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The Art of Cookery Made Easy and Refined, 1802

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TITLE: The Art of Cookery Made Easy and Refined, Comprising ample directions for preparing every article requisite for furnishing the tables of the nobleman, gentleman, and tradesman
AUTHOR: John Mollard
PUBLISHER: Whitaker, London
DATE: 1802 (this edition, 1836)
THIS VERSION: Based on the online edition at archive.org, digitized by Google from the collections at Oxford University. This is an Optical Character Recognition scan, it has been partly edited, but still contains very significant errors.


THE
ART OF COOKERY.
BY
JOHN MOLLARD,
PARK HOTEL, NORWOOD.

"Magister artis ingenique largitor Venter." - Perseus

"An action taking place with individuals of every nation, three hiudred and sixty-five times in the year, possesses intrinsically an importance more than sufficient to excuse a short investigation into the materials chiefly connected with it." - Quarterly Review, No XLV

NEW EDITION.
LONDON: WHIITAKER & Co. AVE MARIA LANE.
1836.
LONDON: GILBERT & RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,
ST. John's square.

PREFACE.
Having been so many years in their service, as owner of the Freemason's Tavern, before its present respected occupant, and Mattre d^Hdtel in other well-known localities, the author trusts, with some degree of confidence, that the public will not be displeased to receive the receipts for those dishes they have so often welcomed when set before them. They are the fruits of long experience, and in their composition he has been guided by the well-known axiom, that ^' it is the guests who are to decide on the merits of the feast, and not the caterer." Thus, although the author has admitted no receipt into his work which is not in accordance with the scientific principles of his art, yet he has permitted none to have a place in it, merely because it is theoretically correct: each has been over and over again submitted to that best committee of taste - the public.

As the aim of art is ever to simplify, the most frugal housekeeper may consult this work on the score of economy, no less than the more ambitious cook for the sake of a guide to scientific prindples and refined luxury. The language is studiouBly plain; the directions brief, yet clear; the ingre- dients i^portioAed with a sdrupulous jealousy of the expenditure, but at no sacrifice to the interests of the palate.

In strict adherence with the title, the present work is confined to the full development of Cookery as an art. Each section is head«d ' by general observations, and directions for the plain cooking of the respective articles to which it' is devoted; the more c Hnplez modes of preparation follow. By rejecting receipts which have no connection with the table, but which are too often incongrttously inaerted in similar publications, tlie author has been enabled to be much more fall than is usual on the mysteries of pastry, confectionary, and sweetmeats, which are most important items in every family, and belong of right to the domain of die cook. The last position will not be denied, when it is remembered that the most philosophical cooks of antiquity (the Athenians) piqued them- selves on the variety and excellence of their farinace- ous compositions, and that the cake, or bread, termed CribaniteSi is said to have been so delicious as even to cause appetite by eating. To attain this last result is the cunne of successful cookery !

Few directions are given for marketing, and none for carving. A volume might easily be writ- ten on either, and well written tooy and the tyro be just as advanced after as before reading it Obser- vation and practice can alone teach these two aux- iliaries to the science of gastronomy. Bills of Fare are furnished for the several months, more as guides to the articles in season, and as affording hints for

the elegant disposition of the table, than with any desire that they should be implicitly followed. To . insist on cleanliness as essential to the thorough cooky is hardly necessary; but it may not be unim- portant to suggest) that the accomplished one will aim rather at imitating than servilely following^ will adhere to the spirit rather than the letter of a receipt) will at times judiciously innovate, and at others boldly invent.

Numerous alterations have been made in the pre* sent edition and among the additions, the author begs to draw attention to the receipt for dressing WHITE BAIT) a dish hitherto omitted in worhs on Cookery, but surely of interest to the Amphitryons of the metropolis.

Park Hotel, Norwood. April \6th, 1836.

CONT E NTS.

SOUPS, BROTHS, &c.

PAGE

Cullis, or t thick gnvy 1

B4cbamel 2

To make a passing of flour and

butter 2

Colouring liquid 2

A green colouring for soups or

sauces 2

Veal broth...... 8

Beef broth 3

Leg of beef soup 4

Mutton broth 4

Soup of mutton chops, cucum- bers, &c 5

LamV& head soup 5

GraTf Bonp • 6

Cleared gnvy soup i 6

Partridge soup 6

Soup with pigeons* and poached

eggs 7

Soup with chicken and sweet-

biead 7

Hare soup 8

Giblet soup 9

Real turtle 9

Ctllipee. 11

Mock turtle, or calfs head soup. 12

Craj-fisb soup 12

Ovstersoup 12

Fish meagre soup 13

Soup and bouilli 13

Cressfloup 14

AlareineBOu^ 14

Potage it la reme {another toaj^). 15

Soup^amas ffrenouiUee 15

Potage oiM? c&ottiT 16

C^eoise soup 16

Soup i la Juuenne 17

Flemish soup 17

Vermicelli soup {wkUe) 17

PAGB

Rice and Termicelli soup 18

White rice soup 18

Rice soup ..-....¦ 18

Macoaroniand Parmesan cheese

soup. 19

Onion stmp 19

Celery soup 19

Turnip soup 20

Chestnut soup 20

Oreen peas* soup 20

Old peas' soup 21

Soup for a family 22

Consomm6, or the essence of

meat 22

Glaze for hams, larding, roasted

poultry, &c 22

Glaze for meats 22

Tomato glaze for sauces 23

FISH.

General observations 24

Entree of salmon ..^ 25

Entree of fresh salmon and capers 26

Entr6e of a jole of salmon 26

Broiled salmon .«.. 27

Dried salmon with poached eggs. 27

Entree of crimped cod 27

Slices of cod fried with oysters • 2S

Entree of turbot baked 28

Entree of slices of sturgeon 29

Roasted pike or sturgeon 29

Entrie of mackarel 29

Entree of fillets of mackerel ... 30 Mackerel (the German way)... 30~

Collared mackerel 31

Broiled mackerel 31

Entree of whitings 81

To salt haddocks or whitings.... 33

VUl

CONTENTS.

PAGE

EotrieoftoleB {Mmaidote) 32

Entree of fillets of soles with

lobsters, &c 32

Olives of soles 33

£!ntr6e of herrings 33

Entree of smelts, &c 33

To pickle smelts 34

En^e of skate 34

Entr6e of eels 35

Entree of eels {another u ay). . . 35

Oollared eels 35

Stewe i carp or tench {with

aauoe) 36

Carpe Koyale 37

Piper, with Dutch sauce 37

Sprats to resem ble anchovies ... 37

To dress white bait 38

To feed oysters 38

Scalloped oysters 39

Scalloped oysters {another way) 39

Tofry oysters 39

Raffout of oysters, &c 40

Pickled oysters 40

Potted lobster 41

Battered lobsters 42

Aspic of fish 42

Toitewfish 43

Entree of fish in a mould 43

Water soucby of perch, floun- ders, soles, eels, &c 54

Baignets of fish 44

Bacquillio with herbs 45

Entree of fish in balls 45

POULTRY, GAME, &c.

Obaervations on meat and

poultry 46

Direstions for poultry, &c.

plain boiled 46

Directions for roasting 47

Turkeys 47

Turkey with truffles 47

Turkey with chestnuts 48

Turkey with ragout 48

Turkeys, pullets, or chickens

with oyster sauce 49

Chickens or turkeys wi th celery 49

Pulled chicken {or turkey) 49

Another wa^ 50

Chickens with peas 50

Amdkerwaif 50

PAGX

Chickens with lemon sauce .... 50 Fricassee of chickens, or rabbits

[white) 51

Fncassee of chickens, or rab*

bits {brown) 51

Souffle of fowls 62

Pullet roasted with butter 52

Fowl stewed withrice 52

Hashed fowls 53

Toasts with fowl, &c.... 53

Legs and wings of fowls with

parsley 54

Winffs and legs of fowls with

colours 54

Wings and legs lanied and

5 lazed 55

let a la Montmorenci 56

Fowl a la Menehauh 66

Grills and sauce {generally eaten

aflerdinner) 56

Salmi, or hash of ducks 67

Duck, aux navets 57

Duck with cucumbers 67

Duck ^ la bechamel 58

Geese and tame ducks 58

Stewed giblets {plain) 58

Stewed giblets (u;«fA /MKw) 59

Pigeons 59

Pigeons glazed 59

Pigeons a la surdle 59

Entree of pigeons with truffles 60

Compote of pigeons 60

Pigeons a la crapaudine 60

To roast larks 61

To keep pheasants or hares .... 61

Partridges and pheasants 61

Partridges or pheasants auae

olives 62

Purtridges aux choux 62

Partridges en cripine 63

Guinea fowls, pea fowls, pullets,

chickens and turkey pullets. 63

Quails, ruffs and reeves 63

To roast woodcocks or snipes... 64

Salmi of woodcocks, . 64

Potted larks or small birds .... 64

Plover's eggs {dij^erent ways), 66

Wild fowl?;. 66

Hares 66

Hare roasted {another way), ... 66

To roast a bare with the skin on 66 Hashed hare, wild fowl, phetr

aants, or partridges », 66

CONTENTS.

IX

PAOB

JuQred hare 66

Glazed hare 67

Rabbits 67

Rabbits haded 67

Rabbits with onions 68

Rabbits en gdUutHne^ for a dish. 68

Matelote oi^rablnts 68

MEATS.

To prepare a haunch of veni- son, or mntton, for roasting. . 69f

Hashed venison 69

Rump of beef (a la mode) ... 70

Romp of beef {h. la Cardinal) 71

Butnp of beef braised 72

Piekled rump of beef 72

KUet of beef hutled 73

Fillet of beef marinaded. 73

ftisket of beef, with Spanish

onions 73

Baked beef. 73

Dntch beef. 74

Red beef for slices 74

Ribs of beef with oysters 75

BouilH of beef (ii^ 90ur cront) 75

Rump steaks 76

Entree of beefsteaks 76

Broiled beef steaks 76

Beef eoUops 77

Oanelon ot beef. 77

Beef olives 78

Potted beef 78

Potted beef {another way) 79

Qz heart roasted.. 79

Ox cheek 79

Beef tongues {aux truffles) .... 80

Beef palates 80

Beef palates, fned 81

Beef palates (a 2a cr^mtf) 81

Beef palates, with ham, &c... 82

BecftaUs 82

Hashed cairs head 83

CalTsheadb^hamel 83

Neck of veal 0a Amnon 84

Neck of v«al larded 84

Calf 's ears glazed 85

Calf*s ears with Parmesan

cheese 85

CalTs hrains ^ 2a ^T^iw. 86

Calf *s brains with oysters ..... 86

Breast of veal with oyaters . ... 87

FAGS

Breast of veal engakuiime 87

Breast of veal ragout 87

To roast fillet of veal or hare. . 88

Loin of veal a 2a or^me 88

Tendons of veal 90

Fricandeau of veal 90

Minced veal for a dish 90

Minced veal (ano/Aer icay) 90

Calf's feet h la sauce 91

Calf's feet {another way) 91

Calf's feet with forcemeat 92

Todres veal cutlets 92

Veal cutlets au naturel 92

Veal cutlets larded 93

Scotch collops 93

Veal coUops {wbUe) 93

Veal olives » 94

Potted veal 94

Calf's liver roasted 95

Roasted sweetbreads 95

Boiled sweetbreads 96

Fried sweetbreads 96

Broiled sweetbreads 96

Sweetbreads «a Aemwm 96

Glazed sweetbreads 9Q

Sweetbreads with veal and ham. 97 Ragout of sweetbreads {brown), 97 Ragout of sweetbreads {white), 98 To preserve calves' tongues .... 98

Mutton rumps marinaded 98

£ntr4eof rumps of mutton 98

Fillet of mutton with cucum- bers 99

Fillet of mutton ii Clialienne,.. 99

Hashed mutton for a dish 100

Mutton cutlets d, la Maintenon. 100 Mutton cutlets with pot ates... 101

Cutlets & la Irish stew 101

Haricot mutton cutlets 102

To dress mutton, lamb, or pork chops in a plain manner ...... 1 02

Mutton chops with mashed po- tatoes 102

Lamb's head minoed 103

Shoulder of lamb glazed 103

Shoulder of lamb en MMorantme 104

Shoulder of lamb ffrillea 104

Breast of lamb with peas 104

Breast or tendrons of lamb en

matelote 105

Breast of lamb with b^hamel 105

Neck of lamb glazed 105

Neck of lamb and ' turnips 106

CONTXNTfl.

PAOB

Hind quarter of Umb marifuid-

od 106

Hind quarter of lamb with spin- ach 107

Leg of lamb with oysters 107

Lamb cutlets with tendrons... 107 Lamb cutlets with tendrons

(cMotherwayJ 108

Lamb cutlets with cucumbers 108

Lamb^s tails and ears 109

To dress a lamb's fry 109

Another iDc^ 109

Todresspartof a wildboar 110

To roast a pig 110

Fillet of pork roasted 110

Collared pig Ill

Pork cutlets 11]

Pork cutlets f'anoMtfrtMty^... 112

Pig*s feet and ears 112

To prepare large pig's feet and

ears 112

Sucking pig's feet 113

To pickle hams, tongues, or pig's cheeks, Westphalia fash- To pickle tongues, &c 113

A plain or pickled tongue forced 114 Pyramid of tongue with turnips 114

Ham braised 115

Ham with Windsor beans 115

Mock brawn 116

Sausage meat 116

Hotch notch (or English olio) 117

Aspic or meat or fowl 118

Roasted tripe 118

Fried tripe and onions 119

Boiled tripe and onions 119

Tripe and onions (anoiherway) 119

Fricass^ of tripe (white) 120

Fricassee of tripe f6rouw^ 120

Marrow bones 120

SAUCES, FARCES, &c.

Observations on fish sauces, &c. 121 Green sauce for ducklings, or

green geese 122

Fennel sauce for mackerel,

either boiled, or broiled 122

Sweet sauce for roast mutton, or

venison 123

Apple sauce for pork, geese, &c. 123

PAGB

Sauce for a hare 124

Mushroom sauce for fowls, &c. 124

Bread sauce 124

Bread sauce for turkeys, game,

&c .....^....: 125

Mayonnaise sauce 125

Mayonnaise sauce (it la Ravi-

slotU) 125

Queen sauce for chickens, &c. 126 Truffle sauce for turkeys, &c... 126 Spanish sauce (for stewed

meats) ..•• ^^

Haricot sauce 127

Poivrade saMce(/orffame,Mam^

tetumeutlets,,qv.) 127

Poivrade sauce (another way) 127

Robert sauce 128

Sauce hach^e 128

Italian sauce 128

Admiral sauce 129

Liver sauce 129

Orange sauce 129

Lobster sauce for fish 130

Oyster sauce for fish 130

Oyster sauce for beefsteaks 131

White oyster sauce 131

Shnmp sauce for fish 132

Dutch sauce for fish 132

Anchovy sauce for fish 133

Anchovy and caper sauce for

fish 133

Lemon sauce 133

Stewed French olive sauce 134

Spanish onion sauce 134

Onion sauce 134

Savory sauce 134

Celery sauce (white) for Teal,

chickens, turkeys, &c 134

Celery sauce (brown) for pul- lets, &c 135

Turnip sauce 135

Sorrel sauce 135

Shrimps for sauces 135

A zest for sauces 136

Souffl6 of bread or panade for

sauces 136

Stewed asparagus for sauce 136

To stew peas for sauce for lamb,

veal, chickens, &c 137

Essence of ham for sauces 137

Anchovy liquor to be used in

fish sauces 138

Melted butter 138

CONTBNTB.

Zl

PAOB

To make marinade 138

Farce a la quenelle (or balls of

fowU for entries^ ^e, ) 139

Chddiveau, or forcemeat for piei

or pufis 140

Forced meat balls for rasouts,

Ac. 140

Light forcemeat for pies, or

rowls, &c 141

Marbled farces 141

Stuffing for turkeys, bares, veal,

&c 141

Stuffing for veal or hares 142

Seasoning for meats, poultry,

fish, or raised pies 142

Gravy for roast meat, steaks

ana poultry 142

Common mustard 143

Mustard (for keeping) 143

Mushroom catchup 143

Walnut catchup for fish sauces 144 To preserve mushrooms for

sauces 144

To keep cucumbers for winter

use for sauces 144

To preserve green truffles for

sauces 145

VEGETABLES, SALADS, &c.

Directions for vegetables 146

Blanc for vegetables, meats, or

poultry 146

Potatoes creamed 146

To mash potatoes 147

Fried potatoes 147

Scolloped potatoes with mutton,

&c 147

To stew cabbage 148

Parsnips for salt fish 148

Mashed turnips 148

Cauliflower ^ 2a ft^iu; 149

Cauliflower ^ la crime 149

Cauliflower d 2a aatfoe 149

Cauliflower with Parmesan

cheese 149

French beans ^ la crime, for a

dish 150

Asparagus peas 150

Anotiertoay 151

Forced cucumbers 151

Stewed cucumben 151

PAGS

To preserve cucumbers 152

To stew peas for a dish 152

Pur^e or peas 153

Stewed endive 153

Stewed cardoons 154

Stewed watercresses 154

Stewed mushrooms (brown) ... 154 Stewed mushrooms \u^ite) ... 155

Broiled mushrooms 155

To dry morells, mushrooms, and

champignons 155

Mushroom powder 156

Stewed artichoke bottoms 156

Artichoke bottoms with force- meat 156

Fried artichoke bottoms 157

To dry artichoke bottoms 157

Jerusalem artichokes stewed... 157 Jerusalem artichokes {anoiker

twiy) 158

Green truffles for a dish 158

A batter for frying, &c 158

Fried celery 159

Fried peths 159

Fried onions with Parmesan

cheese 159

To fry parsley 159

To di^ herbs 160

French salad 160

Salad of lobster 161

Lobster salad {ano^erway) .... 161

Salad of asparagus 162

Dutch sahMi 162

MADE DISH£S,ENTR£METS, &c.

Currie, or pepper water 163

Cnrrie of cnicken 164

Currie of veal 164

Currie of mutton 165

Pig*8 head currie 165

Currie of lobsters 165

Curried attelets 165

Rice in shapes with currie 166

Plain rice to be eaten with cur- rie 167

Timballe of rice 167

Pilau of rice 168

Pilau of rice {anotkerwap) 1 68

Fried egKs and bacon 169

andbacon 170

zu

CONTBNTB*

PAOK

Hard eggs fried 170

Poached eggs with sorrel, or

endive 170

Poached eggs with bam and ve- getables 171

Souffle 171

Souffle of eggs 172

Souffle of toasts 172

Buttered eggs 173

Eggnalatnpe 173

Omelets 173

Omelet of eggs 174

A sweet omelet of eggs 175

Omelets of eggs for garnishing,

or cutting in slips 175

Omelet So'ufflee 175

Effgs for balls 176

A^t cake 176

Lobstercake 177

Oyster loaves 177

Oyster atteleta 177

Canapes 178

Rissoles 179

Salmagundi 179

Sourcrout 180

To make haggis 180

Brunswick sausages 181

Fried eg^, in paste 181

Ramequms 182

Ramequins {another toajf) 182

Stewed cheese 182

Fondue of cheese 183

Potted cheese 183

Spinach fritters 183

To stew macaroni 184

PICKLES, VINEGAR, &c.

Rules to be observed in pickling 184

To pickle onions 185

To pickle red cabbage 185

To pickle cucumbers, &c 186

To pickle large cucumbers 1 87

To pickle mushrooms 187

To pickle artichoke bottoms... 188

To pickle beet root 188

To pickle barberries 189

To pickle currants 189

India pickle 190

Tampon vinegar 191

Garlic vinegar 191

Cucumber pickle 191

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY,

PAOS

To make puff paste 192

French puff paste 192

Paste for raised pies, creama,

&c 193

Paste for pasties 193

Fine tart paste 193

Crisp tort paste 193

Paste for tourtes 194

Paste for stringing tartlets ...... 194

Rice paste for tarts, &c 194

Fish pie 195

Fishmeagre pie 195

Eel pie 196

Sea pie 196

Vealpie 196

Mutton pie 197

Pork Die 197

Flat chicken pie (or tourte)... 198

Pigeon pie 198

Woodcock pie 198

Hare pie 199

Venison pasty 200

Braised beefsteak pie 20O

Braised pie with rump of beef

and truffles •.. 201

Raised turkey pie with a tongue 201

Raised chicken pie 202

Raised ham pie {with directions

/or making a raised crust dif-

/erent toojfs) 203

Raised macaroni pie 203

Vol au vent 204

Pulpton of chicken, rabbita,

&c 204

Pufl^ for a journey 206

Puffs with chicken, &c 205

Puffs with forcemeat of veg&-

tobles ^.. 206

Forcemeat patties 206

Petits pat^s of chicken and ham 207 Patties of lobsters, or oysters... 207

Beefsteak pudding 207

Pudding with chicken, or birds 208

Game puddin ^ 208

Marrow pudding 209

Marrow pudding (ano^iW toa^) 209

Poudings d. la Heine 210

Calf's feet pudding 210

Suet puddinff 211

Muffin pudding, with dried

cherries 211

CONTENTS.

xm

PAGK

Bread pudding 211

Rice pudding 2]]

Rice pudding {another vxiy).... 212

Potatoe pu^ng 213

Carrot pudding 213

Peas^ pudding, to be eaten "with

boiled Dork. 213

Fiencli black puddings 214

White puddings 215

A rich plain pudding 215

Orange pudding ! 216

Tansey pudding, 216

Almond pudding 217

Baked fruit pudding 217

Damson pudding 217

Damson pudding {another

wa^) 217

Baked apple puddings 218

Boiled apple pudding 218

Apple dumplings 219

Raspberry dumplings 219

Batter pudding 219

Cabinet pudding 220

A Creorge pudding 220

A quaking pudding 221

Dutch pudmnff 221

Oxford dumpBngs 221

Norfolk dumplings 222

French pancaJces 222

Pancakes 222

Pine strawberry fritters 223

Apple fritters 223

Puin pottage 224

Oatmeal pottage, or gruel 224

Sago, 225

Canals of paste, with sweet- breads 225

Cream forpies 225

To green codlings for pies, &c. 226

To stew apples for tarts 227

Tarts, or tartlets 227

Rhubarb tart 227

Tourte of rroe fruits 228

French puflfe 828

Lemon puffs 228

Fried puflfiB, with sweetmeats... 229

Cheesecakes 229

Mincemeat 230

Concluding Remarks 230

BREAD, CAKES, &c.

To make English bread 231

b

PAGE

French bread 232

French bread {another way) ... 232

Muffins and crumpets 233

Breakfast cakes 233

Breakfast cakes {another way), 234 Rusks, or tops and bottoms... 234

To make buns 235

Buns {aaiailter way) 235

Bath buns 236

Bridecake 236

Rich plum cake 237

Twelfth cakes 237

Pound cake 238

Common seed cakes 238

Savoy cake 239

Diet bread cake 239

Bath cakes 289

Bath cakes {another way) 240

Bristol cakes 240

Hyde-park-comer cakes 240

An English cake 241

A Swiss cake 241

A French cake 241

A Russian cake 242

A Turkish cake 242

Shrewsbury cakes 243

Portugal, or heart cakes 243

To make an almond cake 243

Cinnamon cakes 244

Yeast cake 244

A best rice cake 245

Rice cakes 245

Small cakes 245

Naples biscuits 246

Sponge biscuits 246

Almond nuts 246

Good gingerbread nuts 247

Dutch gingerbread 247

Ratafias 247

Wafers 248

Cracknels 248

Macaroons 249

To fir bread crumbs 249

Small crusts to be eaten with cheese, or wine, after din- ner 249

SWEET DISHES,PRESERVES, SWEETMEATS, &c.

A Macedoine of fruit 250

Charlotte of apples 250

XIV

CONTBNT8.

PAOX

PulpUm of api^et 251

Sooffl^ of riee and applet 251

Oolden pipptna d la erhme 251

Golden pi lyim (anotker tooy ) . . . 252

Stewed pi]^iM 253

Pippioa with rice 253

Green codlings, frosted with

•Qgar 254

Tobakepean 254

ChMMobeny fool 256

Bt^DetBdritalimme 255

Bcjgneto^ Feau 256

Lemon Imtter, with aweetmeats 256

Lemon and oiaage loaTea 257

C^ompote of onagea 257

ChaatOlrbaaket 258

Derilledalmonda 268

Almond coatarda, 258

Almond hog*8 paddings 259

Almond paate 259

Minuigles 260

Gaofres 260

Notints 261

Danoles 261

Cannaway puffs 262

Cnrdpnffs 262

Water ices of omiges, or le- mons 262

lee cream 263

Tea cream 263

Vimncream 264

Coneecream 264

Coffee cream (ano^^tMi^) 264

Burnt cream *i64

Paatnr cream 265

A wnip for trifle, or marma- lade 265

A whip for creams, or trifles. . . . 265

Whipped jelly for a moald 266

Trifle 266

To make syllabub 266

Syrup of ffolden pippins 267

fihrrupof cloTes, «c ^7

Nutmeg syrup 268

Byrup of roses 268

Syrup of capillaire 269

To make capillaire 269

Orgeat 269

Ijemonade, or orangeade 270

Milk punch 270

Blancmange 270

Blancmange of almonds 271

Bkncmange of flowers 271

PA6JE

Bhucmaage with fruita. 271

Riband blancmange 272

Dutch blancmange 272

Cleared calTs feet jdly 272

Marbled jeUy 273

SaToty jelly 2IZ

Toprcaervecherrieafertaita... 274

Dried cherriea 274

Cherriea in bnuray, for dca-

serU 275

To p reser v e cnnania 275

To pnssei vc baibeiiiea £tv

To bottle gooaebcniea, &c for

tarts -276

To bottle gooeeberriea {amatker

tiwjr) 277

Piesoired apricots for tarte, or

desserts 277

Peachea, neetarines, &c. pre- served in brandy 278

Raspber^jam 278

Apncotjam 278

Greengage jam 279

Quince jam 279

Currant jdly. 279

Peach, or neetarine ieUy 280

Candied orange, or lemon peels 280

To make melon citron 280

Orange marmalade 281

Orange marmalade, {(uudker

icajf) 282

Apricot cheese 282

To preserve beef suet for fry- ing, or paste 282

Monlpelher butter 262

To preserve butter 283

To clarify butter for potting ... 283 Obserration on stores 283

VARIOUS RECEIPTS.

Pyramid of paste 284

Pyramid of paste {another tec^) 285

A hermitage of paste 285

Almond paste for ornamenting. 286 To prepare sugar for a carmcd,

or basket 286

To clarify sugar, or carmel 287

Flowers in sugar 288

To make wax baskets 288

To clarify innglass 289

CONTENTS.

XV

PAGE

Iceing for tarts 289

Iceing for a cake 289

To make red colouring for pip- pin paste, &c. or for gamisn-

ing twelfth cakes 289

Gum paste for ornamenting cakes, &c 289

PAGE

To choose cochineal 290

To prepare cochineal 290

Colours for gamishinff 290

A perfume for general purposes 291 A bill of &re for the several months 293

THB

ABT OF COOKERY.

SOUPS, BROTHS, &c.

CULLIS, OR A THICK GRAVY.

TaK£ slices of ham, veal, celery, carrots, turnips, onions, leeks, a small bunch of sweet herbs, some allspice, black pepper, mace, a piece of lemon-peel, and two bay leaves; put them into a pan with a quart of water, and draw them down till of a light brown colour, but be careful not to let them burn; then add a sufficient quantity of beef broth to cover them. When it boils skim it very clean from fat, and thicken it with flour and butter passed. Let it boil gently three quarters of an hour; season with Cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and salt; strain through a sieve, and add a little colouring liquid.

B

2 ART OF COOKERY.

BECHAMEL.

Take white veal, lean ham, turnips, celery, onions cut in pieces, a blade of mace, and a little whole white pepper; sweat them down till three parts tender, then add some beef broth. Let it boil, skim it clean, and thicken it with flour and butter passed; then add a suffident quantity of cream to make it quite white. Let it sinmier gently half an hour, and strain it through a sieve. It should be of the thickness of light batter.

TO MAKE A PASSING OF FLOUR AND BUTTER.

Put fresh butter into a stewpan over a fire; when it is melted, add a sufficient quantity of sifted flour to form a paste, and mix them together with a whisk over a very slow -fire for ten minutes.

COLOURING LIQUID.

Put three ounces of brown sugar and. a gill of water into a clean frying-pan; set it over a slow fire, and stir with a wooden spoon, tiU the Uquid is thoroughly burnt, and of a good bright colour. Add half a pint of water; when it boils, skim and strain it Let it settle; then pour it off, and preserve it in a bottle for use.

A GREEN COLOURING FOR SOUPS OR SAUCES.

Pick and wash three or four handsful of parsley;

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 3

squeeze it dry, and pound it in a mortar; then rub it through a tamis cloth or sieve. Put the pulp in a gallipot, and set it in a pan of boiling water over the fire; and when it becomes very hot, put it aside in a cool place till wanted.

VEAL BROTH.

Take a leg of veal, a small quantity of lean of ham, a couple of old fowls, and some game; cut them up, and put them in a pot with a quart of water. Stew for half an hour; then add a little allspice, and a blade or two of mace, and pour in some beef broth, made as directed in the following receipt Let it boil till the meat is tender; strain, and let it stand in a cool place till the next day.

This broth is the foundation of all soups. Brown soups should be coloured with a small quantity of colouring liquid, and may be cleared with the white and yolk of an egg, if approved. Be careful to remove the fat before clearing.

BEEF BROTH.

Cut chuck-beef, the shins, or leg, into small pieces, and put them in a pot on the fire widi water sufficient to cover them. Steam for half an hour, and then fill the pot with water. Let it boil; then sldm it clean, and add carrots, turnips, onions, and eeiery. Let it simmer till the meat is tead^; then strain it

b2

4 ART OF COOKERY.

LEG OF BEEF SOUP.

Bone a leg of bee^ and put it into a stewpan, with three quarts of veal broth; add carrots, tur- nips, onions, some allspice, six shalots, a clove of garlic, and a small bunch of parsley, marjoram, basil, savory, and thyme. When it boils, skim it clean, and let it stew till done; then take the leg of beef out of the liquor, and cut it into dice. Have ready three calf's feet boiled till done, and cut in the same manner. Strain the liquor of the beef and feet, and thicken it with flour and butter passed; add a gill of Port wine, and seascm with Cayenne pepper, salt, and a little lemon juice; add the meats, and boU all together for half an hour; then serve in a tureen.

MUTTON BROTH.

Take a neck of mutton cut into pieces, preserv- ing a handsome piece to be served up in the tureen. Put all in a stewpot, with three quarts of cold beef broth, or water with a little oatmeal mixed in it, some turnips, onions, leeks, celery cut in pieces, and a small bunch of thyme and parsley. When it boils, skim it clean, and take the piece of mutton out when nearly done, letting the rest boil till tender; then have ready turnips cut in form of dice, some leeks, celery, half a cabbage, and parsley, all cut small, and some marigolds; strain

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C« 5

the liquor of the meat, skim it free from fat, and add the. above ingredients to it, with the piece of mutton, and a little pearl barley, if approved; sea- son with salt, simmer all together till done, and serve with toasted bread on a plate.

SOUP OF MUTTON CHOPS, CUCUMBERS, &C.

Take cucambers cut into shapes, carrots, ttirnips, celery heads cut into lengths of two inches, and peeled button onions; stew them in a pint of veal broth till tender; then take out the vegetables, strain the liquor in which they were stewed, and reduce it nearly to a glaze; then add the vegetables again. Cut eight chops from a loin of mutton, trim them, and season with pepper, salt, a little grated nutmeg, and pounded mace, and boil them with a gill of white wine, in a pint of veal broth till nearly tender; then add the chops to the vegeta- bles, strain their liquor to them, and pour in two more quarts of veal broth. Boil all together gently for ten minutes, and serve in a tureen, with croutons of fried bread, and a few drops of colour.

lamb's head SOUP.

Halve the head, wash it clean, and put it into a stewpan with three quarts of veal broth. Boil it till tender; then wash the brains and liver, stew them tin tender in a pint of veal broth, rub them

b3

6 ART OF COOKERY.

through a tamis doth, and put the pulp to the head. Add half a pint of scalded asparagus heads. Stew gently for a quarter of an hour, and add a liaison of four yolks of eggs and half a pint of cream. Serve with croutons of fried bread in the tureen.

GRATT SOUP.

Boil some carrots and turnips cut small, celery heads in pieces not more than two inches long, and some peeled button onions, till they are nearly done; and scald, separately, some sorrel, lettuce, and chervil, cut small. Add them, when ready, to three quarts of veal broth made to boil. Season with salt, and add a little colottring liquid.

CLEARED GRAVY SOUP.

To three quarts of veal broth, perfectly free from &t, add an e^ beat up with the shell; boil gently fw five minutes, and add a few drops of colouring liquid. Then strain through a tamis doth.

PARTRIDGE SOUP.

Cut into pieces two or three old partridges or pheasants, an old fowl, some lean of ham, two heads of celery, two turnips, two onions, one carrot, a blade of mace, and a dove of garlic. Peel and wash the herbs: then put the game, &c. into a pot with one quart of water, cover it dose.

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 7

and steam till it is nearly done. Add three quarts of veal broth, and let it simmer for a quarter of an hour. Then strain it; and when cool, take the fat off, and clear it with the yolk and white of an egg beat up. Set it on the fire, and when it boils, pass it through a tamis cloth, add a few drops of odouring liquid, and season with Cayenne pepper and salt. Make it boil: then add some of the game, and serve it up. If approved, it may be thickened with flour and butter passed.

SOUP WITH PIGEONS AND POACHED EGGS.

Truss the pigeons as for a pie, and half fill them with forcemeat, having plenty of forced mush- rooms pounded in it. Scald and drain them dry; and put them in a stew-pan with a pint of veal broth. Stew till done; then make hot two quarts of veal broth, and add to it some carrots, turnips, peeled button onions, and cejery heads in lengths of two inches. Steam the vegetables separately before putting them into the broth. Season with salt, and make it boil; and five minutes before serving add the pigeons, and a liaison of four eggs, and half a pint of cream; and put some poached eggs into the tureen.

SOUP WITH CHICKEN AND SWEETBREAD.

