter, mix them well with the butter with your hand, put the pound and six ounces of currants in with it; put in one pound and a quarter of flour, and mix it with the rest '^ add half a pound of citron and lemon and orange peel cur in it; and a handful of sweet almonds cut; and a handful bit- ter almonds pounded with a little powdered sugar; half an ounce of cinnamon and mace pounded, antla glass.of brandy; then paper your hoop, put your cake in the oven, and let it be of a regular heat.

No. 43. Lemon Wafers,

Tx\KE six lemons, and squeeze into an earthen pan; pound and sift some double refined susjar and mix it with the lemon juice; put one white of an egg in with it, and mix it up well together with your wooden spoon, to make it of a fine thickness; take some sheets of wa- fer paper, and put one sheet of it on a pewter sheet, or tin plate, put a spoonful on, and cover the sheets of wa- fer paper all over with your knife; cut it in twelve pieces, and put them across a stick in your hot stove, with that side the paste is on uppermost, and you will find they will curl; when they are half curled, take them off very carefully and put thern up endways in a sieve, that they may stand up; let them be in the hot stove one day, and you will find they will be all curled and then they are done.

No. 44. Barberry Wafers.

BARBERRY v^afers are made the same way as your lemon wafers, only v/hen you have made as many lemon wafers as you want, mix a little cochineal with the rest of the paste, to make it of a fine pink colour, and if it should be too thin, put a little powdered sugar with it, and dry them the same way as the lemons. No. 45. Orange Wafrs.

TAKE six China oranges, and rasp the rind of them \-ery fine, cut them in halves, and squeeze them into a little pan; take three lemons, and squeeze them in with the orange juice and the rind; add some powdered su- gar sifted through a lawn sieve, and make it of the same thickness as you do for your lemon wafers, and dry them the same way with wafer paper.

No. 46. Bergamot Wafers.

SQUEEZE six lemons into a little pan; mix with them some double refined powdered sugar sifted through a lawn sieve, so as to make it of the same thickness as your lemon wafers; add some essence of bergamot, and mix it well with one white of an ^%%\ beat it till you see it is very white; if you find it grow too thick, squeeze one more lemon in, cind mind you do not make it too strong of the essence of bergamot, for


CONFECTIONFR. 31

if you do it will become bitter, and not pleasant to taste; then do them the same way as your lemon wafers. No. 47. Videt Waftrs,

TAKE six lemons and squeeze them in a little pan; add some fine powdered sugar sifted through a lawn sieve, and mix it with the juice, till it is as thick as your lemon wafers; put some essence of violets, be careful to get your essence very strong; put a little blue colour, so as to make it a very fine colour; if you iind it too thin, put a little more sugar into it, then spread it on the wafer paper, as your lemon wafers. No. 48. Pepfiermint Wafers.

TAKE six lemons, and squeeze them into a little pan; add some very fine sugar and one white of an egg, and beat it very well, so as to make it very white; put some of the strongest oil of peppermint into it, so as to make it strong enough to your palate, then do them the same as your lemon wafers.

No. 49. Bergamot Drops.

POUND and sift some sugar very fine; squeeze four or five lemons, and mix the juice and sugar togetjier with a wooden spoon; drop about twenty drops of the essence of bergamot into it, and mix it well with your spoon; stir it over your fire three or four minutes, drop them off your knife about the size of the orange and le- mon drops, and make tliem as round as you can, let them stand till cold, and tljey will come off well; they must be dropt on writing paper.

No. 50. Black Currant Drofis.

GET half a sieve of black currants, and put them in a pan; mash them with your spaddle, and put them over the fire; bring them just to a boil and pass them through a sieve over an eartiien pan, put wnat jelly comes from them in an earthen pipkin, and put it over the fire and let it boil for two hours, stir it all the time at bottom with your spaddle, or else it will burn; put in two pounds and a half of powdered sugar, mix it with the jam and stir it over the fire half an hour, drop it on pew- ter sheets or plates, in little drops from your knife, and put them in your hot stove, let them be there til! you find that they are quite dry, and then take them off with vour knife.


32 THE COMPLETE

No. 5 1 . Chocolate Drofis,

TAKE one pound and a half of chocolate, put it in your pewter sheet or plate, and put it in the oven just to warm the chocolate; then put it into a copper stew- pan, with three quarters of a pound of powdered sugar, mix it well over the fire, take it off, and roll it in pieces the size of small marbles, put them on white paper, and when they are all on, take the sheet of paper by each corner, and lift it up and down, so that the paper may touch the table each time, and by that means you will see the drops come quite flat, about the size of a six- pence, put some sugar nonpareils over them, and cover all that is on the paper, and then shake them off, and you will see all the chocolate drops are covered with the sugar nonpareils; let them stand till cold, and they will come off well, and then put them in your box papered. No. 52. Damson Drops.

PUT some damsons in the oven to bake but not so much as to break, then skin and stone them, and pass them through a sieve; sift some common loaf sugar through a lawn sieve, and mix with them, make it very thick, drop them off your knife on paper, put them in your stove to dry; when they are quite dry, turn them on a sieve, and wet the outside of the paper, and they will come off eaily; put them into the stove again till they are quite dry and hard, and then put them by in your papered box.

No. 53. Seville Orange Dro/is.

THIS is the same sort of paste as yiur Seville orange paste cakes are made of, only drop them off your knife on your plate, then put them in your hot stove, and when they are fit, take them off with a knife, turn them upside down on a sieve, and put them in the stove again for a day; then paper your box and put them in. No. 54. Lemon Drojis.

SQUEEZE the juice of six lemons into a brown pan or bason, take some double refined sugar, pound and sift it through a very fine lawn sieve; mix it with the lemon juice and make it so thick that you can hardly stir it; put it into a copper stew pan, with a wooden spoon stir it over the fire five minutes; then take it off and drop them off the point of a knife, of the same size


CONFECTIONER. 33

with the orange drops, and let them stand till cold, and they will comeoft'the paper.

M B. If you wait for their cooling put them out in some cool place: they must be dropt on writing paper. No. 55. Orange Drops.

RASP six China oranges very fine, squeeze them in a small pan or bason with the rind; squeeze two lemons with them, without rasping the rind, sift some powder- ed sugar and mix with the juice, make it of a fine thick- ness, put it over the fire in a small stew pan, and with a wooden spoon turn it for five minutes, then take it ofF the fire, and drop them off the point of a knife, as round as you can upon white paper about the size of a silver two pence; let them stand till they are cold and they will come off; then put them in your box. No. 56. Pefijiermint Drojis,

SQUEEZE three or four lemons into a bason, and mix some powdered sugar with the juice, the sugar must be sifted through a lawn sieve; make it of a proper thickness, and put some oil of peppermint in with it, as much as you think proper to your palate; make it of a proper thickness with sugar, put it in a saucepan and dry it over the fire, stirring it with a wooden spoon for five minutes, then drop them off a knife on your writing paper, the same size as the last receipt mentions, and let them stand till they are cold, and they will come off easily, then put them in your papered box. No. 57. Violet Drops

SQUEEZE six lemons, mix with them some pow- dered sugar sifted very fine; put into it two large spoons- ful of essence of violets and some blue colour, just enough to make it of a fine blue, viz. a little Prussian blue, pounded and mixed with a little gum water; mix all well together, and dry it over the fire, the same as the others, and drop them off a knife on paper the size of the others; let them stand till cold, do not make it too thin, before you put it over the fire to dry; when they are cold, put them in your papered box. No. 5 8. Barley Sugar Drops,

THESE are made the same way as we make the bar- ley sugar, only when boiled put the rind of one or two lemons in rasped, an^rop the syrup on the marble in


U THE COMPLETE

little round drops as big as a shilling; let them stand lill cold, then put them up in papers, and as you take them off the marble have some powdered sugar at the side of you, to put them in.

No. 59. Le?7io?i Prawlongs. TAKE some lemons, and peel the rind off in four quarters; take all the white off from the inside of the rind; cut the yellow rind in pieces, about one inch long and about the tenth part of an inch wide; have a pan of boiling syrup on the fire, and let it boil till it comes al- most to carimel, then put the prawlongs in, and stir them very much with a large wooden spoon till they are cold; put them in a large sieve, and shake them just to let the sugar that does not stick to them go through the sieve; lastly put them in your box, and keep them in a dry place.

No. 60, Orange Praivlongs. TAXE China oranges, and peel the rind off in four quarters; take all the white off from the inside of the rind; cut the yellow rind in pieces about one inch long, and about the tenth part of an inch wide; have a pan of boiling syrup on the fire, and let it boil till it comes al- most to a carimel; put the prawlongs in, and stir them very much v.'ith a large wooden spoon till they are cold; then put them in a large sieve, and shake them, just to let the sugar that does not stick to them go through the sieve; put them in your box, and keep them in a dry place.

No. 61. Pistachio Praivlongs^ Red, TAKE some pistachio kernals, and have a preser- ving pan on the fire with syrup; boil it till it comes al- most to carimel, put some cochineal in and the nuts; and stir them; when they come off the fire break them apart, let them have two coats of sugar, and see that they are of a fine colour, and do every thing according to the receipt of the burnt almonds.

No. 62. Burnt Filbert Prawlongs, Red. TAKE some Barcelona nuts and crack them, put the kernals into a copper pan or sheet, and put them in the oven to roast; have a pan with syrup boiling, and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel; put a little cochineal in a cup, when the sugar is boiled, add it t(^


CONFECTIONER. 35

it and the filberts, and stir them very much with a large wooden spoon, till you find the sugar is got hard round them; put them in a sieve, and separate them which stick together; have another pan, with syrup in, and boil it as before and as iiigh; put the same quantity of cochineal in, and mix them as before, because the second time you do them, the finer the colour will be, then put them in your box.

No. 63. Orange Flower Prarjlongs. TAKE orange flowers, pick the leaves asunder from each other, and see that they are quite dry; have a pre- serving pan with syrup on the fire and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel, then put your orange flowers in; stir them well with a large spoon, continue the stirring till they are cold, then put them in a sieve, and sift them, till you see the powder of the sugar all gone, then put them in your box, but do not put them in a damp place.

No. 64. Seville Orange Jumbles. TAKE some Seville oranges, and cut the rind of them as thin as possible, and the breadth of a silver three pence, and as round as you can; put them on a sieve into your stove; let them stand four or five hours; put some syrup over the fire, and let it boil a quarter of an hour; put your jumbles in the syrup, and give them three or four boils; drain your syrup from them, put them on a sieve in a hot stove, let them be there two or three days, till they are quite dry, then put them in your box and keep them dry. No. 65. Burju Almonds^ Red. TAKE some of the finest Jordan almonds you can get, sift all the dust from them, have some syrup boil- ing in a pai), and let it boil till it comes almost to cari- mel, put half a cup full of cochineal in; put the almonds in as fast as you can, and stir them till they are cold; then put them in your sieve and break those that stick together, from each other; then have another pan of syrup boiling, the same as before, and when they are cold, pick them from each other, for they must always have the coats of sugar on them; see that your cochin- eal is properly mixed, to make them of a fine colour, as you must put more cochineal in the last coat than you did in the first.


36 THE COMPLETE

No. 66. Burnt Almonds^ White. TAKE some of the finest Jordan almonds you can get, and sift all the dust from them; then have some syrup boiling in a pan, and let it boil till it comes al- most to carimel; put your almonds in and stir them till they are cold; pick them in your sieve, break them that stick together, and then have another pan of syrup boiling, the same as before, and give them two coats of sugar; when done pick tnem from each other. No. 67. Pistachio Prawlongs, White. TAKE some pistachio kernals, and have a preser- ving pan on the fire with syrup, and boil it till it comes almost to carimel; put in the nuts, stir them till they are all covered with sugar, and give them two coats, the same as burnt almonds, white.