Prepare a chicken as for a fricass^, and cut a

b4

8 ART or O0OKERY.

throat sweetbread in sUees. Scald them; then add a pint of veal broth and a blade of mace. Then take some green onions, cut small, and tiro turnips, and stew them till tender* Rub them through a tamis cloth, and add to the pulp five pints of veal broth. Let it boil; and then add the ehicken and sweetbread and a pint of young green peas. Season it:. and serve with croutons of fried bread.

HARE SOUP.

Take a hare, cleaned and skinned; bone it; cut the meat into pieces, and placing each piece in a bard of fat bacon, put the whole into a stew- pan. Add half a pint of Port wine, some allspice, a blade of mace, a bay leaf, three onions, and a clove of garlic. Stew till tender: then rub half the meat through a tamis cloth, keeping the remainder warm. Stew the bones with three quarts of veal broth, and the liquor in which the hare was stewed; and season with Cayenne pepper and salt. Then strain it; clear it with the white and yolk of an egg, and run it through a tamis cloth. Add the remaining pieces of hare to the cleared soup, and thicken it with a little flour and butter passed. Boil all together for a quarter of an hour, and serve in a tureen.

^--1

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 9

OIBLST SOUP*

Take three pair of goose giblets, scalded and cleaned, chop them into pieces of a convenient size, and put them into a stew-pan with two quarts of water. Boil them till they are half done, and then strain the Hquor into another stew-pan, containing three quarts of veal broth. Add marjoram, savory, thyme, basil, and parsley, chopped fine: and a sufficient quantity of pounded spices, such as, allspice, mace, cloves, and nut- megs; and also four large onions, twelve shalots, and a clove of garlic chopped fine. Let the whole be boiled for an hour. Then chop the bones off from each end of the giblets, and strain the liquor to them. Stew till they are done; then strain the liquor again, and thicken it with flour and butter passed. Let it boil gently for a time, and strain it to the giblets. Add some egg and force- meat balls scalded; and season with Cayenne pepper and salt. Boil all together; and five minutes before serving add half a pint of boiling Sherry wine, and the juice of a lemon.

REAL TURTLE.

Hang the turtle up by the hind fins with a cord, and cut the head off over night: the next morning cut off the fore fins at the joints, and the callipee all round. Take out the entrails and

b5

10 ART or COOKERY.

remove the lean from the bone. Scald the fins whole; and cat the callipee and callipash into pieces, and scald them. Then cut the fins into pieces about three inches long, wash them, and put them into a pot with water sufficient to cover them, and boil them with the bones till the fins and pieces of callipash, &c. are nearly done. Pick them free from bones, and, putting them into another pot, strain the liquor, and reduce it two- thirds by boiling. Then add to it a good quantity of strong veal broth, and some knotted mar- joram, savory, thyme, basil, parsley, twelve onions, twenty-four shalots, and about eighteen middling- sized cloves of garlic, all chopped fine, and also some pounded spices, such as nutmeg, allspice, cloves, mace, and a little ginger. Boil all together for an hour. Then cut the lean meat into pieces of ahout two ounces, strain some of the liquor to it, and boiling it till three parts done, put it into the pot with the fins, and the pieces df callipee and callipash. Then strain the whole of the liquor, and thicken it with a passing of flour and butter, taking care not to make it too thick. Season with Cayenne pepper and salt, add a pint of boiling Sherry wine, and strain it to the turtle, adding some scalded egg and forcemeat balls. If there is any green fat, boil it till tender, cut it into pieces, and put it to the turtle; and five minutes

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 11

before serviag, add another pint of boilmg Sherry mnef and some lemon juice. Let the whole .stew gently till tender, and serve in tureens.

If a callipash is served up, the shell should be cut down on each side, and the pieces chopped for the soup; the remaining part of the back shell to be pasted round with a raised crust, egged, ornamented, • and baked, and the soup served in it in the same manner as in the tureens.

CALLIPEE.

Take a quarter of the under part of a turtle of sixty pounds weight, scald it, take the shoulder- bone out, and fill the cavity with a good high- seasoned forcemeat, made with the lean of the turtle; put it into a stewpan, and add a pint of Madeira wine, Cayenne pepper, salt, lemon juice, a clove of garlic, a little mace, a few cloves and allspice tied in a bag, a bunch of sweet herbs, some whole onions, and three quarts of good beef broth. Stew gently till three parts done; then take the' turtle and put it into another stewpan, with some of the entrails boiled and some egg balls; add a little thickening of flour and butter to the liquor, let it boil, and strain it to the turtle, &c. then stew till tender, and the liquor almost reduced to a glaze. Serve in a deep dish, pasted round as a callipash, ornamented and baked.

b6

12 ART OF COOKERY.

The above mode of serving in a dish, is pro- bably the best, as it frequenily hiqppens the shell of the callipee is not properly baked.

MOCK TURTLE OR CALF's HEAD SOUP*

Take a cleaned head, scald it with three quarts of water till three parts done, and cut it into pieces of a middling size. Strain the liquor, and add to it three quarts of veal broth, the bones of the head, and the herbs and spices as directed for giblet soup, and let it boil for half an hour. Strain the liquor and thicken it with flour and butter passed. Season it with pepper and salt, and strain it to the pieces of the head. Then add some scalded forcemeat and egg-balls boiled gently till tender; and five minutes before serving add a little lemon juice, and half a pint of boiling Sherry wine.

CRAY FISH SOUP.

To three quarts of veal broth, add the crumb of two penny French rolls, the meat of a boiled lobster, and half a hundred cray-fish tails pounded. Let it boil; and then rub it through a tamis cloth. Season with a little Cayenne pepper and salt. Make it boil; pound some lobster-spawn, and strain it with a little flour and water into the soup.

OYSTER SOUP.

Scald a quart of oysters, strain the liquor, let it

SOUPS) BROTHS, &C. Id

«ettle, and put it to the fleshy part of the oysters. Then take two quarts of real broth, add the beards and gristly part, with a small quantity of pounded mace, and the crumb of two penny French roils. Make it boil, and rub it through a tamis cloth; then add all together; make it hot, and, five minutes before serving, add a liaison of three yolks of eggs and cream.

All white soups with a liaison of eggs and cream, should be set in a pot of boiling water.

FISH MEAGRE SOUP.

Take some cleaned skate, or other fish, cut it into pieces, and put it into a stew-pan with a blade of mace, two turnips, two good-sized onions, and two heads of celery, cut small. Stew gently with three quarts of water, (or the same quantity of veal broth if not for meagre soup,) till it is done; then add two anchovies boned, and strain and clear it with one egg beat up with a whisk. Add a little liquid of colour, and strain it through a tamis cloth; after which two ounces of vermicelli may be put into it.

SOUP AND BOUILLI.

Tie about three pounds of brisket of beef round with pack-thread, and stew it till tender; strain the liquor and reduce it nearly to a glaze. Have ready some carrots and turnips cut into shapes, celery heads in lengths of two inches,

14 ART OF COOKERY.

some peeled button onions, half a cabbage cut into shreds, some lettuces and Tarragon leaves cut small. Steam the vegetables till tbey are nearly done; then put them with the liquor of the beef reduced to three quarts of veal broth, and add a pint of young green peas sweated with a bit of fresh butter till half done. Untie the beef, take away the bones, add them to the soup, and boil gently for half an hour. Five minutes before serving, wipe the beef dry, glaze it, and serve it on a dish, and the soup and vegetables in a tureen.

CttESS SOUP.

Take twelve large red carrots, scrape them clean, cut off the red part only in thin slices, and put them into a stewpan with a quart of water; add cleaned turnips, celery, leeks, and onions, cut in pieces, and half a pint of split peas. Stew ail together till tender, adding some broth to prevent burning; then rub it through a tamis cloth, and put to the pulp five pints of veal broth, and some blanched water-cresses; boil for twenty minutes, skim, season with salt, and serve. It should be of the consistence of peas' soup.

A LA REINE SOUP.

To three quarts of veal broth, uncoloured, add the crumb of three penny French rolls, three-quar-

¦-» "¦ - • ¦ '^^^'^•^^^^m^m^fmmimmmm

SOUPS) BROTHS, &C. 15

ters of a pound of Jordan almonds, scalded and pounded fine, and the meat of a ready-dressed fowl, pounded with the abnonds. Let it boil; rub it through a tamis cloth, and set it for a while in a pot of boiling water over the fire. Before serving, add a liaison of the yolks of three eggs and half a pint of cream; and season with salt.

FOTAGE A LA R£iN£ f another way J.

Pound the white meat of dressed fowls, the yolks of four eggs boiled hard, and the crumb of two penny French rolh soaked in veal broth; then rub it through a tamis cloth, and add a sufficient quan- tity of good veal broth. Put the pan into a pot of boiling water, and let it remain on the fire till the soup is thoroughly hot. Have ready a chicken trussed for boiling, and stewed in a little water till tender, and add it and the liquor to the soup, toge- ther with half a pint of cream made hot, and the crust of a French roll cut into round pieces. A thin bard of bacon may be tied over the chicken to keep it white, but it must be removed on serving.

SOUP AUX GRENOUILLES.

After cleaning and scalding the frogs, cut off* the hind quarters, and boil them in a little milk till tender; then put the fore quarters into two quarts

It AftT OP COOK£kY.

of real broth, aad add two miioiis, two torn^ a little mace and nutmeg pounded, a small cl »Ye of gariic^ and the crumb of two penny French rolls. Boil all together till tender, and rub the whole throng^ a tamis cloth; then make it boiling hot^ and add the hind quarters of the frogs, and a liaisoa of four yolks of eggs and half a pint of cream. Season with salt

POTAGE AUX CHOUX.

Cut a fowl into joints, as for a fricassee, put it into a stewpan with three quarts of veal broth, and add to the broth a small quantity of basil, parsley, thyme, six shalots scalded and chopped fine, half a cabbage cut into shreds and scalded, some force- meat balls blanched, and some oysters blanched and bearded, with their liquor. Boil all together for twenty minutes, and serve in a tureen, with some croutons of fried bread in it

GEKEOISE SOUP.

Make a paste with the yolks of sue eggs boiled hard; mix with it the yolks of three raw eggs, some salt, and a spoonful of flour; then roll it out of a moderate thickness, cut it into square pieces, lay upon each square a bit of Quenelle forcemeat, and, folding each into the form of a puif, boil them for half an hour. Strain them, and add them to three quarts of veal broth. Boil some spinach,

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 17

squeeze and chop it, and put it into the soup, and add a liaison. Take care that it does not curdle.

SOUP A LA JULIENNE.

Cut into pieces some spring carrots, turnips, green onions, celery, leeks, parsley, sorrel, cher- vil, the tops of a bundle of spruce-grass, some spinach and cabbage-lettuces, and, adding a pint of fresh green peas, stew the whole till tender. Rub it through a tamis cloth, and mix with the pulp three quarts of veal broth, and half a pint of aspa- ragus-tops scalded. Let it boil till the asparagus is done; and five minutes before serving, colour it with spinach-juice rubbed through a tamis cloth.

FLEMISH SOUP.

To the crumb of two penny French rolls, add three quarts of veal broth; and, when nearly boil- ing, mix with it three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, and rub it through a tamis cloth. Cut a cabbage into shreds, scald it, and put it to the soup; and, if approved, a chicken may be boiled in it. Season with salt and a little Cayenne pepper, and, five minutes before serving, add a liaison of four yolks of eggs and half a pint of cream.

VERMICELLI SOUP. (White.)

Boil three quarts of veal broth, and two ounces of vermicelli together for ten minutes, then rub it

18 ABT OF COOKERY.

through a tamis cloth, and season with salt Make it boil, skim it, and add a liaison of eggs and cream; or, it may be made with cleared gravy soup, adding the vermicelli, and letting it simmer for ten minutes.

RICE OR VERMICELLI SOUP.

May be made in the same manner with the cleared broth, by adding the rice whole when boiled tiU half done, and the vermicelli when washed.

WHITE RICE SOUP.

Pick and wash two ounces of rice, and boil them in a pint of milk till it is nearly absorbed, then add three quarts of veal broth, and season with salt; let the rice boil till tender, and five minutes before serving, add a liaison of three yolks of eggs and cream. Have ready a knuckle of veal, which has been boiled in a quart of water with a blade of mace till tender. Strain the liquor, skim it free from fat, and add it to the soup. For a knuckle of veal may be substituted two calf's feet boiled till tender; and the bones being afterwards taken out, the feet and liquor must be added to the soup; or a fowl may be cut into quarters, and, being prepared in the same manner, may be put into the soup.

RICE SOUP.

To three quarts of cleared broth add two ounces

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 19

of lice, washed, picked, parboiled, and drained dry. Let it boil gently till the rice is tender.

MACCARONI AND PARMESAN CHEESE SOUP.

Take a quarter of a pound of riband maccaroni, and boil it till tender in a quart of veal broth; then add three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, a small quantity of pounded mace, and five pints more of veal broth; boil all together five minutes, and rub it through a tamis cloth; then boil it again for ten minutes, skim it, season it with salt and Cayenne pepper, .and add a liaison of four yolks of eggs and cream.

ONION SOUP.

Take eight middling-sized peeled onions, cut them into very thin slices, and pass them with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and flour, till tender; then add three quarts of veal broth, and boil for twenty minutes; skim it, season with salt, and add a liaison. Mix it weU with a whisk, make it simmer, and serve.

CELERY soup.

Cut the heads into lengths of two inches, and the white part into small pieces; wash, blanch, and drain them; then put them into three quarts of

20 ART OF COOKERY*

cleared gravy soup, and boil gently till tender; add a little Cayenne pepper and salt

TURNIP SOUP.

Peel the turnips, cut them into shapes, and fry them till of a nice colour, then drain them into a cloth, and put them into three quarts of plain cleared gravy soup; let them simmer till done, and season with Cayenne pepper and salt.

CHESTNUT SOUP.

Peel thirty roasted chestnuts, and pound them in a mortar, then put them into a stewpan with the crumb of two penny French rolls, and add three quarts of veal broth; make it boil, and rub it through a tamis cloth. Then bone a pheasant, scald it, and let it boil gently in the soup till tender; and peel twenty chestnuts, boiled till nearly done, and put them to the soup: five minutes before serving, add a liaison of four yolks of eggs^ and half a pint of cream; season with salt.

GREEN PEAS* SOUP.

Take one quart of young green peas, four turnips pared and cut in the form of dice, two Cos lettuces cut into small slices, and two middling-sized onions cut very fine; wash them, add a quarter of a pound.

SOUPS, BROTHS, &C. 21

of fresh butter, and stew them till nearly done* Then take two quarts of large fresh green peas, and boil them in three quarts of veal broth till tender; strain and pound them, preserving the liquor; then rub the peas through a tamis cloth, add the pulp with the liquor to the above herbs, a little flour and water, pepper and salt, and season with a bit of sugar, if approved: boil altogether half an hour; skim it, and when it is to be served, add the pulp of some boiled parsley rubbed through a tamis cloth to make it look green. Cut pieces of bread into thin sippets, dry them before the fire, and serve on a plate.

Meagre green peas' soup may be made in the same manner, substituting three quarts of water for the veal broth,

OLD PEAS* SOUP.

Take the red part only of three carrots, cleaned, six turnips, four onions, three heads of celery, peeled and cut small, a pint of split peas, and a little dried mint. Put them into a stew-pan with a quart of water, and stew till tender; then rub them through a tamis cloth, add to the pulp three quarts of veal or other broth, and season with pepper and salt; then add some turnips peeled and cut into dice, and some celery and leeks cut fine. Boil all together for half an hour; some pieces of pickled

22 ART OF COOKERY.

pork may be boiled and added to the soup tea minutes before serving. Serve with bread cut into the form of dice and fried brown.

SOUP FOR A FAMILY.

Cut the particles of meat from the trimmings of different joints, as beef, mutton, veal, pork, &c., put the bones into a pot with water sufficient to cover them, and boil them till the goodness is ex- tracted; then strain the liquor, and wash the trim- mings of the vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, onions, leeks, celery, and a little cabbage. Cut all small, and put them into a pot with the above liquor and some split peas; let it boil till the peas are tender; add a little dry mint, and rub it through a tamis cloth; then season the meat with pepper and salt, sweat it down till three parts tender, and add the pulp. Boil all together till the meat is done; skim it, and serve with fried bread in the form of dice.

CONSOMME, OR THE ESSENCE OF MEAT.

Reduce veal broth to a good consistence, but be careful not to let it colour.

GLAZE FOR HAMS, LARDING, ROASTED POULTRY,

&C

Take a leg of veal, some lean of ham, beef, some indifferent fowls, celery, turnips, carrots,

SOUPS) BROTHS, &C. 23

onions, leeks cleaned and cut into pieces, a little lemon peel, mace, and black pepper, and sweat them down in three quarts of water till three parts done; then add a sufficient quantity of water to cover the meat, and boil it till the goodness is ex- tracted; skim it, and strain the liquor into a large pan. Next day carefully remove the fat, set the broth over a fire, and when warm clear it with whites and a few yolks of eggs; then add a little colour and strain it through a tamis cloth, boil it quickly till reduced to a gllu^e, and be careful not to let it bum.

In the same manner may be made a glaze of separate herbs or roots, which will be serviceable on board ship, or in the country, where herbs or roots cannot be procured at all times. It must be pre- served in bottles.

GLAZE FOR MEATS, &C.

Take good veal broth, clear it with one yolk, and two whites of eggs, beat together; make it boil, and run it through a tamis cloth; then boil it over a brisk fire till reduced to a glaze, and preserve it in a small pot close covered.

TOMATO GLAZE FOR SAUCES.

Gather the tomatoes when perfectly ripe, put them into a stewpan over a moderate fire, and when

13

24 ART OF COOKERY.

they are dissolved^ ruii the liqi»r throng a ueve. To eyerjr quart of juioe, pot two ounces of aneho- vies boned, two ounces of shalots, chopped, and half an ounce of garlic. Let it boil for an kottr; then rub it through a fine sieve, reduee the liquor a fourth, and mix with it an equal quantity of glaze of meat Put it into gallipots; and when the glaze is cold, tie the pots over with bladder and leather, and set them in a cool place.

FISH.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

Fish should be chosen very fresh and of good appearance; but, as an exception, skate will be better for eating if kept for one or two days in a cool place before it is dressed.

Fish plain boiled should be prepared Aus: - Put them into dean boiling pump water well salted, and on serving garnish with fresh pidced parsley and scraped horse-radish. Salt fish should be properly soaked, then cut in pieces and put into cold water, and, after boiling, let it simmer six or eight minutes, and serve on a napkin, with boiled parsnips and potatoes round, or on a plate, and egg sauce in a boat.

FISH. 25

The fish generally fried, are r - Skate, whitings^ haddocks, smelts, soles, perch, flounders, halibut, cod.

These should be prepared for frying in the fol-« lowing manner:- Wipe them dry, beat up tihe yolk of an egg9 and spread it over them with a paste brush: then put crumbs of bread over the egg. Have plenty of lard in an iron fiying-pan, and when it almost boils put a proper quantity, and fry them of a fine gold colour; drain them dry, and serve with fried parsley and scraped horse-radish ^.

Broiled fish should be prepared thus: - Wipe the fish dry, flour them well, and have the gridiron clean; then rub the bars with a veal caul, and put the fish at proper distances^ Broil them gently over a clear coal fire till of a fine colour, and serve directly.

Fish in general should be floured, except her- rings, which must only be scored with a knife. The methods of broiling particular fish will be specified.

£NTRE£ OF SALMON.

Make white paper cases, and put a little sweet oil at the bottom of each. Cut some fresh salmon

' The crumbs should be rubbed through a hair sieve. The parsley should be picked, washed, and dried with a doth, then put into the lard, taking care that this is not very hot, and fried of a green colour. Drain it dry, and sprinkle a little salt on it.

C

26 ART OF COOKERY.

into pieces, pepper and salt, and put them into the cases; then set them over a 6re on a baking plate and in a stew-pan covered over, with a fire at top and bottom. When broiled enough, serve with poached eggs on the top of the salmon, and anchovy sauce in a boat '

£NTK££ of fresh SALMON AND CAPERS.

Cut fbds/lbin slices of j&esh salmon; have ready a small qqantity of parsley, tiiyme, basil, and shalots, chopped very fine, and mixed with a little sweet oil, the yolks of two eggs, Cayenne pepper, and salt; dip the slices of fish into this mix- ture separately, afterwards strew them with fine bread crumbs; put them into boiling lard, fry them of a good colour, drain dry, and serve with a sauce made with cullis and chopped capers.

ENTREE OF A JOLE OF SALMON.

Take a jole of salmon, scald and clean it; lard the thick part with slips of fat bacon cut square, and larded with a larding pin. Then put it into a stew-pan with two onions, six shalots, chopped fine, a small bundle of thyme, some basil, two laurel leaves, four cloves, a little Cayenne pepper, a pint of Sherry wine, and a little salt. Set it over the fire, and stew till the salmon is done. Then take it out of the liquor, and put it upon a dish; and

FISH. 27

when the fish is cold, garnish the dish with savcKry jelly. The salmon should be ornameated with Montpelier butter«.and the centre with savory jelly. The liquor in which the fish was stewed should be reduced to a strong consistence, and put under the salmon.

BROILED SALMON.

Take some pieces or slices, wipe them dry, dip them in sweet oil, and season with pepper and salt; fold them in pieces of writing paper, brml oyer a clear fire, and serve very hot

Red mullets are to be cooked in a similar way.

DRIED SALMON WITH POACHED EGGS.

Take four thin slices of salmon, soak them in milk three hours, then wipe them dry, and broil them over a clear fire; when done serve up on fried or toasted bread, with eight poached eggs over the salmon. A sauce made with a little essence of veal, cream, and yolk of eggs, should be put round the toasts.

ENTREE OF CRIMPED COD.

Take a slice of crimped cod, cut three inches thick; put it into boiling salt and water; let it boil ten minutes, then pick it into flakes; when they are cool, have ready a batter made with flour, sweet oil, a table-spoonful of white wine, and a little salt;

c2

28 ART OF COOKERY.

make some lard boiling hot, dip each flake into the batter, and fry of a nice colour; drain them dry, and serve with fried parsley sound, and oyster sauce in a butter-boat

SLICES OF COD FRIED WITH OYSTERS.

Egg, bread-crumb, and fry in boiling lard, some slices of crimped cod; when done, drain them dry, and serve with ojrster sauce in the centre, made in the same manner as for beef steaks.

ENTREE OF TURBOT BAKED.

Take a middling sized turbot, well cleaned; fill the cavity near the head with some light forcemeat well seasoned, then wash the best side over with white of egg, and strew fine bread crumbs upon it; bake it gently till of a brown colour. Serve with a sauce under it, made with a gill of cullis, half a table- spoonful of anchovy essence, half a gill of Madeira wine, three ounces of fresh butter, and the juice of a lemon, mixed well together over a fire.

Turbols may be cooked and served in the sAune manner, with a Dutch sauce, or with lobster or shrimp sauc^ not made too thick, and a liaison of two yolks of 9gg^ and half a gill of cream added five minutes before serving.

FISH. 29

ENTREE OF 8LICE8 OF STURGEON.

Cut the slices very thin, put them into a stew- pan over a fire, with parsley, thyme, and shalots chopped very fine, two ounces of fresh butter, grated nutmeg, pepper, salt, and a little lemon juice; when three parts done lay them upon a dish, and when cool put each slice between some light forcemeat, which egg and strew over with fine bread crumbs. Fry them gently in boiling lard till the forcemeat and fish are done; then drain them dry and serve with sauce under, made with strong cullis, a small quantity of Madeira wine, and some chopped capers.

ROASTED PIKE OR STURGEON.

Let the fish be well cleaned, then make a stuffing of capers, anchovies, parsley and thyme chopped fine, a little grated nutmeg and lemon peel, pepper, salt, bread crumbs, fresh butter, and an egg. Fill the fish and sew it up; turn it round, and fasten the head to the tail; then egg the fish over and bread-crumb it; after which bake or roast it gently till done, and of a good brown colour. Serve with a sauce over it made of cullis, fresh butter, Cayenne pepper, anchovy essence, and lemon pickle.

ENTREE OF MACKEREL*

Split them down the back, season with pepper

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32 ART OF COOKERY.

TO SALT HADDOCKS OR WHITINGS.

Clean the fish, and split them open, lay them in salt for two days, then wipe them dry, and sprinkle them over with a little powdered alum. Hang them up in a warm place.

ENTREE OF SOLES (EN MATELOTTE).

Let good-sized soles be cleaned and filleted; roll them up, put them into a stew-pan, add a little fresh butter, lemon juice, pepper, and salt, and simmer them over a slow fire till done. Serve with a sauce over, made of button onions, mush- rooms, egg balls, pickled cucumbers scooped round, slices of sweetbreads, and good strong cullis co- loured with lobster spawn; and add the essence of the fillets of soles.

The above fillets may be fried, and served with the sauce round.

ENTREE OF FILLETS OF SOLES WITH LOBSTER, &C.

Wipe half the quantity of fillets dry, roll them up and tie them with thread; then egg, bread- crumb, and fry them of a nice colour; have ready the other part rolled up likewise, and boil them in salt and water. When they are done, put the boiled and fried alternately into a dish, and serve with lobster or Dutch sauce under.

The meat of the lobster should be pounded and

FISH. 33

rabbed through a sieve, the pulp added instead of pieces, and made in the same manner as lobstec sauce.

OLIVES OF SOLES.

Fillet two large soles, and wipe them dry; then wash the inside of each over with white of egg; lay a little light forcemeat, made with some of the fish, instead of meat; roll them up and run a small wooden skewer through; afterwards dip each sepa- rately into a batter made with two ounces of sifted flour, a little salt and sweet oil, a table-spoonful of white wine, and two eggs; the batter should be well beaten. Have ready some boiling lard, fry the fillets of a brown colour, and drain them dry. Serve with some good bechamel sauce under.

ENTREE OF HERRINGS.

Take eight fresh herrings, wipe them dry, and score them with a knife; have ready a mixture of parsley and shalots chopped very fine, a table- spoonful of sweet oil, and a little salt; dip the fish separately in the mixture, and afterwards roll them in fine bread crumbs; broil them over a clear fire; when done, serve them very hot; the sauce, made with melted butter, mustard, catchup, and a little vinegar, to be served in a butter boat.

ENTREE OF SMELTS, &C.

Clean, turn round, and fry of a good colour,

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34 ART OV COOKERY.

some fresh smeks; three parts bml a slice of fresh crimped cod cut two inches thick; pull it into flakes; have ready some bechamel, whisk it with the yolks of two eggs, add the flakes of the cod, season with salt and lemon juice, and simmer the fish over a slow fire till done. Serve with the fried smelts round the dish, and a few over the stew.

TO PICKLE SMELTS.

Lay four dozen smelts in rows in a jar, then make a pickle of half a pint of Port wine, a lemon cut in slices, a pint of the best vinegar, a small quantity of pounded ginger, nutmeg, mace, pepper, salt, cochineal, saltpetre, sugar, and a bay leaf. Boil the ingredients together, skim clean, and put it to the smelts; pour over when cold a little sweet oil; tie the jar down close with some bladder and leather; set it in a cool place.

ENTREE OF SKATE.

Boil four or five rings of best crimped skate in strong salt and water gently for ten minutes; drain it very dry and put it upon a dish; have ready a sauce made with a little scalded parsley, chopped fine, some liver of the skate boiled and rubbed through a sieve, a little mustard and melted butter, a gill of veal broth, a gill of cream, and the yolks of four eggs, whisked together over a fire, and made nearly to boil. Serve it over the fish.

nsn. 35

EKTRB£ OF EELS.

Take some good-sized eels, bone and cut them in pieces of three inches long; pass them over a slow fire in a small quantity of sweet herbs and shalots, fresh butter, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When three parts done put all on a dish, and dip each piece in the liquor; bread-crumb, and broil them over a clear fire. Serve them with anchovy sauce in a boat

ENTREE OF EELS (another way).

Take two large eels, bone and lay them flat, put upon each some light forcemeat well seasoned, roll them up separately, bind them round with tape, and put them into a stew-pan with a gill of Madeira wine, one dove of garlic, half a bay leaf, four peeled shalqts, a little thyme, and a pint of veal broth. Stew till done, then strain the liquor, skim it free from fat, season and thicken with flour and water, and reduce it to half a pint; put the eels into a deep dish, glaze the tops, and serve with the sauce under, and sippets of fried bread round the dish.

COLLARED EELS.

Skin and bone two large eels, lay them flat, and season with pl^enty of parsley, a shalot chopped very fine, and a small quantity of pepper, salt, beaten spices, and mushroom powder. Then roll

c6

36 ART OF COOKERY.

and bind them tight with tape^ put them into a stew- pan with a pint of veal broth, half a gill of lemon pickle, and a gill of white wine; simmer them over a fire till done, and put them on a dish; skim the liquor free from fat, season with salt, clear it with two eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth, boil it down gently till of a strong jelly, and put it into a basin. When the eels are cold, take off the tape, trim the ends, wipe them dry, and serve them with the jelly round them, a few bunches of pickled barberries on their tops, and slices of lemon round the rim of the dish.

Should the liquor be pale on clearing, add a few drops of colouring liquid.

STEWED CARP OR TENCH fwiA SaUCeJ.

Clean the fish and roe; stew them gently in half a pint of good veal broth till nearly done; then take a gill of veal consomme, an onion, and six shalots chopped fine, a bit of lemon peel, and three anchovies, which boU together for five mi- nutes. Then add the liquor of the fish, and strain it to half a pint of cream, three ounces of fresh butter, the yolks of four eggs and a little elder vin^;ar. Whisk it over the fire till it thickens, but be eareful not to let it burn. Set the fish upon a dish, and pour the sauce over it Put sippets of fried bread round it

CARP£ ROTALE*

Scale, clean, and cut the fish into pieces, then stew them with a pint of red wine, and when they are nearly done, take them out, and add to the liquor a gill of good cullis, a bay leaf, an anchovy, a clove of garlic, a bit of fresh butter, some Cayenne pepper, and salt, and a gill of tamarind juice. Boil all together for twenty minutes, strain it to the carp, and simmer gently till the fish is done. On serving add some fried button onions drained upon a cloth, and garnish the dish with small patties.

PIPER, WITH DUTCH SAUCE.

Clean the fish, put a forcemeat into it, and sew it up. Brush it over with yolk of egg, roll it in fine bread crumbs, then brush it over with oiled butter, roll it again in more crumbs, and bake it of a nice colour. Serve with Dutch sauce, or with culbs; if with the latter, put in some capers chop- ped fine.

SPRATS TO RESEMBLE ANCHOVIES.

Mix together half a pound of common salt, half a pound of bay salt, and a quarter of a pound of sifted loaf sugar. Then spread a layer of wiped sprats at the bottom of a jar, and sprinkle some of the mixture over them: lay another layer of sprats

38 ART OF COOKERY.

above this, and so on alternately till the jar is full. Tie a bladder and leather over them, and set them in a cool dry place. Turn the jar frequently.

TO DR£SS WHITE BAIT.

This is a fish peculiar to Greenwich and Black- iKralL It resembles a sprat, and is in high season in June and July. It is caught at high tide.

Put the fish into water the instant they are caught; and when wanted to be dressed, take out a handful, allowing them to drain through the fingers. Put them on a cloth with plenty of flour, and pass the fish lightly forwards and backwards, till the flour adheres to them. Sift them lightly through a corn sieve, and fry them in boiling hot lard, for not more than five minutes. Take them out with a spoon having holes, into a colander, sprinkle a little salt over them, and serve immediately, with a plate of bread and butter in slices, and a le^on. Some prefer Cayenne pepper on another plate.

TO J'EED OYSTERS.

Wash fresh live oysters very clean, and put them into a shallow tub, with the bottom shell downwards. Sprinkle them with salt and fine oat* meal, and pour in just sufficient spring water to cover them. Repeat the same for three days.

7

-H

nsn. 89

SCALLOPED OYSTSRS.

Blanch and strain the oysters; then add to their liquor, which must be free from sediment, a large piece of fresh butter, a little pepper and salt, some lemon peel, and grated nutmeg. Beard and wash the fish, add them to the ingredients, sinmier them oyer a fire five minutes, and put them into scallop ^ells with the liquor. If there be more than suffident, boil it till nearly reduced and add it; then put fine bread crumbs over, smooth them with a knife, and shake a little sweet oil over the bread crumbs with a paste brush. Bake or set them over a fire upon a gridiron for half an hour, and colour the top part with a salamander.

SCALLOPED OYSTERS {Another way).

Put some fine bread crumbs and sweet oil to- gether; mould the shells with the mixture, and bake of a nice colour. Ten minutes before serving, fill the shells with stewed oysters, done in the same manner as above, and when they are to be sent to table, pour over the oysters a little hot cream which has been boiled down.

TO FRY OYSTERS.

Open twenty-four large oysters; blanch them with their own liquor; and when three parts done, strain them, and preserve the liquor; then wash and let them drain. In the mean while make a

40 ABT OF GOOKEKT.

batter with four taUe-cpoonsfiil of flour, two ^^ a little pepper and salt, and the liquor. Beat it well with a wooden spoom or a whisk for five minutes. Put the oysters into the batter, mix them lightly, and have ready boiling laid. Take the oysters out singly with a fork, put them into the lard, and fry them of a nice brown colour. Then put them on a drainer, strew over a small quantity of salt, and serve. K they are for a dish, put fried parsley, or stewed spinach, under them.

RAGOUT OF OYSTERS, &C.

Blanch two dozen large oysters, and preserve the liquor; then wash and beard the oysters, put them into a stew-pan, add to them some stewed mush- rooms, and a throat sweetbread blanched and cut into thin slices. Make a sauce with the liquor strained from the sediment, a gill of essence of veal, some catchup, lemon pickle, Cayenne pepper and salt; thicken with flour and butter, add a little colour, and strain to the oysters and sweetbreads; stew them gently ten minutes, and serve them with fried bread round the dish.

PICKLED OYSTERS.

Put two dozen large oysters into a stew-pan over a fire with their liquor only, and boil them five minutes; then strain the liquor into another

FISH. 41

Stew-pan, and add to it a bay leaf, a little Cayenne pepper, salt, a gill and a half of vinegar, half a gill of catchup, a blade of mace, some allspice, and a bit of lemon peel. Boil it till three parts reduced, then beard and wash the oysters, put them to the pickle, and boil them together two minutes. When they are to be served, place the oysters in rows, and strain the liquor over them. Garnish the dish with slices of lemon or with barberries.