No. 68. Burnt Filberts, White. TAKE some Barcelona nuts and crack them; put the kernels in a copper pan, or sheet, and put them in the oven to roast: then have a pan with syrup boiling, and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel; put your filberts in, stir them till they are all covered witii su- gar, and give them two coats as the burnt almonds, white.

No. 69. Merings in the form of Eggs. TAKE a half pint bason full of syrup, put it in a small stew pan, and boii it to what is called blow; then take the whites of three eggs, put them in another copper pan, and whisk them very strong; when your sugar is boiled, rub it against the sides of the pan with a table spoon; when you see the sugar change, and all white, quickly mix the whites of eggs with it, for if you are not quick your sugar will turn all to powder; when you have mixed it as light as possible, put in the rind of one lemon, stir it as little as possible; take a board about one foot wide, and eighteen inches long, and put one sheet. of paper on it; with your table spoon drop your batter in the shape of half an ^%%., sift a little pow- dered sugar over them before you put them in the oven: let your oven be of a moderate heat, watch them very close, let them rise, and just let the outside be a little hard but not brown, the inside must be moist; take them off with a knife, and put about half a tea


CONFECTIONER. 37

spoonful of rasberry or strawberry jam in the middle of theai; then put two of tliem together and they will be in the shape of an egg, but you must handle them very gently.

No. 70. Almond Pa.^te.

TAKE half a pound of sweet and one dozen of bit- ter almonds, and pound them so very fine that you can hardly perceive the least piece of almond in it; use water to povmd them witi), but do not make them too wet, for if you do it will be a long time before you can get them dry again; only just to keep them from oil- ing; take a small saucepan and a w coden spoon and put the paste in the saucepan, and half a pound of powder- ed sugar with it, nnx it well together, before you put it on a slow fire, keep rul>bing it with your wooden spoon in the pan, and be careful it does not burn, wl;ich it will if your spoon does not touch the bottom of tlie pan; wiien you find the paste does not stick to the pan, and comes altogether, tnen it is done. .A-^. B. Put a lit- tle flour on your dresser, that it may not stick. No. 7 1 . Orgeat Paste,

TAKE two pounds of sweet and one ounce of bitter almonds, pound them very fine with water; have two Cjuarts syrup boiling, and let it boil till it is come to blow; mix tlie almonds with it and stir it over the fire till it becomes very stiff, stir it all the time with aspad- die or else ii will burn at bottom; when cold put it in your pots, and tie a bladder over the paper. No. 72. Orgeat Syru/i.

TAKE eight ounces of sweet and one ounce of bitter almonds, pound them very fine, thtit you Ci^nnot feel one piece of almond in it; mix one quart of water,wine mea- sure, with it; strain it through a fine cloth; put in one gill of orange flower water, have two quarts of boiling syrup, and let it boil till it is alm.ost caiimel; mix what drains from the almonds with the syrup on the fiie, and let it boil till it becomes a fine syrup; put it into your bottles whilst w^arm; the next day cork them, and put bladders over the corks.

No. 7o, Lemon Syrup.

TAKE six lemons and rasp them very fine into a ba- son j squeeze the juice of one dozen of lemons to the D


38 THE COMPLETE

rind, and mix it well together with a spoon; take one quart of fine syrup, put it in a saucepan and let it boil till it is almost carimel; while your syrup is boiling, drain your lemon juice and rind through a fine sieve; take care that you put the juice to the syrup before it is carimel, or you will have your syrup too high; then let it boil three or four minutes, and observe that it is a fine syrup; when done take it off; let it stand a little time, and put it in your bottles while warm; the next day cork them, and tie bladders over the corks. No. 74. Orange Syrup..

TAKE eight China oranges, rasp them very fine in- to a bason; squeeze one dozen of China oranges and two lemons to the rind: mix it all together with a spoon in the bason; drain all the juice through a fine lawn sieve; take one quart of fine syrup, and boil it till it is almost carimel; put the juice to the syrup, but mind you make it a fine syrup; put it into your bottles, cork and bladder them the next day.

No. 75. Seville Orange Syrup.

TAKE one Seville orange, and rasp it very fine; squeeze eight Seville oranges and one lemon with the rind; mix it all well with the spoon; take one quart of fine syrup, and boil it till it is almost carimel; strain your juice through a fine sieve, and mix it well with your syrup, mind you make it a fine syrup; put in your bottles while a little warm; cork and bladder them the next day.

No. 7e>. Pine Apple Syrup.

DRAIN the syrup from your pine apple chips, when you are going to dry them that are preserved, as you will see in your receipt of pine apple chips; boil the syrup three or four times, and put it into your bottles while warm; cork and bladder them the next day. No. 77. Capillaire Syrup,

TAKE two quarts of fine syrup, and boil it to blow; boil twice or thrice two gills and a half of orange flower water, skimming it all the time; put it into your bottles, and cork it up the next day; put pieces of bladder over the corks, but mind that it is a fine syrup before yoii take it off.


CONFECTIONER. 39

No. 78. Currant Jelly, Red and White.

PUT your currants into a preserving pan, mash them and put them over the fire; when they are all broke and just upon the boil, take your spaddle and put them into a hair sieve; let all the juice drain through a flannel bag till it is quite fine, if it is not fine enough the first and seconcj time, put it through again; take as much sugar as you have got jelly, and let it boil almost to carimel, then put your jelly in, and let it boil ten minutes, skim it all the time; then take it off, mind it is a fine jelly, and put it in your glasses.

No. 79. RaHpberry Jtll\i^for Ices.

PUT your raspberries in the preserving pan; wash them well 'with your spaddle, put them over the fire, stirring them all the time they are on; when they are ready to boil take them off, and pass them through a hair sieve into a pan, letting no seed go through; put your jelly into another pan, and set it on the fire, and let it boil twenty minutes before you put the sugar in, stirring it ail the time, or else it will buin at bottom; put fourteen ounces of sugar to every pound of jelly, let it boil twenty minutes, stirring it all the time, when cold put it in a brown pan and pots; sift a little powdered sugar over it; let it stand one day and then cover it up; this jelly is good to make ice cream with.

No. 80. ^pfile Jelhji) to fiut over your fruit or ivhat you like.

TAKE one dozen and a half of russetings, pare and cut them into pieces into a preserving pan, and take the cores from them; cover them with water, and let them boil quite to a marmalade; put them in a hair sieve, let them drain; have as much syrup in another pan, as there comes jelly through the sieve, and let the syrup boil till italmost comes to carimel, put the jelly to the syrup, and let it boil ten minutes; then put it over your fruit, let it be hot.

No. 81. Hartshorn Jelly.

BOIL half a pound of hartshorn shavings in a gallon of water, till one third of the water is boiled away, then strain it off and let it stand till it is cold, melt it again, put in a little bit of orange and lemon peel just to colour it, skim it, well, and add half a pint of Rhenisli or white


40 THE COMPLETE

mountain wine, the juice of one lemon and a half, \vith half a pound of fine sugar; taste it, and if it is not sweet <^nough to your palate, add more; take the whites of six cg-jj^s, whisk them well and put them in; stir these to- i^ether, let it boii a little, take it oif, and add as much lemon juice as will sharpen it to your mind; pour this into your jelly bag, iirst putting in the whites of eggs, dud it will run the clearer, if it does not come clear the first time, pour it into the bag again, and it will come clearer into your glasses; let your bag hang near a fire to keep the jelly warm, till it all runs off; you may know when the liquor will jelly, if when it is on the fire, you lake out a little in a spoon and let it cool. No. 82. Calves Foot Jdly.

BOIL two calves feet in a gallon of water, till it comes to two quarts, strain it off and let it stand till cold, skimming off all the fat clean; take the jelly up clean fi'om the sediment; put the jelly into a saucepan with a point of mountain wine, half a pound of powdered su- gar, and the juice of four large lemons; whisk six or eight whites of eggs; put them in a saucepan, and stir them well with the jelly till it boils; let it boil a few min- utes; pour it into a large flannel bag, and it vail run through pretty quick, pour it again till it runs clear; get a large china bowl ready with two lemon peels rasp- ed as thin as possible; let the jelly run into that bowl, and the peels give it both a fine amber colour, and also a fine flavour; lastly put it into your glasses. No. 83. Black Currant Jelly.

PUT your black currants into a preserving pan over the fire; mash them with your spaddle and just let them boil; take them oft* and drain them through a very fine sieve; boil them a quarter of an hour; to every pound of currant jelly put fourteen ounces of powdered sugar; boil them ten minutes; put it in your pots; let it stand two days before you cover it up, and put brandy papers over the jelly before you tie tlie papers.

No. 84. Tomake Elo}no7ige.

TAKE one pint of milk and half a handful of picked isinglass; put the isinglass into the milk and boil i' till all ti.e isiui!:lass is melted; strain it through a sieve; pound four ounces of sweet, and six or seven bitter


CONFECTIONER. 2t

almonds very fine; put a little spice in your milk; when you boil it, mix your almonds with the milk to make it palatable; pass it throup^h a sieve again, put it in your moulds, and let it stand till it is cold.

No. 85. Goosbn^ry Jelly.

TAKE two quarts of green goosberries; and put to them two quarts of water; boil and mash them as they boil, until they are all to a mummy; drain all the juice from them through a flannel bag; when it is all drain- ed, take as much more syrup, as there is jelly from the goosberries; boil the syrup to blow; put the goosberry jelly into it and boil it about a quarter of an hour, and mind you make it a fine jelly.

No. 86. Rasberry Jam,

PUT the rasberries into a large copper pan, stir them well at the bottom of the pan with a large spaddle about three feet long; mash the rasberries as much as you can; put them over the fire and keep stirring them all the time; when you find they are almost ready to boil, take them off; have a large hair sieve over another pan and pass the rasberries through the sieve; the hair of the sieve must be large enough to let all the seeds of the rasberries through; mind there is no pieces of ras- berries left; put them over the fire and stir them with your spaddle; let the rasberries boil half an hour, stir- ring them well from the bottom as they boil, to prevent them from burning; put in fourteen ounces of powder- ed sugar to every pound of rasberries; take them off the fire; mix them well together and boil the sugar and the rasberries together half an hour; sift some powdered sugar over the tops of the pan before they are covered- No. 87. Afiricot Jam.

GET the ripest apricots you can, cut them to piecea and take the stones from them; put them into a large copper preserving pan, and mash them as much as you can; put them over the fire to warm, mashing them all the time; pass them through a cullender and keep' forcing them with a small pestle; when they are all broke put them over the fire and just let them boil for ten minutes, stirring them all the time; then put fif- teen ounces of sugar to every pound of apricots; let D 2 '


42 THE COMPLETE

them boil together half an hour, stirring them all the time with your spacldlethat it may not burn at bottom; "when it is boiled enough put it into brov.n pans; when cold put some apple jelly over the top of them, and brandy papers over tlie jelly before you cover them, and let them stand two days before you put them by. No. 88. Straivbcrry Jam.

PICK the stalks from the strawberries, and put them into a large copper preserving pan; mash them with your spaddle to break them as much as you can; put them over the fire, make them quite hot, almost to . boil; pass them through a very fine cullender; boil the strawberries you have past twenty minutes, stirring them all the time with your spaddle; weigh your straw- berries; and allow fifteen ounces of powdered sugar to every pound of strawberries; put in the sugar and boil them together, stirring them from the bottom, (else they will burn) for half an hour over the fire; fill your pans and sift some powdered sugar on the tops of them before you put them by, and the next day put papers over them.

No. 89. Barberry Jam.

PICK your barberries from the stalks, and put them into an earthen pan, then into the oven to bake; when baked pass them through a sieve with a large wooden spoon, taking care there are no skins of the barberries in it; weigh the barberries, and to every two pounds of barberries allow two pounds and a half of powdered su- gar; mix the sugar and the barberries together, and put it in your pans, covering it up; set it in a dry place but when you have filled your pans with it, sift a little powdered sugar over the tops of them. No. 90. Ptach Jam.

GET the ripest peaches, stone and bruise them; put them in a preserving pan and let them boil; mash them very much, stirring them with your spaddle; when they are soft pass them through a large sieve; pound some bitter almonds with powdered sugar to keep them from oiling; put half an ounce of them to a pound of jam; put the jam and almonds over the fire and boil them a (juartcr of an hour; add ten ounces of powder- ed sugar to evei'v pound of jam; mix the sugar and


CONFECTIONER. 43

the jam together, boil it half an hour, stirring it all the time from the bottom, else it will burn; when it is biol- ed enough, put it into your pot or p.ms, and when cold put some apple jelly over it, and brandy paper over that. No. 91. Black Plum Jam.

GET the ripest black muscle plums you can, cut them to pieces, stone them and put them into a large copper pan; bruise them as mwch as you can with your spaddie; warm them over the fire till they are soft; pass them through a cullender with a pestle and get as much through as you can; boil it one hour, stirring it from the bottom all the time, or else it will burn; put six ounces of powdered sugar to every pound of jam;• take it off the fire and mix it well, put it over the fire ten minutes, then take it off and put it in brown pans sif- ting some powdered sugar over it.

No. 92. Rasberry Cakes.

TAKE one pound of rasberry jam, one pound of pow- dered sugar, and mix them well together, with your spoon; have some small pieces of tin made in round rings about the size of a half crown piece, and about a quarter of an inch deep, and have a piece of wire fixed to the ring to lay hold by; then have a pewter sheet or plate, put your ring on it and fill it with your jam, stroke it over the top of it with your knife, have a pin and pull it along all the inside of the ring and lift the ring up and the cakes will stick to the plate; put them into your stove, and let them be there until the next day; then take them off with your knife and turn them; put them on a sieve and let them be until the next day, and when you find they are well dried, put them into your box. No. 93. Seville Orange Paste Cakes.

CUT one dozen of Seville oranges into halves, and squeeze them into a brown pan; put the peels into a pan of water and let them boil until they are quite soft; take them out and scoop all the inside out of them; pound the peels in a mortar, then take one dozen and a half of hirge apples, pare and cut them into pieces into a preserving pan; add to them tiie juice of the orantjes and water enough to cover the apples, and let them boil till they come to marmalade; pass it through a sieve with a spoon, likewise pass tne oraage peels that are


44 THE COMPLETE

pounded through a sieve; mix the apples and oranges together; ha^'e as much syrup in another preserving pan as you have got jam; boil the sugar until it is nearly carimel; mix it with your jam, stirring them well to- gether; put it over the fire ten minutes, stirring it all the time with your spoon; take your heart tin moulds, or any shape you like, and place them on your pewter sheets or plates; fill them with your paste, put them into a hot stove, and let them stand till you find the mould will come off easily, and without the jams run- ning; take them off and place them in a sieve and put them in your stove until they are quite dry, then let them lay in your stove one day.

No. 94. Millefruit Rock Candy.

FIRST get a tin box one foot long and eight or nine inches wide, and six wires made to go into this tin; the tin box must be made rather smaller at bottom than at top, let there be a hole at the bottom about the size of a common quart bottle cork, and when you put any thing in put a cork in this hole; put a layer of paste knots at bottom and a layer of angelica knots; put a wire between every layer to keep them hollow, go on with layers of any thing you have got that is well dried and hard; have a pan of syrup and let it boil till it comes to blow, then pour it over them in the tin box and let it stand three hours in a very hot stove; then pull out the cork at bottom and put the box on one side for all the syrup to run out; let it stand half an hour in the stove, then take them out and you will find it will be candied all round them, then put them into your papered box. No. 95. Rock Sugar of all Colours.

TAKE a pint of syrup, and put it into a pan and boil it almost to carimel; have a white of an c^^ in a little pot and mix a little powdered sugar with it, make it very thick with a tea-spoon; take your syrup off the fii-e, put the egg and sugar into the boiling syrup; stir it jpcjund very much in the pan with a large spoon; have a sieve papered, you must be very quick alDout it or it ¦will come over the pan; pour it into your sieve, when cold it will be hard like a rock; and when you want to vary the coiour, mix that colour you fancy with your Gggs and sugar.


CONFECTIONER. 45

No, 96. Barley Sugar.

TAKE a small stev/pan, put some syrup into it and boil it till it comes to carimel; rub a little butter on a marble stone just to greese it that it may not stick; then take your saucepan by the handle and let the syrup run out of the spout along the stone in long sticks; twist it (while it is hot) at each end and let it stand till cold.

No. 97. The ivaij to make all sorts of Carranvay Coivjits, I TAKE some fine carraway seeds, sift all the du&t from them, and have a large copper preserving pan about two feet wide and with two handles, and tw o pieces of iron made as a ring on each side, then you must have a pulley fixed to the beam and a cord with a hook to each end so as to fix it at each side of the pan to l^t the pan sling; then have some fine starch as white as you can get and just soften it, boil some syrup a quarter of an hour and mix it with the starch; t.;ke some gum. arabic, put it into some water, then put that into another pan and make it just warm; have an iron pot with char- coal fire under the large pan, but not too liot, only just enough to keep the pan warm; have a large tub to put your pot of fire at bottom and your large pan must be on the top; put the carraway seeds into your pan; add a large ladle full of gum arabic, rub them with your hands until you find they are ail dry; then put the ladle full of starch and syrup, and do the same over your pan of fii-e until you find they are all dry; put the gum only three or four times totaem at fivst, then tae starch and sugar, but boil your syrup more as you find they come to coat with it and not so much starch; when you have dried them seven or eight times put them into your sieve; put them into the stove, do them tue next day, and so for six or seven days successively. No. 98. Cardamom Comjirs,

GET your cardamoms at the chemists, and they will be in a shell; put them in your oven just to dry tlse skins, and they will break; pick all the seeds from them, put the seeds into your large comfit pan and have a fire under the same us for others; mix your gum, starch and syrup, and do them the same about the pan with your hands.


46 THE COMPLETE

No. 99. CaHmel Crocont.

TAKE your copper crocont top and butter it all over, then have some syrup boiling in a stew pan; let it boil until it comes to carimel, take the pan off, dip a three pronged fork into the syrup or from the spout of the pan; and you will see strings hang to the fork; move the fork to and fro over the crocont until you quite cover it thick, have your little dish of sweetmeats under; take this crocont off the mould, and when cold put it over the sweetmeats and handle it very lightly. No. 100. Whip for a Tnfie.

TAKE one pint of cream, put it in a freezing pot, put the pot into a little ice in an ice-pail, and whisk your cream with a whisk; mix your wine and rind of an orange in another bason, and the juice of an orange and sugar according to your palate; put your cream in and mix it, then pour all the liquor into a dish that your trifle is to be in and pour the froth of the cream over it, and put what your fancy likes to garnish it with \ add different coloured sugar nonpareils and some small biscuit of different sorts. No. 101. E-uerlasting Whipsylabub to fiut into glasses,

TAKE fiv^e iialf pints of thick cream, half a pint of Rhenish wine, half a pint of sack, and the juice of two large Seville orany;es; rasp in the yellow rind of three lemons, and a pound of douljle refined sugar well pounded and sifted; mix all together with a spoonful of orange flower water, beat it well together with a whisk half an hour, then with a spoon fill your glasses. This win keep above a week, it is much the better for being made the day before it is used.

No. 102. Floating Island^ a pretty dish for the middle of a iahle^ at a Second Course^ or for a Supfier.

TAKE a soup dish according to the size and quan- tity you would wish to make, but a deep glass dish is the best, put it on a china dish; first take a quart of the thickest cream you can get, make it sweet with fine powdered sugar; pour in a gill of fine mountain and rasp the yellow rind of lemon in; whisk your cream very strong as carefully as you can; pour the thin from the froth into a dish; take some Naples biscuits and cut them as thin as possible, lay a layer of then as light


CONFECTIONER. 47

as possible on the cream, then a layer of currant jelly, again a layer of Naples biscuits, over that put your cream that you saved; put as much as you can make the dish hold, without running over; garnish the out- side with sweetmeats and what else you like. No. 103. Iceing for a Rich Cake.

TAKE six whites of eggs and whisk them very strong; then have a pint of syrup in a small stewpan, and let the syrup boil until it comes to blow through your skimmer; work it about the pan with a spoon, when it is all white and is a great deal thicker, mix the whites of eggs together, make it very thick, put it over your cakes and put them into your stove; let them dry, then put another coat over them; make it as smooth as you possibly can and let it dry in your stove. No. 104. To Clarify Sugar for Siveetmeatf{.

TAKE a large deep copper pan and break two eggs into it, then whisk it as you pour the pan half full of clear water, so as to make it like soap suds; put two large loaves of sugar into it, and put it over the fire; take a large skimmer, stir it till it is all melted, if you stir it longer your syrup will not be clear; be careful it docs not boil over into the fire, for it is dangerous, as it may set the house on fire; when you find it begins to boil and the scum rises, take it off the fire, but do not stir it till it has stood half an hour; then you will find that all the scum will come to the top; take a large skimmer and take it off clean; put it on the fire, let it boil twenty minutes, skimming it all the time; strain it throug-h a flannel bag very clean; put it into a pan or a large stone jar, and use it as you want it to your fruits.

No. 105. Cedraty Essence.

GET the Cedraties at the Italian warehouses, rasp the rind of them all round very fine; put it in a large marble niorter, and allow for every quarter of a pound, two pounds of powdered sugar; mix it well with a large spaddle till you find it is all of a colour and that the rind is well mixed; put it into a stone jar, and squeeze it down as hard as you can; put a bladder over the paper you cover it with and tie it over quite tight; put it by, and in one montli it will be fit to us^.


48 THE COMPLETE

No. 106. Lemon Essence.

RASP your lemons all round very thin, and allow lor every quarier of a pound of rind one pound of sugar; mix it tiie very same way you do tlie essence of ced- raties, put it into a stone jar, and bladder it up the same "vvay.

No. 107. Orange Essence.

TAKE one dozen and a naif of china oraiiges, rasp them all round and squeeze six of them in with the riiKl; mix it well lii a bason, let three pints of syrup bull about twenty minutes; iiiix the orange rind and juice, ana just give it a boii»or two, and wiien cold put it in bottles and cork it up.

No. 108. Lemonade.

RASP two lemons and squeeze six, put to them three gills ol syrup and the rest water; taste it, and if it is not to your palate, alter and mend it till it is right; then strain it through a lawn sieve, and put it in your glasses for use.

No. 109. Orangeade.

TAKE eight China oranges and rasp four of them; squeeze the eight and three lemons to the rind; put about two gills of syrup irito it and the rest water; taste it, and if you find it not rich enough put some syrup to it, and squeeze more oranges in according to your pal- ate; and if not sour enough, squeeze in one more le- mon; strain it through a lawn sieve, and it is fit for use.

No. 110. Currant Water made of Jelly.