POTTED LOBSTER.

Boil two live lobsters in strong salt and water till half done: then take the meat and spawn out of the shells, put it into a stew-pan, add a little beaten and sifted mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, salt, a small quantity of lemon juice, a spoonful of essence of ham, a dessert spoonful of anchovy liquor, and simmer them over a fire for ten minutes. Then pound the meat in a mortar, reduce the liquor almost to a glaze, put it to the meat with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, mix them well together, press the mixture down into small flat preserving pots, cover with clarified butter, and when cold, put white paper over the pots, and set them in a dry place.

Prawns, shrimps, cray-fish, and crabs, may be done in the same manner.

42 ART OF COOKERY.

BUTTERED LOBSTERS.

Boil two lobsters till half done; then take off the tails, cut the bodies in halves, pick out the meat, and leave the shells whole. Break the taUs and daws, cut the meat very small, and put it into a stew-pan with a table-spoonful of the essence of ham, two ounces of fresh butter, half a gill of consomme and cream, a little beaten mace, one shalot and parsley chopped very fine, and a few bread crumbs. Mix all together over a fire for five minutes, season with Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice; fill the reserved shells with the mixture, strew fine bread crumbs over, and bake gently twenty minutes. Before serving colour the crumbs with a salamander.

Crabs may be prepared in the same maimer.

ASPIC OF FISH.

Put into a plain tin or copper mould warm savory jelly about an inch and a half deep; then take fresh smelts turned round, boil them gently in strong salt and water till done, and lay them on a drainer. When the savory jelly in tl e mould is quite cold, put the smelts upon it with the best side downwards; then put a little more jelly just lukewarm over the fish, and when that is cold fill the mould with more of the same kind. When it

FISH. 43

18 to be served dip the mould in warm water, put the dish upon the jelly, and turn it oyer.

Pieces of lobsters, fillets of soles, &e. may be done in the same manner.

TO STEW FISH.

Add to some cullis a few chopped shalots, anchovies, a bay leaf, horse-radish scraped, a small quantity of lemon peel, and some Port wine; season it well with Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice; and when it boils, and is of a proper thickness, strain it to the fish; then stew it gently, and serve in « deep dish with the liquor, and fried bread round it. If carp or tench, some of the hard roe should be mixed in batter and fried in pieces. The roes likewise of different fish may be stewed in the same manner, and served as a dish of them- selves. Eels, soles, or other fish may be done the same way.

ENTREE OF FISH IN A MOULD.

Wipe a tin mould clean, and rub the inside with fresh butter; strew the bottom with grated Parmesan cheese an inch thick, covering it with a layer of boiled riband maccaroni, of the same thickness^ and over this some fish of any kind, boned, cut into pieces, and strewed with herbs, such as parsley, thjrme, and shalots, chopped very fine, and a small quantity of beaten spices

W ART OT COOKEBY.

and Cayenne pepper, and then a layer of d roni and ParmcBan cheese. Put the fish into a moderate oven, bake it one hour, then turn it awe- fully out of the mould into a disli, and serve with Bome strong cuUis round it

WATER SOUCHV OF PERCH, FLOUNDERS, SOLES, EELS, &C.

Boil skate or other fish into a soup; let it settle, and add it to a little boiling pump water well sea- sonedwith salt; when it boils, skim it clean. Boil the fish five minutes; take them out with a lai^e skimmer, put them into a deep dish, strew parsley roots and scalded parsley over, and add some of the liquor of the parsley roots. Serve as hot as possible, with slices of brown bread and butter on a plate.

The time the fish are to boil must be regulated by their size; and the parsley roots should be cleaned, cut into slips, and boiled by themselves till tender.

BAtONETS OF FISH.

Make a tight forcemeat with fish of any kind.

Afterwards put a small quantity into pieces of puff

paste, the size of a common puff; then fry them in

lard, and drain them dry. Serve with

it bechamel sauce round tbem.

&c. may be done the same way.

VIBH* 45

BACQUILLIO WITH HERBS.

Let the fish be veil soaked; then boil them and pick free from bone. Wash and chop small some spinach, sorrel, green onions, and parsley; after, wliich add fresh butter, essence of anchovies, Cayenne pepper, and plenty of the juice of Seville oranges. Sweat the herbs down, add the fish, and simmer them till tender.

ENTREE OF FISH IN BALLS«

Bone a haddock, or any kind of fish, then pomul the meat in a mortar, add to it a small quantity oC parsley, thyme, basil, and shalots, chopped very fine, some beaten spices, one table-spoonful iKC white wine, Cayenne pepper, salt, some bread crumbs, half a gill of cream, and the yolks of four eggs; likewise two whites of eggs beat to a solid froth; mix all well together, roll it into balls the size of a small walnut, and put them into boiling water. Sinuner a quarter of an hour, drain them dry, and serve with a little strong cuUis sauce over. . In the same manner may be done fowls or meat.

46 ART OF COOKERY.

POULTRY, GAME, &c.

OBSERVATIONS ON MEAT AND POULTRY.

Meats should be preferred wben of a good fatness and when the lean appears juicy, but not particularly streaked with fat, as in this case it frequently eats hard. When the season will permit, let it hang for a week, in which time it will arrive at its best state. Poultry, likewise, should be chosen tolerably &t and of a soft g^in. Let them hang three or four days, which will improve their flavour: but wood- cocks, snipes, larks, and sucking-pigs, should be dressed fresh. Be particular that the poultry are trussed very neatly.

DIRECTIONS FOR POULTRY, &C. PLAIN BOILED.

Turkies, chickens, and meats, intended to be plain boiled, should be soaked in cold water, and afiterwards put into plenty of boiling pump water, kept skimmed, and preserved as white as possible. The time they will take dressing may be learned by a little practice. Be particular in trimming the meats neatly, and in trussing the poultry. The carving, which is frequently expressed by the phrase of cutting into pieces^ should likewise be carefully attended to.

POULTRY) OAME, &C. 47

DIRECTIONS FOB ROASTING.

Observe that in roasting a good quick fire is re- quired, but not too strong, and the meats should be well-jointed, neatly trimmed, and covered with paper, to preserve them from being of too high a colour. Beef and mutton should not be done too much; veal, pork, and lamb, should be done well; and some little time before serving, take the paper off, sprinkle the meat with salt, and when of a proper colour, froth it with butter and flour. Large poultry may be papered and done in the same manner; but small poultry, such as chickens, wood- cocks, rabbits, wild fowls, &c. will not require papering. The time the several articles will take roasting must be ascertained by practice, as the weather and the different strengths of fires make a material alteration. Entrees may be served with small ornaments of puff-paste, or croutons of fried bread round them.

TURKIES.

To be roasted with a stuffing in the breast, and served with bread sauce in a boat.

TURKEY WITH TRUFFLES.

Truss the turkey as for boiling, put some light forcemeat and truffle pounded with it into the

48 ART OV COOKEET.

cavity near ilie breast, and aeenre k finom felling out. Then put slices of lemon* smne salt, uid bards of fiit baeon on the breast, bind white paper over it with packthread, and roast gently (if a good* sized turkey) one hour and a half. When it is to be served up, take off the pifier, glaze the breast, and put the truffle sauce round the turkey.

Pullets, chickens, pheasants, or partridges, may be done in the same manner.

TURKEY WITH CHESTNl/TS.

Truss the turkey as for boiling, stuff it with light forcemeat and peeled Spanish chestnuts whole, and paper and roast it as a turkey with truffles. When it is to be served, glaze the breast and put chestnut sauce to it, made with good cullis and chestnuts, which should be boiled till half done, and then roasted in a frying-pan till wholly done; after which let them be peeled and put into the cullis five minutes before serving the turkey.

TURKEY WITH RAGOUT.

Stuff it in the plain way, boil it, and when it is to be served, put over it the following sauce: - Take slices of throat sweetbread, white button mushrooms stewed, artichoke bottoms boiled till half done, and cut in halves, cock's-combs boiled till done, and a few egg baUs scalded; add a good b^

POUi;rRY, GAME) ^&c 49

diamel, and stew lliem gently for ten minutes. Chv instead of bechamel, there may be put to the above ingredients half a pint of real broth, and let all be boiled ten minutes; then add a liaison of three eggs and cream, simmer them together five minutes more, and season with s^k, lemon juice, and Cayenne pepper*

TURKEYS, PULLETS, OR CHICKENS, WITH OYSTER

SAUCE.

Boil them, wipe them dry, and when they are to be served, pour over them white oyster sauce.

CHICKENS OR TURKEYS WITH CELERY.

Boil or braise them, and when they are to be served, wipe them dry, and pour over them white celery sauce. Or serve with brown celery sauce under, and glaze the breasts.

PULLED CHICKEN (oT Turkey),

BoU a fowl till three parts done, and let it stand till cold; then take off the skin, cut the white meat into slips, put these into a stewpan, add a little cream, a very small quaiitity of grated lemon peel, some pounded mace, Cayenne pepper, salt, one sha- lot chopped, a little lemon juice, and a spoonful of consomme; thidsen widi a little flour and water, and simmer over a fire ten minutes, during which time

D

50 AKT OF COOKEST.

score the legs and rump, season Aem with pepper and salt, broil tkem xf a good ookrary and senre them oyer the polled chicken.

Another Way,

Cut the fowl as above, and add to it some be- chamel; or, instead of thickening with floor and water, add a liaison of two eggs, five minates before it is to be served.

CHICKENS WITH PEAS.

Trass them as for boiling, blandi them fve minutes, and wash them clean, then braise them till tender with a little veal broth and bards of faX bacon, or with white pq)er over them. Whendiey are to be served, wipe diem dry, glaze the tops lightly, and put peasf sauce under.

AnoOur Way*

Cut the chidLens into pieces, blanch and drain them dry, and put them into a stewpan widi a little veal broth; then stew till tender and the liquor almost reduced. When they are to be served, put them on a dish, and die peas' sauce over.

CHICKENS WITH LEMON SAUCE.

Boil two chickens as white as possible, or braise them with bards of bacon over diem; when they

7

POUI/TRY, GAME, &C. 51

are doBe, wipe them dry and pour the sauce over. Or the sauce may be put round the chickeilkSy and leaves of scalded tarragon on the breasts.

FRICASSEE OF CHICKENS OR RABBITS (white).

Cut them into pieces; blanch and drain them dry; then put them into a stewpan, with a little veal broth, a blade of mace, and a middling sized whole onion. Stew them gently till three parts done; then add slices of blanched throat sweet- breads, stewed white button mushrooms, egg balls, and pieces of artichoke bottoms. When they are all nearly stewed, season with salt and a little lemon juice, and add a liaison of three eggs, simmer it over a fire for five minutes, taking care not to let it curdle; serve very hot, with the mace and onion taken out.

Instead of a liaison, the broth it is stewed in may be almost reduced, and a bechamel added with the sweetbreads, mushrooms, &c.

FRICASSEE OF CHICKENS OR RABBITS {browu).

Cut the chickens into pieces, and fry them in a little lard till of a light brown colour; then drain them very dry with a cloth; after which put them into a stewpan, add button mushrooms stewed, pieces of artichoke bottoms, blanched truffles, morells, egg balls, and some well-seasoned cullis.

D 2

52 AKT OF COOKERY.

Set them over a moderate fire, stew gently till done, and serve with fried oysters round them.

SOUFFLE OF FOWLS.

Take a fricassee of two chickens stewed till half done, add a liaison of two yolks of eggs and cream, and, instead of setting again over the fire, put it into a deep dish; then pour the whites of four eggs beaten to a solid froth upon the chickens, together with some crumbs of bread, rubbed through a hair sieve over the froth; set them in a brisk oven for half an hour.

PULLET ROASTED WITH BATTER.

Bone and force the pullet with good stuffing or forcemeat, paper it and put it to roast; when half done take off the paper, and baste the fowl with a little light batter; let it dry, baste it again, repeat- ing this till it is done and nicely crusted over; then serve with bechamel or poivrade sauce beneath.

FOWL STEWED WITH RICE.

Truss a pullet as for boiling, and stew it in a pint of veal broth till tender, and the liquor nearly reduced, with two blades of mace and some slices of onions. In the mean time wash, pick, and boil till half done, a quarter of a pound of rice; stnun it and add three ounces of fresh butter, some

POULTRY, GAME, &C, 53

Cayenne pepper, and salt, and simmer it over a iire till done. Then put the fowl into the centre of a dish, the rice over it, and serve with bechamel sauce over the rice. Let some leaves of baked puff paste bp put round.

HASHED FOWLS.

Cut into pieces (very neat) ready dressed fowls, turkeys, or rabbits, and put them into a stewpan. Then make a thickening with a bit of fresh butter, flour, and chopped shalots or onions mixed over a slow fire; discharge it witli veal broth, add a little lemon pickle and catchup, season it, and put a small quantity of colouring liquid; boil for ten minutes, strain to the poultry, and let the whole stew gently. When served, a few pieces of the fowl griUed may be put round it.

Instead of the* thickening and veal broth, cuUis may be added with lemon pickle and catchup.

TOASTS WITH FOWL, &C.

Pound the white meat of a cut fowl or turkey with the same quantity of beef marrow; add half a gill of cream, a little grated Parmesan cheese, beaten mace, Cayenne pepper, chopped parsley, two shalots chopped, and the yolks of four raw eggs; mix all well together; then add the whites of four eggs beaten to a solid froth; toast a slice

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54 ART OF COOKERY.

of bread, lay the mixture upon it, and over the mixture some fine bread crumbs; bdsie in a mode- rate oven for twenty minutes, and serve with cuUis or truffle sauce under.

Fish may be done in the same manner, by adding a little anchovy liquor, and omitting the fowl.

LEGS AND WINGS OF FOWLS WITH PARSLEY.

Cut the legs full, and let the wings, with the meat of each side of the breast, be cut off with them; then bone and stuff the legs with light forcemeat coloured with boiled parsley rubbed through a tamis cloth; sew them up, dip them in white of egg, roll them in bread crumbs, and put them in two paper cases - ^a leg and wing in each; bake them; when they are to be served, put round them a sauce made with mushrooms and lean of ham chopped very fine, added to some cullis and a spoonful of white wine; let the liquor be reduced almost to a glaze. Fried parsley to be served upon a plate.

WINGS AND LEGS OF FOWLS WITH COLOURS.

Cut the legs from a good-sized fowl and the wings as large as possible, leaving no breast bone; then fill the cavities with light forcemeat, sew them up neatly, blanch them, drain them diy, wash the

POULTRY, GAME, &C. 55

tops with raw white of egg, and lay a small quan- tity of forcemeat on it, and work a sprig with slips of lean ham and white and yellow omelets of eggs. Put them into a stewpan with a little broth, cover the pan close, and stew gently till done, and the Hquor nearly reduced. When they are to be served, put imder a cullis boiled almost to a glaze.

They may be done in the same manner, and served cold; or put savory jelly round them, in- stead of cullis, for an ornamental supper.

WINGS AND LEGS LARDED AND GLAZED.

Cut the wings and legs, and force them as directed above; then lard neatly, blanch them, and stew them with a little broth. When they are to be served, glaze the larding, and put under a strong cullis, or sorrel sauce, or bechamel.

They may likewise be served cold for a ball supper.

PULLET A LA MONTMORENCI.

Bone it, leaving the legs and wings on; then season the inside with pepper, salt, and beaten spice. Put a light forcemeat into it, sew it up, truss it as for roasting, set it with hot water, and lard it neatly; then roast it gently with a veal caul over. When it is done, take off the caul, glaze the larding, and serve with white ragout of sweet-

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56 ART OF COOKERY.

breads round it, or with strong callis or plain be- chameL

FOWL A LA STE MENEHOtJLT.

Take the bones out of the legs and wings, and draw them in; then split the fowl from the top to the bottom of the back, skewer it down close, pass it with chopped parsley, thyme, shalots, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When three parts done put it on a dish, and when cold, wash yolk of egg over it with a paste brush, strew bread crumbs over, and broil gently till done, and of a light brown colour. Serve with a cuUis sauce under, with catchup and lemon pickle mixed in it.

GRILLS AND SAUCE {generally eaten after dinner).

Season some small pieces of ready dressed fowl or turkey with pepper and salt, and grill them gently of a nice brown colour. In the mean time put into a stewpan a gill and a half of cullis, an ounce of fresh butter, a table spoonful of mush- room catchup, the juice of a lemon, and a small bit of the rind, a little Cayenne pepper, a tea spoonful of the essence of anchovies, and one shalot chopped fine. Boil these ingredients together five minates, strain the liquor, and serve it in a sauce boat: the pieces of chicken, &c. on a dish.

POULl'RY, GAME, &C. 57

SALMI, OR HASH, OF DUCKS.

Hoast the ducks till half done; then cut them into joints; add the gravy to a gill of cullis, half a gill of Port wine, and a few shalots chopped fine. Season with a little Cayenne pepper, salt, and garlic. Make it boil, and strain it to the duck. Set the whole over the fire in a stewpot with boil- ing water. Let it simmer for half an hour, and add a little lemon juice.

DUCK AUX NAVETS.

Bone a duck as whole as possible, and season the inside with beaten spices, pepper, and salt; then draw in the legs and wings, and fill the inside with light forcemeat. Stew it up, braise it in a pint of veal broth, cover it with white paper, and let it stew gently till tender, and the liquor almost reduced. When it is to be served, glaze the breast, and pour the sauce round it, which is to be made thus: - Cut the turnips into shapes as for haricot; and putting them into a stewpan, sweat them with a bit of fresh butter till three parts done; then add a good cuUis and the essence in which the duck was braised. When it boils, skim free from fat, season, and stew the turnips till done.

DUCK WITH CUCUMBERS.

The duck must be boned, braised, and served

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58 ART OF COOKERY.

in the same manner as the above, but instead of turnips put cucumber sauce, or peas, as for veal tendrons.

DUCK A LA BECaAMEL.

Bone, braise, and glaze the duck as before direct- ed; and serve with the following sauce round it: - Boil some heads of spruce grass in a little veal broth, and when tender rub them through a tamis cloth: add the pulp to a small quantity of becha- „.l. boil *e. l^Ae, fo, J ^L,, .d .e. the sauce be very white and strong.

GEESE AND TAME DUCKS

Should be roasted with sage and onions chopped fine, seasoned with pepper and salt put into the inside, and served with apple sauce in a boat

Green geese and ducklings should be roasted with pepper and salt put in the inside, and served with green sauce in a boat

STEWED GIBLETS {plain).

Cut two pair of scsdded goose giblets into pieces of two inches long; blanch them, trim the bones from the ends, and wash the giblets; then drain them dry, put them into a stewpan with half a pint of broth, cover the pan close, and simmer over a slow fire till three parts done, and the liquor nearly

POULTRY, GAME, &C. 59

reduced. Add good seasoned cuUis, and stew diem till tender.

STEWED GIBLETS {toith peCLS).

Proceed as with the above; but, instead of plain cullis, take a pint of young green peas, and sweat them till three parts done with a bit of fresh butter and a little salt: add some cullis, put them to the giblets, and stew till tender. If requisite put a little colouring liquid.

PIGEONS

May be roasted plain or with a little stuffing in them; and served with parsley and butter.

PIGEONS GLAZED.

Put some good seasoned forcemeat into the pigeons, cut off the pinions, lay back the legs, blanch, and roast gently with vine leaves and bards of fat bacon over them. When done, glaze the top part, and serve with cullis sauce, or celery heads, or asparagus tops, &c under them.

PIGEONS A LA SURELLE.

Bone the legs and wings of four pigeons and draw them in; fill them with a high-seasoned force- meat, and braise them in half a pint of veal broth. When done, take the pigeons out, and reduce their

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60 ART OF COOKERY.

liquor to a glaze. Wipe them dry, glaze the tops, and serve with stewed sorrel under.

ENTREE OF PIGEONS WITH TRUFFLES.

Bone three pigeons, stuff them with good sea- soned forcemeat, blanch and lard them; cover the larding with paper and roast them. When they are to be served, glaze the larding, and put them into the centre of a dish, with six lamb sweetbreads, larded, braised, and glazed, round the pigeons, and some trujffle sauce under.

COMPOTE OF PIGEONS.

Cutoff the pinions, draw the legs in close, colour the breast in boiling hot lard, blanch and wash them; which done, put them into a stewpan, add a little veal broth, and simmer them gently till nearly done. Then make a ragout of blanched sweetbreads, button mushrooms, truffles, morells, artichoke bottoms, egg balls, cullis, and the liquor of the pigeons strained, and season well. Let the ingredients stew for ten minutes, add them to the pigeons, and serve all together in a deep dish.

PIGEONS A LA CRAPAUDINE.

Cut off the pinions, draw in the legs, and cut the breast so as to lay back; then pass them with sweet herbs, mushrooms, shalots chopped fine, a

POULTRY, GAME, &C. 61

little firesh butter, grated nutmeg, lemon juice, pepper, and salt. Simmer till almost done; then lay them on a dish, and when nearly cool, egg with yolk of eggs, and strew them with crumbs of bread rubbed through a fine hair sieve. Fry them of a light colour in boiling hot lard; or they may be broiled. Serve with a good cullis and sharp sauce underneath.

TO ROAST LARKS.

Draw and fill them with a light forcemeat made with the white meat of a ready dressed fowl. Put them upon a larkspit, and place a part of a vine- leaf, and a piece of fat bacon of equal size between each bird. While roasting, strew fine bread crumbs over them. Let them be of a nice light colour, and serve with some fried bread crumbs round them, and a little melted butter in a sauce- boat

TO KEEP PHEASANTS OR HARES.

Hang them up by the legs, and when the blood runs from the bill or mouth, it denotes that they are fit for dressing. The birds should be roasted in preference to boiling.

PARTRIDGES AND PHEASANTS

Should be roasted plain, and served with poivrade sauce hot, and bread sauce in boats.

62 ART OF COOKERY.

PARTRIDGES OR PHEASANTS AUX OLIVES.

Bone and force the birds; and braise them in a small quantity of broth. When they are to be served, glaze the breasts lightly, and put stewed French olive sauce round them, with the essence of the birds mixed in it, and a smaU quantity of garlic

PARTRIDGES AUX CHOUX.

Bone the birds, and lard them with slips of fat bacon rolled in chopped herbs and pounded spices. Pepper and salt them, tie them round with slices of fat bacon on the breast, and put them into a stew with a pint of veal broth, a gill of Port wine, and the bones of the birds. Stew them till three parts done, take the birds out of the liquor, and the bacon from them. Then line a mould with bards of bacon, rubbed with the yolk of eggs, and put in some large stewed mushrooms, some stewed cabbage, and a little vinegar; and put the birds in the middle, with some slices of sweetbread and a little cabbage over them. Put some water into the stew pot, and make it boil; then set the mould in it, and let the birds stew for one hour. When ready, make a small hole in the top, turn the mould on a dish, strain over the birds the liquor in which they were stewed, and serve immediately.

POULTRY, GAME, &C. 63

PARTRIDGES EN CREPINE.

Bone and stew the birds till half done, with a gill of veal broth, half a gill of white wine, an onion, two leaves of basil, a little thyme, a clove of garlic, pepper, salt, lemon juice, two cloves, and half a bay leaf. Then take the birds out of the liquor and strain it to some good cuUis. When the birds are cool, put each into some light force- meat, wash them over with the whites of eggs beaten to a solid froth, and garnish lightly with leaves of puflF paste in what form you please. Bake them of a nice colour, and serve with the sauce under them, reduced to a good consistency.

Woodcocks may be done in the same manner, with the addition of their trail pounded in the forcemeat.

GUINEA FOWLS, PEA FOWLS, PULLETS, CHICKENS,

AND TURKEY PULLETS,

May be roasted either larded or plain, and served with gravy under, and bread and egg sauces in separate boats.

QUAILS, RUFFS AND REEVES,

Should be roasted with bards of bacon and vine leaves over them; and served with sauce in a boat made with cuUis and Port wine.

64 ART OF COOKERY.

TO ROAST WOODCOCKS OR SNIPES.

Take out the trail, then roast the birds^ aad ten minutes before they are done, bake a toast, put the trail into a stewpan with a little cuUis and fresh butter, and boil them together. When the birds are to be served, put the sauce over the toast, and the woodcocks upon it; if the woodcocks are thin, roast them with a bard of bacon over.

SALMI OF WOODCOCKS.

Take two woodcocks half roasted, cut them up neatly, and let the trimmings be pounded in a mortar with the entrails: put them into a stewpan, add half a pint of cullis, two shalots chopped, half a gill of Port wine, and a bit of lemon peel. Season with pepper, salt, and lemon juice. Boil the in- gredients ten minutes, and straining the liquor to the carved woodcocks, stew gently till done, setting them in a pan of boiling water over the fire. Serve in a deep dish with sippets of fried bread strewed over.

POTTED LARKS OR SMALL BIRDS.

Pass them with the same ingredients as for veal; when they are half done take them out and put the lean veal in. When the forcemeat is made, put the birds into the pots with it, bake them, and proceed in the same manner as with potted veal.

POULTRY, GAME, &C. 65

Pheasants, partridges, chickens, &c. may be done in the same way, but will take a longer time to bake.

plovers' eggs {different ways).

Boil them twenty minutes, and when they are cool, peel and wipe them dry; then lay them in a dish, and put chopped savory jelly round and between them, with slices of lemon and bunches of pickled barberries round the rim of the dish. Or they may be served, either peeled or not, in ornamental paper or wax baskets, with picked parsley under them; or they may be sent to table hot in a napkin.

WILD FOWL

Should be roasted plain, not done too much, and served with onion sauce in a boat; as also a small quantity of gravy and Port wine boiled together.

HARES.

To be dressed in the same manner as rabbits, with stuffing. Serve with cullis and fresh butter put over, and warm currant jelly in a sauce boat

HARE ROASTED {another way).

Stuff it, and while roasting dredge with flour, baste it with milk, and so on alternately till a quarter of an hour before it is done; then baste it

66 ART OF COOKERY.

with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter pat into the dripping pan. Serve with a cullis sauce and butter put over, and currant jelly in a sauce boat.

Baste it repeatedly, as there must be a good crust over. Three pints of warm milk will be required for that purpose.

TO ROAST A HARE WITH THE SKIN ON.

Scald and clean it from the hair, then cut it open, and clean and wipe the inside dry. Chop the liver, add it to some good stuffing, and mix with it' some slices of throat sweetbreads scalded.

HASHED HARE, WILD FOWL, PHEASANTS, OR

PARTRIDGES.

Cut into neat pieces, put them into a stewpan, and add a liquor made in the same manner as for venison; or put cullis and Port wine with their own gravy. Set the stewpan in a pot of boiling water over the fire.

JUGGED HARE.

Case the hare, cut oS the shoulders and legs, and divide the back into three pieces. Lard them well with fat bacon, and put them into a stewpot with the trimmings. Add some allspice, mace, whole pepper, a small clove of garlic, three onions, two bay leaves, and parsley, thyme, and savory, tied together in a small bunch; a quart of veal

POULTRY, GAME, &C. 67

broth and one gill and a half of Port wine; and simmer over a fire till three parte done. Then take out the shoulders, legs, and back: put them into another stewpan, and straining the liquor to lliem, add some passed flour and butter to thicken it a little. Stew till tender, skim it free from fat, season with Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice, and serve in a deep dish.

GLAZED HARE.

Case the hare, bone it as whole as possible, wash and fill the inside with light forcemeat: then sew it up, and truss as for roasting. Lard the back with bacon, as for a fricandeau of veal: cover it with a veal caul, and roast very gently. When it is to be served, take oiF the caul, glaze the larding, and put strong cuUis boiled, with a gill of Port wine under the hare.

RABBITS

May be roasted either plain, or a stuffing, with the liver chopped in it, may be put into the belly. Serve with parsley and butter in a boat.

RABBITS LARDED.

Bone the back part, leaving the legs on; force it, sew it up, and braise or roast it. If braised, glaze it, and serve with a sauce made with the liver

68 ART OF COOKERY.

boiled and chopped fine, some scalded parsley chopped, and some chopped mushrooms. Let the inside of a lemon be cut into small dice, boiled with a gill of cullis, and served round the rabbit.

RABBITS WITH ONIONS.

Boil them as white as possible, and when they are to be served, wipe them dry and pour over onion sauce, made thus: - Boil some mild onions peeled, till nearly done; squeeze and chop them, but not too small; add a bit of fresh butter, a little salt and flour, a sufficient quantity of cream to mix them, and a little white ground pepper, if approved. Let the sauce be of a good thickness, and simmer it over a slow fire for ten minutes.

RABBITS EN GALANTINE FOR A DISH.

Bone two rabbits, lay them flat, put a little light forcemeat upon them, slips of lean ham, breast of fowl, and omelets of eggs white and yellow, the same as for garnishing. Roll the rabbits up tight, sew them, lard the tops with slips of fat bacon, and blanch and braise them. When they are to be served, glaie the larding, and put good cullis under them.

MATELOTE OF RABBITS.

Cut into pieces, blanch, and wash diem; then

MEATS. 69

put them into a stewpan with a gill of water, cover close, and preserve them as white as possible. When nearly done, and the liquor, which should be colourless, almost reduced, add half a pint of good bechamel, a few boiled cocks'-combs whole, pickled cucumbers, ham, tongue, omelets of eggs (as for garnishing), cut into small squares, and a few stewed button mushrooms* Stew them toge- ther for ten minutes, and serve directly.

MEATS.

TO PREPARE A HAUNCH OF VENISON, OR MUTTON,

FOR ROASTING.

Take great care the venison is well hung and good. Wipe it, take the skin from the top part and put butter and plenty of salt over it; then cover it with paste confined by four or five sheets of paper braced with packthread. Roast it gently, and ten minutes before it is done, take off the paper, let it colour gradually, and froth it with flour and butter. Serve with warm currant jelly in a boat, and some good gravy with a little Port wine in it, in another sauce boat

HASHED VENISON.

Take the most underdone parts of ready dressed

70 ART OF COOKERY.

venison, cut them into slices, and put them into a stewpan; then pass a little fresh butter and flour and chopped shalots over a slow fire for ten minutes, and add half a pint of Port wine, a pint and a half of veal broth, its own gravy, a little lemon peel, Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice. Season, boil all together a quarter of an hour, and strain it to the venison. Let it simmer gently in a pot of boiling water over a fire till thoroughly hot.

RUMP OF BEEF (d la ModeJ.

Bone the rump, lard it with slips of fat bacon seasoned with sweet herbs, beaten spices, pepper and salt. Bind it with packthread, put it into a braising pan, cover it with some veal broth, make it boil,^ skim it, and add a pint of Port wine, half a gill of brandy, some onions, turnips, celery, a few bay leaves, garlic, champignons, a little whole all- spice, and a little mace. Stew till nearly done; take the meat out of the liquor, cut off the strings, wipe it dry, and put it into a clean stewpan; then strain the liquor, skim the fat off clean, season with Cayenne pepper, salt, a gill of vinegar, lemon pickle, and a small quantity of lemon juice; add a little colour, clear it with whites of eggs, and strain it through a tamis cloth to the beef. • Stew gently till done, and serve in a deep dish.

To the liquor, when cleared with eggs and

M£AT6« 71

strained, may be added a passing of flour and butter, by way of thickening, if approved. The reason for clearing the liquor is, that it will then appear bright, either thickened or plain.

RUMP OF BEEF (d la CardiualJ.

Bone die rump, lard it well with slips of hi bacon, seasoned with parsley, thyme, shalots chop-* ped fine, some beaten spices and pepper, and put it into a deep pan; have ready a mixture of two ounces of saltpetre, four oimces of common salt, one ounce of beaten ginger, and two ounces of brown sugar pounded together: rub the beef with it, and let it remain twenty-four hours; then wash it with warm water, put it into a stewpot, and cover it with bards of fat bacon and writing paper; add two quarts of water, a pint of Port wine, six onions, three laurel, two bay, and six basil leaves, two cloves of garlic, some slices of carrots, turnips, and celery, half a pint of vinegar, an ounce of mushroom powder, and half a gill of lemon pickle; stew the beef till tender, take it out of the liquor, wipe it dry, glaze the top, put it into a dish, and preserve it in a warm place; then strain the liquor, skim it free from fat, afterwards reduce it to a pint, and serve it with the beef.

72 ART or COOKERY.

RUMP OF BEEF BRAISED.

Boil some carrots and tiimips cut into shapes, peeled button onions, and eelery heads in lengths of two inches, in a sufficient quantity of broth till nearly done. Then put them into a si^wpan with some stewed mushrooms and truffles. Stew till the liquor is reduced nearly to a glaze; add some good cuUis, and simmer gently.

Bone the rump of beef, and lard it with slips of bacon; tie round with packthread, and braise till tender. Then taking it out of the braise, hiy it before the fire for ten minutes to dry, glaze it well, and put the sauce round it. Seire with croutons of fried bread.

PICKLED RUMP OF BEEF.

Take four ounces of common salt, two ounces of bay salt, the same of saltpetre, some brown sugar, two ounces of powder of dried juniper-berries, and three quarts of water; boil all together a quarter of an hour: when cold put a middling sized fiit rump of beef into it Let it remain for a fortnight, turn it every day, then take it out of the pickle, and hang it up to smoke for a week; before dress- ing, lay it in warm water for four hours, then braise widi two quarts of beef broth, a pint of Sherry wine, and some onions; when it is to be served, wipe it dry, glaze it, and put mashed turnips and carrots round it.

MEATS. 73

FILLET OF B£EF LARDED.

Take a fillet or piece of a rump, force and lard it with bacon, turn it round like a fillet of veal, cover with bards of fat bacon, and roast it; when nearly done^ take off the paper, and let the larding be of a light brown colour; glaze the top, and serve with a sauce made of cullis, lemon-pickle, catchup, some scalded celery heads, and button onions peeled and scalded; stew till tender, and put the sauce round the beef.

FILLET OF BEEF MARINADED.

Take the fillet froni the under part of the sirloin, and lay it in a marinade of half a pint of boiling Port wine, a gill of vinegar, some chopped shalots, and a little allspice. Let it remain for twenty-four hours; then wipe it dry, lay some forcemeat upon it, roll it up tight, and roast with a veal caul over it. Reduce the marinade almost to a glaze, add some good cucumber sauce to it, glaze the top of the beef, and serve with the sauce round it.