TAKE two large spoonsful of currant jelly, and mix it with a little warm water, then put one gill of syrup, squeeze two or three lemons in and let the rest be wa- ter; taste and make it to your palate, putting a little cochineal in to make it of a fine colour; strain it through a sieve, and it is fit for use.

No. 111. Freyfi Currant Water.

TAKE a quart of fresh currants and squeeze them through a sieve with your hand; put two large wooden spoonsful of powdered sugar and one lemon in it, and the rest water; n ake it to your palate; strain it through a sieve and it is fit for use.


CONFECTIONER. 49

No. 112o Cedraty Water.

TAKE a large wooden spoonful of the essence of cedraty, put it in a bason, squeeze three lemons; add three gills of syrup and all the rest water; make it to your palate, mind that all the essence is melted; and if it is not rich enough put more syrup in; pass it through your lawn sieve, and it is fit for use

No. 113. Rasberry Water of Rasberry Janu

TAKE two large spoonsful of jam; put it into a ba- son; squeeze six lemons in, and let the rest be water; put a little cochineal to colour it, put in a little syrup to make it palatable; pass it through your sieve, and be careful all the seeds are clean out, it is then fit for use. No. 114. Fresh Rasberry Water.

TAKE one pint of fresh rasberries, and pass them through a sieve with a wooden spoon; put two large spoonsful of powdered sugar in, squeeze one lemon in, and let the rest be water; make it palatable, and put a little cochineal in to colour it; pass it through a sieve and it is fit for use.

No. 115. Bergamot Water.

SQUEEZE six lemons, and to that add three gills of syrup, and let the rest be water; mind you make it rich before you put the essence in; when it is to your taste, put a tea spoonful of essence of bergamot in; pass it through a sieve, and it is fit for use. No. 116. Apricot Water.

TAKE two large spoonsful of apricot jam, and one gill of syrup; squeeze four lemons, put a handful of bitter almonds pounded and a little powdered sugar in the jam, so as to make it have the same bitter taste as the kernals of the apricots; let the rest be water, and make it palatable; pass it through a very fine lawn sieve, 'and it is fit for use.

No. 117. Straivberry Water of Strawberry Jam.

TAKE two large spoonsful of strawberry jam, squeeze three lemons, and add one gill of syrup and the rest v/ater to make it palatable, pass it through a lawn sieve, and it is fit for use.

No. 118. Fresh Strawberry Water,

TAKE one pottle of strawberries and pick the stalks from them; pass them through a sieve with your E


so THE COMPLETE

wooden spoon; and put in two large spoonsful of pow- dered sugar; squeeze one lemon and let the rest be water; make it palatable, pass it through a sieve, and it is fit for use.

No. 119. Barbei-ry Water.

TAKE two large spoonsful of barberry jam, and put them in a bason; squeeze two lemons, put in one gill of syrup and the rest water; put a little cochineal in, and if you find it not rich enough, put a little more sy- rup, make it palatable, pass it through a sieve, and it is fit for use.

No. 120. Peach Water.

TAKE two large spoonsful of peach jam in a bason; put one handful of bitter almonds with a little powder- ed sugar; squeeze five lemons, put in two gills of sy- rup and let the rest be water; make it palatable, pass it through a sieve with a spoon, and it is fit for use. No. 121. Pear Water.

GET some large pears, rasp them into a bason; if your pears are large four will be sufficient, if small, six or eight; squeeze six lemons, put in four gills of syrup and let the rest be water; make it rich and palatable, pass it through a lawn sieve, and it is fit for use. No. 122. Cherry Water.

TAKE one pound of Kentish cherries, pound them in a mortar so as to break the kernels of them; take the cherries and kernels, put them into a bason and add four gills of syrup; squeeze four lemons in, and let the rest be water; make it palatable, pass it through a sieve, and it is fit for use.

No. 123. Orgeat.

Take six ounces of sweet and one dozen bitter al- monds; pouti'l tljem very fine, so that you cannot feel one piece of ahnond; mix one quart of water with them, strain it through a lawn sieve, and put one gill of orange flower water to it, and it is fit for use.


CONFECTIONER. 51


ICE CREAMS OF ALL SORTS,


' No. 124. Barberry Ice Cream.

TAKE a large wooden spoonful of barberry jam and put into a bason with one pint of cream; squeeze one lemon in, mix it well; add a little cochineal to colour it; put it into your freezing pot and cover it over; put the freezing pot into a pail and some ice all round the pot; throw a good deal of salt on the ice in the pail, turning the pot round for ten minutes; then open your pot, and scrape it from the sides, cover it up again, and keep turning it for some time, till your cream is like butter, and as thick; put it in your moulds, put them into a pail and cover it with ice and salt three quarters of an hour, till you find the water is come to the top of the pail; do not be sparing of salt, for if you do not use enough it will not freeze; dip your mould into water, and turn it out on your plate to send to table.

No. 125. Rasberrij Ice Cream.

TAKE a large spoonful of rasberry jam; put it into a bason and squeeze one lemon in; add a pint of cream and a little cochineal to colour it; pass it through a sieve into a bason; put it into your freezing pot, and do as above directed in your barberry ice cream. No. 126. Stra%vberry Ice Cream.

TAKE a large spoonful of strawberry jam; add a pint of cream and a little cochineal; put it into your freezing pot, and follow the first directions of your ras- berry cream.

No. 127. AfiHcot Ice Cream.

TAKE one spoonful of apricot jam; put it into a ba- son and squeeze one lemon in; take a handful of bitter almonds pounded with a little powdered sugar, put them all to a pint of cream and put it into your freezing pot.^^


52 THE COMPLETE

No. 128. Pine Jfiple Ice Cream.

TAKE one gill and a half of pine apple syrup, put it into a bason and squeeze in one lemon and a half; add one pint of cream, make it palatable, then put it into your freezing pot and freeze it till it is as thick as butter; if you would have it in the shape of a pine, take the shape and fill it; then lay half a sheet of brown pa- per over the mould before you put it into the ice; and let it remain some time, and be careful no water gets into the shape.

No. 129. Currant Ice Cream.

TAKE one large spoonful and a half of currant jelly, put it into a bason with half a gill of syrup; squeeze in one lemon and a half; add a pint of cream and a little cochineal, then pass it through a sieve, and freeze it as the others.

No. 130. Pistachio Ice Cream,

BREAK '^ix es-ers into ?. paii; and beat them well w ith a wonfler. spoon: put in a pint of cream, bc^t that well with the eggs, and put in the rind of a lemon, one gill and a half of syrup, and a little cinr,ainon and mace, boil it and stir it all the time, else it will burn, let it boii tiii you nnu ic grows thick and comes to a curd; then take it off; mix four ounces of pistachio nuts blanched and pounded very fine in a mortar with the custard; pass it through a sieve, and put it into your freezing pot.

No. 131. Biscuit Ice Cream.

BREAK six eggs into a stewpan and beat them well with a wooden spoon; add one pint of cream, the rind of one lemon, two gills of syrup and a little spice; boil it till you find it just thickens, stirring it all the time; crumble some Naples biscuits and ratafia biscuits; pass them through a sieve with the other ingredients, and put it in your freezing pot.

No. 132. Plain Ice Cream.

PUT one pint of cream into a freezing pot in a little ice, whisk it about till it hangs about the whisk, then tak$ the whisk out and put as much powdered sugar as will lay on half a crown; stir and scrape it about with your ice scraper till you find it all frozen; put it into youc mould, and put them in your ice to take the shape.


CONFECTIONER. 45

No. 133. Brotmi Bread Ice Cream.

DO the same with a pint of cream as in the plain ice cream, only when you have frozen it, rasp two handfuls of brown bread and put it in before you put it into your moulds.

No. 134. Royal Ice Cream.

TAKE the yolks of ten eggs and two whole eggs, beat them up well with your spoon; then take the rind of one lemon, two gills of syrup, one pint of cream, a little spice, and a little orange flower water; mix them well and put them over the fire, stirring them all the time "with your spoon; when you find it grows thick take it off, and pass it through a sieve; put it into a freezing pot, freeze it, and take a little citron, and lemon and or- ange peel with a few pistachio nuts blanched; cut them all and mix them with your ice before you put them, in your moulds.

No. 135. Ginger Ice Cream.

TAKE four ounces of ginger preserved, pound it and put it into a bason, with two gills of syrup, a lemoa squeezed, and one pint of cream; then freeze it. No. 136. Fresh Strawberry Ice Cream,

TAKE one pint of fresh strawberries, pick the stalks from them and pass them through a sieve with your wooden spoon; put four ounces of powdered sugar to them, and one pint of cream, freeze it, Sec.

No. 137. Fresh Rasberry Ice Cream.

TAKE one pint of rasberries, pass them through a sieve; put five ounces of powdered sugar and a pint of cream, then freeze it.

No. 138. Fresh Afiricpt Ice Cream.

TAKE four ounces of the ripest apricots you can get, pass them through a sieve with your wooden spoon, with four ounces of powdered sugar and one pint of cream, and freeze it.

No. 139. Coffee Ice Cream.

TAKE one ounce of coffee whole, and put it in a stewpan with one pint of cream; put it over the fire and let it simmer and boil ten menutes or a quarter of an hour; drain all the coffee from it, break four eggs into a pan and add one gill and a half of syrup; beat them well up together, put the cream that comes fromi


^4 THE COMPLETE

the coffee into it; give it a boil, stir it all the time, passi it through the sieve and freeze it.

No. 140. Chocolate Ice Cream.

TAKE one ounce and a half of chocolate and warm it over the fire; take six eggs, one i^ill of syrup, and one pint of cream; put it over the fi/e till it begins to thicken; mix the chocolate in, pass it through a sieve and freeze it.

No. 141. Seville Oran.^e Ice Cream.

RASP the rind of one Seville orange into a bason, and squeeze three, and two lemons; add two gills of syrup and one pint of cream; mix it well, pass it through a sieve, and freeze it.

No. 142. Lemon Ice Cream.

RASP one lem.on and squeeze three or four; add two gills of syrup and one pint of cream; mix it all to- gether, pass it through a sieve, and freeze it. No. 43. China Orange Ice Cream.

RASP one China orange, squeeze four, and one le- mon and a half; put in two gills of syrup and one pint of cream; pass it through a sieve and freeze it. No. 144. Burnt Filbert Ice Cream.

ROAST some Barcelona nuts well in the oven, and pound them a little with some cream; put four eggs into a stewpan, with one pint of cream and two gills of syrup; boil it till it grows thick, pass it through a sieve and freeze it; then mix your filberts with it be- fore you put it in your moulds.

No. 145. BAirnt Ice Cream.

TAKE six eggs, one gill of syrup, and one pint of cream; boil it over the fire until it becomes thick; then have two ounces of powdered sugar in another stewpan, and put it over tlie fire; let it burn till all melts, stirring it all the time, and when you see it is burnt of a fine brown, pour the other in, mix it quickly, pass it through a sieve and freeze it.

No. 146. Milk fruit Ice Cream,

TAKE two gills of syrup, squeeze three lemons, put in a pint of cream, and freeze it; cut some lemon peel, a little orange peel, and a little angelica, into small pieces \ wheuitis frozen ready to put into the moulds^.


CONFECTIONER. S3

put in your sweetmeats with a little cochineal: mix your ingredients well, but not the cochineal, as it nuist appear only here and there a little red, then put it into the mould.

No. 147. Fresh Gurra?it Ice Cream.

TAKE one pint of currants, pass them through a sieve with five ounces of powdered sugar and a pint of cream, then freeze it.

No- 148. Cedraty Ice Cream.

TAKE two large spoonsful of essence of cedraty, put it into a bason, squeeze in three lemons and add one pint of cream; observe that all the essence is melt- ed, then pass it through a sieve and freeze it. No. 149. Burnt Almond Ice Cream.

THIS ice is done in the same manner as the filbert ice cream.

No. 150. Parmasan Cheese Ice Cream.

TAKE six eggs, half a pint of syrup, and a pint of cream; put them into a stewpan and boil tliem until it begins to thicken; then rasp three ounces of Parma- san cheese, mix and pass them through a sieve, and freeze it.

No. 151. Damson Ice Cream.

TAKE three ounces of preserved damsons, pound them and break the stones of them, put them into a ba- son, squeeze in two lemons, and a pint of cream; press them through a sieve, and freeze it.

No. 152. Prunello Ice Cream.

PUT five eggs into a pan with two gills of syrup and one pint of cream; boil it over the fire till it comes thick, then put as much prunello spice as will make it palatable; then pass it through a sieve and freeze it. No. 153. Peach Ice Cream.

TAKE one large spoonful of peach jam, add one handful of bitter almonds pounded v/ith sugar, squeeze one or two lemons, and put in a pint of cream; then pass it through a sieve and freeze it.

No. 154. Black Currant Ice Crea7n.

TAKE one large spoonful of black currant jelly, squeeze one lemon in, and add a pint of cream j pass it and freeze it.


56 THE COMPLETE

No. 155. Cheney Ice Crta?yi. TAKE half a pound of preserved cherries, pound them stones and all; put them into a bason with one gill of syrup, squeeze in one lemon and add a pint of oream j pass it through a sieve, and freeze it»


CONFECTIONER. 5?


WATER ICES OF ALL SORTS.


No. 156. Barberry Water Ice.

TAKE a large spoonful of barberry jam, put it into a bason, squeeze in one lemon, add a pint of water and a little cochineal to colour it; pass it through a sieve and freeze it; be very careful that it freezes thick and smooth like butter before you put it in your moulds. No. 157. Raster ry Water Ice.

TAKE a large spoonful of rasberry jelly or jam; put into a bason, squeeze in one lemon, add a pint of ^.viitci- and a little cochineal, and pass it through a sieve; if you make it roith jam, be careful not to let any of the seeds get into your ice; let it freeze rich like but« ter, which if it does not you must add a little more sy° rup, and then freeze it.

No. 158. Strawberry Water Ice.

TAKE a large spoonful of strawberry jam, put it in- to your bason; squeeze in one lemon, add a pint of water and a little cochineal, and if it does not freeze rich enough, add a little more syrup and freeze it. No. 159. A/iricot Water Ice,

TAKE a large spoonful of apricot jam, put it into a bason, squeeze one lemon in, add a pint of water, and put to them one handful of bitter almonds pounded fine, with a little sugar; pass them through a sieve, and freeze it rich and thick.

No. 160. Fine Apple Water Ice.

TAKE two gills of pine apple syrup, squeeze two lemons in, add a point of water; it must be rich and freeze thick; if you want to have it to the shape of a pine, close it well and cover your shape with a sheet of paper before you put it in the ice; let it lie for one hour covered with the ice and salt before you turn it out,.


58 THE COMPLETE

No. 161. Chocolate water Ice.

TAKE three ounces of chocolate, warm it and mix half a gill of syrup with a pint of water; mix it well and freeze it thick.

No. 162. Seville Orange Water Ice.

TAKE the rind of two Seville oranges off very fine and thin; squeeze them into a bason with one lemon; add two gills of syrup and half a pint of water; pass them through a sieve and freeze them I'ich. No. 163. China Orange Water Ice.

RASP one China orange, squeeze in three and one lemon, put in two gills of syrup and half a pint of wa- ter; pass it, and freeze it rich and thick. No. 1 64. Lemon Water Ice.

RASP one lemon, squeeze three, and put in two gills of syrup and half a pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich.

No. 165. Pu7ich Water Ice.

PARE the rind very thin off one Seville orange, you are not to rasp it; put your parings into a bason, squeeze in two oranges and one lemon, pul in two gills of syrup and half a pint of water, mix it and pass it; freeze it rich; when frozen and mixed well with your spoon, put as much rum in as you think will make it agreeable to the palate, but when you put the rum in, take the freezing pot out of the ice while you mix it, which must be well done before you put it into the moulds.

No. 166. Peach Water Ice.

TAKE a large spoonful of peach jam,putit into aba- son with a large handful of bitter almonds pounded fine, one gill of syrup, and one pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich.

No. 167. Currant Water Ice.

TAKE a large spoonful and a half of currant jelly, put it into a bason, squeeze two lemons, add half a gill of syrup and a pint of water; then freeze it rich. No. 168. Fresh CurraJit Water Ice,

TAKE a. pint of currants, pass them through a sieve, put in four ounces of powdered sugar and one pint of Water; pass it and freeze it rich.


CONFECTIONER. 59

No. 169. Fresh Rasberry Water Ice.

TAKE half a pottle of rasberries, pass them through a sieve, then put in five ounces of powdered sugar and a pint of water, pass it and freeze it. rich. No. 170. Damson Water Ice.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of preserved damsons and break the stones, put them into a bason, squeeze in one lemon, add almost a pint of water and half a gill of syrup; pass it through a sieve and freeze it rich. No. 171. Prunello Water Ice.

PUT two gills of syrup into a bason; squeeze in three lemons, half a pint of water, and as much pru- nello spice as will make it palatable; press it and freeze it rich.

No. 172. Blackcurrant Water Ice,

TAKE one large spoonful of black currant jelly, put it into a bason; squeeze in two lemons, and add a gill of syrup and half a pint of water j puss it and freeze it rich.

No. 173. Gra/ie Water Ice.

TAKE two handsful of elder flowers, put them into a pot, boil a pint of water and pour it over them, cover them close; then take two gills of syrup and the juice of three lemons; drain all tlie water from the flowers, add it to the rest, make it palatable, pass it and freeze it; when it is frozen, put it in the shape of a bunch of grapes, close it well and cover the mould with half a sheet of paper; then put it into the ice and salt for one hour before you turn it out.

No. 174. Cherry Water Ice.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of preserved cherries sweet; pound them in a morter just to break the stones; then put them into your bason, squeeze in two lemons, add on gill of syrup, a pint of water and a little cochi- neal; mix them well together; pass them, and freeze it rich.

No. 175. Pear Water Ice.

SQUEEZE three lemons into a bason, add two gills of syrup, and a half a pint of water; rasp four large French pears into it; mix them well and make it pala- table, pass it through a lawn sieve and freeze it rich j


60 THE COMPLETE

put it into the shape of the pear, and cover the moulds ¦with paper before you put them in the ice. No. 176. Mill: fruit Water Ice.

SQUEEZE three lemons into a bason, add two gills of syrup and half a pint of water; freeze it rich, then cut some preserved orange and lemon peel with a little angelica in small pieces; put them with the ice, which must be like butter before they are put in; pass it through a sieve before you freeze it, or put your sweet- meats in, then put a little cochineal in, but you are not to mix that much, only to be a little red here and there, as if to run in veins in the ice, but observe you do this before you put it into the moulds.

No. 177. Bergamot Water Ice,

SQUEEZE three lemons into a bason, add two gills of syrup, half a pint of water and half a tea spoonful of essence of bergamot, pass it and freeze it rich before you put it into your moulds.

No. 188. Cedraty Water Ice.

TAKE four ounces of essence of cedraty, put it into a bason, squeeze in three lemons, and add two gills of syrup, and half a pint of water; then pass it through a sieve, freeze it rich, and if you would have it in the shape of the cedraty, after you have filled your mould, close it well and cover it with half a sheet of brown pa- per before you put it in the ice.

No. 179. Fresh Strawberry Water Ice.

TAKE half a pottle of strawberries, pick the stalks from them, pass them through a sieve, put in five ounces of powdered sugar and one pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich, if it does not freeze rich put some syrup in.


CONFECTIONER. 61


FRUITS PRESERVED IN BRANDY.


No. 180. Aiiricots.

GET the best apricots you can of the palest colour cind clear from spots, but not too ripe; put theni in a pan of water, cover them over with paper and put them over a very slow fire; let them simmer till you find they are soft, then take them out; put them in a large table cloth four or five double, and cover them up close; then have soiViC of the best Fiencii brundy, it must not be coloured, but clear like water; and put ten oonces of powdered sugar to every quart of brandy; let the sugar melt, then put your apricots u;to a glass jar, fill it up with your brandy and cover it up very close with leather and bladder, now and then keep filling up your jar with brandy, for the apricots suck up a good deal; if you do not cover them close the apricots will lose their colour.

No. 181. Pt aches.

GET some of the finest peaches, free from ail spot colour, what is called the white heart pe^ch; they come in the last in season; scald them in a stevv pan of water, take them out when soft, and put them in a large table cloth four or five double; put ten ounces of powdered sugar to every quart of French brandy, white, let your sugar melt and stir it well; put your peaches into a glass jar, and pour your brandy over them; cover them very close with leather and bladder, and observe to keep your jar filled with brandy. N. B. Mix your brandy and sugar before you scald your peaches. No. 182. Morclla Cherries.

GET some of the finest Morclla cherries; cut the stalks and leaves from them about half an inch long and put them in your glass jar; put ten ounces of powder- ed sugar to every quart of brandy j when the sugar is


62 THE COMPLETE

dissolved pour it over your cherries, cover it close with the leather and bladder, and keep filling it up. No. 183. Mogul Plums. TAKE some preserved Mogul plums and drain all the syrup from them, put them into your jar, put five ounces of sugar to every quart of brandy; when the sugar is melted pour it over your plums, and cover it close as before directed.

No. 184. Green Gages. TAKE some preserved green gages, and use the same method as your last receipt directs. No. 185. Green Or avge Plums. TAKE some preserved green orange plums and use the same method as before directed. No. 186. Grapes. TAKE some preserved grapes, and use the sam<^ method as before directed.


CONFECTIONER. 45


PRESERVED SWEETMEATS, WET.


No. 187. Green Afiricots^ wet.

TAKE green apricots when they are the size of a ^mall wainiit, put them in a bag with a great deal of salt, and shake them in it just for the salt to take off the silkiness of the skin; then take them out, put them into a large pan with water, place them over a slow fire just to scald them, and when you find they grow soft, then have a flat preserving pan with a very thin syrup boiling in it; but before you put them in, drain the apri- cots well from the water through a sieve; when the syrup boils, put them in, but do not put too many in the pan at a time, only let the syrup cover the apricots; but observe you do not crowd them in the pan; boil your syrup about a quarter of an hour, then take them dut, put them in a flat earthen pan and cover them with a sheet of paper, that no dust can get in; the next day boil them half an hour, and if you find they look well, drain the syrup from them through a sieve; boil the syrup twenty minutes, then put the apricots in again and just give them two or three boils; then put them in the flat pan and cover them close with paper, minding to keep them covered with syrup as it boils; when your syrup is of a fine thickness, and the apricots look well, put them in your pots, and when cold put a little apple jelly over them to cover the tops.

No 188. Apricots ripe, wet,

FIRST take a large knife, split the apricots in half, and with a small knife peel them fine; have a preserv- ing pan on the fire with water boiling; put some of the apricots in; when you find they grow soft, have two basons of cold water on each hand and put the softest by themselves, as those that are broken will spoil the rest; have a preserving pan on the fire with thin syrup boilr


64 THE COMPLETE

ing-, drain all the water from them, and put the hardest ones in and let them boil ten minutes, then put them in a Hat earthen pan, and cover them witli paper; then have another preserving' pan on the lire with syrup boil- iu'^; put the soft ones in and just give them a boil or two, then put them in the same pan as the others and cover them; the next day boil the hard ones five mi- nutes, and put them in the same pan again, but drain the syrup from the soft ones; boil it and pour it on them v/hen hot; do the same four or five days successively, and keep them covered with the syrup, then put them in pots, and pour a little apple jelly over the top, and be careful the pots are not in the least damp, for that will make them work and grow sour.