BRISKET OF BEEF WITH SPANISH ONIONS.

To be done in the same manner as the rump, but not to be larded with bacon.

BAKED BEEF.

Bone a leg, sticking, or a head of beef, and wash

74 ART OF COOKERY.

it dean. Chc^ plenty ot paisley, a small quantity of thyme, shalots, nuujotaiii, saTory, and a little basil; mix them together, and add a small quantity of beaten allspice, mace, clores, pepper, and salt. Rub the beef well with the ingredients, set it in an earthen pan, put to it a pSL of Tinegar, half a pint of Port wine, eight middUi^-flozed whole onions peeled, two bay leaves, and a few fresh or dried diampignons. Let the meat remain till next day; then add a soffident quantity of water, cover the pan dose, and bake till tender.

DUTCH BEEF.

Rub the prime ribs of faX beef with common salt, and let them lie in a pan for diree days; then rub them with the different artides as for hams or tongues, and add plenty of bruised juniper berries. Turn the meat every two days for three weeks and smoke it

RED BEEF FOR SUCE&

Take a piece of tiiiii flank ni beef, and cut off the skin; then rub it well with a mixture made of two pounds of common salt, two ounces of bay salt, the same of saltpetre^ and a pound of moist sugar, pounded in amoitar. Pat it intoan earthen pan, and turn and rub it every day for a week; then take it out of the brine, wipe it, and strew over pounded mace, doves, pepper, a Utde allspice.

MEATS. 75

plenty of chopped parsley, and a few shalots. Then roll it up, bind it round with tape, braise till tender, and press it like collared pig; when cold, cut it into slices, and garnish with pickled bar- berries.

RIBS OF BEEF WITH OYSTERS.

Bone two ribs, roll them round like a fillet of veal, put forcemeat or stuffing in the middle, and bind them round with t^e; then cover them with a veal caul and paper, roast them, and ten minutes before serving, take the caul off: let the beef be- come of a nice brown colour, and serve with oyster sauce round it, made in the same manner as for beef steaks.

BOU1LLI OF BEEF (tOltk SOUr CTOUt).

Take a piece of brisket of beef, weighing six pounds, which has been salted for two days, and stew it till tender; in the mean time cut a large white cabbage into small slips, wash, blanch, and squeeze it, and put it into a stewpan with half a pound of fresh butter; add an onion stuck with six cloves, haljf a gill of vinegar, a tea spoonful of coriander seeds pounded and sifted? a clove of garlic, pepper, and salt; put the ingredients over a moderate fire; when the cabbage is three parts

e2

76 ART OF COOKERY.

done, add a pint of strong veal broth, and a little flour; let the cabbage stew till tender, and be careful not to let it burn; when the beef is to be served, wipe it dry, glaze it, and put the crout and some fried sausages round it.

RUMP STEAKS.

Cut them of a good thickness, broil over a clear coal fire, pepper and salt, and lay them on a dish. Pour over them a sauce made of chopped parsley, a bit of fresh butter, some cullis, a little lemon pickle, and half a gill of catchup simmered together, and reduced one half. Put fried potatoes cut in slices round the dish.

ENTREE OF BEEF STEAKS.

Take two rump steaks cut three inches thick, lard them with bacon seasoned with Cayenne pep- per and salt, braise them with a pint of water, a bay leaf, some allspice, a clove, garlic, an onion, a small bundle of parsley, and a gill of Port wine; when the steaks are done, and the liquor nearly re- duced, put them upon a dish, strain their liquor over, and serve with fried bread round them.

BROILED. BEEF STEAKS.

Take a small fat rump of beef, and cut off the fillet and the first two or three steaks; then cut

MEATS. 77

the remainder into steaks^ and remove the skin from the h.t Beat them with a chopper, and season with pepper and salt just before putting on the gridiron, which should be well cleaned, and the steaks frequently turned* When done, pepper and salt them on both sides, and serve on a hot dish with a little gravy under; set some scraped horse- radish, chopped shalots, and pickles, on small plates, and oyster saiice in a sauce boati or slices of onions dipped in batter and fried*

The fillet and outer steaks of the rump may be made into a pudding, in order to have prime steaks for broiling.

BEEF COLLOPS.

Take the fillet from the under part of a rump of beef, cut it into small thin slices, and fry them till three parts done; then add slices of pickled cucumbers, small mushrooms stewed, blanched oysters, some good seasoned cullis, and stew till tender.

CANELON OF BEEF.

Make a forcemeat of lean veal and ham, bread soaked in cream, some green tru£9es, pepper, salt, a smaU quantity of beaten spices, beef marrow, parsley and shalots chopped, and a little white wine. Let the ingredients be pounded well toge- ther with two eggs, make them into the form of a

s 3

78 ART OF COOKERY.

pudding, and cover it wiih bards of baoon^ white fapevj and a paste of flour and water. Bake it, and when ready for serving, take the bards, paper, and paste away; glaze the top (^ the forcemeat, and put a good bechamel or cnllis sauoe round it.

BEEF OLIVES.

Roll some of the forcemeat for Canelon of Beef, in slices of a fillet of beef cut from the under part of a rump; put a small skewer through eacb of the olives, dip them in batter, and fry in boiling lard; when done, drain them dry, and serve with stewed French olives round.

POTTED BEEF.

Take two pounds of the fillet from the inside of a rump of beef and two pounds of the best fat bacon. Cut them small, put them into a mortar, add a small quantity of parsley, thyme, savory^ four shalots chopped fine, some pepper, salt, two spoonsful of essence of ham, a spoonful of mush- room powder, some sifted mace, cloves, and allspice, two eggs beaten, and a gill of Rlienish wine. Pound all well together till quite fine; then fill small pots with the mixture, cover with paper, bake very gently for forty minutes, and when cold cover with clarified butter.

meats; 79

POTTED BEEF {WMthOT tOay\.

Take three pounds of the lean of fillet of beef, and three quarters of a pound of lean of ham cut into small pieces, an ounce and a half of loaf sugar, and a quarter of an ounce of saltpetre. Mix all t(^ther, and let them lie for twenty-four hours. Then season with a little pounded mace, ground white pepper, and ^It; put it into an earthen pan with four ounces of fresh butter, and set it in a slow oven tin tender. * When cold, beat it in a mortar with four ounces of fresh tatter till fine. Put ifc into small pots, press it close, and pour clarified butter over it. Cover the pots with paper, and set them in a dry place.

¦

ox HEART BOASTED.

Let the heart be kept for some time, wash, trim off the pipes, wipe it, and fill it with a stuffing as for a fillet of veal; tie over the top a piece of veal caul, roast it gently one hour and a half, and five minutes before serving take off the caul, froth it with flour and butter, and put it on a very hot dish. Serve with a sauce under made of cullis, fresh butter, a table spoonful of catchup, and half a gill of Port wine boiled together. A calf s or sheep's heart may be done in the same manner.

ox CHEEK.

Bone and wash the cheek clean; then tie it up

E 4

80 ART OF COOKERY.

like a rump of bee£ put it in a braising pan with some good broth; when it boils, skim it, add two bay leaves, a little garlic, some onions, champignons^ celery, carrots, half a cabbage, turnips, a bundle of sweet herbs, some whole black pepper, a little allspice and mace. Let the cheek stew till tiearly done, then cat the strings, and put the cheek in a clean stewpan. Strain the liquor through a sieve^ skim off the &t very clean, season with lemon juice, Cayenne pepper and salt, add a little colour, clear it with two eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth to the eheiel^ and stew till tender.

BEEF TONGUE {atix Truffles).

Boil a pickled neat's tongue two hours; peel it, and let it remain till cool; then make a large incision in the under part, fill it with light force- meat containing some green truffles pounded; sew it up, trim it neatly, rub it with yolk of egg, and cover it with a paste made with beef marrow; then wash the paste over with white of egg, ornament it in the same manner as a raised pie, with the re- mainder of the paste, bake till tender in a mode- rately heated oven, and serve with truffle sauce under; or with stewed spinach or turnips.

It may be eaten with chickens, turkey, or roast veal.

HEATS. 81

BEEF PALATES.

Scald, scale, and boil the palates till tender; when cool, roll them up with forcemeat in the middle, and tie them with thread; braise them as white as possible and serve with a sauce made of ham, breast of fowl, pickled cucumbers, omelets of eggs, and good seasoned cullis or bechamel.

The ham, &c. should be cut in the form of dice, and the omelets made as omelets for garnishing.

BEEF PALATES FRIED.

Blanch and peel three ox palates; add to them some boiling liquor made with half a gill of vine- gar, a gill of veal broth, a little Cayenne pepper and salt, four shalots chopped fine, and a bay leaf; let them remain in the liquor eight hours; then strain it to three eggs and a sufficient quantity of sifted flour, to make it into a light batter; after- wards cut the palates into quarters, dip them sepa- rately into the batter, and fry them in boiling lard till done, and of a good colour. Drain them dry; serve with cullis sauce under, and some fried par- sley on a plate.

Beef tails may be boiled till the bones can be taken away; then proceed as for palates.

BEEF PALATES (d la Cr^e).

Blanch, peel, and boil the palates till done; then

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82 ART OP COOKERV.

line a tin mould with veal caul; lay a palate on it, and over this some light forcemeat with green truffles pounded in it, and so on alternately till the mould is full. Bake gently for an hour, turn it out of the mould on a dish, and serve with a sauce over, made with the yolks of two hard eggs, one anchovy, grated nutmeg, a table spoonful of lemon pickle, and a gill of consomm^, rubbed through a tamis cloth; make the liquor boil, and add a liaison of two yolks of eggs, and a gill of cream.

BEEF PALATES WITH HAM, &C.

Blanch, peel, and boil three beef palates till nearly done; have ready slices of lean ham of the same thickness, and likewise some slices of bread; then cut each the size of a crown piece, and stew the ham and palate till tender in a little veal broth, and a gill of white wine; let the bread be fried when the ingredients are to be served; put the pieces of palate round the bottom of a dish, and upon them the bread, and the ham at top; pour a sauce over made with culHs and a little catchup.

The pieces of ham, palate, and fried bread, to be of an equal number.

BEEF TAILS.

Cut the tails into joints, blanch, wash, and braise

!2

MEATS. 88

them till tender; drain them dry, mid serve with haricot sfiuoe 4 ver«-^Or the tails may be glazed, ajpd tb» saooe pot iXNUid* Add to the sauce the essenoe of the tails reduced to a glase.

Hashed calf*s head.

Take a head, without the scalp, chopped in half; wash and blanch it, peel the tongue, cut it in slices, and likewise the meat from the head. Add blanched morells and truffles, egg and forcemeat balls, stewed mushroomis, artidboke bottoms, and well seasoned cullist Stew gently till the meat is nearly done, and then add slices of throat sweet-breads. On serving, put round the hash the brains, and rashers of bacon; and, if approved, put half the head ou the top prepared thus: - Brush it over with the yolk of a raw egg; then season with pepper and salt, strew with fine bread crumbs, bake till very tender, and colour with a salamander if requisite. The brains should be egged, rolled in bread crumbs, and fried in boiling lard. The rashers of bacon may be broiled.

calf's head bechamel.

Let the head be halved, preserving the tongue whole; then bone one cheek, make an incision in the under part, fill the cavity with forcemeat, sew it up, blanch, put it into a veal caul, and braise it till tender, in the mean time boil the other cheek

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84 ART OF COOKERY.

till half done, cut the meat from it into middling- fiized pieces, and prepare the tongue in the same manner; put them into a stewpan with some be- chamel, stew till nearly done, then add slices of throat sweet-breads, . stewed mushrooms and e^ balls: five minutes before serving, add a liaison of three yolks of eggs and a gill of cream, and season. Put it into a deep dish, and the braised cheek well glazed over the stew.

NECK OF VEAL EN HERISSON.

Cut off the scrag and the under chine bone; then lay a light forcemeat on the top of the veal about half way, brush it over with white of ^gs, and work a sprig or any other device with pickled cucumber, ham, breast of fowl, omelets of eggs white and yellow, boiled carrots, and some capers. Put the veal into a stewpan, add a little broth, and stew it gently till tender, taking care not to disturb the ornament. When readv to be served, glaze the plain part, and put under a cuUis sauce with asparagus or peas.

KECK OF VEAL LARDED.

Take off the under bone of a neck of veal, leaving only a part of the long bones on; trim it neatly, lard it, and roast it gently vrith a veal caul over. Ten minutes before it is done take off the

MEATS. 85

caul, and let the veal be of a very light colour.

When ready to be served, glaze it, and put under

some sorrel sauce, celery heads, or asparagus

tops.

calf's ears glazed.

Let six ears be cleaned and blanched; then braise them with a little Veal broth, bards of bacon, and slices of lemon to preserve them white; when tender wipe them dry, glaze, and serve them with the following sauce: - Stew a pint of green peas, rub them through a tamis cloth, and add to the pulp half a pint of good seasoned cuUis. Simmer for ten minutes.

calf's ears with PARMESAN CHEESE.

Take six ears cleaned and blanched; put them into a stewpan with half a gill of white wine, a gill of veal broth, salt, Cayenne pepper, a small bundle of parsley, thyme, three leaves of basil, an ounce of fresh butter, four peeled shalots, and one clove of garlic Let all stew together; when the ears are tender, take them out of the liquor, strain it, add the crumb of two penny French rolls, and pound it in a mortar with the yolks of four eggs, half a gill of cream, and two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese. When the ears are cool, fill them with this forcemeat, and put them into a dish

86 ART OP COOKEBT.

with a gill of cnllik Then take equal qoaatities of

grated Parmesan dieese and fine bread oiunbs,

mix them together, and put them over the ean;

bake them in a moderately heated oven for three

quarters of an hour, and if not of a sufficient colour

on serving, brown the top with a salamander.

• calf's brains a-la-creme.

Blanch and wash them free from skin, and put them into a stewpan with a gill of veal broth, half a gill of white wine, a blade of mace, two peeled shalots, and a small bundle of parsley and thyme; simmer them till done. Put them into a deep dish with sippets of fried bread round; then strain the liquor, add to it the yolks of two eggs, and a gill of cream; season with Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice. Let it simmer for five minutes, and pomr it over the brains.

calf's brains with oysters.

Blanch and dean &e bmins, then wipe them dry, dip them into ydk of e^ and roll them in fine bread-crumbs; afterwards fry them in boiling lard till of a good colour, and drain them very dry. Serve with some stewed oysters under (either white or brown)* Pieces of ham of the size of a crown piece, may be broiled and put in the dish.

MEATS. 67

BREAST OF VEAL WITH OYSTEBS.

Cut off the under bone of a breast of veal, and remove the skin from the top, then blanch and braise it, or roast it gently till very tender with a veal caul over. When it is to be served, take off the caul, glaze the top of the breast, and put round it white oyster sauce.

BREAST OF VEAL EN GALANTINE.

Bone the veal and lay a light forcemeat over it, and upon that some slips of lean ham, pickled cucumbers, fat bacon, and omelets of eggs white and yellow. Roll it up tight in a cloth, tie each end, and braise it till tender. When ready, take it out of the cloth, wipe it dry, and gla^e the top; then put under it stewed sorrel, or stewed celery heads, or ragout; or it may be let to stand till cold, pressed, and served with savory jelly chopped fine.

BREAST OF VEAL RAGOUT.

Take off the under bone and cut the breast in half, lengthwise; then cut it into middling sized pieces, fry them in a little lard till of a light brown colour, wipe them dry, put them into a stewpan with half a pint of veal broth, and simmer them till nearly done and the liquor almost redueed; add blanched morells, trufiBes, slices of throat sweetbread, egg balls, artichoke bottoms, a little catchup, and some

88 ART OF COOKERY.

cuUis; season with Cayenne pepper and salt, and a little lemon juice. Let all stew together till done.

TO ROAST FILLET OF VEAL OR HARE.

Make a stuffing with beef suet chopped very fine, some parsley, thyme, shalots, a small quantity of basil and lemon-peel, scalded, a little grated nut- meg, and two eggs (or milk), pepper, salt, and an anchovy rubbed through a sieve: some blanched oysters may be added if approved. The whole should be pounded and rubbed through a sieve. Melted butter may be poured over the veal, or white oyster sauce may be served round it.

LOIN OF VEAL A LA CREME.

Take the best end of a loin of veal, joint it^ and cut a little of the suet from the kidney; trim it so as to lie flat, and then make an incision in the centre of the top part about three inches deep and six long. Take the piece out, chop it, add to it the suet or beef marrow, some parsley, thjrme^ green truffles, mushrooms, shalots, and lemon peel, chopped very fine, and season it with pepper, salt, and a little beaten spice. Put all together into a mortar, add the yolks of two ^gs, and a little French bread soaked in cream; then pound the in- gredients well, fiU the cavity with the forcemeat^

MEATS. 89

and cover it with a piece of veal caul; after which tie it down dose, cover the whole with a large piece of caul, roast it gently, and when ready to be served, take off the large piece of caul, let it colour a little, glaze it lightly, and put under it a bechamel or a ragout of sweetbreads.

FUlet of veal may be done in the same manner, instead of plain stuffing.

TENDONS OF VEAL.

Cut the under bone from a breast of veal, and take the lean meat from it, leaving only the gristle, which must be cut into thin pieces. Blanch and wash them clean; and setting them in a stewpan with half a pint of veal broth, put bards of fat bacon over them, and add half a pint of broth, a clove of garlic, and a bay leaf. Stew them till very tender; then taking them out of their liquor, glaze, and put them before the fire for five minutes. Kemove the fat from the liquor in which they were stewed, reduce it almost to a glaze, and add it to a sauce, either of Tomatos, puree of peas, or aspara- gus beads stewed in a little cullis. Put the tendons round a dish, with the sauce in the middle. Fried bread may be served with them.

The lean of the breast of veal may be used for a pie, or a made dish.

90 ART OF COOKERY.

PRICANDKAU OF VEAL.

Cut off a long or round piece from the leg, beat it flat with a chopper, and make an inetaion in the under part Put into it a little light forcemeat, sew it np, lard the top part widi pieces of fat bacon, blanch it^ put it into a stewpan with a little broth, and corer close; let it stew till very tender, and the liquor nearly reduced* * When it is to be senred, glaze the larding, and put stewed sorrel under.

Mutton may be done in the same manner.

The forcemeat, if not approved, may be omit- ted; and instead of only one piece of veal, three or four small pieces may be served on a dish. Fricandeaux, &c. should be put before a fire, or into a slow oven, for five minutes before they are glazed.

MINCED VEAL FOR A DISH.

Cut ready dressed veal into small pieces, put them into a stewpan, and add a very small quan- tity of grated lemon peel, and a little bechamel: season with Cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and salt: stew the veal gently for ten minutes, and serve with sippets of bread round it, either fried or plain.

MINCED VEAL (another loayj*

Add to the veal a little broth, one shalot chopped fine, and a small quantity of grated nutmeg and

MEATS. 91

lemon peel. Season with Cayenne pepper, lemon jnice, and salt; stew for ten minutes, and just before serving, add a liaison of two eggs and cream; simmer them together for fiye minutes, and be careful it does not burn or curdle. Put it in a deep dish, and serve upon the mince two pickled sheep's tongues, boiled, peeled^ and glaeed. Sippets of bread should be placed round.

calf's feet a la sauce.

Let the feet be well cleaned; bofl them in milk and water till the bones can be taken away, then put them into a stewpan with a little cullis, some capers, scalded parsley, and lean of dressed ham chopped fine; stew all together a quarter of a^ hour. Serve with sippets of plain bread round the dish.

calf's feet {another way)*

Boil three feet in milk and water dll tender; drain them, take the long bones away, put the feet into a dish, and serve over them a sauce made with two ounces of fresh butter, a gill of cream, a little salt, mustard, and some scalded parsley chopped very fine; thicken with flour and water, and add some vinegar, or instead of flour and water, the yolks of two eggs and a little cream mixed together may be added.

Tripe may be done in the same manner.

92 ART aF COOKERY.

calf's feet with forcemeat. Let the feet be cleaned and boiled till tender; take the bones out, fill the cavity with forcemeat, wash the feet with yolk of egg, and roll them in bread crumbs; then dip them in oiled butter, roll them in fine bread crumbs, and fry them in boiling lard till of a nice colour. Serve with fried parsley over, Mayonnmse sauce, and croutons of fried bread.

TO DRESS VEAL CUTLETS.

Beat the cutlets with a chopper, and cut them into pieces rather larger than a crown-piece; then wash them over on each side with an egg beaten tip, and strew them with a mixture of parsley chopped fine, a little sifted basil, grated nutmeg, lemon peel, pepper and salt; butter a saute plate, and broil them over a clear fire of a light colour. Serve with rashers of fried ham or bacon round them; or with some fried oysters, putting a cullis with some catchup added, or Tomato sauce under them.

VEAL CUTLETS AU NATUREL.

Cut the best end of a neck of veal into chops, trim off the bone, pass the steaks with a bit of fresh butter, chopped parsley,' thyme, and sha- lots, and season with pepper, salt, and lemon juice.

MEATS, 93

When nearly done, lay them on a dish with the liquor; and when eool, egg, breadcrumb, and broil them gently. Serve them round each other, with a sauce in the centre made with cullis, a little catchup, lemon pickle, and artichoke bottoms cut into pieces.

VEAL CUTLETS LARDED.

Cut the best end of a neck of veal into chops, leaving only a part of the long bone; then lard, blanch, and braise them: and when they are to be served, drain dry, glaze, and place them round each other in a dish, and put green truffle or white mushroom sauce, in the centre.

SCOTCH COLLOPS.

Cut the veal into thin slices of the size of a half-crown piece, and blanch them for two minutes in boiling water. Then wipe them dry, fry them in sweet oil till of a nice light colour, and add some slices of scalded sweetbread, half a pint of cullis, some stewed mushrooms, and egg and forcemeat- balls scalded. Season with lemon juice, and serve with a sweetbread braised and glazed; or a heart sweetbread may be roasted and put on the top.

VEAL COLLOPS (white). Cut the coUops as in the above receipt, but in-

d4 ART OF COOKERY.

Stead of frying, put them into a stewpan with a bit of fresh batter, a little lemon juice, and a blade of mace. Simmer them till nearly done, then strain the liqnor to some bechamel and add the eoUope with some slices of throat sweetbread, oock's-combs blanched, egg balls, pieces of artichoke bottoms, and white mushrooms stewed. Let them stew gently, season with salt, and make the sauce of a sufficient thickness to adhere to the ingredients.

Five minutes before serving, add a liaison of eggs and cream.

VEAL OLIVES.

Cut thin bards of fat bacon of six inches long and four broad; lay upon them very thin slices of veal of the same dimensions, wash the veal with yolk of egg, and put upon it some light forcemeat. Roll them up, run a lark spit sideways through each olive, tie a string over them to prevent their falling off, trim each end with a sharp knife, roast gently, and froth and serve with a cuUis sauce under.

Instead of bards of bacon being put under the veal, thin slices of raw ham may be put over; and some forcemeat rolled up.

POTTED VEAL.

Cut small a pound of lean white veal, put it into

MEATS. d5

a stewpan, with two ounces of fresh batter, die juice of a lemon, pepper, salt, sifted mace, a bay leaf, some allspice, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and mush- room powder, a little parsley, thyme, savory, and two shalots chopped fine. Stew for ten minutes; then pound them, and add a pound of the mellow part of a pickled tongue boiled and half a pound of cold fresh butter. Mix them well together with two eggs beaten; then press the mixture down tightly into small pots, cover with paper, put them into a moderate oven, bake for twenty minutes, and when cold put clarified butter over.

calf's liver roasted.

Make an incision in the under part of a calf s liver, fill it with stuffing made with beef marrow, bread crumbs, grated nutmeg, one shalot, two mush- roonois, parsley and thyme chopped fine, and one egg beaten. Then sew it up, lard it with small slips of fat bacon, put a piece of veal caul over, and roast gently. When ready, take off the caul, glaze the top, put .under it some good cullis sauce, and plenty of fried parsley round.

ROASTED SWEETBREADS.

Blanch heart sweetbreads till half done; then wash and wipe them dry; cut off some of the pipe, put yolk of eggs on the tops with a paste brush,

96 ART OF COOKERY.

and strew fine bread crumbs over. Roast them, gently till done and of a nice colour, and serve, with a toast under and melted butter poured over^ together with some cuUis sauce round.

BOILED SWEETBREADS.

Blanch two heart sweetbreads, wash and trim oflF the pipe, then boil them in milk and water with a little salt for half an hour; drain them dry, and on serving put over them some boiling bechamel with a little parsley chopped very fine in it.

FRIED SWEETBHEADS.

Let some throat sweetbreads be blanched, cut into slices, and served in the same way.

BROILED SWEETBREADS.

Blanch the sweetbreads till half done, wash and trim off the pipe; then cut them into large slices, season with a small quantity of Cayenne pepper and salt, broil them gently over a clear fire till of a nice brown colour, and serve tjiem very hot, with some cold fresh butter on a plate.

SWEETBREADS EN HERISSON.

To be done in the same manner as neck of veal.

GLAZED SWEETBREADS.

Lard two heart sweetbreads very neatly, blanch,

MEATS. 97

and braise or roast them; and when ready to be served glaze the top part, and put stewed endive, or truffle, or Tomato sauce, under them.

SWEETBREADS WITH VEAL AND HAM.

Blanch heart sweetbreads eight minutes, wash, and wipe them dry; then take a piece out of the under part, pound it with a small quantity of light forcemeat, fill the cavity in the sweetbread with it; rub the top with white of egg, lay over it a thin slice of lean ham, a slice of veal, and a bard of bacon; put paper and a thin sheet of common paste over the whole, bake gently for an hour, and just before serving take o£f the paste and paper, glaze the bacon lightly, and put a good bechamel under the sweetbreads.

RAGOUT OF SWEETBREADS (brownj.

Take throat sweetbreads blanched and cut into slices; morells blanched, halved, and washed free from grit; some stewed mushrooms, egg balls, artichoke bottoms, or Jerusalem artichokes, boiled tiU half done and cut into pieces; green truffles pared, cut into slices half an inch thick, and stewed in a little broth till nearly reduced; and cock's* combs boiled till three parts done. Mix all the ingredients together, add some cullis, stew gently a quarter of an hour, season and serve.

F

98 ART OF COOKERY.

RAGOUT OF SWEETBREADS (white).

Put into a stewpan some stewed mushrooms, egg balls, slices of blanched throat sweetbreads, cock^s- combs boiled till nearly done, and half a pint of con- somme. Stew for ten minutes, then pour the liquor into another stewpan, and reduce it over a fire to one half the quantity. Beat up the yolk of two eggs, a gill of cream, a little salt, and strain them through a hair sieve to the sweetbreads, &c.; then put all over a slow fire and simmer five minutes; or instead of these ingredients, stew with bechamel only.

TO PRESERVE CALVES* TONGUES.

Pickle the tongues as directed; when they are ready wipe them dry, put them into bullock's blad- ders tied at the end, and hang them in a dry place.

MUTTON RUMPS MARINADED.

Clean and cut the rumps of an equal length, and lay them in a pan with the marinade for a whole night; then pass them in butter till nearly done. Lay them on a dish to cool, wash them over with yolk of egg, and breadcrumb them. Fry them gently in boiling lard till done, and of a nice colour. Drain them dry, and serve with a well seasoned ctiUis sauce with catchup in it.

Mutton steaks may be done in the same manner.

ENTREE OF RUMPS OF MUTTON.

When the rumps are well cleaned, braise them

MEATS. 99

till nearly done; then fry slips of bread of the same breadth and length; put upon each slip a rump, with grated Parmesan cheese over it, and upon the whole, a little mustard, butter, and cullis, mixed together; strew fine bread crumbs on the top. Bake the rumps till tender, and serve with a little consomm^ round them.

If approved a liaison of two yolks of eggs, and a gill of cream, may be added to the consomme five minutes before putting it round the rumps.

FILLET OF MUTTON WITH CUCUMBERS.

Take the best end of a neck of mutton, cut off the under bone, leaving the long ones on; then trim it neatly, lard it, or let it remain plain; roast gently, glaze, and serve with cucumber sauce under.

The mutton may be put into marinade for one night, made with a gill of Port wine, a little vinegar, and beef broth boiled together.

FILLET OF MUTTON A l'iTALIBNNE.

Take the best end of a neck of mutton, and catting the bones out, stew with a little broth till tender. Set it on a dish to cool, brush it over with yolk of egg, roll it in fine bread crumbs, brush it over again with oiled fresh butter, and roU it in more bread crumbs. A quarter of an hour

f2

100 ART OF COOJLERY.

before serving, broil it gently over a slow fire till of a nice colour, and serve with a sauce d ritalienne round it.

HASHED MUTTON FOR A DISH.

Take mutton ready dressed, and cutting it into thin slices, put them into a stewpan with slices of pickled cucumbers, walnuts, or onions; then make a sauce with chopped shalots or onions, passed with a bit of fresh buttery and a little flour over a slow fire till three parts done: after which add a pint of veal broth^ or gravy, and a little catchup. Boil ten minutes, and season with Cayenne pepper and salt; then strain it to the mutton, and stew gently till it is thoroughly hot, in a pot of boiling water over a fire.

Beef may be done in the same manner^ and on serving, put the bones (which must be seasoned with pepper and salt, and grilled) over the hash.

MUTTON CUTLETS A LA MAINTENON.

Take the best end of a loin of mutton, remove the under bone, and cut it into chops; beat and trim them neatly; then add to them a bit c^ fresh butter, chopped parsley, thyme, ^alots, pepper, salt, a little pounded mace, and lemon juice. Pass them till nearly done; then lay them on a dish, pour die liquor over the chops, and, when nearly cool, breadcrumb, and put them separately in oiled

MEATS. 101

white paper; fold them up, broil them over a slow fire, and serve with hot poivrade sauce in a boat.

MUTTON CUTLETS WITH POTATOES.

Cut a loin of mutton into steaks, beat them with a chopper, and trim them neatly. Pass them in sweet herbs, 'shalots, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When nearly done, lay them on a dish till almost cool, and egg, breadcrumb, and fry them in boiling lard till of a light brown colour. Place the steaks round a dish, leaving a cavity in the centre, which is to be filled with potatoes. Put the sauce under the steaks.

The potatoes must be peeled, scooped, or cut into shs^es. Fry them of a light colour, and set them before the fire till wanted; add a little cuUis and catchup to the sauce the steaks were passed in; then strain and reduce it almost to a glaze.

CUTLETS A LA IRISH STEW.

Take the best end- of a neck of mutton, remove the under bone, and cut it into chops; season them with pepper, salt, a little mushroom powder and beaten mace. Put them into a stewpan, add a large onion sliced, some parsley and thyme tied in a bunch, and a pint of veal broth. Simmer the chops till three parts done, then add some whole potatoes peeled, and stew till done. Serve in a deep dish.

f3

102 ART OF COOKERY.

Let the parsley and thjrme be taken out before serving.

HARICOT MUTTON CUTLETS.

Cut a loin or best end of a neck of mutton into steaks, trim neatly, and fry them till three parts done, and of a nice colour. Put them into a stewpan, add a little liquor to preserve them from burning, and simmer till tender. Lay the steaks round a dish, and serve with haricot sauce over.

The essence in which the steaks were stewed may be strained, skimmed clean, and added to the sauce.

TO DRESS MUTTON, LAMB, OR PORK CHOPS IN A

PLAIN MANNER.

Cut a loin of mutton, or lamb, into chops of a middling thickness: beat them with a chopper, and trim oiF a sufficient quantity of the bone and fat; broil them over a clear moderate fire, season with pepper and salt, and serve very hot with gravy.

Lamb chops may have stewed spinach or fried parsley underneath.

MUTTON CHOPS WITH MASHED POTATOES.

Bone a piece of loin of mutton, cut it into steaks of a good thickness, season with pepper and salt, and broil them over a clear coal fire, taking care that they are not done too much. Then have,

MEATS. 103

ready a shape of mashed potatoes very hot, which has been formed in a tin mould. Put the chops round, serve immediately, with some chopped shalots, and scraped horseradish, on separate plates.

lamb's head minced.

Chop the head in half, and blanch it with the liver, heart, and lights. Then chop the heart, &c. and add a little parsley chopped very fine, a small quantity of shredded lemon peel, and some cuUis; stew gently till done, and season. Wash the head over with yolk of egg, season it with pepper and salt, strew fine bread crumbs over, and bake it gently till very tender. On serving, coloar it with a salamander, put the mince under, and the brains filed round it, with rashers of broiled bacon.

The brains may be prepared by cleaning them in warm water, wiping dry, and dipping them in yolk of egg; then breadcrumb, and fry in boiUng lard.

SHOULDER OF LAMB GLAZED.

Bone a shoulder of house lamb, and season it with pepper, salt, mushroom powder, and beaten spice; fill the cavity with some light forcemeat; sew it up, and make it in the form of a leg of lamb; after which blanch it, and braise with a little broth and bards of fat bacon. When done

F 4

104 ART OF COOKERY.

wipe it dry, gla^e it, and serve with sorrel sauce under; or a strong collis saace having a little Tarragon vinegar in it

SHOULDER OF LAlfB EN EPfGRAMME*

Roast a shoulder of Iamb till three parts done, and let it stand till cold; then take the blade- bone out with the meat, leaving only the skin whole in the form of a fen. Cut the meat into slips, add to it parsley, thyme, shalots, and mush- rooms, chopped fine, some well seascmed collis, and a little lemon pickle. Stew gently for a quarter of an hour. Let the fan of the shoulder and the blade-bone be broiled, and served over the stew.

SHOUI4DER OF LAMB GRILLED.

Roast it till three parts d me, then score it with chequers, season with pepper aifd salt, and grili gendy till done. Let it be of a light brown colour, and serve with a sauce over made vnih cuUis, catchup, lemon juice, and a bit of fresh butter, or Tomato sauce.

BREAST OF LAMB WITH PEAS.

Cut off the under bone, blanch, and braise it. On serving glaze the top, and put stewed peas under, or puree of peas.

MEATS* 105

BREAST, OR TEKDRONS OF LAMB, EK MATELOTTE.