No 189. Presei-ved Pine Jjijile C/iips, luet,

TAKE the top and stalk of the pine apple, chip off the ends of the outsides and the bottoms of them; cut the pine apples in slices about the thickness of the fifth part of an inch; take an earthen deep pan, and one pound of sugar; lay some sugar at the bottom of the pan, then a layer of the pieces of pine, but not one over the other: then put another layer of sugar pretty deep, then another of pine, then another of sugar pretty deep, and so on till your pan is almost full; at the top put a good deal of sugar pretty deep; cover them up with paper and let them stand till you see the sugar is almost melted; let them and the syrup boil half an hour, then put them in the same pan again, the next day give them another boil, and so continue eight days, then drain all the syrup from them entirely; if the syrup is too clod- den, just dip the chips in a little water; then wipe them and lay them on your sieve to dry; mind the sieve is quite dry; as you put them into the stove, dust a little very fine powdered sugar through a cloth bag over them, put them in the stove and let them remain there till you think they will not give nor be sticky; then put them in your drawers or box with clean white paper about them

No. 190. Angelica, luet.

CUT the stalks of the angelica about a foot long, put them in a pan of water and boil them till they are quite soft J then string the outsides of them, and put them


CONFECTIONER. 63r

into a tub of cold water, till they are all done; drain all the water off, lay them in a long earthen pan till it is three parts full, pour some boilin^^ syrup over them and fill the pan with it, always keeping the angelica covered with syrup, and let it stand till next day; there must be a hole in the side of the pan towards the bottom, that you may always drain the syrup from the angelica with- out disturbing it; boii the syrup, put it to the angelica for eight or nine days successively, and let it remain iu the same pan for use.

No. 191. Barberries in s/n^igs^ wet

CUT the sides of the barberries open, take the stones out of them, tie six bunches to a piece of wood about an inch long and about the sixth part of an inch wide, wind them on with red thread; put your barbaries in bunches on the sieve, and have a preserving pan with sugar, and boil the syrup half an hour; put the barberries in the syrup, boil tliem and skim them with paper, give six or seven boils, always get the scum clean off; put themi in a flat earthen pan and cover them Avith paper; those tied on a stick are called bunches, but what you would "wish in sprigs must not be tied to a stick, you may put them in pots as other sv/eetmeats.

No. 192. Easberries "whole,, ivet.

TAKE some of the finest rasbeiries you can %tt^ then with a large pin prick the largest and dryest; just cover the bottom of the sieve with them; put a pre- serving pan on the fire with syiiip in it, boil the syrup ten minutes, then put the rasberries in, let them boil, and skim them as they boil with whitish brown paper; ten or twelve boils are sufficient, and of all things ob- serve that the pots are quite dry before you put your rasberries in, for if they are the least damp it will spoil your fruit; the next day cover them with apple jelly, and let them stand in the pots two days before you tie them up.

No. 193. Currants in bunches whole ^ wet,

TAKE some of the best currants you ean get; stone them with a pin and cut them as little as you possibly can; take a small piece of stick with thread, and 'lay them on a sieve; have your preserving pan on the fire with your syrup in it, boil the syrup about twenty n\i- F 2-


66 THE COMPLETE

notes on a brisk fire; put your currants in bunches into the synip; only cover the bottom of the pan with them, nor put two many in; let them have five or six boils, and take the scum off, with paper; put them in your pots,when cold put some apple jelly over the top of them, and mind your pots are very dry as before directed. No. 194. Cedraties whcle^ wet.

GET the cedraties at the Italian warehouse; make a >.ole through the middle of them at the thick end; put them in a large preserving pan with water and boil them one hour and a half, then drain all the water from them, set them up end ways to drain the water out of the ends; boil some syrup in a large preservmg pan twenty minutes then put the cedraties into a large earthen deep pan, pour the syrup over them and let them stand two days before you meddle with them, then boil them with syrup half an hour; (do not let them be loo soft) put them into the pan and cover them with paper; the next day drain the syrup from them, boil and pour it on them. again, and repeat it so for ten days, always keeping them covered with syrup; those done in quarters are done the same way only cut long ways before you first boil them; when done put them in your pots, and when cold cover them with apple jelly; take care your pots are dry.

No. 195. Cherries sweet, in syrufi.

LET your cherries be the best Kentish you can get, stone them, put them into a tub with boiling hot syrup over them, and cover them till the next day; then boil and put them into tlie tub again, the next day boil them softly twenty minutes and put them into the tub again, continue this for eight days; then make a thick syrup for them, put them into it, then in an earthen pan or pot; put some apple jelly over the tops and brandy pa- pers over them; if you want to dry sweet cherries, put them into your preserving pan, warm them iuid drain them well from the syrup through a sieve; put them into the hot stove arid shift the sieve every day till tjiey are dry; then put them into your boxes. Whole cher- ries are preserved the same way as those, only you leave the stones in and the stalks on them.


CONFECTIONER. 67

No. 196. Cherries not svjeet^ Kuet or dry.

LET your cherries be the best Kentish you can gel, and stone them in this manner; cut a quill as if you were going to make a tooth pick, only make the end of it round, take hold of the cherry, thrust the quill down close to the top of the cherry, holding the stalk at the same time that you pull, then the stone will come out without tearing the cherry to pieces, which otherwise it would do; when you have done so to all the cherries, put them into a tub, and put a large quantity of pow- dered sugar over them, so as to put layers of sugar and layers of cherries till tlie tub is full; let them stand two or three days till you find all the sugar is melted, amongst the juice of the cherries; then let them have one or two boils, pour them into the tub again, and let them stand till the next day; repeat the same four or five days successively; the last time pour what you want to dry on a sieve, and when they are all Avell drained, have sieves enough to put them on, then put them on the bottom of a sie\ e only just to cover the bottom, let your stove be very hot; put them in, changing them every day, and turn the cherries, they will dry the bet- ter, then paper your box, and put them in; those you would wish wet, put them in pots as before directed. No. 197. Cucumbers in Girkins^ luet.

LET your cucumbers be clear, and free from all spots, put them in salt and water, let them stand two or three days, then take tnem out and drain them well; put them in another pan of water, scald them, put them in a tub, and let them stand all night; then drain the water from them, put them into a pan of water, and to every two quarts of vvater put half a pint of syrup; put them in, and let them boil over a slow fire five minutes; put them in the tub again, and let them stand till the next day; then boil them again, drain the syrup from them, and have a clean pan with the syrup of a proper thickness; let it boil, put the cucumbers into it, arid let them boil gently for a quarter of an hour; then put them into a flat brown pan, and cover them; let them stand two days, then drain the syrup from them; boil the syrup one minute, and pour it over them; the next day boil them and the syrup together three or four mi-


6S THE COMPLETE

nutes and repeat the same for five days; then put them, in the pots or in a cream pan, and cover them up.

JV. B. Always observe to let your preserved fruit!i» stand two or three days before you put them up. No. 198. Comport Golden Pi jipins^ wet.

LET your golden pippins be the largest and soundest you can get; pare them very fine and clean, bore a hole through them large enough to put your little fin- ger through; put some very fine syrup rather thin in a preserving pan, peel some lemons very fine, and put the peel in the syrup, which must be thinner than any thin syrup in the former ingredients; put your apples in and let them simmer over the fire very gently three quarters of an hour; then take them off and when cold they are done, then put them in your comfiter for table.

JV. B. This is a quick way when you want a comport in a hurry.

No. 199. Comfiort French Ptars^ white., wet.

LET your pears be large and sound; cut them inta quarters long ways; put them in a pan of water, and over the fire which must be slow; let them simmer three quarters of an hour very slowly; then put lemon peel in a pan of thin syrup; drain all the water from them; when your syrup boils, put them in and give them five or six boils; ti^en put them in an earthen flat pan, and the next day boil them aguin, till you think the syrup, is got well into them, tijen keep them into the brown pan for use.

No. 200. Comfiort French Pears red., wet.

LET your pears be large and sound; pare and cut them in quarters; prepare them as the former receipt, only put cochineal in to colour tiiem, while they are sim- mering over the fire; put in by degrees, till you see it becomes a fine red.

No. 201. Da?nsons whole., wet.

GET some of the largest and best damsons, and prick them with a pin at each end, boiling syrup on a brisk fire in your preserving pan for a quarter of an hour; then put your damsons in, and boil them twenty mi- nutes; put tiiCin in an earthen pun, cover theiv, up with paper, and skim them as they boil quite clean; put them in your pan j the next day strain the syrup from


CONFECTIONER. 69

them, and let it have a good boil; then Dut the damsons into the pots, and when cold put some apple jelly over them.

No. 202. Grafies in bunch fs^ wet.

STONE your a:rapes with a large pin, have a large preserving pan with water in it, put an ounce of salt in with the water when cold, and put a sheet of paper over them in the water; let them simmer over a slow fire about half an hour; let them stand till cold, put them into a brown pan or a little tub with some water till the next day, then draw all the water from them; have some thin syrup boiling on the fire, put the grapes into it, and when they are in, let them boil five minutes; then take them off, put them into an earthen pan, and cover them with paper; the next day drain the syrup fuom them, and boil the syrup a quarter of an hour; then put the grapes in five minutes; repeat the same next day, till the syrup comes to a proper thickness, and the grapes look well, but be careful to have syrup enough to cover them.

No. 203. G 00 sherries in the form of ho fLs^ wet.

GET the finest green goosberries you can, cut them into quarters, and take the seeds out of them; take a needle and white thread, make a knot at the end, take hold of one of the goosberries that you have cut, and push the needle through the end of tie g;cosberry that is split, take another and do the same, and make it go part of it into the other goosberry, and do so till you have got eight on; then you will find they will be in the form of a green hop; when you liave finished your hop, fasten the ends of the thread; put them into a pan of water, scald t'leiii, and put them into a tub with their own liquor, that you have scalded them in; let them lie in the tub, three or four days, till they begin to grow sour and ferment; then put them into fresh water over the fire till they become hot, but not to boil, observe to put a little sugar into the water, and they will green; drain all that away from the hops and lay the hops regu-' larly in an earthen pan; boil some thin syrup and put o' er them; give them a boil once a day, till you think they are done, and keep them in an earthen pan, till you want to dry them.


70 THE COMPLETE.

No. 204. Green goosberries, ivet.

LET your goosberries be the largest and finest yoti can get, put them over the fire to scald, but do not let them boil, put them into a tub and let them stand three days; then drain all the liquor from them, put them into another pan with water, and a little syrup with the water; let them be over the fire till they warm, but not to boil, only just to come green; the next day strain all the liquor from them, put the goosberies into an earthen pan, and pour some thin syrup over them boiling hot; repeat it once a day for six days; make the syrup come thicker by degrees, and then put them into the pots. No. 205. -Lemons nvhoh^ wet.