Cut the breast into two long slips, trim off the bone and skin, cut them into small pieces, and blanch and boil them in a little broth and lemon juice. When nearly dose, add peeled and half- boiled button onions, pieces of pickled cucumber cut of the same size, a few button mushrooms stewed, some slices of throat sweetbreads, blanched omelet of egg, cut into dice, and lean ham cut in the same manner: then add a cuUis or bechamel. On serving, put sippets of fried bread round.

BREAST OF LAMB WITH BECHAMEL.

Take off the under bone; then blanch and put it into a stewpan, with parsley, thyme, and shalots, chopped very fine, a bit of fresh butter, pepper, salt, a little essence of anchovies and leinon juice. Simmer over a slow fire till nearly done; then lay it on a dish^ and, when almost cool, egg and breadcrumb it, broil it over a slow clear fire till tender, and let it be of a nice brown colour. Serve with bechamel sauce under.

NECK OF LAMB GLAZED.

Cut' the scrag and the chine bone from a neck of house lamb; then take off the skin, trim part of the fat away to lard th^ neck lengthwise, blanch it, and brabe or roast it gently widi a veal caul

F 5

106 ART OF COOKERY.

over. On servings glaze the lardiog? aud pour white onion sauce round it.

NECK OF LAMB AND TURNIPS.

Cut the scrag, chine bone, and skin, from a neck of house lamb, and lay it in cold water for an hour; then boil it, and serve with mashed turnips round. The dish may be ornamented with boiled carrots cut into shapes. Have some caper sauce in a butterboat.

HIND QUARTER OF LAMB MARINADED.

Bone the leg, fill the cavity with a light force- meat well seasoned, sew it up, and lard the top part of the quarter with slips of fat bacon. When done, take a quart of veal broth, half a gill of vinegar, some whole black pepper, salt, two bay leaves, three onions cut in pieces, a little garlic, and half a pint of Rhenish wine. Boil all the in- gredients together a quarter of an hour, put the lamb into a deep dish, and strain the liquor to it. Let it lie five or six hours, and turn it several times; then roast the lamb gently with a veal caul over it. When nearly done, let it colour a little, and glaze the top. Serve with a sauce under, made with the above liquid boiled down almost to a glaze, and some cuUis.

A shoulder or leg of lamb may be done in the same manner.

MEATS. 107

HIND QUARTER OF LAMB WITH SPINACH.

Boil the leg, preserving it as white as possible, and serve with spinach under, and the steaks round it very hot The loin may be cut into chops, and seasoned with pepper and salt; then fried or broiled. Pick and boQ the spinach till nearly done; then strain and squeeze it dry, chop it, and add a little piece of fresh butter, pepper, and salt, a little cuUis or cream, and stew for five minutes.

The spinach may be served as a dish with fried bread round it

LEG OF LAMB WITH OYSTERS.

Bone the leg, and fill the cavity with light force- meat, and some blanched and bearded oysters pounded with it Sew it up, and put over it slices of lemon, salt, bards of fat bacon, and paper. Roast gently, and when ready for serving, glaze it, and put a sauce round made with oysters blanched and bearded, stewed mushrooms, boiled button onions, some cuUis, and the liquor in which the oysters were blanched. Season with Cayenne pep- per and lemon juice.

LAMB CUTLETS WITH TBNDRONS.

Cut a neck of house lamb into chops, leaving only the long bone; then beat them flat, and pass them with parsley, thyme, and shalots, chopped very fine; add a little lemon juice, mushroom

F 6

106 ART OF COdKERT.

powder, pepper, and salt When three parts done lay them on a dish, and when half cold breadcrumb and broil them on a stewpan corer, oyer a slow fire,^ with a bit of fresh butter. On serving put in the centre of the dish some braised tendrons of the breast of lamb, and round them the cutlets, and turnips or Tomato sauce over the centre.

LAMB CUTLETS WITH TENDRONS {another woy).

The tendrons may be senred in the centre of the dish, with the cutlets larded, braised, and glazed^ set round them; and the sauce made in the same manner, substituting bechamel for cuUis.

LAMB CUTLETS WITH CUCUMBERS.

Take the bone from a loin of lamb, cut it into chops, beat them flat with a chopper, and trim off some of the fat Pass them with a piece of fresh butter, chopped parsley, thyme, shalots, lemon juice, pepper, and salt When three parts done, put them on a dish, and, when nearly cool, egg, breadcriunb, and fry them in boiling lard till of a light brown colour. Drain them dry, place them round each other in the dish, and serve with cucum- ber sauce in the centre.

Mutton and veal cutlets may be done in the same manner.

;MI&4kTa. 109

LiJfB's TAILS AND ^AW*

Seald fo6x toUs akid five ears r^ry clean, aDd bTake them in a^ pint of real broth. When the tails are katf doaei take them out, egg and bread- crumb them oyer, and broil them gently. Let the ears be stewed till'thr^ parts done, and nearly re- duce the liquor; then add cuUis, stew them till tender, and serve with the sauce in the centre of the dish, the tails round them, and a bunch of pickled barberries over each ear. Or the tails and ears may be stewed in a little broth till tender; then add a liaison of eggs and cream, and serve with twelve heads of large asparagus cut three inches long, boiled till done, and put over plain. Let the heads be preserved as green as possible.

TO DRESS A lamb's FRY.

Scald the fry till half done; then strain, wash, and wipe it dry: dip the pieces in yolks of eggs, and breadcrumb them; fry them in plenty of boil- ing lard, and serve with fried parsley underneath.

Another Way.

Scald the fry as above, but instead of dipping them in egg, fry them in a plain way with a piece of butter till of a light brown colour; then drain, and sprinkle a little pepper and salt over, and serve with fried parsley underneath.

110 ART OF COOKERY.

TO DRESS PART OF A WILD BOAR.

Put into a braising pan fourteen pounds weight of the boar; add to it a bottle of Port wine, eight onions sliced, six bay leaves, Cayenne pepper, salt^ a few cloves, mace, allspice, and two quarts of veal broth. Stew gently, and when tender take the meat out of the liquor, put it into a deep dish, and set it in an oven. Then strain the liquor, reduce it to one quart, thicken it a little with passed flower and butter, and season with lemon pickle. Let it boil ten minutes, skim it clean, pour it over the meat, and serve.

TO ROAST A PIG.

Make a stuffing with chopped sage, two eggs, bread crumbs, and fresh butter, and season with pepper and salt; put it into the belly, sew it up, spit the pig and rub it over with a paste brush dipped in sweet oil. Roast gently, and when done cut off the head; then cut the body and the head in halves, lay them on a dish, put the stuffing with the brains into a stewpan, add to them some good gravy, make it boil, and serve the pig with the sauce under it.

FILLET OF PORK ROASTED.

Take a piece of back of pork, cut the chine bone from the under part, and lay it in a marinade all night When it is to be roasted run a lark spit

MEATS. Ill

through, tie it on another spit, cover it with paper, and roast gently; and on serving, if not coloured enough, glaze it lightly, and put some Robart sauce underneath.

COLLARED PIG.

Bone the pig; then have ready some light force- meat, slips of lean ham, pickled cucumbers, fat ba- con, white meat of fowls, and omelet of eggs white and yellow. Season the inside of the pig with beaten spices; then lay on them the forcemeat, and on that the slips of the above different articles alternately; after which roll it up, put it into a cloth, tie each end, sew the middle part, and putting it into a stew- pan with a sulBScient quantity of broth to cover it, stew it two hours and a half. Then take it out of the liquor, tie each end tighter, lay it between two boards, and put a weight upon it to press it. When cold take it out of the cloth, trim and serve it whole, either modelled or plain, or cut into slices, and put chopped savory jelly round.

A breast of veal, or a large fowl, may be done in the same manner.

PORK CUTLETS.

Take a piece of back of pork, cut it into chops,, beat and trim them, season with pepper and salt, and broil them gently till done and of a light brown

112 ART OF COOKERY.

oolonr. Serve widi stewed red or white cabbage iiiider» or with Robort «8«ce.

PORK CUTLETS {another way).

Trim the chops neatly as above^ pass them with a bit of fresh batter, chopped shalots, pepper, salt) and a little lemon juice. When nearly done, bread- crumb and broil them till of a light brown colour. Serve with a sauce under made of cuUis, mush- rooms, catchup, lemon pickle, and mustard, re- duced nearly to a glaze.

pig's feet and ears.

Take prepared feet and pass them, with chop- ped parsley, thyme, shalots, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When done, breadcrumb and broil them gently. Let the ears be cut in slices, then stew them for ten minutes in culUs well seasoned, and serve with the feet over.

to prepare large pig's feet and ears.

Scald and clean them; dien ^lit the feet ami tie diem round with packthread; put them into a pot with water sufficient to cover them; make it boil^ skim it clean, and add some garlic, thyme, shalots, onions, bay leaves, whole black pepper, allspice, mace, salt, and udder of veaL Braise them till tender, and put them in an earthen pan for use.

MEATS. 1 13

SUCKING pig's feet.

Blanch two or three sets of feet and the plucks; then put the feet into half a pint of water, with two shalots, some parsley and sage chopped fine, and a little potmded nutmeg, anil mace; when the feet are three parts done and the liquor nearly reduced, mince the pluck and put it to the feet with some cuUis, half a table spoonful of lemon pickle, and a table spoonful of white wine; season with Cay- enne pepper, and salt. Stew the feet till tender, and serve with sippets of bread round them, either plain or fried.

TO PICKLE HAMS, TONGUES, OR PIG'S CHEEKS,

WESTPHALIA FASHION.

Salt them for a day with saltpetre; then mix together one pound of common salt, two ounces of bay salt, three quarters of a pound of moist sugar, an ounce of bitter aloes boiled in a gill of water, and two ounces of juniper berries pounded. Rub the meat well with this mixture, put it into a pan, and turn it for three days. Then add a pint and a half of the best vinegar, and turn it for a fortnight or three weeks. Rub it finally with bran, hang it in a dry place, and smoke it with wood ashes.

TO PICKLE TONGUES, &C.

Take large tongues perfectly fresh, cut some of the root away, make an incision in the under part.

114 ART OF COOKERY.

rub them well with common salt, and lay them in a tub or pan dose covered for four days. Then pound together two parts of saltpetre, one part of common salt, one part of bay salt, and one part o£ moist sugar. Rub the tongues well with the mixture, put all into the pan, and turn them every second day for ten days, when they will be suffi* ciently pickled.

Pigs' faces and hams may be done in the same manner, but according to their size let them lay in the different pickles for various periods, and when well coloured smoke them.

A PLAIN OR PICKLED TONGUE FORCED.

Boil it till half done, then peel it, and cutting a piece from the centre of the under part, put it into a mortar. Then add three ounces of beef marrow, half a gill of cream, the yolks of two eggs, a few bread crumbs, a little pepper, and a spoonful of Madeira wine. Pound them well together, fill the cavity in the tongue with it, sew it up, cover it with veal caul, and roast or boil till tender.

PYRAMID OP TONGUE WITH TURNIPS.

Boil the tongue till tender, then peel it, and cutting it into slices, put them between two plates in a moderate oven to keep warm. Serve with

M£ATS. 115

mashed turnips in the middle of the dish, and the tongue round. Glaze the top lightly*

HAlif BRAISED.

Take a mellow smoked ham perfectly clean; trim it well, and put it into a braising pan; after which, add to it four quarts of water, a bottle of Madeira wine, and a few bay leaves. Cover the pan close, and simmer the ham over a moderate fire till very tender. Then wipe it quite dry, take off the rind, glaze the top part, and serve on a large dish with stewed spinach on one side and mashed turnips on the other. Or, a ham may be orna- mented with paste made in the same manner as for a raised pie, and cut into leaves; then dip them into white of egg, and put them upon the glazing in the form of a flower: afterwards set it in a moderate oven for half an hour.

Hams may be boiled plain, and served in the same manner. Pickled tongues may be stuffed with marrow and boiled, then peeled, and served with the above vegetables.

HAM WITH WINDSOR BEANS.

Clean and trim the ham neatly; braise it with a battle of Sherry wine, and a quart of beef broth. When nearly done, take the skin off, and preserve it hot in the braising pan: strain and skim it free

116 ART OF COOKERy.

^m tat, and bcal it down till reduced to a ^laze. Glaze the ham, and put the remainder to some Windsor beans, boiled and drained till dry; add some bechamel, a little scalded parsley, and pepper, and put it round the ham on serving.

MOCK BRAWN.

Take four scalded calf's feet, boil them Ull tender, and take out the bones. Have ready some of the belly-piece of pork boiled, and seasoned when cold with a little mace, cloves, and Cayenne pepper, pounded fine. Lay on the pork a forcemeat, and the feet upon that. Roll it up, tie it round with tape, and putting it into a cloth, tie this at each end. Br^se it till tender, then set it on a dish with a board and weight over to press it When cold, serve with oil, vinegar, mustard, and a littie sugar, in a butter-boat.

SAUSAGE MEAT,

Take a pound of the lean meat of young pork chopped small, tiie same quantity of the flay and fot chopped, some bread crumbs, nutmeg, allspice te pounded] a littie grated lemon peel, s^e, thyme, two shalots chopped very fine, and an ten up; season with pepper and salt. Mix togetiier with the hands, or pound it in a

MEATS. 117

mortar; then make it into cakes and broil it, or put it into the entrails of a pig nicely cleaned.

HODGE POPGE {or English Olio).

Take four beef tails out into joints; two pieces of bouilli about a quarter of a pound each, and two pieces of pickled pork of the same weight. Put them into a pot, with water sufficient to cover them; and when it boils, skim clean, and add half a savoy, two ounces of champignons, some turnips, carrots, onions, leeks, celery, one bay leaf, whole black pepper, a little allspice, and a small quantity of mace. When the meats are nearly done, add two quarts of strong veal broth; and when tender take them out, put them into a deep dish, and preserve them hot till they are to be served; then strain the liquor, skim it free from fat, season with Cayenne pepper, a little salt, and lemon juice, and add a little colour; then have ready turnips and carrots cut into shapes, some celery heads trimmed three inches long, and some whole onions peeled. Sweat them down till three parts tender, in separate stewpans, and strain their essences to the above Uquor; clear it with whites of eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth, mix the vegetables, and adding the liquor to them, boil them gently for ten minutes, and serve them over the meats.

118 ART OF COOKERY.

A partridge or a chicken may be added if approved.

ASPIC OF MEAT OR FOWL.

Bone either a shoulder of lamb or a fowl, and season the inside with pepper, salt, and a little beaten spice; then put into it some light forcemeat, sew it up, blanch, and braise it in broth. When done, lay it on a dish with the breast downward to preserve it as white as possible; and when the jelly in the mould is quite stiff, work on it a sprig or star with small slips of ham, pickled cucumber, breast of fowl, and white and yellow omelets of egg; then set it with a little jelly, and when cold put the meat or poultry upon it, and fill the mould with lukewarm jelly. When it is to be served, turn it out as the aspic of fish.

Pieces of meat or poultry, without forcing, may be done in the same manner.

«

ROASTED TRIPE.

Take four pounds of double of fat tripe, and, putting some light forcemeat between the fttt, roll it round, and tie bards of fat bacon and some writing paper over it Roast gently for an hour and a half; and on serving take off the paper and bacon, and pour over it some white onion sauce.

MEATS. 119

FRIED TRIPE AND ONIONS.

Cut the tripe into slips of four inches long and three inches wide, dip them in batter and fry them in boiling lard. On serving, put under it slices of onions cut one inch thick, and fry them in the same manner. Or instead of slips of tripe, pieces of cow-heel may be used; and let melted butter be sent in a sauce-boat with a little mustard in it, and, if approved, a table spoonful of vinegar.

BOILED TRIPE AND ONIONS.

Cut a prepared double of tripe into slips, then peel and boil some Spanish, or other onions, in milk and water with a little salt, and when they are nearly done, add the tripe, and boil it gently twenty minutes. Serve with the onions and a little of the liquor in a tureen. Serve, likewise, in a sauce- boat, some melted butter with a little mustard, and, if approved, a table spoonful of vinegar mixed with it.

TRIPE AND ONIONS {another way).

Put the pieces of tripe into a pan with milk sufficient to cover them; bake till tender, and serve in a bowl with onion sauce in a butter- boat.

This mode will be found to be the best.

120 ART OF COOKERY.

FRICASSEE OF TRIPE {tohite).

Cut the tripe into small slips, and boil in a little consomm^ till the liquor is nearly reduced; then add a liaison of two yolks of eggs and cream, a small quantity of salt, Cayenne pepper, and chop- ped parsley. Simmer all together over a slow fire for five minutes, and serve immediately. Or instead of the liaison, &c. a little bechamel and chopped parsley may be added.

FRICASSEE OF TRIPE {brown).

Cut the tripe into shapes with cutters; then add mushrooms chopped fine, a little scalded parsley chopped, an anchovy rubbed through a hair sieve, a spoonful of white wine, one of catchup, and a gill of cuUis, seasoned; stew the tripe gently till done, and serve with leaves of pufif paste baked and put round.

MARROW BONES.

Chop the bones at each end so as to stand steady; wash them clean, saw them in halves, tie over a bit of pasted white rag, set them upright in a saucepan with water, and boil them for two hours. Remove the cloth, and serve very hot, with fresh toasted bread.

121

SAUCES, FARCES, &c.

'OBSERVATIONS ON FISH SAUCES, &C.

Let it be particularly observed that fish sauces should be of the thickness of light batter, so that they may adhere to the fish when dressed; it being a frequent error that they are either too thick or too thin. The thickening should be made with the best white flour sifted, and butter passed over a fire for some time, or some water mixed with a wooden spoon or a whisk. A little of it is recom- mended to be always ready where there is mucb cooking, as it is frequently wanted both in fisb and other sauces.

There are, likewise, other articles repeatedly wanted for stove-work; and as their possession has been found to obviate much inconvenience and trouble, it may be well to enumerate them: colouring liquid preserved in a bottle, strained lemon juice preserved in the same manner, Cayenne pepper, ground spices^ ground pepper and salt mixed, which should be preserved sepa-^ rately in small jars; and every day, when wanted,

6

122 ART OF COOKERY.

fresh bread crumbs should be rubbed through a hair- sieve; parsley, thyme, shalots, savory, marjoram scalded and chopped fine, and lemon-peel chopped very /fine and put on a &sh, in separate partitions.

Few directions are given for serving the fish sauces with any particular kind of fish, - spch as lobster sauce for turbot or salmon, &c.; it is therefore recommended that every person make a choice, and be not biassed altogether by custom.

All white sauces, when added to the ingredients, should be set in a pot of boiling water over a fire to be made hot.

GREEN SAUCE FOR DUCKLINGS, OR GREEN GEESE.

Pick green spinach or sorrel, wash, and bruise it in a mortar, and strain the liquor through a tamis cloth. To a gill of the juice add a little loaf sugar, the yolk of a raw egg, and a spoonful of vinegar; if spinach juice, put one ounce of fresh butter, and whisk all together over a fire till it begins to boil.

Should the sauce be made of spinach juice, two table spoonsful of the pulp of gooseberries, rubbed through a hair sieve, may be added instead of the vinegar.

FENNEL SAUCE FOR MACKAREL, EITHER BOILED,

OR BROILED.

Pick a little green fennel, mint, and parsley,

SAUCES, &c. 12S

wash, boil them till tender, drain and press them, chop them fine, add melted butter, and serve imme- diately; for should the herbs be mixed with the butter any length of time before serving, they will be discoloured. The same observation should be attended to in making parsley and butter sauce.

If approved, some pulp of green gooseberries rubbed through a hair-sieve, and a little sifted sugar, may be added.

SWEET SAUCE FOR BOAST MUTTON, OR VENlSON«

Add to a gill of Port wine two table spoonsful of vinegar, half a gill of cullis, some sugar and onion bailed, and rubbed through a sieve, and a little pounded cinnamon; make it boiling just before serving.

APPLE SAUCE FOR PORK, GEESE, &C.

Pare, quarter, and core, baking apples; put them into a stewpan, add a bit of lemon rind, a small stick of cinnamon, a few cloves, and a small quan- tity of water. Cover the pan close, set it over a moderate fire, and when the apples are tender take the peel and spices out; add a bit of fresh butter, and sugar.

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124 ART OF COOKERY.

SAUCE FOR A HARE.

Take a gill of good veal broth, two table spoonsful of Port wine, a little sifted sugar, some currant jelly, two ounces of fresh butter, and two shalots scalded and chopped fine. Boil all together for five minutes, and pour it over the hare boiling hot.

MUSHROOM SAUCE FOR FOWI.S, &C.

Peel a pottle of fresh gathered forced mushrooms, wash them clean, and put them into a stewpan with two ounces of fresh bntter, a little salt, and the juice of half a lemon. Cover the stewpan, and set it on a moderate fire for ten minutes. When the liquor is extracted, make it of a proper thickness with flour and water, season with Cayenne pepper, and colour it with a little soy.

BREAD SAUCE.

Rub some bread crumbs through a colander, and setting them in a stewpan, add some cream or milk, a little salt, and ground white pepper, an onion boiled till tender and chopped fine, and a bit of fresh butter. Boil all together for five minutes.

If any white meat of a dressed fowl is at hand, pound it fine, rub it through a hair-sieve with a little milk, and add it to the sauce.

SAUCES, &c. 125

BREAD SAUCE FOR TURKIES, GAME, &C.

Soak a piece of crumb of bread in half a pint of milk or cream, add a middling-sized peeled onion, boiled till tender, and put them over a fire; when the milk is absorbed bruise the bread, and mix with it two ounces of fresh butter, a little white pepper, and salt.

MAYONNAISE SAUCE.

Mix with a wooden spoon the yolks of six eggs boiled hard, a spoonful of sweet oil, and a dessert spoonful of Tarragon vinegar. When it begins to thicken, add two spoonsful of aspic of jelly, or be- chamel, and a little salt. When it again begins to thicken, add a spoonful of oil, and half a spoonful of vinegar. Serve it of a good consistence.

This sauce may be served over a cold salad of lobsters, soles, sa&non, or other fish.

MAYONNAISE SAUCE A LA RAVIGOTTE.

Take some chervil, tarragon, burnet, and chives; wash and pick a handful of each, and boil them in salt and water for six or eight minutes. Then put them into cold water, strain, pound them in a mortar, and rub them through a tamis cloth. Add to the pulp some Mayonnaise sauce, and colour with spinach juice.

g3

1S6 ART OF COOKERY.

QUEEN SAUCE FOR CHICKENS, &€* -

To the crumb of a penny Frenck roll add half a pint of boiling veal broth) two ounces of J MNlaii   almonds blanched and pounded very fine, the yolks of two boiled eggs^ and the white meat of a cut fowl pounded; rub theise ingredients through a tamis cloth, add a little cream, and season. Pour it over the chickens, &c. boiling hot.

TRUFFLE SAUCE FOR TURKIES, &C

Put green truffles into water, clean them well with a hard brush, and cutting the outside paring thinly off, trim them into shapes; put the trimmings into a mortar, pound and add them to the force* meat which is to be put into the cavity near the breast of the turkey. Then set the truffles in a stewpan with a pint of beef broth, stew them gently, and when the liquor is almost reduced add some well seasoned cullis.

SPANISH SAUCE (foT stewed meats).

Cut a pound of lean ham into small pieces, put it into a stewpan with a little water, four peeled shalots, a laurel leaf, one clove of garlic, and an anchovy rubbed through a sieve; stew gently for half an hour; then add half a pint of veal broth, half a gill of catchup, two table spoonsful of sweet oil, and half a gill of best wine: season with

SAUCES, &c. 127

Cayenne pepper, amt lemon juioe, make it of a proper ddckness, let it simmer tiil the hasn is done, and strain it

HARICQT SAUCE.

Take clean turnips and carrots, and scoop or cut them into shapes, some celery heads in lengths of about two inches, button onions peeled, some dry or green morells, and artidioke bottoms cut into pieces. Let them all be blanched in separate stewpans till diree parts done; &en drain and put them all together with some small mushrooms stewed, and a good well seasoned cullis, and sim- mer die vegetables till d »ie.

POiVBAD£ sauce: (for game^ Maintenon cutlets. J

Peel twelve shalots and chop them small; add to them a gill and a half of vinegar, a table spoonful of veal consomme, half an anchovy rubbed throu^ a fine sieve, a little Cayenne pepper, and salt. Serve in a sauceboat cold, if to be eaten with cold game; but if with hot, roast, or grills, make it boiling.

POiVRADE SAUCE. (AuotJier way.)

Peel and chop twelve dbalots, and put them into a stewpan with a gill of vinegar. Stew for ten minutes; then add a table spoonful of Tomato

64

128 ART OF COOKERY.

glaze, a gill of cnllis, a tea q[)oonfiil of made mustard, a bay lea^ a litde salt, some Cayenne pepper, die juice of balf a lemon, and a small clove of garlic. Simmer all together for five minates, and strain diroogli a rieve.

ROBERT SAUCE.

Take some collis, a bay lea^ an onion sliced, a blade of mace, a little mustard, and a pil of Rhenish wine. Boil all together a quarter of an hour, strain, and reduce it nearly to a glaze.

SAUCE HACHEE.

Take some pickled encumbers ch ^ped small, some capers, parsley, shalots, the breast of a fowl, lean of ham, carrots, and yolks and whites of eggs; add some well seasoned cullis and a little mush- room catchup. Simmer all together a quarter of an hour.

The ham, fowl, eggs, and carrotB to be boiled before they are chopped.

ITALIAN SAUCE.

Peel, scald, and chop eight shalots, and add them to a quarter of a pottle of mushrooms cleaned and chopped fine. Sweat them together, and add some good bechamel.

SAUCES, &c. 129

ADMIRAL SAUCE.

Put a piece of fresh butter into a stewpan, and add two anchovies rubbed through a hair-sieve, a few capers chopped, some grated nutmeg, a gill of good cuUis, and the same of white wine. Set it over the fire; and, when warm, add the yolks of two eggs, a gill of cream, and a little salt Whisk it till it nearly boilS taking care not to let it curdle. It may be served with mutton chops, boiled rabbits, or mutton.

LIVER SAUCE.

Pound four fat livers fine with a bit of fresh butter, and add to them a small quantity of parsley, Tarragon leaves, and green onions scalded and chopped fine, a gill of Port wine, the same of cullis, some pepper, salt, a few coriander seeds, and a little cinnamon and pounded sugar. Stew all together for five minutes.

ORANGE SAUCE.

Squeeze the juice of a China orange into a stewpan. Boil half the peel till tender, rub it through a hair-sieve, and add it to the juice with a gill of cullis, and an anchovy rubbed through a sieve. Season with a little Cayenne pepper, and make it boil.

65

ISO ART OF COOKERY.

LOBSTER SAUCE FOR FISH.

Take the spawn out of live lobsters, bruise it well in a mortar, add a little cold water, strain it through a sieve, and preserve it tiU wanted; then boil the lobsters, and when three parts done, pick and cut the meat into small pieces, and put it into a stewpan. To the meat of a large lobster, a pound of fresh butter and a pint of water may be added, including a sufficient quantity of the spawn liquor to colour it. Set it over a fire, thicken it with flour and water, keep stirring till it boils; then season with anchovy liquor, lemon juice, and Cayenne pepper. Lei it simmer five minutes and skim it.

Or, instead of cutting the meat of the lobster into pieces, it may be pounded in a mortar, and rubbed through a tamis cloth; and the pulp put with the other ii^edients when the sauce is to be made.

OYSTER SAUCE FOR FISH.

Blanch and strain the oysters, and preserve their liquor; then wash, drain, and beard them, and put them into a stewpan; add fresh butter and the oyster liquor free from sediment, with some flour and water to thicken; season with lemon juice, anchovy liquor, a little Cayenne pepper, a spoonful of catchup, if approved, and a bit of lemon peel

8AUCB8, &C. 131

When it boUs ddm it» and let it simmer five minutes.

Muscles and cockles may be done in like manner.

OYST£E SAUCE FOR B££F STEAKS.

Blanch a mit cif oysteis, land )reserve their liquor; then wash and beard them, and put their Uquor into a stewpao with a smaU qnantity «rf India soy and catchup, a gill of cullis, and a quarter 6f a pound of fresh butter. iSet thtei over a firie, and when nearly boiling thidcen with floUr and water, or flmr and batter; season with a little Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice; strain it to the oysters, and stew them gently five minutes.

WHITE OYSTER SAUCE.

Bkuaeh laige oysters till half done, and strain and preserve the liquor; then beard and wash them, and put the liquor, free from sediment, into a stewpan. Add to it two ounces of fresh butter, half a pint of good cream, a piece of lemon peel, and a bkde of mace; pat it nver a fire, and when it nearly boils add .flour and water mixed, to thicken it properly. Season with lemon juice, salt, and a little Cityenne pepper, if approved; strain it through a fine hanvsieve to the oysters, and boil them gently five minutes.

Stewed oysters for dishes may be done in the

g6

192 ART OF COOKERY.

same manner; which should be served with sippets of bread round.

SHRIMP SAUCE FOR FISH.

Boil live shrimps in salt and water for three minutes; then pick, wash, and drain them dry; after which add fresh butter, water, anchovy liquor, lemon juice, Cayenne pepper, and flour and water to make it of a sufficient thickness. Put the in- gredients over a fire, and when boiling skim, and let tfie shrimps simmer for five minutes. Or when the shrimps are picked, wash the shells, drain them dry, put them into a stewpan, add a little water, and boil them ten minutes; then strain the liquor to the butter instead of the water, which will make it of a better flavour. The bodies of lobsters, also, when picked, may be prepared in like manner for lobster sauce.

DUTCH SAUCE FOR FISH.

Boil a little scraped horseradish with a gill and a half of vinegar for five minutes; then strain it, and when cold add the yolks of two new eggs, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, a dessert spoonful of flour and water, and a little salt. Whisk the ingre- dients over a fire till the mixture almost boils, and serve directly to prevent it from curdling.

SAUCE8, &C. 13d

. ANCHOVY SAUCE FOR I'ISH.

Put half a pound of fresh butter into a stewpan; add to it three spoonsful of anchovy liquor, a spoonful of walnut, and the same of mushroom catchup, the juice of half a lemon, a little Cayenne pepper, a tea spoonful of India soy, if approved, and a sufficient quantity of flour and water to make it of a proper thickness* Make the mixture boil, and skim it clean,

ANCHOVY AND CAPER SAUCE FOR FISH.

Rub three or four anchovies through a hair sieve, and add to them half a pint of veal broth, a little soy, a dessert spoonful of shalot vinegar, and some grated nutmeg. Set it over the fire with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; and when it boils, thicken it, and add a little Cayenne pepper, and plenty of chopped capers. Simmer for ten minutes, and serve in a butter-boat, or pour it over baked haddocks or gurnets.

LEMON SAUCE.

Pare two lemons, and cut them into very small pieces in the form of dice; then take some liver and scalded parsley chopped, and put them into a stewpan; add some boiling bechamel and a little melted butter, and simmer for two minutes.

134 ART OF GOOKSRT.

STEWED nUEBCH OLIVE SAUCE.

The olives should be stoned, and stewed in Strang Teal broth tOl tender, and the liquor nearly reduced; season with Cajrenne pepper, salt, and leuKRi juice.

SPANISH OHIOV SAUCE.

Braise six Spanish onions till three parts done; peel them, and add some good eollis seasoned with Cayenne pqpper, salt, and lemon juice, a gill of Port wine, and a little siftted lump sugar; stew them till tend».

ONIOK SAUCE.

Rub some boiled oni Mis through a hair-sieve: add to diem a little firesh butter, cream, flour, and salt, and stew for five minutes.

SAVOT SAUCE.

Cut some savoys in quarters, blanch them, tie them round, and braise them till half done. Take them out of the liquor, cut off the string, set them in a stewpan witii goad strong cuUis, and simmer them till tender.

CELERY SAUCE {whUe) FOR VEAL, CHICKENS,

TURKEYS, &C.

Cut celery heads three inches long, trim, wash, and blanch them; drain them dry, and add a little

SAUCES, &0. 195

broth; boil them till nearly done, and the liquor almost reduced; then put to them some bechamel, and, if approved, add a liaison of two yolks of eggs and cream, five minutes before the sauce is put over the meat or poultry.

CELERY SAtJCE (brovm) FOR PULLEl^, &C.

Dress celery heads as above, but instead of b^hamel add a good cullis.

These two sauces may be served in dishes with fried bread round the celery heads, as entrees of themselves.

TURNIP SAUCE.

Pare four turnips, sweat them with a little water till they are done and the liquor reduced; then rub them through a tamis cloth. Add to them a small quantity of bechamel, and cut some more turnips in shapes. Sweat them in the same manner, and add more b^hamel to them.

SORREL SAUCE.

Wash clean, squeeze, and chop fine, plenty of sorrel, and put it into a stewpan with a bit of fresh butter; stew it till the liquor is almost reduced, and then add a little strong cullis. Let the sauce be of a good thickness.

SHRIMP FOR SAUCES.

To a pint of picked shrimps add a gill of vinegar,

)S6 ART OF COOKERY.

a little salt, two or three cloves, and some Cayenne pepper. Put them into bottles with the liquor, cork them close, set the bottles in cold water, and boil gently for half an hour.

A ZEST FOR SAUCES.

Clean truffles, mushrooms, tomatos, or vege- tables of any kind, and pound them in a mortar separately. Boil them in some good strong veal broth with essence of ham; and when the goodness is extracted, strain the liquor through a hair-sieve, add some well-boiled calfs feet broth, bottle it, and cork it close. Set it in cold water over the fire; when it boils, simmer for half an hour, and put it in a dry place.

SOUFFLE OF BREAD OR PANADE FOR SAUCES.

Boil some cream and milk, and soak the crumb of French rolls in it; when nearly cool, rub it through a hair-sieve.

STEWED ASPARAGUS FOR SAUCE.

Scale some large asparagus, then cut off the heads as far as they are eatable, boil them till nearly done, strain them, and pour cold water over to preserve them green. Have boiling a good strong cullis, and put in the heads five minutes

SAUCES, &c« 137

before serving the sauce, which may be pot over tendrons of veal, lamb, &c»

Some tops of sprue grass may be boiled in a little broth till tender, and rubbed through a tamis cloth. The pulp should be put to the cullis before the heads are added.

TO STEW PEAS FOR SAUCE FOR LAMB, VEAL,

CHICKENS, &C.

To a quart of young green peas add two ounces of fresh butter, a very little sifted sugar, and some salt Put them into a stewpan, cover it close, and simmer the peas till nearly done; then add some good seasoned cullis, and stew till tender.

ESSENCE OF HAM FOR SAUCES.

Take four pounds of lean ham in slices, and be careful it is of a good flavour; put it into a stew- pan wiUi a little water, six peeled shalots, and two bay leaves; cover the pan close, set it over a fire, and simmer the ham till three parts done; then add two quarts of water and boil it till tender, strain it through a fine sieve, skim it perfectly free from fat, clear it with whites of eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth, boil it till it is reduced to a pint, and, when cold, put it into small bottles, and cork them close.

138 ART OF COOKSRY.

ANCHOTT I.IQUOR TO BE USED IN FISH SAUCES.

Put into a stewpan one ponnd of the best an- chovies, two quarts of water, two bay leaves, some whole pepper, a little scraped horserafsh, a sprig of thyme, two blades of mace, six shalots chopped small, a gill of Port wine, half lAie rind of a lemon, and a gill of catchup; boil all together twenty minutes, and rub through a tamis cloth with a wooden spoon. When the essence is cold, put it into pint bottles, cork them dose, and set them in a dry place.

MELTED BUTTER.

In order to prevent butter from oiling, flour and water sufficient for the quantity of butter should be boiled, skimmed clean, and the butter added to dissolve, being careful it is of a proper thickness.

Fish sauces may be made in the same manner, mixii^ the liquor of the lobsters or oysters, &e. with flour and water, and when boiling add the batter with the other ingredients.

TO MAKE MARINADE.

Take a little gravy, vinegar, salt, whole black pepper, a few bay leaves, onions sliced, a clove of garlic, and a little thyme. Boil all together and strain.

SAUC£S, &c. 139

FARCE A LA QUENELLE {or balls of Fowls foT

Entrees, §"c.)

Stew for fire minutes a piece of cmmb of bread that has been soaked in a little water, widi a gilt of good veal broth, a table spoonful of chopped parsley, and one of chopped mushrooms; then pound them in a mortar, rub them through a tamis clath, add the yolks of two eggs, and place on a plate with buttered paper over. Pound finely in a mortar the m^tt of two boiled fowls, freed from sinews, rub it through a tamis cloth, and, having ready a pound and a half of calfs udder, which has been well boiled, pounded, and rubbed through a tsmis cloth, add eight ounces 61 this together with six ounces of the bread pulp to each pound of the pulp of fowl; pound the whole for a qiarter oi an hour, add whitfe pepper, salt, a little grated nutmeg, the yolks of two eggs, and a spoonful of bechamel: put it in a basin, wjiich set in ice, and taking out a piece, when cold, of the size of a walnut, boil it for five minutes, cut it in half, (if of a moderate consistenoe, it will form a good ball when the force- meat is to be used), beat it to a solid frotib with the white of an egg, and dipping a silver spoon into a stewpan of boiling water, fill it with the mixture, mould this with the blade of a knife, likewise pre- viously dipped in boiling water, into the shape of

140 ART OF COOKERY.

the spoon, and, then boiling for a quarter of an hoar, drain it on a hair-sieve. Proceed thus till the whole is done.

This &rce may be made in the same manner with veal, partridges, pheasants, hares, rabbits, &c. or, it may be made maigre, with fish of any kind, when, instead of the udder, firesh butter and pounded truffles may be added.

Or, the above farce may be put into a mould lined with bards of fat bacon, pressed down, baked in a moderately heated oven, and served in slices at break&st, either hot or cold.

GODIVEAU, OR FORCEMEAT FOR PIES, OR PUFFS.

Pomid together in a mortar half a pound of lean veal, the same quantity of suet, some parsley, thyme, shalots, basil, and marjoram, scalded and chopped fine, an anchovy boned, and twelve mush* rooms chopped fine, with the yolks of two eggs, a few bread crumbs, pepper, salt, a gill of cream, one of strong broth, and some blanched oysters.

FORCEMEAT BALLS FOR RAGOUTS, &C,

Cut lean veal and beef suet into small pieces, and add chopped parsley, thyme, marjoram, savory, shalots, pepper, salt, bread crumbs, a little grated nutmeg, and yolk of raw eggs. Pound all well together, and roll into balls.

SAUCES, &C. l4l

The balls should be boiled, or fried, before they are added to any dish,

LIGHT FORCEMEAT FOR PIES, OR FOWLS, &e.

Cut in pieces lean veal, hun, and fat bacon; add chopped parsley, thyme, shalots, some beaten spices, lemon juice, pepper, salt, and a few cleaned mush- rooms, or mushroom powder. Put over a slow fire till three parts done; then powid in a mortar till very fine, and add a sufficient quantity of yolk of raw eggs and bread crumbs to bind it.

MARBLED FARCES.

Pound with forcemeat some parsley, scalded, pounded in a mortar, and rubbed through a tamis cloth.

Veal, or fowls, &c. may be forced with plain forcemeat, and the green alternately: or any other colours may be used, as saffron, cochineal, &c»

STUFFING FOR TURKEYS, HARES, VEAL, &C.

Chop beef suet very fine, with parsley, thyme, shalots, a small quantity of maijoram, savory, ba- sil, and lemon peel, with grated nutmeg, two eggs (or milk), pepper, salt, and an anchovy if approved* Mix all well together with some bread crumbs.

142 ART OF COOK£RT.

STUFFING FOR VEAL, OR HARES.

Take beef suet chopped fine, bread crumbs, an anchovy rubbed through a hair sieve, the white meat of a ready dressed fowl pounded, some grated nutmeg, a small quantity of lemon peel, pepper, salt, the yolks of two eggs, parsley, thyme, shalots, and knotted marjoram scalded and chopped fine. Mix all well together, and add some oysters with- out the gristle if approved.

SEASONING FOR MEATS, POULTRY, FISH, OR

RAISED PIES.

Mix together four drachms of nutmeg, the same quantity of cloves, two drachms of mace, two of pimento, two of laurel leaves, two of thyme, two of basil, and some salt. Let the whole be well dried; pound and sift it, put it into a tin box, and set it in a dry place.

GRAVY FOR ROAST MEAT, STEAKS, AND POULTRY.

Cut slices of chuck beef, veal, and lean bant; pare onions, turnips, a carrot, and cut them with celery; then add a bunch of pardiey and diyme, and a little whole pepper, and mace. Put all the ingredients into a stewpan, set them over a mo- derate fire, sweat down till the liquor becomes of

SAUCES, &c. 148

a light brown colour, and be careful not to let it bum. Discharge it with water or beef broth; sea- son with salt, and, if required, add a little c(d^uring liquid. Let it simmer till the meat is perfectly done, skim it free from fat, and strain it through a tamis cloth.

COMMON MUSTARD.

Mix flour of mustard with cold water, a little cream, salt, and sugar.

MUSTARD (for keeping).

Boil a small quantity of scraped horseradish with some of the best vinegar; add to it half as much Mountain wine, and a little sifted sugar and salt. Mix it with the best flour of mustard to a proper consistence, and cover close.

MUSHROOM CATCHUP.

Take mushrooms either natural or forced, the latter will prove the best, and cut off part of the stalk towards the root. Wash, drain, and then bruise them a little in a mortar; put them into an earthen vessel with a middling quantity of salt over, let them r^nain three or four days, and then strain than through a tamis cloth. When the sediment is settled, pour the liquor into a stew- pan, and to every pint of juice add half a gill

144 ART Ol? COOKERY.

¦

of Port wine, a little allspice whole, cloves, mace, and pepper. Boil for three quarters of an hour, then skim and strain it, and wlien cold put it into small bottles, and cork them close*

WALNUT CATCHUP FOR FISH SAUCES.

To a quart of walnut pickle add a quarter of a pound of anchovies and three gills of* Port wine; boil till reduced one third, strain, and when cold preserve it in small bottles closely corked.

TO PRESERVE MUSHROOMS FOR SAUCES.

Peel, wash and boil forced button mushrooms, till half done, in a sufficient quantity of salt and water to cover them; then drain, and dry them in the sun. Boil the liquor with different spices, put the mushrooms into a jar, pour the boiling pickle over them, add sweet oil, and cover the jar with bladder, &c.

TO KEEP CUCUMBERS FOR WINTER USE FOR

SAUCES.

Peel and put fresh gathered middling*sized cu* cumbers into a jar; and boiling an equal proportion of vinegar, water, and some salt, sufficient to cover them, pour it over, add sweet oil, cover the jars with bladder and leather, and set them in a dry place.

fiAUCES^ &C. 145

«

TO PRESERVE GREEN TRUFFLES FOR SAUCES.

Soak fresih truffles in water for three or four hours, and^ after brushing them thoroughly clean with a scrubbing brush, peel them. Pound the trimmbgs finely in a mortar, and putting them into a stewpan with a quart of veal brodi, boil for an hour and a half, strain the liquor to the peeled truffles, and boil together for an hour. When cold, secure the whole in wide-mouthed bottles, and, set- ting them in cold water over afire, boil for an hour. After suffering them to cool, fasten the corks well in with cement^ and set the jars in a dry place.

H

146 ART OF COOKERY.

VEGETABLES, SALADS; &c.

DIRECTIONS FOR VEGETABLES.

Vegetables should be gathered fresh, picked clean, trimmed or pared neatly, and washed in several waters* For plain boiling they should be put into plenty of boiling water and salt. Such vegetables as spinach, greens, cauliflowers, broc- coli, when three parts done, should be placed in cold water for five minutes, as it preserves their colour, then returned to boiling water till done. Before serving, they should be drained dry.

Potatoes and carrots are best steamed.

BLANC FOR VEGETABLES, MEATS, OR POULTRY.

Mix in two quarts of boiling water half a pound of fat bacon, a quarter of a pound of beef suet, two ounces of fresh butter, a little salt, and a lemon peeled and sliced - then bnuse.

POTATOES CREAMED.

Pare, cut into quarters, trim, and put the potatoes into a stewpan. Boil gently till half done, drain dry, and add a small quantity of cream, salt, and fresh

VEGETABLES, SALADS) &C. 147

butter, or some beehameL Stew very gently till they are done, and be careful they do not break.

TO MASH POTATOES.

Peel mealy potatoes, and boil them till nearly done; drain and steam them till quite dry, then add fresh butter, a little cream or milk, and some salt. Mash them well over afire jive minutes before they are to be used, and preserve them as white as possible. They may be served plain, or in a shap^.

The same mash may be put into scollop shells and coloured with a salamander; or may be mixec^ with yolk of egg, then moulded with the hand into round balls, and fried in boiling lard.

FRIED POTATOES.

Fare and cut potatoes in slices half an inch thick, then wipettem dry, flour, and put them into boiling lard or dripping, and fry of a light brown colour. Drain dry, sprinkle a little salt over, and serve with melted butter in a sauce boat

SCOLLOPED POTATOES WITH MUTTON, &C.

Mould scollop shells with mashed potatoes, and bake them of a good colour in a quick oven^ have ready some stewed mutton or beef collops

h2

148 ART OF COOKEBT.

well-seasoned, put them into the shapes, and serve very hot: or the coUops may be put into the shapes of the potatoes, and covered with the same. Then bake and serve with some cuUis under.

TO STEW CABBAGE*

Cut the cabbage into slips, and l)lanch and drain them dry. Put them into a stewpan, with a bit of fresh butter, pepper, salt, an onion, some vinegar, half a pint of veal broth, and a little allspice tied in a cloth. Stew gently till done and the liquor nearly reducied, and before serving take out the spice and onion.

PARSNIPS FOR SALT FISH.

Boil till done some fresh parsnips, rub them through a hair-sieve, and add to the pulp a little cream with some sifted sugar and a bit of fresh butter. Reduce the liquor till the pulp becomes thick, and serve in a butter boat.

Place some boiled parsnips whole round the dish, in. a napkin.

MASHED TURNIPS.

Pare and boil them till three parts done; then squeeze tHem between two plates, put them into a stewpan and add a little flour, fresh butter, cream, and salt. Mix them well over a fire, stew gently

VEGETABLES, SALADS, &C, 149

for five minutes, arid preserve them as white as possible; if approved, a little powdered sugar iriay be added.

CAULIFLOWER A LA BLANC.

Wash, cut into pieces, and boil the cauliflower till three parts done. Lay it in oil and vinegar for an hour, and then putting it into a raised crust three inches deep, serve with Mayonnaise sauce, and crumbs of fried bread.

CAULIFLOWER A LA CREME.

Boil the flower and pour over it the following sauce: Put a gill of consomme and a table spoon- ful of vinegar into a stewpan and set over a fire till hot; five minutes before it is to be sent to table, add a liaison of two eggs and a gill of cream.

CAULIFLOWER A LA SAUCE.

Boil the flower, and either serve it up whole, or ill pieces, placed round each other in a dish. The sauce over to be boiling and of a good thickness, made with strong cuUis, a little vinegar, and fresh butter mixed together.

Broccoli may be done in the same manner.

CAULIFLOWER. WITH PARMESAN CHEESE.

Cnt off the leaves and stalk, boil in salt and

Hd

150 ART OF COOKERY.

water till nearly done, and drain dry. Hare ready a dbh with fried bread dipped in white of raw eggf and put round the rim. Set the flower in the centre of the dish, and pour over a sauce made with boiling b6chamel. About three minutes be- fore putting it over the cauliflower, add grated Parmesan cheese.

FRENCH BEAN6 A LA CREME FOR A DISH.

Cut young beans in slips, boil them in plenty of water and salt to preserve them green, and when done drain them dry. Then put into a stewpan two ounces of fresh butter, with the yolks of three eggs beat up in a gill of cream, and set over a slow fire. When hot add a table spoonful of vinegar and the beans, simmer all togetiier for five minutes^ and keep stirring the beans with a wooden spoon to prevent the mixture from burning or curdling.

ASPARAGUS PEAS*

Scale sprue grass, cut it into pieces the size of peas as far as the green part extends, and wash and put tiiem into a stewpan. To a quart of grass peas add half a pint of hot water lightly salted, and boil them till three parts done; after which strain the liquor, boil it down till nearly reduced, and put to it three ounces of fresh butter, half a gill of cream, a littie sifted sugar, flour, and water

VEGETABLES, SAtADS^ &C. 151

sufficient to make it of a proper thickness; add the peas, and serve mtti the top of a French roll toasted and buttered pat under theiU*

{Another Way.) ^

, Boil the peas in salt and water till nearly done; then strain and put them into a stewpan, adding a little sifted sugar, two ounces of fresh butter, a table spoonful of essence of ham, and half a gill of cream, with two yolks of raw eggs beat up in it; stew gently five minutes, and be careful they do not burn. Serve in the same manner as the ^beve*

Large heads of asparagus may be done in the same manner whole.

FORCED CUCUMBERS.

Pare fresh gathered cucumbers of a middling size. Then cut them into halves, take out the seeds, fill the cavity with forcemeat, and bind the two halves together with strong thread; put them into a stewpan with a small quantity of vinegar, salt, and veal broth; .set them over a fire, simmer till three parts done, and reduce the liquor; then, adding a strong cullis, put it to the cucumbers, and stew them gently till done.

STEWED CUCUMBERS.

Pare and cut into shapes fresh gathered cucum-

h4

152 ART OF COOKCRT.

berg, if s^edy, or sUees if young. Put them into a stewpan^ and add a little salt, yinegar, and aii onion. Simmer over a fire tDl nearly done, and the liquor reduced; or fry them with a bit of fresh butter, and add a good strong cullis. Stew the cucumbers till done, and serre them with mutton roasted ?rith larding, or plain.

The cucumbers may be served as an entrde with fried bread putround them.

TO PRESBRVE CUCUMBERS.

Lay fresh gathered gerkins of a large size in salt and water for two days; then drain and wipe them dry, put them into glasses, make boiling a mixture of sugar, vinegar and water, pour it over the cucumbers, cover and set them in a warm place; boil the liquor again, and pour it over them for three successive days. Then take a quart of the liquor, add plenty of doves, mace, ginger, and lemon-peel; boil for half an hour, strain, and put to it plenty of sifted sugar, dear it with whites of eggs if requisite, reduce to a strong syrup, and put it to the gerkins. When wiped 'dry and in the glasses, cover them down very close.

TO STEW PEAS FOR A BISH.

Put a quart of fr^sh shelled young peas into a stewpan, adding a quarter of a pound of fi-esh

¦^

VEGETABLES, SALAI S» &C. 158

butter^ a middling sised ontoa aUced very fine, a , cos ox cstbjbage, lettuce washed and cut into pieees, find a yery little salt . Cover the pan close, put it , over, a moderate fixe, and siyeat the . peas till half dope. Make them of a proper thickness with fiour and water^ add a spoonful of essence of ham, season with Cayenne pepper, and add a small lump of sugar if £q^proved. Stew the peas gently till tender, being careful not to let them bum.

PUREE OF PEAS.

Stew till tender a pint of fresh-shelled green peas, with two ounces of fresh butter, a little salt, a bit of loaf sugar, a few chives chopped fine, a cos lettuce chopped, and a moderate quantity of chopped parsley. Rub through a tamis cloth, add half a pint of good seasoned cullis, and reduce it.

The pur^e may be served with veal, beef, or mutton.

STEWED ENDIVE.

Trim off the green part of endive heads^ wash and cut them into pieces, and scald them till half done; then squeeze, chop, and put them into a stewpan; add a small quantity of strong cullis, stew till tender, and serve in a sauce-boat; or under roast mutton.

h5

}54 ART OF COOKERY.

STEWED CARDOONS.

Cut the heads in pieces, take off the outside skin, wash, and scald them; put them into a stew-^ pan, add a little broth to cover them boil till three parts done and the liquor almost reduced, add a small quantity of bechamel, and stew them gently till done. Serve • with sippets of fried bread and stewed watercresses, alternately, round the rim of tixe dish, and the cardoons in the centre. Instead of bechamel, cullis may be used.

STEWED WATERCRES&ES.

Pick and wash twelve bunches of water-cresses: boil them till half done, and drain and squeeze them dry; then chop and put them into a stew- pan, adding a little cullis, cream, salt, pepper, and flour. Stew gently ten minutes, and serve with fried bread round.

STEWED MUSHROOMS (broum).

Clean with a knife a pottle of fresh forced mush- rooms, put them into water, and when ihey are to be stewed take them out with the hands to^void the sediment. Then put them into a stewpan with an ounce and a half of fresh butter, a little salt, and the juice of half a lemon. Cover the stewpan close, put it over a fire, and let the mushrooms boil for five minutes. Then thicken them with a

VEGETABLES, SALADS, &C« 153

little floor and water mixed, add a small quantity of colouring liquid, some Cayenne if approved, and stew gently for five minutes more.

STEWED MUSHROOMS (wkite).

Follow the same process as above: but instead pf adding colouring liquid, put to them a gill of good cream.

BROILED MUSHROOMS.

Clean with a knife fresh forced mu^ooms, and wash and drain them dry; then make a case with a sheet of writing paper, rub the inl^ide well with fresh butter, and fill it with the mushrooms. Sea- son with pepper and salt, put tliem upon a baking plate over a slow fire, cover them with a stewpot cover, with some fire upon it, and when the mush- rooms are nearly dry, serve, them very hot.

¦   "i

TO DRY MORELLS, MUSHROOMS AND CHAM- PIGNONS.

Take fresh morells and champigncms of the largest size, and forced mushrooms of the size of a shilling; cut off the stalk, wash them fr«e from grit, drain them dry with a cloth, run k fine twine through them with a large needle, hang them up in a warm dry place, and when perfectly dry, put them into paper bags, in boxes closely covered,

h6

AST OP COOKEBT.

Whm wsDted li^ them' in. warm w»ter im half an hour, and prepare them as whan freah.

MUSHROOM POWDER.

Dry mdshrooms or champignons whole, and set ihem before a fire till crisp; then grind and sift them throogh a line siere, and preserve the powder in small bottles close corked.

STEWED ARTICHOKE BOTTOMS.

Boil six artichokes till half done; then take the leaves and choke away, and trim the bottoms'neatly with a knife, or cut them with a shape. Put them into a stewpan, add half a pint of broth, a little salt and lemon juice, and boil gently till done. When they are t« be served wipe them dry, put them into the centre of a dish with fried bread round the rim, and a strong bright cullis over them, or bechamel.

ARTICHOKE BOTTOMS WITH FORCEMEAT.

Take six bottoms of artichokes boiled and clean- ed, wipe them dry, wash tbsm with y(Jk of e^, cemeat over . the egg, and upon then dip each double into rewing fine bread crumbs over, lard: when of a brown colour.

V£G£TABL£S, SALADS, &C. 157

dxain dry and serve with fried parsley roand, or some good cullis under.

FRIED AKTICHOKE BOTTOMS.

Let the. chokes be boiled till the leaves can be taken away, then cut the bottoms into halves, take the choke away, and fry them in batter: serve with melted butter, in a sauce-boat, with a little ground white pepper in it.

TO DRY ARTICHOKE BOTTOMS.

Take the largest firm artichokes when in season, cut off the stalks, and boil till the leaves and choke can be taken away. Set them on a baking plate in a very slow heated oven, or hang them up in a warm place to dry, and when perfectly so put them into paper bags. When wanted lay them in warm water and salt, and when pliable trim them neatly, braise them in broth and lemon juice, which will preserve them white, and when done enough, cut them into pieces if for ragout; if for dishes, serve them whole with good cullis sauce over.

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES STEWED.

Pare, cut into halves, and boil them in a little consomm^ till nearly done and the liquor almost reduced; then add a small quantity of fresh butter, salt, flour, and cream. Set them over a fire for five minutes, and serve with fried bread round.

158 ART OF COOKERY.

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES (anotfier way).

I

Pare and cut them into shapes as for haricot, and fry them in boiling lard till of a light brown colour; then drain dry, put them into a stewpan, and add a little strong cullis with a small quantity of vinegar and mustard mixed in it Serve with fried bread round.

GREEN TRUFFLES FOR A DISH.

Clean two pounds of green truffles; then put them into a stewpan with half a pint of broth, a gill of Port wine and a little salt, and boil gently half an hour. When to be served drain dry, and put them into a folded napkin. They should be eaten with cold fresh butter, or with oil, vinegar, and Cayenne pepper.

The liquor in which they were boiled may be made into a cullis, and put into different sauces, such as haricot, ragout, or celery, &c.

A hatter for frying the following articles^ being a suf ficierU quantity for one Dish.

Take four ounces of best flour sifted, a little salt and pepper, three eggs, and a gill of beer; beat them together with a wooden spoon or a whisk for ten minutes. Let it be of a thickness sufli* cient to adhere to the different articles.

2

VEGETABLES, SALADS, &C. 159

FRIED CELERY.

Cat celery heads three inches long, boil them till half done, wipe them dry^ and add to the bat- ter. Have ready boiling lard, take out the heads singly with a fork, fry them of a light colour, drain them dry, and serve with fried parsley under.

fri£d peths.

To be done, and served in the same manner as the above.

FRIED ONIONS WITH PARMESAN CHEESE.

Pare six large mild onions, and cut them into round slices of half an inch thick. Make a batter with flour, half a gill of cream, a little pepper, salt, and three eggs, beat up for ten minutes; then add a quarter of a pound of Parmesan cheese grated fine and mixed well together, to which add the onions. Have ready boiling lard; take the slices of onions out of the batter with a fork singly, and fry them gently till done and of a nice brown colour. Drain them dry, and serve them placed roimd each other. Melted butter, with a little mustard in it, to be served in a sauce-boat.

TO FRY PARSLEY.

..• Pick, wash^ and drain fresh gathered parsley very dry with a cloth. Have ready clean boiling lard, put the parsley into it, keep stirring with a

16D ART OF COOKERY.

skimmeTy and when a little crisp» take it out, pat it on a drainer^ and strew salt over.

TO DRY HERBS.

Grather maijoram, savory, thyme, basil, parsley, &C. on a dry day, when in season, and a little blown. Divide them, separately into small bunches, as they will thus dry best. Then hang them on a line in a dry room or place where the air has free admission but no direct rays of the sun: when perfecdy dry (which will require two or three weeks to accomplish) put them in rows in boxes closely covered, and set them in a dry place. Or they may be rubbed separately, sifted through a hair-sieve, and preserved in bottles closely corked.

FRENCH SALAD,

Consists of the different herbs in season, as tar- ragon, chervil, sorrel, chives, endive, Sicilian let- tuces, watercresses, dandelion, beet root, celery, &c. all of which should be very young, fresh gathered, trimmed neatly, washed clean, drained dry, and served in a bowl. The sauce to be served in a sauce-boat, made with oil, lemon pickle, vinegar, catchup, Cayenne pepper, a boiled yolk of an egg, and salt.

Some persons eat with this salad cold boiled tur- bot, or other fish.

VEGETABLES, SALADS, &C. 161 SALAD OV LOBSTER.

Take boiled hen lobsters, break the shells, and preserve the meat as white as possible. Cut the tails into halves, put them into the centre of a dish with the red side upwards, and the meat of the claws whole; place round the lobster a row of parsley chopped fine, and a row of the spawn from the inside chopped; and after this mix a little of each and strew over the top of the lob- ster. Then put slices of lemon round the rim of the dish, and send in a sauce-boat a mixtture of oil, vin^ar, mustard, Cayenne p^per, and

salt.

LOBSTER SALAD (another way).

Boil two lobsters till half done, then take the meat out as whole as possible, put it into a stewpan with half a pint of good veal broth, a blade of mace, an onion, half a bay leaf, a table spoonful of lemon pickle, and half a gill of vinegar, and sim- mer all together till the lobster is done, which must then be taken out of the liquor, and put into the centre of a dish: strain the liquor, add a little flour and water, season, and mix with it a sufficient quantity of live spawn to colour it, and two eggs well beaten; set it over a fire, and boil ten minutes; strain it through a tamis cloth, and reduce to half a gill. Put it over the lobster when cold, and garnish the dish with slices of cucumber and beet root.

163 ART OF COOKERY.

SAXAD OF ASPARAGUS.

Scale and cut off the heads of large asparag^ boil them till nearly done, strain, put them into cold water for five minutes, and drain them dry; then lay them in rows on a dish, put slices of lemon round the rim, and mixing well together a little mustard, oil, vinegar, Cayenne pepper, and salt, put it over the asparagus just before serving.

DUTCH SALAD.

Cut the meat of any dressed fish into shapes, and place them round each other on a dish, with two Spanish onions, either baked or boiled, in the centre, and likewise a boiled beet root. Before i^erving, pour over a sauce made with two spoons- ful of salad oil, a spoonful of Tarragon vinegar, a little salt, an anchovy rubbed through a hair-sieve, the yolks of two eggs boiled hard, a spoonful of common vinegar, one of cream, one of essence of ham, one of Sherry wine, a tea spoonful of made mustard, and some Cayenne pepper mixed well to- gether. Serve with some fried sippets of bread, or pickled barberries round.

MADE DISHES, ENTREMETS, &C. 163

MADE DISHES, ENTREMETS, &c.

CURRIE, OR PEPPER WATER.

Cut a chicken into pieces, blabch and wash it^ put it into a smdM stewpot, add a table spoonful of eurrie powder, half a pint of veal broth, and simmer them till half done. Then peel and cut into thin slices two good sized onions, fry them with two ounces of fresh butter till nearly done and of a brown colour; then add them to the chicken, together with a pint of veal broth,' half a bay leaf, the juice of half a lemon, and two table spoonsful of the juice of tamarinds, (which are to be dissolved in boiling water and strained.) Boil all together till the chicken is nearly done; then take it out, put it into another stewpan, rub the ingredients through a tamis cloth, and add them to the fowl with a table spoonful of flour and water to thicken. Make it boil, season it well with Cayenne pepper and salt, skim it clean, and serve it in a bowl.

164 ART OF COOKERY.

CURRIE OF CHICKEN.

Cut two young chickens into pieces, blanch and drain them dry, put them into a stewpan with two table spoonsful of currie powder, and a gill of veal broth, and stew gently till half done. Then- cat into slices three middling-sized onions, and put them into a. stewpan with a table spoonful of currie powder, a quart of veal broth, two ounces of Jor- dan almonds blanched and pounded fine, and boil till the onions are tender; then rub tl^e. whole through a tamis cloth to the chicken^ and season with Cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon or tamarind juice. Let the chickens stew till three parts done, then pour the liquor into another stewpan, adding three ounces of fresh butter, and a very little flour and water, and reduce to three gills. Strain through a tamis sieve to the chickens, and let them simmer till tender.

Rabbits, veal, or pork may be done in the same manner.

CURRIE OF VEAL.

Cut a piece of breast of veal into tendrons, and Fry them in a little lard till of a light colour; then drain them dry, add currie powder, and follow the same directions as for chicken currie.

MADE DISH£S, ENTREMETS, &C. 165

CURRIE OF MUTTON.

Take three pounds of the best ezid of a loin of mutton, cut off the bone and some of the &t; then cut the meat into small square pieces, fry them, and follow with the same directions as for veal.

pig's head CURRIE.

Take a young porker's head, cleave it in half, blanch and wash it, then cut it into small thick pieces, fry them, and dress in the same manner as veal and mutton; only omit the fresh butter, as there will be a sufficient quantity of fat.

CURRIE OF LOBSTER.

Boil lobsters till three parts done, and pick aiid cut the claws and tails into good-sized pieces; then add currie powder, and proceed in the same manner as with currie of chicken, only pound the body of the lobsters, and spawn if any, and add them to the almonds and other ingredients.

«

CURRIED ATTELETS.

Put slices of throat sweetbreads, and slices of veal or mutton of the same size into a stewpan with a bit of fresh butter, a table spoonful of currie

166 ART OF COOKERY.

powder, the juice of half a lemon, and a little salt. Set over a slow fire, and when half done add to them blanched and bearded oysters, with their liquor free from sediment. Simmer, all together five minutes, la^ them on a dish, and when cold put them alternately on small wooden or silver skewers. Then dip them in the liquor, strew fine bread crumbs on each side, broil them over a clear fire till of a brown colour, and serve them with some currie sauce under.

The slices of sweetbread, oysters, and meat to be of an equal number.

RICE IN SHAPES WITH CURRIE.

Wash and boil a quarter of a pound of rice till half done; drain it, and add a sufficient quantity of currie powder to colour it, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, a bay leaf, a giU of veal broth, salt, and lemon juice; then put it over a slow fire, and when nearly tender, let it get cool, and add the yolks of three eggs. Have ready a tin mould lined with bards of fat bacon; put the rice round the inside and at the bottom, and upon it a dressed currie of two chickens or meat, with only a little of the liquor; cover with the remain- der of the rice, and bake in a moderately heated

MADE DISHES, ENTREMETS, &a 167

oyen for one hour. When it is to be served, torn it gently out of the mould into a dish, take the bacon from it, make a small opening at the top, and add the remainder of the currie liquor boiling. Serve plain boiled rice round the baked, and some button onions boiled till tender.

PLAIN RICE TO BE EATEN WITH CURRIE.

Pick and wash a pound of rice, and put into boiling water. Let it simmer till three parts done; then strain and wash it in several waters till free from slime. Drain it in a large hair-sieve, and when dry put it into a stewpan with some paper and the cover over it. Set it in a moderate oven for one hour and a half; or longer, if there be a greater quantity.

TIMBALLE OF RICE.

Wash, and scald three quarters of a pound of Carolina rice for five minutes, strain, and put it into a stewpan. Then add to a pint of boiling cream, one pound of Jordan almonds, and an ounce of bitter almonds, finely pounded, and strain through a strong, coarse cloth to the rice. Put to it six ounces of sifted sugar, and the same quantity of fresh butter, set over a fire, and simmer till tender: then add a quarter of a pound of ratafia

168 ABT OF COQKEBV.

cakes, two eggs, and four yolks. Sheet a mould with pastQ) rolled like a cord; beat the whites ef two eggs to a solid froth, mix it lightly with th^ mixture, and, putting this into the mould, bake for an hour and a half: or it may be baked in a raised crust.

PILAU OF RICE.

Wash, pick, and dress, in the same manner as for plain rice, observing only, that before setting in the oven, a little pounded mace must be added to the rice; then put into a stewpan a chicken half bailed and a pieoe of pickled pork three parts boiled, and cover with the rice. On serving, place the fowl and pork at the bottom of the dish, with the rice over, and garnish with boiled or fried button onions and halves of hard eggs, hot

PILAU OF RICE {another way).

Wash, pick; and boil a pound of rice in plenty of water till half done, with a dozen of whole cardamum seeds; then drain it, pick out the seeds, and put the rice into a stewpan, with three quartdrs of a pound of fresh butter and some pounded mace, and salt. Cut a loin of house lamb, or some fresh pork, into small pieces; put them into a frying-pan, add a small quantity of cinnamon, cloves, cummin

MADE DISHES) ENTREMETS, &C. 169

and cardamum seeds pounded and sifted, with a bit of butter and some Cayenne pepper, and fry the meat till half done. Then add two bay leaves, and four good sized onions sliced, to a pint and a half of veal broth; boil them till tender and rub them through a tamis cloth or sieve. Then boil the liquor over a fire till reduced to half a pint, and add it to the fried meat and spices, together with some peeled button onions boiled. Place some of the rice at the bottom of another stewpan, then a layer of meat and onions on the rice, and so on alternately till the whole is put in. Cover the pan close, set it in s^ moderately heated oven for two hours and a half, and when to be served, turn the rice out carefully on a dish.

¦

FRIED EGGS AND BACON.

Take slices of ham or rashers of bacon, and broil, drain, and put them into a deep plate. Have ready a little boiling lard in a stewpan, break the eggs into it, and when they are set, turn and fry them not more than two minutes. Then take them out with a skimmer, drain them, and serve them very hot over the bacon or ham. Put under a strong cuUis, with a little mustard and vinegar, but no salt

170 AAT OF CqOKlkAY.

EGOS AND BAOOiC*

Boil six eggs for five minutes, then peel and cut them into halves; take out the yolks, and pound them in a mortar with a small quantity of the white meat of dressed fowl, lean ham, a little chopped parsley, one shalot, a table spoonful of cream, a dessert spoonful of catchup, a little Cay- enne, some bread crumbs, and sifted mace. Fill the halves of the whites with the mixture, bake them gently ten minutes, and serve on rashers of bacon or ham broiled, with some cuUis over.