GET some large clear lemons that have no spots, carve, the outside of them with a knife as you like; scoop a hole at the stalk of them, that you may put your little finger in, that the syrup may penetrate the inside; have a large preserving pan with water, put the lemons into the water, cover them with paper, and let them boil gently, till you find them grow tender; then have some thin syrup, boiling on the fire, drain all the- water from the lemons quite dry; put the lemons into a small tub, pour the syrup over them, and cover them with paper; let them stand till the next day, then drain the syrup from the lemons, and boil it a quarter of an hour; then put the lemons into the tub again, pour the syrup over them, and let them stand till the next day; then boil the lemons and syrup together for twenty mi- nutes; put them into the tub again, keep the lemons covered with syrup, and if you find it shrink, put more syrup to it the next day; repeat the same boiling, and w hen you find the syrup has penetrated the lemons, and they are clear, take a clean large preserving pan with more syrup, and boil it till it is pretty thick; drain the old syrup from the lemons, put them into the tub, pour the other syrup that is boiling over them, and let them stand three or four days before you look at them, tlien if you find they have not sucked in the syrup enough, you may drain the syrup from them, and give them another boil for a quarter of an hour; pour it boiling over thcjn, and always keep them in a flat earthen pan.


CONFECTIONER. 71

No. 206. Seville Oranges^ luhole^ nvet.

TAKE some of the largest Seville oranges you can get, and very clear from all spots; carve the outsicles of them in flowers or according to your own funcy; bore a hole at the stalk end of them, about ti\e size of half your little finger; put them into cold water, for where you have carved them the rind will turn black; let them be in cold water about four or five hours; then put them on the fire in a large copper pan, and boil them slowly about four hours; then take them out of the water and turn them with the end thyt has the hole undermost upon a sieve, that all the water may drain out of them; let some thin syrup boil a quarter of an hour in another pan, put the oranges in and boil them ten minutes; then put them in a small tub, pour the syrup overihem and cover them with paper; the next day boil the oran- ges and syrup together a quarter of an hour on a brisk fire; put them into the tub again and let them stand till next day; then drain the syrup from them and boil it twenty minutes, observing to keep them well covered in the syrup; continually boiling your syrup, and put- ting it over the oranges for six or eight days till you find they are tender, and have taken the syrup; let them stand five or six days in the syrup, give the syrup five or six boils again, and pour it over the oranges in a large flat earthen pan, in which keep them for use. No. 207. Orange iieds^ ivet,

GET some of the finest Seville orange peels clean from spots; put them into a copper pan, if you have a great number to do, and boil them two hours; scrape the inside of them clean, that none of the pitch re*» main; place the peels one in another round a small tub, till the tub is almost full; pour a great deal of syrup over them till they are covered; let them stand two or three days before you touch them; make a hole at the bottom of the tub, drain the syrup from the peels, boil and pour it over them; let them stand for two days, then boil your syrup again, and let them stand for four or five days running; then drain all the syrup from them, and pour it when boiling on them again; let them re- main in the tub till you are going to candy them, then


72 THE COMPLETE

take them out, and wash them when you Want them.

JV. B. Observe to keep them well covered with syrup.

No. 208. Orange chilis ^ wet.

TAKE some Seville oraneje peels, cut a bung or piece of cork round, so that it will go into the orange; with a sharp pen-knife pare them round, which we call turning, and cut your chips about the third part of an inch long; and nearly the same thickness; put them into a pan of water, and boil them gently over the fire one hour and a half; have another p n with syrup boil- ing; drain ail the water from the cliips, put them into the syrup and boil them for aquurter of an hour; then put them into a large earthen pan, or small tub, cover them, and let them stand till next day; ti.en boil them again witlit^e syrup a quarter of an hour; put them into the tub again, repeat this for four or five times; then put them into a large pan, not into pots, cover them well with syrup, and keep them for use. No. 200. Lemon chijis^ ivet»

TAKE some fine lemon peels, pare off all the rind with a knife, cut it all into pieces, if you can about a quarter of an inch wide; put them into a cabbage net, and into a preserving pan with water; boii them quite tender, then have another pan wiih syrup boiling, and when the chips are boiled enough in the water, take them out of the net and put them into the boiling syrup.

JV*. B, Let them be well drained before you put them into the syrup, and let them boil a quarter of an hour; then put them into a large earthen pan and let them stand till next day; then drain the syrup from them and boil it ten minutes, and pour it over them; cover them till the next day, then boii the chips and syrup to- gether twenty minutes and putjthem into the tub again; keep them covered with the syrup, and when you think it is well soaked in them, boil them all togetJier; put them into your tub till you want to candy. No. 210. Lemon pet Is, wet.

TAKE the largest and clearest lemon peels you can get, and throw into a large presci ving pan with water; let them boil till you find them quite soft and tender, then


CONFECTIONER. 73

take them one at a time out of the water, and with a table spoon take all the pith out of the inside clean from them; throw them into a tub of cold water as you do them; let them stand in the water four or five days, then put your lemon peels one within the other, and place them round a large deep tub; have a large preserving pan of syrup boiling over the fire, pour some of the syrup over them, and cover the tub; let them stand two days and bore a hole at the bottom of the tub to let the syrup out; boil the syrup three or four minutes, pour it over the peels again and keep them always well covered with syrup: repeat boiling the syrup in this manner for eight or ten days; then keep them in the syrup in the tub till you want to can- dy them.

No. 211. Pears, wet.

GET some baking pears that are of a very hard na- ture, put the pears in a large preserving pan with wa- ter; let them simmer over the fire till you find them rather soft; take them out of the boiling water with a skimmer, and put them into a bason with cold water; pare them in tliis manner, first cut off the end of the pear, then hold the stalk end in your hand, and brinp* your knife down the skin straight, so as to make the skin come off in five pieces all rovuid the pear; throw them into another bason with cold water; have the preserv- ing pan with syrup in it, let the syrup boil ten min- utes; then put the pears in; but first drain the water well from them, let them boil in the syrup again about ten minutes, skim it with paper, boil them in the same manner six days, draining the syrup off the paper every time till the syrup is of a fine thickness; let them re- main in this syrup till you want to candy them. No. 212. Green Orange Plums, %vet.

LET your plums be the soundest and best you can get, prick them with a fork and put them into cold wa- ter; have a very thin syrup, so thin as to be hardly sweet; scald them in it and let them have but one gen- tle boil; put them in an earthen pan, let them stand till the next day, then drain all the syrup from them, boil and pour it over them; repeat the same eight or nine days successively, then let them have a gentle boil and G


74 THE COMPLETE

put them in your pots, observe that your pots are not the least damp; put some apple jelly over them when cold; let it be three days before you tie them up,* and keep them and all other sweetmeats in a dry place. No. 213. Mogul Plujns^ nvet.

TAKE the largest mogul plums you can get with clear skins, prick them with a fork about ten or a dozen times, mostly about the stalk; throw them into cold ¦water, otherwise they will turn black where you have pricked them, put them over the fire just to scald them, have a pan half full of boiling syrup, drain all the plums from the water through a sieve and put them into the syrup, do not put too many in, only just to cover the bottom of the pan; boil the plums and the syrup ten minutes, then put them into a flat earthen pan and cover them with paper; the next day drain the syrup from them through a sieve, let the syrup boil, put the plums in it and let them boil together; put them into the same pan and repeat the same five or six days; it is best to keep these plumbs in a flat earthen pan, till you want to dry any of them.

No. 214. Pine Ajiples^ vohole^ ivet,

TAKE the pine apple, chip off all the small pieces of leaves from the bottom of every pine, take the top and stalk, and have a preserving pan on the fire with wa- ter, and to every two quarts of water put half a pint of syrup, so as to make it very fine thin syrup, and only just sweet; be sure that it boils before you put the pines in, and let theni simmer an hour over the fire; the next day let them boil gently another hour, take them off and cover them carefully, the next day let them boil gently about half an hour; put mor^ syrup as thick as you use to other fruits, the next day drain this syrup off and boil it, repealing the same seven or eight days; then put them into an earthen pan, and cover them up very carefully from any dust, and be very careful that your pans are very dry.

No. 225. A small Yclloiv Plum wet.

LET your plums be clear from spots, run a fork in once at each end and no more, you must not Iiave the plums too ripe, put them in water as you prick them J boil a pan of syrup ten minutes j drain all the


CONFECTIONER. 75

water tVom the plums and put them in the syrup; boil and skim them, repeat the same four or five days; then put them carefully into pots, mind do not break them for they are very tender, and take care ycur pots are very dry; let them stand two days before you put them by; cut small pieces of writing paper, dip them in brandy and put it over your fruit in every pot, this should be done to all fruits, it must be put close that no air can get in, then another paper over that; tie them up. Ao. 216. Stra-i.vberries^ ivhole-) wet,

OBSERVE to get the strawberries for this purpose in very dry weather, that if it had not rained for three or four days, pick the largest and finest you can get; put some syrup into a preserviPig pan, boil it over a brisk fire for half an hour and put your strawberries in while it boils, do not put many into the pan only one strawberry deep; let them boil twenty minutes and take oiT all the scum with paper very carefully; if you find they are like to break, take them off immediately and put them into your pots, when cold put apple jelly over, and be very careful that your pots are not the least damp. No. 217. J/iricot Chi/is^wet,

TAKE the chips that you cut off the apricots, and some powdered sugar; take a brown pan, lay a layer of chips and then a layer of sugar over them, and so on till your pan is full; let them stand till the sugar is ail melted, boil them and put them into the pan again; boil them the next day, and so repeat boiling them ten or eleven days successively; then have proper syrup and put them in a brown pan till you want to dry them. No. 218. Green Gages, ivet

LET your green gages be very sound, prick them with a fork six or seven times or more about the stalks; put them into cold water, or else they will turn black; scald them, and have another preserving pan with boil- ing syrup; drain the water from the gages and put them into a deep earthen pan; place them regularly and pour the boiling syrup over them; let them stand till next day, then drain all the syrup from them; boil it again, and put it over them; repeat so for seven or eight days, then take another flat earthen pan, drain the syrup


re THE COMPLETE

from them, place your gages in this pan; boil some fresh syriipforhalfanhourandpour it over them, cove? them up till you %vant them; you. may put some into pots if you like.


CONFECTIONER. 7f


DRIED FRUITS<


No. 219. Damsons Dried,

TAKE damsons that you have preserved, drain all the syrup from them, cover the bottoms of the sieves and put them into your stoves which must be hot, change the sieves every day till they are dry, and as you change the sieves turn your damsons, and when they are not sticky nor likely to give, take them out and paper a box and put them in, and lay a paper between every layer of damsons

No. 220. Mogul Plums^ dried.

TAKE mogul plums that you have preserved, drain all the syrup from them, wash them in a bason of water and lay them on a sieve; put them into the stove v/hich must be pretty hot, turn them next day on another sieve, and let them stand in the stove two or three days; then put them in your box papered, and lay a sheet of paper between every layer of plums.

No. 221. Green Orange Plums^ dried.

Take green orange plumbs that you have preserved, drain all the syrup from them, wash them in a bason of water, put them on sieves and into the stove; change the sieves and turn them every day on clean sieves; put them in your box, and use the same care and me- thod as before directed.

No. 222. Green Gages, dried,

TAKE preserved green gages, and put them over the fire to warm, drain all the syrup from them, put them on the sieves and into the stove; change them every day and turn them, else they will stick; let them be in three days, and then put them in the boxes as be- fore directed.

No. 223. Pears candied, or dried.

TAKE the pears out of the syrup, and put the:n on wires or a lars-e sieve- drain all the svrup from them, wash them in -vvarm water to get the syrup off them, drain them quite dry; then have a pan of syrup on the lire boiling, and let it boil till it comes to blow, take the pan off the fire, and take a spoon and rub it on the sides of the pan till you see it turn white; then put your pears in, and take them out, put them on a wire, and let them stand till cold, then put them in your box. No. 224. Cherries^ sweety dried.