HARD EGGS FRIED.

Boil the eggs five miuuteg; then peel^ wipe diem dry, cut them in halves, dip them in batter, and fry of a light brown colour. Serve with stewed spinach under, with a little strong cuUis and essence of ham mixed in it.

POACHED EGGS WITH SORREL, OR ENDIVE.

Cut a slice of bread large enough to cover three par,ts of the inside of a dish; ^y it in beilii^ lard. till of a light colour, drain it dry, and lay it in a warm place. Wash and chop tome sor- rel, squeeze and put it into a stewpan with a bit of fresh butter, Cayenne pepper, and a table spoon- ful of essence of ham; simmer till done, thicken

MADE DtCAKS^ BNtREliffBfS, &C. 171

it with flour and wat^, and beil Ave minutes; then butter the toast, poach and drain the eggs; lay them over the bread, put the sorrel sauce round, and serve very hot.

POACH&D £OG8 WITH HAM AND VEOETABLES.

Fry a slice of bread in boiling lard, drain it dry, put it into a dish, and upon it slices of ham which have been stewed till tender in a little Madeira wine; then poach the eggs, lay them upon the ham, and round the bread put some asparagus, peas, or truffle sauce.

SOtJFFLE.

Boil a pound of Carolina rice, with a quart of milk and two ounces of grated chocolate, till ten- der; then rub it through a tamis cloth. Add to the pulp twelve ounces of fresh butter, the yolks of sixteen eggs, and a little salt; then beating the whites of the eggs to a solid froth, mix the whole by degrees lightly with the mixture, which must be of the thickness of batter, and bake it in a raised crust with sifted sugar over.

Half a pound of marmalade, of any kind, rub- bed through a hair-sieve, may be added to the batter, and baked in a hoop, with sifted sugar over.

i2

1 72 ART 0¥ COOKERY,

SOVFPLE Of,MfiGB.

. Mix over a slow fire, for five minutes, three ounces of fresh butter, aud three qunces of sifted flour; then whisk into it one egg at a time to the amount of eight ^gs, « glass of brapdy, and aquart of milk strained, and previously boiled with lemoa peel and cinnamon: whisk all well together till it becomes of a light batter. Then butter the inside of a plain tin mould, and stick dried clierries round it; add the souffle when cold, and set the mould in boiling water over a fire till the mixture is done. Turn it gently out of the mould; and serve over sauce made with butter, sugar, and white wine paixed together; preserved apricot3 may be put round.

SOUFFLE OF TOASTS.

Pound in a mortar half a pound of the dressed meat of fowls or game, with a quarter of a pound of beef marrow and four yolks of eggs. Fry some toasts in boiling lard, and, when done, spread over them the pounded ingredients together with the whites of three eggs beat to a solid froth, and over this some grated Parmesan cheese and a few fine bread crumbs: set in a moderately heated oven till of a nice colour. On serving, put a good cnllis round.

MADE DTSHISS, £NtB£M;£nrS, &C. 173

BUlTERED £OOS«

Break twelve eggs into a stewpan; add a little parsley chopped fine, one anchovy picked and rubbed through a hair-sieve, two table spoonsful of consomme or of essence of ham, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter made just warm, and a small quan- tity of Cayenne pepper* Beat all together, set over a fire, and keep stirring with a wooden spoon till the whole is of a good thickness, and to pre- vent burning. Serve in a deep dish with a fresh toast under.

EGGS A LA TRIPE.

Boil the eggs gently five minutes, then peel, wash, and cut them into halves; put them into a stewpan, add a little strong bechamel warm, and a small quantity of parsley chopped very fine. Sim- mer over a fire a few minutes, and serve plain, or with fried oysters round,

OMELETS.

Beat up eight eggs with chopped fowl, game, ham, or any other dressed article. Fry in an iron frying pan well burnt^ and wiped clean.

All vegetables used in omelets should be scalded, drained dry, chopped fine, and then mixed with the eggs.

i3

174 ART or COaRBRYi

OMELET or EGOS.

Break ten eggs; add a little parsley and one shalot chopped fine, one anchovy picked and rubbed through a hair-sieve, a small quantity of grated ham, a little pepper, and if approved two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; mix all well together. Have ready an iron frying-pan, which has been prepared over a fire by burning a bit of fresh butter in it for some time, so that the eggs may not adhere to the pan when turned out. Wipe the pan very clean and dry; put into it two ounces of fresh butter, and when hot put in the mixture of eggs: then stu- with a wooden spoon till it be- gins to thicken, mould it to one side of the pan, let it remain one minute to brown, put a stewpan cover over it, and turn it into a dish; if approved, pour round a little strong cullis, and serve very hot.

A small quantity of boiled tops of asparagus or celery, some fowl, or oysters,, or other ingredients, may be pounded and rubbed through a sieve, with a table spoonful of cream and one of catchup, and the pulp added to the eggs, the whole being beaten well together, and fried as above. Or the mixture, instead of being fried, may be pnt over a fire and stirred till it begins to thicken; then put it on a toast, colour it with a hot salamander, and

MADE dISHBSI, ENTREMETS, &C« 175

serve with a little cuUis, or bechamel, or green truf- fle sauce underneath.

A SWEET OMELET OF EGG«.

^ Mix well t(^ether ten eggs, bulf a gill of cream, a quarter of a pound of oiled fresh butter and a Uttle syrap of nutmeg; sweeten with loaf sugar, put; the mixture into a fjrying-*paa prep^ed as above directed, fry it in the same manner, and serve with a little sifted sugar over,

OMELETS OF EGGS FOR GARNISHING, OR CUTTING

IN SLIPS.

Put the yolks and whites of eggs into, separate )$ns, beat them up with a little salt, and then place them in separate earthen yesseh rubbed with sweet oiJL Have ready a po$ of boiHz^ water over a fire, put them in* cover dose^ and let the ome- lets steam till thoroughly done.

OMELET SOUFFLEE.

Put iato a stewpan six yolks of eggs, four owacies of sifted sugar, six. ounces of ratafia cakes iro)c€99, the rind of a lemon grated, and a little salt; beat the whites of the eggs to a solid froth, and add to the mixture. Melt lightly in a frying- pan two ounces of fresh butter, put the mixture into it, stir it till congealed,, and then, putting it

i4

176 A^TiOW CQQVLtSKY.

on a plate or dishf «et it in an oven till coloured; or, hold a salamander over.

. £608 VOIR BALLS*

Boil six eggs, take out the yolks, pound them, and add a tittle flour and salt, with the yolks of two raw eggs. Mix all well together, and roll into balls. They must be boiled before added to any made dish or soup.

MEAT CAKE.

Cut the fillet from the inside of a rump of beef into small pieces, and pound with some lean veal in a mortar. Add a small quantity ol le.num juke, pepper, salt, diopped parsley, basil, thyme, mush- rooms, savory and shalots, some beaten spices, and a sufficient quantity of ycdks of eggs to bind. Then add and mix widi your hands some fal bacon and lean of ham cut into small dice. Have ready a stewpan or a mould lined with bards of fat bacon, fill it with the mixture, press it down, put on the top bay leaves and a little Rhenish wine, cover wiA the bards of ha/sxm^ put it into a mo*-^ derate oven, and bake it thoroughly. When cold turn it out of the mould, trim it clean, set it on a dish, put chopped savory jelly round, and a small modelled figure on the top; or the whole of the cake may be modelled.

MADE JMtmSy ElffTRBXETS, &C. 'l7^

Pound the meat of two boiled lobsters with lean of raw ham, beef marrow, the yolks of four eggs, a bit of bread soaked in cream, a little beaten mace, Cayenne pepper, and salt Colour the whole with lobster spawn which has been taken out of the lobster when boiled; then line a mould with thin slices of fat bacon, press down the mix- ture into it, cover with bards of bacon, and the mould cover: bake it an hour and half, and let it stand till cold; turn it out of the mould, take the fat away, and serve the cake, either modelled,, or plain, with some savory jelly round. .

Cakes of fowls, &c. may be done in the same manner.

OYSTER LOAVES.

Cut a small piece off the top ef some small French rasped rolls; then t^e the crumb entirely out, and fry the case and tops in boiling lard till crisp and of a light colour. Drain them dry, keep them warm, and just before serving put oysters into them, done ia the same manner as for scollops, with the top of the rolls over.

OYSTER ATTELETS.

. Blanch and cut throat sweetbreads into slices; then

I 5

178 AWt as COPKKRT.

tttke raahers of bacon the size oC thf slices^ and as m»BY large oyoitesns, blaacfaed md \^^A^ as ihere are pieces of sweetbread aad ba^Q. Put th? whole into a stewpan with a bit of fresk butter, and a small quantity of parsley, thyme, and shalots, chop- ped very fine^ pepper, salt, and leopyon juice, over a slow fire, and siomier five minutes* Turn them out on a dish) and when a little oool, put upw a small wooden, or silver skewer, a slice of sweetr breadi a slice of bacon, and an oyster, and so al- ternately till the skewers are full; then put bread crumbs over them, previously rubbed through a hair-sieve, and broil the attelets gently till done, and of a light brown colour. Serve with s^ Ujttle cullis under, together with the liquor from the blanched oysters reduced and added to it

CANAPES.

Cut some pieces of the crumb of bread about four inches long, three Inches wide, and one inch thick, and fry them in boiling lard till of a light brown colour; put them on a drainer, and cut into slips some breast of fowl, anchovies pieked from the bone, pickled cucumbers, and ham or tongue. Then butter the pieces of bread on one side, and lay upon them alternately the different articles till filled. Trim the edges, and put the pieces, cut in any form preferred, upon a dish

2

MADE lVl6flfe^ tNTREMtSTS, &C. I7t

with ^ces of lemon roand die rim; atid serve in a i^uee^bottt 'a' IM^ 'mixture of oil, vinegftF) Cayenne pepper, and salt

Cut into small slips breast of fowl, lean ham, pickled cucumbers, and anchovies; add to them consommS, Cayenne pepper, bread cnimbs, and raw yolks of eggs. Simmer over a fire for five minutes, being careful not to let the mixture burn, and then ttim it out on a plate. When cold, cut it into pieces, and dipping these first in yolk of raw egg, and then in fine bread crumbs, mould them with the hands into any form that may be chosen. Have ready boiling lard, firy them of a nice colour, drain them dry, and serve with fried parsley under.

SALMAQUV0I.

Chop small, and separately, lean of boiled ham,

breast of dressed fowl, picked anchovies, parsley,

omelets of eggs white and yellow (the same as for

garnishing), shalots, and a small quantity of pickled

cucumbers, capers, and beet root. Then rub a

saucer over with fresh butter, put it in the centre

of a dish, and secure it from moving. Place round

it in partiticms the different articles separately till

the saucer is covered, and put on the rim of the

didk some slices of lemon.

i6

180 ART: OF COOKERY;

SOURCROUT.

Cut large white cabbages, when in season, into slips, wash them clean, and drain them dry. After which put into a tub a layer of cabbage, then a layer of salt, afterwards a small quantity of pounded and sifted coriander seeds, and so on alternately; when the tub is nearly full put a weight over to press it well, and set it in a cool, dry place, covered with a coarse cloth. When wanted for use, put some of the cabbage into boiling water over a fire for five minutes, and strain it. Have ready some pieces of salted bouilli beef, of a quarter of a pound each, nearly boiled; and some pieces of pickled pork equal in number and weight Put them into a stewpan, add the cabbage, fresh butter, a little vinegar, onions sliced very thin, some whole pepper, allspice, and mace, tied in a bit of cloth; stew till tender, take out the spices, season the cabbage with Cayenne pepper, and serve with fried onions, and fried sausages round the crout

TO MAKE HAGGIS.

Blanch and chop the heart and lights of a sheep, then add a pound of beef suet chopped very fine, crumbs of French roll soaked in cream, a little beaten cinnamon, mace, cloves, and nutmeg, half a pint of sweet wine, a pound of raisins stoned and

chopped, a sufficienttqiuuitky^ flour to make it of a proper consistence, a little salt, the yolks of three eggs, and some sheep^s chitterlings well cleaned and cut into slips. Mix all together, and have ready a sheep's bag nicely cleaned, in which put the mixture; then tie it tightly and boil it three hours; or it may be made savory, omitting the wine and the stoned raisins.

BBUV8WICK SAUSAGES.

Cut into dice five pounds of lean pork, the same quantity of pig's flay, and half a pound of fat bacon. Season with two ounces of common salt, one of ground pepper, half an ounce of saltpetre, a few shalots peeled, chopped fine, and scalded, and a little pennyroyal, marjoram, savory and parsley likewise chopped fine and scalded. Mix these in- gredients with a quart of good ale, and, after al- lowing the mixture to stand for two days, fill witli it an ox's chitterlings well cleaned. Either boil or smoke them, and hang them in a dry warm place.

FRIED EGGS, IN PASTE.

Boil six eggs hard, cut them in halves, remove the yolks, and replace them with some light force- meat pounded with some of the hard yolk. Cover them with puff paste; fry, or bake, and serve with fried parsley round.

18Q AET OF COOKBBT.

KAMBQUIKS.

Warm in a stewpan two spoonsful of milk with two ounces of fresh butter; mix over a slow fire for five minutes with three ounces of sifted flour then add two ounces of fresh butter, four ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, two eggs, a small quan- tity of mignionette pounded with a little sugar, the white of an egg beaten to a solid froth with a table spoonful of cream, and a little salt; mix the ingredients well together. Put the mixture in cases of writing paper four inches square, wash the tops with yolk of egg^ bake in a brisk oven for a quarter of an hour, and serve hot.

RAMEQUiNs {another way).

Roll out puiF paste, and strew grated Parmesan cheese over it; fold, and roll it again. Stamp it with a patty cutter, maik the top with a smaller cutter, brush over with yolk of egg, and bake of a light colour. Before serving, take out the tops and fill with bechamel.

STEWED CHEESE.

Cat small into a stewpan Cheshire and Glouces- ter cheese, a quarter of a pound of each; then add a gill of Lisbon wine, a table spoonful of water, and, if approved, a tea spoonful of mustard. Mix

MADE DISHES, ENTRXMCTS, &C. 188

orer a fire till the chieese is diaeolved; then have ready a cheese plate with a lighted lamp beneath, put in the mixture, and serve it directly. Send up with it some fresh toasted bread in a toast rack.

FONDUE OF CHEESE.

Mix two ounces of fresh butter, two of potatoe- flour, a gill of warm cream, two yolks of eggs, two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, two of Gruyere cheese grated, half a tea spoonful of sifted sugar, and a little white pepper; then mix lightly with these ingredients the whites of two eggs beaten to a solid froth. Bake in small paper cases, in a mo- derately heated oven, or fry as a pancake.

POTTED CHEESE.

To a pound of grated Parmesan, or Cheshire cheese, add three ounces of cold fresh butter, a little sifted mace, and a tea spoonful of mustard. Mix all well in a mortar, put it into small pots, cover with clarified butter, and set the pots in a cdol dry place.

SPINACH FHITTEHS.

Boil ^ spinach till done, squeeze, chop it, and aiUBng^ a little fresh butter together with the yolks of tMTo eggs, roll it into pieces like sassages, dip them in a good thick batter, and fry. Serve with

184 ART OF COOKERY. .

R sRuoe round, made wUt r good euVm and. r Ultle rvioe^jar*

TO STEW MACARONf.

Boll R quRTter of r pound of riband macRroni in beef broth till nearly done; strain, Rnd Rdd r gill of creRm, two ounces of fresh butter, r tRble spoonful of the essence of ham, three ounces of grRted PRrmesRn cheese, some CRyenne pepper, Rnd SRlt. Mix over r fire for five minutes, put it on R dish, strew grRted PRrmesRn cheese over, smooth it with r knife, and colour with r very hot sRlamanden

PICKLES, VINEGAR, &c.

RULES TO BE OBSERVED IN PICKLING.

The best common vinegar should, in genieral^ hei used for pickling, boiled in a well-cleaned copper or brass preserving pRu, but not sufiered to remain in the pRn Rfter it boils. The numerous Rrts piRc- tised to preserve the ingredients green are useless if the vegetRbles Rre gatliered fresh on a dry day^ when in season, and the processes followed thajt are recommended.

PICKLES, TINS6AR, &C 185

- ' Further bttt more expensive directions might be given, which would scarcely however answer better, excepting to those who pickle extensively.

TO PICKLE ONIONS.

Peel small button onions into milk and water with, plenty of salt; set over a fire, and when boiling, strain the onions, wipe them dry, and put them into glasses. Have ready cold white wine vinegar, in which whole white pepper, ginger, mace, and slices of horseradish have been boiled. Pour it over the onions, and cover them with bladder and leather.

TO PICKLE RED CABBAGE.

Cut a firesh light red tabbage into sUps, wash it clean, and put it into a pan with plenty of salt for two days. Then boil for half an hour a sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover the cabbage, together with a moderate quantity of bruised black pepper, mace, allspice, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, and mus- tard-seed. Strain the vinegar and ingredients, and let them stand till cold, then add a little bruised cochineal; drain the cabbage on a large sieve till dry, and put the whole into jars down close: or the liquor may be poured over the cabbage boiling, and when cold, add a little bruised cochineal before

186 AET OF «oaKi»y« .

the jars ave tM down* TUs will make tfie cab* bage sooner fit for use*

Onions iiiay be peeled and done wbc^ in tke same manner, and mixed with red cabbage.

TO PICKLE CUCUMBERS, &C

Lay gerkins in a strong brine of salt and water for three days, wipe them dry, and put them into stone jai8« Then put a sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover them into a preserving pan, with plenty of whole ginger and black pepper, a mid- dling quantity of mace, allspice and cloves, some slices of horseradish, peeled onions, shalots, and a small quantity of garlic. Let the ingredients boil for ten minutes, and pour them with the liquor over the gerkins, cover the jars with cabbage leaves and a plate, and set them in a warm place. Drain the liquor from them tke next day, boU it, and pour over them again; and if on the iMtA day they are not green enough, boil the vinegar again, and pour it over them; or boil them for three minutes in the vinegar, and when cold tie bladder and white leather over the jars, and set t&eot in a dry place.

In the same manner may be done walnuts, love- apples, berberries, capsicums, French beans, nas- turtimns, and small pickling melons peeled very thin and cut into quarters; or walnuts scalded and

PICKLCS^ TINKOABy &C« 187

ptttintD sak atid water far a wedk, cbaiigii^ the water three times.

,,T0 J?ICmJ: LAUGE CUeUMBJERS.

P^el them veiry tibdn* cut them into halTes, throw the seeds away, and lay the cucumbers in salt for a day. Then wipe them dry, fiU them with mustard seed, peeled shalots, garlic, small dips of horse- jra^ahi and ma^. Tie th^m round with twme, {Mil tbom into jaxa, pour over them some boiling tt^iior madie aa for India piekl^, or for gerkins, and G)Vf^T them down elose till fit for use^

TO PICKLE MUSHROOMS.

Take a sujfioient quantity of double ^stilled white wine vin^;ar to cover the mushrooms; add to it whole white pepper, ginger, mace» peeled ghalots, and a small quantity of garlic; boil all together ten minutes and let it stand till cold^ Then peel fresh forced button mushrooms into water, wash them dean, strain, and put them into a atewpan, adding the juice of a lemon and a table apoopful of salt to every quart of mushrooms. Cover the pan close, set it over a fire, and when the liquor is sufficiently drawn from the mushrooms, put the whole into glasses and cover them with the pickle* Tie bladder and white leather over the glasses.

188 . ART OF COOKEHT.

Double distilled white wine tinegar is recom«» mended for this pickle, as it is requisite topresenre the mushrooms white. It is likewise advisable to put them into small jars or glasses for use; since if Exposed to the air but for a short Space of time, they will discolour.

«

TO PICKLE ABTiCHOKE BOTTOMS..

Boil large, fresh, sound artichokes, just enough to take the leaves and choke away, then trim and lay them in salt and water; after which boil for five minutes a sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover them, with whole allspice, black pepper, ginger, mace, cloves, shalots, salt, a few bay leaves, and some slices of horseradish. Drain and wipe the bottoms dry, put them into jars, add the liquor and ingredients, and tie them down close. When fit for use serve them in a deep plate with a little of the pickle, oil, and mustard mixed.

TO PICKLE BEET ROOT.

Boil the roots till three parts done, and cut them into slices of two inches thick. Then take a suf- ficient quantity of vinegar to cover them, with allspice, a few cloves, mace, black pepper^ slices of horseradish, some onions, shalots, a little pounded ginger, salt, and a few bay leaves. Boil the ingre*

PICKLES,; YIMEGARi &C. 189

dients together twenty minutes, and strain: when the piekle is cold add a litde bruised cochineaL Puttke slices of beet into jars, add the pickle, pour a small quantity of sweet oil on die top, and tie the jars down elose.

When the beet is wanted for use, mix well to^ gether sweet oil, mustard, some of the liquor in which the roots were pidcled, and a very little sifted sug^« Lay the slices in a deep plate and pour the Hoxture over*

TO FICKLE BARBERRIES.

Bruise and strain ripe barberries; and to a pint of juice add three pints of vinegar, a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, an ounce of salt, and a quar- ter of an ounce of pounded and sifted ginger. Boil all together, skim.it clean, and putting bunches of the l est ripe barberries into jars, pour the pickle boiling over, and let it stand till cold; then add a little bruised cochineal, and tie the jars over close.

Bundles of currants may be done in like manner*

TO PICKLE CURRANTS.

*

To a quart of double distilled white wine vinegar add half a pound of loaf sugar, whole ginger, one oojace of salt, and a pint of red currant juice;. boil all together, skim it clean, and let it stand tUl cold. Then pick and put some best ripe red currants into

IM ART OF GOOKEHY.

glasses^ fill tfaem widi die pidde, and cover them dewn ekise wudi bladder and leatker.

INDIA PICKLE.

Take in the month of July large fresfa ea^i * flowers, pick them into sm«Jl piecyes, wttsh Ib^m cleao» . and put them into a pas, with plenty qf salt over thea for three days; then drain aod lay them separately to dry in the sun, repeatedly tntniog them till they are almost of ^ brown colour, which will require several days. Have ready drained and dried plenty of whole ginger, slices of horseradish, peeled garlic, whde long poj^r, pe^d skdots and onions, which have been laid in sidt and water for a night, and boiling more than a suffici«nl quantity of vinegar to cover them^ with an ounce of the best pale turmeric added for ev^ two quarts^ put the flowers and other ingredients into stme jars, pour the vinegar boiling over, and ovver them till the next day; then boil the pidde again, and repeat this a third day; afiter which fill the jars with liquor, cover them over closely with bladder and white leather, and set them in a dry place.

In the same manner may be done white cabp bages cut into half quarters, whole Fr^ich beans, heads of celery, heads of asparagus, onions whefe. or sliced, or piddling melons peeled thin, cut into halves, and formed like an Indian mai^o.

PICKLES, TINEGAR, &C. 191

TARBAGON VINEGAR.

Put into a stone jar half a pound of fresh gathered Tarragon leaves and two quarts of best common vinegar, and let them ferment a fortnight; then run it through a flannel %ag, and add to it a quarter of an ounce of isinglass dissolved in cyder. Put it in a clean jar, let it stand till fine, pour it oiF into small bottles, cork them close, and set them in a dry place.

Elder floweis, &c. may be done in the same manner.

GARLIC VINEGAR.

Put into a jar a pound of peeled garlic cut into pieces with three pints of boiling vinegar poured over it, and cover the jar closely. Boil the vine- gar again the next day, and return it to the garlic« Let the garlic remain in the pickle for a fortnight: then filter it. Skdot viitegar may be made in the same manner.

. CUCUMBER PICKLE.

Crush the cucumbers, sprinkle them with a little salt, put them into a jar, and cover them with boil- ing vinegar. Bc»l the vinegar agsun die next day, and return it to them. Let diem lie in the pidde for a week; then filter the liquor; or clear it with the white of an egg, and run it through a tamis doth.

Walnut pickle may be made in the same manner.

192

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &c.

TO MAKE PUFF PASTE.

Mould with the hands a pound of fresh, or good salt butter, and lay it in cold water; then sift a pound of best white flour, rub half the butter lightly into it, mix it with cold spring water, roll It out, put on it (in pieces) half the remaining butter, fold the paste, roll it again, and add the remainder of the butter. Strew lightly upon it a little flour, fold it together, set it in a cold place, and when wanted roll it out twice more.

In summer the white of an egg beaten up may be added to the water for mixing.

FRENCH PUFF PASTE.

Take a pound of flour, one of fresh butter, a little salt, and three new-laid eggs: rub two ounces of butter into the whole of the flour, with a little salt and water, and the yolks of the eggs; work it till it has a gloss like satin, roll it out, fold in the remainder of the butter, roll it out twice, lay it on a dish, which set on ice for five minutes; then roll * put twice more, set again on ice roll out the paste twice again, and return it to the ice plate. When wanted, roll it out twice.

PIES^ PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 193

PASTE FOR RAISED PIES, CREAMS, &c'

Take a pound of sifted flour, mix in the middle of it half a gill of cream, a little salt, and six ounces of butter; mould it, roll it out three or four times, be careful that it is of a proper thickness, and mould it into any shape that may be selected.

PASTE FOR PASTJES.

Mix a quartern of sifted flour, a pound and a half of fresh butter, two yolks of eggs, and the whites whipped to a solid froth. Work it with a quantity of water sufficient to prevent its being too stiff.

FINE TART PASTE.

Take a quarter of a peck of sifted flour, a pound and a half of fresh butter, four yolks, and two whites of eggs, and a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar. Divide the butter into small lumps, sift the sugar over, make an opening in the centre, break the eggs into it, wet the paste with cream, and a little rose or orange flower water, and mould with the hands till smooth.

CRISP TART PASTE.

Mix half a pound of sifted flour, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, two ounces of sifted sugar,

K

194 ABT OF COOKERY.

and two eggs beaten, with pump water; aad knead the paste well.

PASTE FOR TOURTES.

Roll out twice three quarters of a pound of sifted flour, six ounces of fresh butter, the yolks of two eggs, and a little salt; mould it.

This paste may be used for entries.

PASTE FOR STRINGING TARTLETS.

Cut a bit of puff paste into pieces; mix with it half a handful of flour, and a little cold water, let it be of a moderate stiffness, and mould it with the hands till it draws into fine thread. Roll out a piece three inches long and two inches broad; cut it into slips, draw them out singly, and place them across the tarts in any form, crossing and re-cross- ing them, as this will add much to the appearance of the tartlets.

RICE PASTE FOR TARTS, &C.

Pound in a mortar a quarter of a pound of boiled rice, with a quarter of a pound of beef mar- row, or some sweet oil; then add a little flour, cream, sifted sugar, and four eggs.

This may be cut into small cakes and baked, or boiled.

PI£S» PUDDINGS, PAfiTRY, &C. 195

FISH PIE.

Clean and cut fresh salmon, cod, turbot, soles, sturgeon, or haddocks, into middling-sized pieces; then roll them in a mixture of parsley, thyme, and shalots chopped fine, some beaten spices, powder of mushrooms or truffles, pepper, and salt; put them into a deep dish with some light forcemeat round; cover with puff paste, egg, and ornament the top with leaves of paste, and bake till the fish is thoroughly done. A quarter of an hour before serving, put into it some good strong cullis, with a little Madeira wine.

FISHMEAGRE PIE.

Bone and cut into pieces a male carp, and make it into a forcemeat with some of the roe, parsley, thyme, shalots chopped very fine, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, pepper, salt, a little beaten spice, half a pint of cream, four eggs, and crumb of French bread. Then take pieces of eel» sal- mon, and skate, pass them with sweet herbs, pepper, salt, lemon juice, and a bit of butter. When cold, lay some of the forcemeat at the bot- tom of a deep dish, and mix with the fish some stewed mushrooms, button onions, truffles and morells blanched, and the roe cut into pieces, and put them into the dish with more forcemeat round the top; then cover with puff paste, ornament

K 2

196 ART OF COOKERY.

with leaves of paste, egg it, and bake. When it is to be served, cut a small hole in the centre of the top, and add a good cuUis*

EEL PIE.

Skin and clean the eels, cut them into pieces of two inches long, pass them with chopped parsley and shalots, a little grated nutmeg, pepper, salt, and lemon juice, for five minutes; then lay a little light forcemeat at the bottom of a deep dish, put the eels over, cover with puff paste, bake, and add some bechamel or cuUis.

SEA PIE.

Take small pieces of salt beef and pickled pork, veal and liiutton chops, a goose or a duck cut into pieces, onions and potatoes cut into thick slices, and season with a little salt and plenty of pepper. Make a paste with beef suet chopped fine, some flour and water; knead them well together, roll out the paste, sheet a large bowl with it, put in the above ingredients alternately, cover with paste, put a cloth over, and boil four hours. Before serving, take off the cloth, make a little hole in the top, and add a good consomme.

VEAL PIE.

Cut the best end of a loin of veal into thin chops, take off part of the bone and some of the fistt firom

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 197

the kidney, season with pepper and salt, place in a deep dish with yolks of boiled eggs, cover with puff paste, egg and ornament with leaves, bake, and when it is to be served, put into it some good consomme.

MUTTON PIE,

Cut part of a loin of mutton into chops, remov- ing the bones, put upon them some slices of peeled potatoes, and, if approved, some slices of onions; place the remaining chops over, cover with puff paste, bake, and add some cullis. Or the chops may be passed with sweet herbs, &c. and, when cold, put into small or large raised crusts with the above vegetables; and some cullis added after baking. "

PORK PIE.

4

Remove the rind and part of the under bone from a piece of loin of pork; cut it into chops, season them with pepper and salt, cover with puff paste, bake, and when it is to be served, pour into it some cullis, with the essence of two onions and a ' little mustard mixed with it

Puff paste is recommended for meat pies, from the superiority of its appearance when baked; but the following mode may be preferred: mix to- gether half a pound of sifted flour, six ounces of fresh butter, the yolks and whites of two eggs well

k3

198 ART OF COOKERY.

beaten^ and a Uttle milk and salt; then knead it well

FLAt CHICKBN FIE {OT ToUfie)*

Cut ckicken into pieces, blanch, and season with pepper and salt: then lay a light forcemeat at the bottom of a deep dish, and upon it some of the chicken, some slices of throat sweetbreads seasoned, some stewed mushrooms, truffles and morells, and upon them the remainder of the chicken. Cover with a puff paste,, then egg and ornament the top. with leaves of the same paste, bake of a nice colour, and before serving put into it a good cullis*

The chicken may be passed with sweet herbs, &c., and, when cold, put into the dish as above. Rabbits may be done in the same manner.

PIGEON FIE.

' Wash the pigeons in cold water and wipe them dry; then lay in a deep dish a rumpsteak cut into pieces, beaten with a chopper, and seasoned with pepper and salt, and upon it the pigeons with the Hver, &c. seasoned. Add some yolk of hard eggs, cover with puff paste, egg, and ornament with small leaves, bake, and then pour in some cullis.

The pigeons may be stuffed with forcemeat, and slices of veal and ham substituted for the beef- steaks. Larks, partridges, or pheasants may be done the same way.

PIES, ^DDDmOS, PASTRY, &C. 199

WOODCOCK PIE.

Bone three birds, fill them with light forcemeat, having the entrails and some green truffles pounded in it; lay them in a deep dish with a little force- meat round; cover with puff paste; egg and orna- ment the top, and when three parts baked, add to the birds a sauce made with the liquor of the bones of the woodcocks, reduced almost to a glaze, a gill of cullis, and half a gill of Madeira wine; season to the palate with Cayenne pepper and lemon juice.

Snipes may be done the same way.

HARE PIE.

Case a young hare, wash it clean, cut it into pieces, daub it with slips of &t bacon rolled in sweet herbs and shalots chopped very fine, and a small quantity of beaten spices, pepper and salt, and stew with a gill of Port wine, and a pint of veal broth, till three parts done. Then put it into a deep dish with a quarter of the liquor and some forcemeat round; when cool cover it with puff paste, and bake till tender; in the mean time strain the remainder of the liquor, season, thicken it with a little flour and water, reduce it to a mode- rate quantity, aiid pour into the pie.

K 4

200 AKT OF COOKERY.

VENISON PASTY.

fione a neck of venison, cut tbe meat into good sized pieces, put them with the bones into a stew- pan, add a quart of veal broth, half a pint of Port wine, some chopped onions or shalots, pepper, salt, a small quantity of beaten spices, and lemon juice; let all stew gently; when the meat is three parts done, put it into a deep dish with one half of the liquor, and, when nearly cool, cover and garnish it with a paste made with flour, plenty of butter or beef marrow, and two eggs beaten up with water and salt, mixed well together. Bake the venison till tender: and three quarters of an hour before serving, strain and thicken the remaining liquor and pour it into the pasty.

RAISED BEEFSTEAK FIE.

Take prime steaks of a rump of beef, remove the skin from the fat, beat the steaks with a chop- per, cut them into middling-sized pieces, pass them with a bit of fresh butter, pepper, salt, lemon* juice, and shalots chopped, and when half done, lay them in a dish till cold. Blanch oysters, strain them and preserve the liquor; then raise a crust, put a layer of steak at the bottom with some oysters upon it, and so alternately; cover the pie.

*"fi^p^^""^Br^r''^r»-'^n»Wi

PIES, .PUDDLNGSy PA8TRT, &C. 201

ornament, and bake it. On serving, pour into it a good cullis, with the oyster liquor and some cat- chup mixed with it.

Or steaks and oysters, may be put into a deep dish, and covered with puff paste.

.HAISED P}£ WITH RUMP OF BEEF AND TRUFFL£8.

Bone a small fat rump of beef, daub it with slips of fat bacon, put it into a raised crust with light forcemeat and plenty of whole, peeled, green truffles round, cover it with the paste, garnish, and bake for two hours; then add a sauce made with a pint of veal broth, a gill of Port wine, half a gill of brandy, half a gill of lemon pickle, a bay leaf, a few chopped shalots, and Cayenne pepper; let it be of a proper thickness, and strain it. Two hours afterwards cut the top off the pie, skim it free from fat, glaze the rump, and serve.

RAISED TURKEY PIE WITH A TONGUE.