TAKE your cherries and syrup, warm them over the fire, drain all the syrup from them, put them on the back of the sieves just to cover the bottoms; put them into the stove the next day, change the sieve, put them in the stove again, and let them stand three or four days in the stove; let them be well dried before you put them in your boxes, for if they are not, they will grow sour and be full of maggots; paper them as be- fore directed.

No. 225. Cherries^ not sweet, dried.

TAKE the cherries that you preserved not sweet, ¦warm them, put them on your sieves and let all the juice run from them; then while hot put them on the sieves, change them every day and let them be in the stove four or five days, afterwards move them about in the sieves till they are thoroughly dry, then paper your boxes as before directed.

No. 226. Ap-ricot Chifis, dried.

TAKE your apricot chips, put them over the fire to warm, and drain all the syrup from them; then make the chips the size you please, put them on the sieve as you make them, dust some sugar over them through a bag, and put them in the stove; let them be there two days, changing the sieves once or they will stick; when dry, paper and put them in your boxes.

No. 227. Orange or Lemon Cliijis, candied or dried.

TAKE your preserved orange or lemon chips, wash them from the syrup with warm water, and the syrup you drain Aom them boil till it comes to blow; put the chips in and rub the sugar at the sides with the spoon all round till you see the syrup all candy; then take the chips out with two forks, and put them on a wire for the sugar to drain off; let them stand till cold, and then put them In your boxes as before.


CONFECTIONER, 79

No. 228. Angelica Knots^ dried.

Take stalks of preserved aiagelica, take them out of your pan, wash all the syrup from them with warm water, cut them in slips about a quarter of an inch long, and the length of the angelica when first preserved j double then into whatever form you like, and if you can, tie them into the form of a true lover's knot; put them on sieves and into the stove, let them stand till they are quite dry and ready to be candied.

No. 229. Barberries in bunches^ dried.

TAKE some preserved barberry bunches, put them over the fire to warm, then on a sieve, let all the syrup drain well from them, then have your sieves ready and put them on; dust some powdered sugar over them through a bag; put them in the stove and let them re* main there till they are quite dry, changing your sieves and turning the bunches; they must stand in the stove four days; paper your box, and put them in as before directed.

.Y. B* The above method, does for currants. No. 230, Lemon Peeh^ candied or dried.

TAKE some preserved lemon peels, wash them in warm water and put them on a sieve to drain; boil some syrup on the fire till it comes to blow, and put your peels in; as soon as they are covered with sugar take them out again, put them on wires for all the sugar to drop through; then let them stand till cold and put them in your boxes.

A*. B. Do orange peel in the same manner. No. 231. Cucumbersn, dried.

TAKE some preserved cucumbers, w^ash all the syrup from them, put them on your sieves to drain, then into your stove to dry, one day is enough for them to dry; afterwards put them in your boxes as before di- rected.

No. 232. Green Afiricota.^ dried

TAKE some preserved green apricots, wash them in a little warm water, put them on your sieves into a hot stove, changing your sieves every day; let them re* main two or three days in the stove until they are well dried, then put them into your boxes prepared, and cover them as before directed. • .


86 THE COMPLETE

No. 233. Aliricots full groivn^ dried.

TAKE your apricots full grown that you have pre- served whole, or those in halves; wash them in warm water, put them on sieves reguarly, not to let them touch one another; put them into a hot stove for two or three clays, changing the sieves every day j when dry put them into your boxes.

No. 234. Grapes in bundles^ dried.

TAKE some preserved grapes, wash them with warm water, put them on your sieves, and into a hot stove, keep turning of them every day, changing your sieves; when well dried put them into your boxes. No. 235. Pine Afiple Chips., dried,

TAKE your slices of pine apples that you have in syrup, and wash them in warm v/ater, then put them on your sieves in such a manner that they do not touch each other, then take some fine powdered sugar, put it into a fine linen bag and just shake it over them; keep turning of them every day for three or four days in a hot stove; wl\en dry put them into your papered box with writing paper between every layer.

No. 236. Cedrates^ whole or in quarters., dried.

TAKE your preserved cedraties either whole or in quarters, wash them in a little warm water; boil some syrup in another pan till it comes to blow; take a large spoon and rub it well to the sides of the pan till it comes white; dip your cedrates in, take them out and put them on your wires over another pan; let them drain well, then put them into a "not stove on the wires for one day, till the candy dries all around them; when well dried put them into your boxes as before directed.

No. 237. Faste Knots, red or luhite.

PARE some large apples, and cut them into a preser- ving pan, Vy'ith just water enough to come up to the top of the apples; let them boil till they come to marma- lade, then pass it through a sieve into a fiat brown pan; t'dke some cochineal ana mix it with the apples to make them a fine colour; have another preserving pan with as much syrup in it as you have got apples, and boil the syrup until it comes to blow; take the syrup of!'the fire and mix the apples with it in the pan; have sheets or plates made of pewter, about a foot ands half long and


CONFECTIONER. 81

about ten inches %vide, with edges turned about the eighth part of an inch, to prevent the paste from falling or running off; cover your plates with your paste and put it into your stove, which must be hot; let them re- main till next day, then take another pewter sheet and with a knife cut the paste round the edges and across the plates, scores about a quarter of an inch wide; then pull it off, and if it comes off easy it is dried enough; when you have got it off in long strings, try to make them into knots according to your fancy; put them on the other plate, then into the stove, and let them stand in the stove two days; then take them out; when they are cold put them into papered boxes, and let them remain their until you want to candy them

No. 238. Perfetto Amore.

FOR four bottles of brandy, you are to peel six large and fresh lemons, the peel is to be very thin; it is to be cut in small bits; and put in the brandy with a little salt, half a handful of currants, five coriander seeds, five cloves, and a little cinnamon. The whole is to be infu- sed together for twelve hours, from which you are to draw off only two bottles of spirit; then you are to take two pounds of sugar, boiled and clarified, in two bottles of water with three eggs, this is a red liquor; therefore you are to take a little roche-alum, which you must mix in a little boiling water, and a little cream of tartar; mix them in a small mortar; then throw it in the liquor; but first you are to strain it; then mix them altogether, and filter it through blotting paper.

No. 239. Persico.

FOR four bottles of brandy, you are to take four handfuls of bitter almonds of the best quality, and they must be very fresh, they are to be cut in small bits, with a little salt, two cloves, and a little cinnamon; put all in the brandy: they are to be infused for twenty hours; S^ke two bottles of spirit; two pounds of sugar, with two bottles of water, without clarifying it, as this liquor will clarify of itself.

No. 240. Jnniseed.

FOR four bottles of brandy, you must take half a pound of anniseeds, and a quarter of a pound of fennel, three cloves to be cut in small bits, with a little salt;


82 THE COMPLETE

put all ill the brandy; it is to be infused twelve hours before you distil it; two pounds of sugar must be cla- rified, with two bottles and a half of water, with the white of two or three ei^gs well beat together. No. 241. Conndla or Cinnamoru

FOR four bottles of brandy, you must take four ounces of cinnamon of the best quality, thirty cloves, thirteen coriander seeds, a little salt, mixed together in brandy, let it infuse for eighteen hours; you are to take from the still as much as you can; two pounds of sugar clarified in two bottles and a half of water, vvith two or three whites of eggs well beat together, mixed with the spirit, and filtered througii blotting paper; after yoil have mixed the spirit, take care to cork your bottles well.

No. 242. Coffee.

FOR four bottles of brandy, take one pound of coffee in powder, the very best Turkey; a little salt, two cloves, a little cinnamon; tiien mix altogether for twelve hours before you distil it; two pounds of sugar, two bottles and half a pint of water clarified with whites of eggs, filtered through the paper.

No. 243. Ckocolat'^.

FOR four bottles of brandy, take one pound of the best chocolate, cut in small bits, a little salt, two cloves, and a little cinnamon; you are to infuse all in the brandy; two pounds of sugar clarified in two bottles and half a pint of water, with whites of eggs, and filter it through the paper.

NB. You must be particular not to take more than two bottles from every four, except from the cinnamon, from which you are to take as much as you can get.

No. 244. Damson Cheese.

PICK the damsons free from stalks, leaves, &c. put them into ajar, tie white paper over them, bake them in a slow oven till quite soft, rub them through a cullen« der while hot, put the pulp and juice which has passed through the cullender into a stew-pan with fine powder- ed sugar to your taste, boil it over a moderate fire till it is as stiff as you can possibly stir it, which will take three hours; keep stirring it to prevent it burning to the pan, and a few minutes before you take it off the fire put the kernels of the damsons into the pan, and mix with it, put it into cups or moulds, let it stand a day, and cut some pieces of writing paper the size of the tops of the cups or moulds, dip them in brandy and put close over them; put them in a dry place and they will keep for several years.

NB You m^y make plum orbullace cheese in the same way: it is necessary to take the skins off the ker- nels before you put them into the pan.

No. 245. Apple Cheese.

PARE and quarter your apples take out the cores, put them into a deep pot or jar, and put the paring and cores at the top, let them bake in a moderate over, till quite soft, take off the parings, cores, and bits of apple which are at the top, if they are dry or hard; tben put your apples into a stew-pan, with fine powdered sugar to your taste, and boil them four hours till it is quite stiff, put it in moulds or cups, and lay paper over it moistened with brandy, set it in a dry place and in three weeks it will cut quite smooth.

NB You may add a little of the rind of a lemon grated, or a few drops of essence of lemon before you put it into the moulds, also a few blanched almonds cut into small pieces and mixed with it.

No. 246. Lemon Pudding.

PUT half a pound of fresh butter, and half a pound of lump sugar into a sauce-pan, and keep it stirring over the fire till it boils, put it into an earthen pot and grate the rind of a large lemon into it, and let it stand till it is cold, beat eight eggs and squeeze the juice of the lemon on them, mix the sugar and butter with them, put them into a dish with a good puff paste at the bot- tom, put bits of candied lemon peel in the dish upon the paste. To be baked in the usual manner. No. 247. Carrot Pudding.

WASH and scrape your carrots, and boil them till quite soft, in a good quantity of water,take off the outsides and grate a quarter of a pound of the middle part of the carrots, add to it a quarter of a pound of clarified butter, four eggs well beat, and sugar and brandy to your taste, bake it in a dish with a puff paste at the bottom, and caa- died orange or lemon peel.

No. 248. Citron Pudding.

BOIL some Windsor beans quite soft, take off the skins, and beat a quarter of a pound in a mortar till quite fine, then add a quarter of a pound of clarified butter, four eggs, well beat, and sugar and brandy to your taste, put a puff paste in the dish and a good quan- tity of citron, cut in long bits, and laid upon the paste, put the pudding into a dish and bake it in a moderate oven.

No. 249. Mice Cake.

ONE pound of rice flower, three quarters of a pound of lump sugar, beat and sifted, nine eggs, and one tea spoonful of essence of lemon, beat the eggs before you mix it, then put in the other ingredients and beat it half an hour; bake it in a quick oven: it is fit to eat as soon as it is cold, and is best when new.

No. 250. Rice Cheese Cake.

STEEP a quarter of a pound of ground rice in milk Over the fire till it is quite soft, put it into an earthen pot and add a quarter of a pound of butter, keep stirring it till the butter is melted,* cover it close and let it stand till the next day, then add a quarter of a pound of cur- rants washed and dried thoroughly, three eggs well beat, two table spoonfuls of ratafia, or brandy, and sugar and nutmeg to your taste, bake it in your patty pans with puff paste at the bottom.

NB. Be careful not to have more m.ilk than the rice requires, if it is two thin the currants will sink to the bottom.


THE END.


INDEX [Omitted]






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