Bone a turkey, and have ready a boiled pickled tongue; pare the principal part, and put it into the .centre of the turkey with some light forcemeat well seasoned, and some slices of throat sweet- breads. Sew it up, and lay it into boiling water for ten minutes. Put the turkey when cold, with bards of fat bacon upon it, into a raised paste, with

k5

902 ART OF COOKERY.

some forcemeat at the bottom; then cover, orna- ment IBA directed for fiat chicken pie, and bake. When it is to be served, take off the lid, and the bards of bacon, glaze the breast lightly, and add cullis, or green trnffle sauce.

Pullets, chickens, partridges, and pheasants may be done in the same manner; but instead of the tongue put in whole green truffles pared, and some truffles pounded with the forcemeat. Or, instead of a raised crust, they may be put into a dish and covered with puff paste, &c.

RAISED CHICKEN PIE.

Put pieces of chicken in a stewpan, either blanched or not, with a bit of fresh butter, lemon- juice, pepper and salt, parsley, thyme, shalots chopped very fine, and a Uttle pounded mace. Whem hdf done, lay them on a dish, and, when cold, raise the crust, put light forcemeat at the bottom, with the chicken upon it, and more force- meat roond the top. Cover, bake gently, and on serving, cut off the lid, and add a ragout of sweet^ i read8, codi6' eomfosi &c.

Rabbits and veal may be done in the same manner, * so knay pigeons, observing to put them into the crust whole.

PIES, PUDDIlTaS, PASTRY, &C. 208

RAISED HAM PIE {with directions foT making a raised crust different ways).

Put a piece of fresh butter into boiling water, and mix it with flour into a paste; as it gets cold knead it several times, taking care that it is of a good consistence, but not too stiff, and then raise it into any shape preferred. Have ready part of a ham boiled till half done, trim it to the shape of the crust, which must be large enough to admit some light forcemeat at the bottom and round the ham. Cover with the same kind of paste, pinch round the top, egg, ornament it, and just before setting in the oven add hatf a pint of Madeira wine. Bake gently for four hours, and on serving add some good cullis, not too salt.

The following crust may be used for chicken pies, as more agreeable eatii^* Rub with a suffi- cient quantity of flour for a middling-sized pie, the yolks of two raw eggs; then add boiling water with plenty of chopped suet in it, and knead well.

RAISED MACARONI PIE.

Ridse a crusty prnament^ and bake it; and when it 18 to b6 S€JFV€fd ha;re ready some hot macaroni i^wed, and a whilie fricassee of chicken, in sepa- late stewpanis. Put them iJ;ternately into the pie, strew a little grated Pairmesiui cheese over, put »

204 AUT OF COOK£KY;

slip of paper round the edge of the fie to prev^st its burning, and colour the cheese with a sala- mander.

VOL AU VENT.

Roll out a piece of tart paste two inches thick, and stamp a piece the size of the bottom of the dish intended for table; then stamp another piece of puff paste, of the same size and thickness: wash the first with egg, lay the other upon it, and mark the centre with a cutter two sizes smaller, egg the top with yolks, and bake. When done take out the centre to the mark and preserve it; wash the inside with yolk of egg, mend the aper- tures, if any, with the paste taken out of it, and fill with fricassee of chicken, or fillets of soles, or lob- sters, &c. with the cover over.

PULPTON OF CHICKEN, KABBITS, &C.

Put chopped veal suet, or beef marrow, in a stew- pan over afire till melted, and when lukewarm mix it with some flour and a little water into a paste. Knead well; and, rubbing fresh butter round the inside of a mould, strew vermicelli upon it, sheet the mould over the vermicelli with the paste rolled half an inch thidk, and within put a layer of chicken, slices of sweetbread, mushrooms, artichoke bot- toms, truffles, and morells; after which put a little light forcemeat round with a paste over, close it

""^1- ia^^i^-ir^a»^^^^^^"- - ^^"""p- ^^¦^¦- ^~^» i^w w^'»^^ i n 1 1 1 , h

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 205

^"^U, egg, and bake it gently* When to be- served turn it oat of the mould, make a small Hole in the top, and pour into it a good cullis.

The chicken must be cut in pieces and blanched: the sweetbreads, trufBes, and morells blanched, and seasoned with pepper and salt

PUFF FOR A JOURNEY.

Roll out a length of paste, of the same quality as for venison pasty; put a layer of forcemeat upon it, then slices of veal, ham, and a fowl boned, cut into pieces, and well seasoned; fold the paste together, wash it with yolk of egg, garnish with the remainder of the paste, and bake it; when it is done make a small opening in the top, and pour into it some good cullis.

Or the paste may be rolled up and the ends well closed; when baked set it upright on one end, and put the cullis in the centre,

PUFFS WITH CHICKEN, &C.

Chop breast of fowl, lean ham, and half an an- chovy; then add a small quantity of parsley, lemon peel, and shalots, cut very fine, with a little Cay- enne and pounded mace. Set in a stewpan over a fire with a ragout spoonful of bechamel, for five minutes; then put the mixture on a plate, and when cold roll out puff paste thin, cut it into square

206 ABT OF COOKERY.

pieces, lay some of the mixture on them, fold the paste, run a jagger iroa round to make them in form of a puff, fry in boiling lard, and serve with itied parsley under.

PUFFS WITH FORCEMEAT OF VEGETABLES.

Put into a stewpan a little fat bacon cut small, the same quantity of lean veal, some parsley andsha- lots chopped together, season with pepper, salt, and beaten spice, and add six French beans, twelve heads of asparagus, six mushrooms chopped, and a little lemon juice. Stew the ingredients gently for ten minutes, and then pound them well in a mortar, with a little cream, some bread crumbs, and yolk of egg. Then roll out puff paste half sm inch thick, cut it into square pieces, fill them with the forcemeat, fold them, run a jagger iron round to shape them like a puff, and fry in boiling lard of a brown colour. Drain them dry, and serve with sauce under made with a little cuUis, lemon pickle, and catchup.

FORCEMEAT PATTIES.

i ? - » •

Sheet the pans as for chicken patties, bat instead of bits of bread, fiQ them .with a light forcemeat, well-seasoned. Cover, bake, and serve with a little cuUis added to the f Mreemeat.

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. ^07

P&TITS FATES OF CHXCKBK AND HAM.

Sheet the pans with puff paste, and put a bit of crumb of bread the size of a dice in each; then cover with more paste, trim round the pan, wash the tops of the paste with egg, and bake the pates of a light colour. When they are to be served take out the bread, have ready the white meat of dressed fowl, lean ham, a shalot chopped fine, a spoonful of consomme of veal, a little cream, flour, salt, Cayenne, and lemon juice: mix all together over a fire, boil for five minutes, fill the pates with the mixture, and serve very hot

PATTIES OF LOBSTERS, OR OYSTERS.

Bake patties as above directed, and fill them with lobsters or oysters chopped, adding a little strong consomme of veal, a small quantity of flour, lemon juice, Cayenne pepper, a bit of lemon peel, a shalot chopped fine, and an anchovy rubbed through a sieve; mix over a fire for five minutes.

The lobsters, or oysters, are to be half boiled before they are chopped.

BEEFSTEAK PUDDING.

Mix well together flour, chopped suet, some milk, a little salt, and one egg. Roll out the paste half an inch thick, and sheet a basin, or a bowl, with

2

208 ART OF COOKEaY.

it. Then trim the skin from the meat, beat the steaks well with a chopper, cut them into middling- sized pieces, season with pepper and salt, put them into the basin with blanched oysters and slices of potatoes alternately, or with slices of onions. Cover the top with paste, and tie a cloth over the basin. Boil the pudding (if of a middling-size) two hours; and on serving, pour into it a little cuUis and catchup,

PUDDING WITH CHICKEN, OR BIRDS.

Line a pudding mould with paste as for beef- steak pudding, fill it with a boned chicken or birds, with a little forcemeat, some truffles, and slices of sweetbreads in each, cover with paste, tie a cloth over, and boil one hour and a half; when it is to be served, turn it gently out of the mould and pour some good cuUis over.

GAME PUDDING.

Bone a hare, or other game, and add to the flesh a pound of fat bacon or beef suet, a little chop- ped parsley, thyme, basil, shalots, garlic, beaten spices, pepper and salt, a gill of Port wine and a spoonful of lemon juice. Put all together over a fire for ten minutes, and then pound in a mortar; add the crumb of two penny French rolls, a gill of cream, and the yolks of four eggs: mix the ingre-

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 209

clients well together, put the mixtare into a pudding mould or cloth, and boil it two hours and a half. When it is to be served pour over it a cullis made with the bones taken out of the game.

The above mixture may be made into sausages, by putting it into calves' chitterlings; then fry fresh, or smoke for a week.

MARROW PUDDING. ^

Boil in a pint of milk an ounce of rice flour, six ounces of beef marrow chopped fine, a little salt, and some pounded cinnamon, for a quarter of an hour. When it has stood till cold, add half a gill of brandy, some sugar, and two ounces of broken ratafia cakes; mix the whole with six yolks and two whites of eggs, put the mixture into a dish, and round the edge of this puff paste; lay a few currants, slices of citron and orange peel, and some pieces of marrow on the top of the pudding, and bake.

Savoy cake may be substituted for the rice.

MARROW PUDDING {another tvat/).

Boil cinnamon and lemon peel in a quart of new milk, and strain to half a pound of beef marrow finely chopped, a few currants washed and picked, some slices of citron and orange peel candied, a

210 ART OF COOKERY.

little ^ted nutmeg, a tea spoonfal of brandy, one of syrup of cloves, and half a pound of Naples biscuits. When the mixture is cold add eight e^s beaten up, omitting five of the whites, and bake in a dish with puff paste round.

POUDINGS A LA REINE.

Mix the chopped white meat of fowl, or game, with a littld good bechamel well seasoned, and the yolks of two eggs. When cold ont it into pieces, and roll them into balls. Dip these first in yolk of egg, then in bread crumbs; repeat this, and fry in boiling lard tilt of a nice colour. Serve with a little good culiis seasoned with garlic.

calf's feet pudding.

Boil two £eet till very tender, and.rtib them through a hair-sieve, or a tamis clotti; add to the pulp four ounces of beef marrow, one ounce of candied orange peel, one of citron, half a pound of currants washed and picked, some grated nutmeg, a little salt, the yolks of eight and whites of three eggs, and a piece of crumb of bread soaked in cream, or milk. Beat the whole well together, boil one hour and a half, and serve with a sauce round made with melted butter, sugar, and white wine.

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 311

SUET PUDDING.

Chop fine half a pound of beef suet; add to it the same quantity of flour, two eggs beaten, a little salt, a small quantity of pounded and sifted ginger, and mix together with milk to a mode- rate thickness. The pudding may be either boiled, or baked.

MUFFIN PUDDING WITH DRIED CHERRIES.

Boil together, ten minutes, a pint and a half of milk, a few coriander seeds, a bit of lemon peel, and a little sugar. Then put four muffins into a pan, strain the milk over them, and when cold, mash them with a wooden spoon; add half a gill of brandy, half a pound of dried cherries, a little grated mitmeg, two ounces of Jordan almonds blanched and pounded very fine, and siz eggs well beaten. Mix all together and boil in a basin; or bake in a dish with paste round.

BREAD PUDDING.

Proceed as for marrow pudding, but substitute the crumb of French bread for the Naples biscuits and the marrow.

RICE PUDDING.

Boil together, ten minutes, a pint and a half of

212 ART OF COOKERY,

cream, or new milk, a few coriander seeds, a bit of lemon peel, a stick of cinnamon, and a little sugar; strain to two ounces of ground rice, and boil for ten minutes more. Let it stand till cold, and then mixing with it two ounces of fresh butter oiled, a little brandy, grated nutmeg, six eggs well beaten, and a gill of syrup of pippins, put it into a dish with puff paste round, and bake, taking care it is not done too much. Should the pudding be made with whole rice, boil till nearly done before straining the cream to it; if approved a few currants may be added.

Millet, or sago, (whole or ground) may be done in the same manner.

RICE PUDDING {another way).

Take a quarter of a pound of sifted rice flour, one ounce of grated Vanilla, eight ounces of beef suet chopped fine, six ounces of chopped marrow, a little salt and grated nutmeg, an ounce and a half of chopped Pistachio kernels, four ounces of broken ratafia cakes, thirty-six dried cherries, and a quarter of a pound of apple jam: mix the whole well together with a gill of cream, and one of Ma- raschino. Tie up the mixture tightly in a buttered cloth, boil for an hour and a half, and, on serving, strew over some pounded sugar and Pistachio ker- nels chopped fine.

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 213

POTATOE PUDDING,

Peel, steam, and rub potatoes through a fine sieve. To half a pound of pulp add a quarter of a pound of fresh butter oiled, sifted sugar, half a gill of brandy, a little pounded cinnamon, half a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of currants washed and picked, and eight eggs well beaten. Mix all together; bake or boil, and serve the pudding with melted butter in a sauce-boat.

CARROT PUDDING.

After boiling, cut oflF the red part from the car- rots, and rub it through a sieve or tamis cloth. To a quarter of a pound of pulp, add half a pound of crumb of Frejich bread, sifted sugar, a spoonful of orange flower water, half a pint of cream, some slices of candied citron, grated nutmeg, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter oiled, and eight eggs well beaten. Bake in a dish with a paste round the rim.

peas' PUDDING, TO BE EATEN WITH BOILED PORK.

Lay a pint of best split peas into water for half an hour; strain, pick, and put them into a cloth, tie them tightly, and boil gently for three hours. Then turn the peas out of the cloth into a stewpan, mash them well with a wooden spoon, add a bit of

214 ART OF COOKERY.

fresh butter, a little pepper and salt, the yolks of two eggs, and mix all well together. Put the mix- ture into a clean cloth, tie it up, and let it hang near a fire for half an hour: turn it out on a dish, and pour melted butter over.

FRENCH BLACK PUDDINGS.

Pick, wash, and boil, till three parts done, two pounds of groats or rice; drain it dry, put it in a stewpan with a quart of pig's blood, preserved from curdling by stirring plenty of salt into it when taken from the animal; add a small quantity of ground pepper, pounded and sifted mace, cloves, nutmeg, and aUspice, a gill of cream with a bit of crumb of French bread soaked in it, some chopped savory, thyme, parsley, and pennyroyal: mix the ingredients over a slow fire for twenty minutes, and, when cold, put with them plenty of the flay cut into small dice. Have ready the entrails well cleaned, fill them with the mixture three parts full, tie the ends, put the puddings into hot water, and boil them gently a quarter of an hour. If to be eaten directly on making, prick them with a fork, and broil them upon a very clean gridiron for ten minutes: if not, lay them on clean straw, and when wanted for use put them into boiling water, sim- mer ten minutes, take them out, and prick and broil them as above.

PIES, PUDDINGS, PA8TBY, &C. 215

If large they will take a longer time to boil and broil.

WHITE PUDDINGS.

To half a pound of beef marrow chopped fine, add six ounces of Jordan almonds blanched and thoroughly pounded, a dessert spoonful of orange flower water, half a pound of the crumb of French bread, half a pound of currants washed and picked, a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar, a little mace, cloves, and cinnamon pounded, a gill of Mountain wine, and the yolks of four eggs beaten. Mix all well together, fill the entrails of a pig three parts full with the mixture, tie each end, and boil half an hour.

A RICH PLUM PUDDING.

Take a pound of raisins stoned, one of currants washed and picked, one of beef suet chopped, two ounces of Jordan almonds blanched and pounded, of citron, candied orange and lemon peel pounded, two ounces each, a little salt, some grated nutmeg and sugar, a pound of sifted flour, a gill of brandy, and eight eggs well beaten. Mix tc^etber with cream, or milk, to a good thickness; then tie it in a cloth, boil five hours, and serve with melted but* ter over; or the above mixture may be put into a mould and baked.

216 ART OF COOKISRT.

ORANGE PUDDING.

Peel as fine as possible four Seville oranges, boil them till tender, rub them through a hair-sieve, and preserve the fine pulp. Take a pound of Naples biscuits, a little grated nutmeg, two ounces of fresh butter, and pour over them a quart of boiling milk, or cream, in which a stick of cinna- mon has been boiled. When the ingredients are cold, mix with them the pulp and eight eggs well beaten, sweeten, and add half a gill of brandy. Edge a dish with pfiiF paste, put in the mixture, garnish the top with strings of paste as for tartlets, and bake in a moderately heated oven.

Lemon pudding may be made in the same manner.

TANSEY PUDDING.

Blanch and pound very fine a quarter of a pound of Jordan almonds; then put them into a stewpan, with a gill of the syrup of roses, the crumb of a French roll, a little grated nutmeg, half a gill of brandy, two table spoonsful of tansey juice, three ounces of fresh butter, and some slices of citron. Pour over a pint and a half of boiling cream, or milk, sweeten, and when cold mix it well, adding the juice of a lemon and eight eggs beaten. This pudding may be either boiled, or baked.

PIES, FUD0INGJ5, PASTRY, &C. Ql7

ALMOND PUDDING.

Proceed as for tansey pudding, substituting for tLe French bread and tansey juice, a quarter of a pound of Naples biscuits and a spoonful of orange flower water.

BAKED FRUIT PUDDING.

Rub gooseberries, or other fruit, through a hair- sieve; and to half a pound of the fine pulp add a quarter of a pound of Naples biscuits, three ounces of oiled fresh butter, half a pint of cream, grated nutmeg, sugar, and six eggs. Beat the ingredients together for ten minutes; then add slices of citron, and bake the mixture in a dish with puff paste round the rim.

DAMSON PUDDING.

Sheet a basin with paste as directed for boiled apple pudding; then fill it with ripe, or bottled damsons, cover it with paste, boil, and when it is to be served, cut a piece out of the top, and mix with the fruit sifted sugar, and a small quantity of pounded cinnamon, or grated nutmeg.

Puddings may be made in the same manner with gooseberries, currants, or bullies.

DAMSON PUDDING (aYudher way). Whisk well together a pint of cream, or milk,

216 ART OF COOKERY.

with six eggs, four table spoonsful of sifted flour, a very little salt, and a small quantity of pounded cinnamon. Have ready ripe, or bottled damsons, rub them through a hair-sieve, add to the mixture a sufficient quantity of the fine pulp to make it a little thicker than batter, sweeten, put it into a but- tered basin, flour a cloth and tie over, boil it an hour and a quarter, and on serving turn it out of the basin and pour melted butter over.

Ripe peaches, nectarines, gooseberries, apricots, greengages, or egg-plums may be done in the same manner; or, instead of boiling, they may be baked in a tart pan, sheeted with puff paste.

BAKED APPLE PUDDINGS.

Stew the apples as for a' tourte or tartlet, and, when cold, add six eggs well beaten; put the mix- ture into a dish with puff paste round the rim, and bake.

BOILED APPLE PUDDINQ.

Make a paste with flour, chopped beef suet, or marrow, a little salt and water; knead it well, roll it out thin, sheet a bowl or basin with it, fill it with good baking apples pared, cut into quarters, and cored, and add lemon peel grated, two cloves, nutmeg, and a little cinnamon pounded fine. Lay a thin paste on the top, tie the basin in a cloth,

PIES, PUDDIKGS, PASTRY, &C. 219

and let the pudding boil till well done. When it is to be served cut a piece out of the top and mix with the apples sugar, a bit of fresh butter, and a little syrup of quinces.

APPLE DUMPLINGS.

Pare large baking apples, core them with a scoop, and fill the cavities with quince marmalade: roll out, a quarter of an inch thick, the same kind of paste as for an apple pudding, mould over each apple a piece of the paste, and boil them separately in a clodi, or wash with whites of eggs with a panto brush, and bake. Serve with grated nutmeg,^ sifted sugar, and fresh butter, in different saucers.

RASPBERRY DUMPLINGS.

Roll out apiece of crisp tart paste, lay upon it plenty of raspberry jam, fold and cut it into pieces, form them into dumplings, and boil them three quarters of an hour. Serve with a sauce over made with butter, sugar, and white wine, and of a good thickness.

BATTER PUDDING.

To three table spoonsful of sifted flour, add a little salt and a gill of milk; mix them till smooth; beat well six eggs, and add them together with more milk till the batter is of a proper thickness;

l2

920 ABT OF COOKERY.

then put the mixture into a basin rubbed with fresh butter, tie a cloth over, boil au hour and a quarter turn it out of the basin, and serve with melted butter, sugar, and grated nutm^, in a sauce-boat; to which may be added a table spoonful of white wine, or a dessert spoonful of vinegar.

When puddings are put into the pot, the water, in general, should be boiling.

CABINET PUDDING.

Boil a pint of cream or milk, with a stick of ciimamon, and some lemon peel, for ten minutes^ pour it over a quarter of a pound of savoy cake, or of sponge biscuits, and, when cold, add two ounces of Jordan almonds scalded and chopped fine. Rub a mould with butter, line it with buttered paper, lay on the bottom and round the sides some dried cherries, pour in the mixture with six whites of eggs well beaten up added to it, and set the mould in a stewpan of boiling water, for three quarters of an hour. On serving put round a sauce made with fresh butter, flour, a little white wine and brandy, and some lemon juice.

A GEORGE PUDDING.

Boil two ounces of rice till tender in a pint of milk; when cool, add four yolks of eggs, half a pound of apple jam, a gill of white wine, half a

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 221

gill of brandy, some slices of candied orange and citron peel, and then incorporate lightly with the mixture the whites of five eggs beaten to a solid froth. Have ready a mould lined with tart paste; fill it with the mixture, and bake of a light colour.

A QUAKING PUDDING*

Beat well together a pint of new milk, the yolks of four, and whites of two eggs, a table spoon- ful of flour, one of bread crumbs, and a little salt: boil three quarters of an hour, and serve with boiling butter, flour, sugar, and white wine over.

DUTCH PUDDING.

Take two pounds of sifted flour, one pound of fresh butter melted in half a pint of milk, a pound of picked currants, eight eggs, and a little sifted sugar; mix with two spoonsful of good yeast, and mould it.

OXFORD DUMPLINGS.

Mix together a quarter of a pound of grated

stale bread crumbs, a few currants, a little moist

sugar, and a quarter of a pound of beef suet

chopped fine, with two eggs, a little salt, and half

a gill of cream. Divide the mixture into several

parts, and boil.

l3

222 ART OF COOKERY.

NORFOLK DUMPLINGS.

Make into a thick batter half a pint of milk, four eggSj a little saltt grated nutmeg, and sifted flour; when well beaten, drop a table spoonful at a time into boiling water, let them boU for five minutes, lay them on a dish, and pour over melted butter and sugar.

FRENCH PANCAKES.

: Mix, and beat up for ten minutes, two ounces of sifted flour, two of bitter Ratafias, three of sifted sugar, a tea spoonful of orange flower water, a little salt, a pint of cream, a gill of milk, the yolks of six new-laid eggs, and two ounces of clarified fresh butter. Put a bit of fresh butter into a frying pan, cover the bottom with the batter, fry it, turn it out on a dish, sift sugar over, and glaze with a salamander. Serve with currant jelly on a plate.

PANCAKES.

Mix well together half a pound of best white flour sifted, with a little salt, grated nutmeg, some cream, or new milk; then whisk eight eggs, put them to the above, and beat the mixture for ten minutes till perfectly smooth, light, and of a mode-

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. ³

rate thickness. Pnt a small bit of lard or fresh butter into the pan, each time of frying, and when hot pour in the mixture in a quantity sufficient just to cover the bottom of each pan; fry of a nice colour, over a regular fire, and serve very hot, with some sifted loaf sugar, pounded cinnamon, and Seville orange, on separate plates.

After preparing the frying pan by burning a bit of butter in it, wipe it very clean with a dry doth, as this prevents the batter from sticking to the pan.

PINE STRAWBERRY FRITTERS.

Make a batter with three ounces of flour, a little white wine, brandy, and grated lemon peel, four whites of eggs well beaten, and two yolks: dip the fruit into the batter separately, and frying in boiling lard till of a light colour, drain on a sieve; then place on a dish, sift sugar over, and glaze with a salamander.

APPLE FRITTERS.

Mix three ounces of sifted flour, a little salt, a gill of cream or milk, and three eggs, and beat them for ten minutes with a spoon or whisk. Then pare twelve Holland pippins, cut them into halves, core, and put them into the batter. Have ready boiling lard, take the halves out singly with a fork, fly them till done and of a light colour, drain them

l4

224 AET OF COaKERT.

dry, and serve witfa sifted sugar over. Let there lie some pounds mnamoii on one plate, and Seville oranges on another.

Peaches or pears may be done in the same manner; as well as oranges, which are to be peeled, divided into quarters, and then put into the batter.

"Some jam maiy be mixed with the batter instead of apples, and fried in smaQ pieces.

PLUM POTTAGE.

To veal and beef broths (a quart of each) add the crumb of two penny French rolls, rubbed through a tamis cloth, mix with the pulp half a pound of stoned raisins, a quarter of a pound of currants, a litde lemon juice, some pounded cinna- mon, mace, and cloves, a pint of Port, a pint of Claret, a small quantity of grated lemon peel, and season with lump sugar. Let all simmer together for one hour; then add a little cochineal to make it of a nice colour, and serve in a tureen. It should be of the consistence of water gruel.

OATMEAL POTTAGE, OR GRUEL.

Mix together three table spoonsful of oatmeal, a very little salt, and a quart of water; and boil gently for half an hour. Then skim, strain it, and add an ounce of fresh butter, some loaf sugar, a little

PIES, PVDPIN6S, PA$TRYy &C. BS5

brandy, ^nd giated nutmeg; or, instead of these ingr^ients,. peppe^r, salty and fresh butter; then boil it again five minutes, mix it tiU very smooth, and let it be of a moderate consistence.

SAGO.

To half an ounce of sago washed clean add a pint of water and a bit of lemon peel; eover the pan close, set it over a fire, and simmer till the sago is nearly done, and the liquor absorbed. Then put to it half a pint of Port wine, a tea spoonful of pounded cinnamon and cloves or mace, sweeten with loaf sugar, and boil gently for ten minutes.

CANALS OF PASTE WITH SWEETBREADS.,

Roll some cards, like a cane, in puff paste; then bake them, and take the card out of the centre. When cool, fill the cavity with marmalade or jam, &c.

CREAM FOR PIES.

To a pint of new milk add a few coriander seeds washed, a bit of lemon peel, a laurel leaf, a stick of cinnamon, four cloves, a blade of mace, some sugar, and boil all together ten minutes. Then have ready in another stewpan the yolks of six eggs and half a table spoonful of flour mixed, and strain the milk to them; set it over a. slow fire, whisk it till it is of a good consistence, and be careful that

L 5

226 ABT OF COOKERY.

it does not curdle. When cold it may be poured over preen codlings, gooseberries, or currants, &c. in pies.

The cream may be perfumed, by adding, when nearly cold, a dessert spoonful of orange flower water, a table spoonful of syrup of roses, and a little ambergris. Fruit pies, likewise, should be sweetened with sifted loaf sugar, covered with puff or tart paste, and when served, the top to be cut off, the fruit covered with either of the above creams, and small leaves of baked puff paste put round.

TO GREEN CODLINGS FOR PIES, &C.

Put a layer of green codlings, and a layer of green vine leaves alternately till the stewpan is nearly full; fill it with cold spring water, and put over a slow fire close covered; when the codlings are soft take the skins off^ and put them into the same liquor quite cold with a little roach alum; set them over a slow fire till they are green, then drain and put them into a syrup for one day. On the next, pour the syrup from them, boil it, add it s^;ain, and repeat this for three successive days* They must then be put into glasses closely covered with paper dipped in brandy, wnd bladder tied over.

Grreengages, &c. may be done in the same manner.

PI£S, PUDDINGS, PA8TRY9 &C. 227

TO STEW APPLES FOE TARTS.

Pare, cut into quarters, and core, some apples; put them into a stewpan, add to them a piece of lemon peel, a little water, and a stick of cinnamon. Cover the pan close, put it over a fire till the apples are dissolyed, sweeten with sifted sugar and a tea spoonful of syrup of quinces, and rub them through a hair-sieve. Let the pulp stand till cold before it is put into the paste.

To make a very fine flavoured tart, stew golden pippins in the same manner, and when they are rubbed through the sieve, add only half a table spoonful of syrup of cloves, and mix well with it a quarter of a pound of pine-apple jam. This mix- ture will keep a month if closely covered.

TARTS, OR TARTLETS.

Sheet tart or tartlet pans with puff paste a quar- ter of an inch thick, trim round the edge with a sharp knife, fill with raspberry or apricot jam^ or orange marmalade or stewed apple, and put fine strings of paste across in any form preferred. Bake in a brisk oven, and be careful not to let the top colour too much.

RHUBARB TART.

Wash and cut into pieces, the size of young gooseberries, slips of green rhubarb; put them intir

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228 ART OF COOKERY.

a disby sweeten with sifted sugar, add the juice of a lemon» oorer with puff paste, and bake. Serve either plain or with cream, as for apple pie.

TOURTE OF RIFE FR]LJITS.

Stew till half done in a good syrup, with a little brandy mixed with it, either cherries, currants, apples, &c. When cold, sheet a tourte pan with crisp tart paste; put the fruit into it, and round the edge a rim of puff paste, two inches broad, and in the centre, upon the fruit, a small ornament cut out of paff paste. Bake in a moderately heated oven.

' The above fruit when stewed may be put into a pie dish, covered with puff paste, and baked of a light colour.

«

FRENCH PUFFS.

Put a piece of fresh butter^ the size of a walnut, into a pint of water, and when it boils, add as much sifited flour as will make a stiff paste. When cool break in four eggs, mix it well, drop the batter into boiling lard till of a nice colour, sift sugar over, and serve with currant jelly or other jam.

LEMON PUFFS.

Beat a pound of sifted loaf sugar in a bowl with the juice of two lemons; whisk the white of an

PIES, PUDDINGS, PASTRY, &C. 226

egg to a very high froth, add it to the mixture, and whisk for twenty minutes; after which add the' rind of three lemony g^ed very fine and three eggs, mixing all well together. Sift sugar over wafer paper, drop on it the mixture in small quantities, and hake them iixa moderately heated oven.

FRIEp PUFJFS WITH SWEETMEATS.

Roll out puff paste half an inch thick, cut it into slips of three inches wide, and these again into square pieces, and lay on each some sweetmeat of any kind. Fold the paste, and run a jagger iron round to form it, or cut it with a sharp knife. Have ready boiling lard, fry the puffs of a light colour, drain them dry, and serve with sifted sugar over, and some orange marmalade round.

CHEESE CAKES.

¦

To three quarts of new milk add three parts of a gill of rennet; let it stand in a warm place, and when it is thoroughly turned drain it well, and mix into it with the hand half a pound of fresh butter, and sweeten with pounded sugar: add a few currants washed and picked, a little citron, candied orange and lemon peels cut into small slices, an ounce of Jordan almonds pounded fine, and three eggs well beaten. Sheet the pans with puff

230 ART OF COOlLEKt.

paste, fill them with the curd, and bake in a brick oven. Or the paste may be made with half a pound of sifted flour, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and cold pump water, mixed lightly and rolled out

MINCE MEAT.

Roast, with a paper over it, a fillet of beef cut from the inside of a rump, and when cold chop it small. To two pounds of meat add two pounds of beef suet chopped fine, two pounds of chopped apples, one pound of raisins stoned and chopped, one pound of currants washed and picked, half a pound of citron, a quarter of a pound of candied orange, and a quarter of a pound of candied lemon peels cut into small slices, together with a small quantity of beaten cinnamon, mace, cloves, allspice, a pint of brandy, and a very little salt. Mix all the ingredients well together, put them into a pan, and keep close covered in a cool place.

It is recommended to omit the meat, substituting one pound of the yolks of hard eggs chopped.

CONCLUDING REMARKS.

All sweets, pastry, sheUfish, or Savoury dishes, either plain or modelled, with fitt, or butter, or

2

BREAD) CAKES, &C. 231

ornaments of any kind, that are served in second courses, or at ball suppers, &c. should be very light, airy, and neat; the pastry, likewise, of the best puff paste, should be well baked, and incline to a pale colour, which has a very good effect.

BREAD, CAKES, &c.

TO MARE ENGLISH BREAD.

Take a peck of the best white flour, sift it into a trough, make a cavity in the centre, and strain through a hair-sieve a pint of good yeast and a pint of lukewarm water mixed together; mix them lightly with some of the flour till of a light paste, and set it in a warm place covered over to prove for an hour; then mix the whole with two quarts of lukewarm water and a little salt, knead it to a good stiffness, prove it an hour more, and knead it again; prove it another hour, mould it into loaves, or batch two pieces together, and bake in a brisk oven.

123S ART OF COOKERY*

A juiddliog^sized loaf tnll require an hour and a hi^f . to hake,

FRENCH BREAD.

Sift a peck of fine flour into a trough, make a cavity in the centre with the hand, strain into it a pint of lukewarm milk and a pint of good yeast mixed together, incorporate with some of the flour till of a light sponge, and set in a warm place covered over to prove for an hour; then add two quarts of lukewarm milk, half a pound of fresh butter, an ounce of sifted loaf sugar, and a little salt; knead till of a nice stiffness, prove an hour more, knead again, and prove another hour; then mould into bricks, lay them on tins, put them into a very slack oven, or warm place, to prove for half an hour, and bake in a brisk oven.

FRENCH BREAD {another way).

Make a sponge with a peck of the finest flour sifted, half a pint of warm milk, and the same quahtit}'^ of good yeast; cover with a cloth, and set in a warm place for three quarters of an hour; meantime warm, and then add to the above, a pint and a half of milk, half a pint of water, half a pound of fresh butter, a table spoonful of sifted loaf sugar, and a little salt: knead all together.

BREAD, CAKES) &C.' 233

Set before a fire, make into rolls, or shapes, set them in a warm place for half an hour, and bake in a brisk oven.

MUFFINS AND CRUMPETS.

Mix for a quarter of an hour a pint and a half of warm milk and water, with a quarter of a pint of good yeast and a little salt; strain to a quarter of a peek of the finest sifted flour; mix lightly, set in a warm place to rise, pull into pieces the size of a walnut, roll them round, cover with flannel, and bake on a muffin stove.

BREAKFAST CAKES.

Rub two ounces of fresh butter into a pound and a half of sifted flour; put it in a dish, make a hole in the centre, and pour in two eggs beaten up, and mixed with half a pint of warm milk, a spoon- ful of yeast, a little salt, and a tea-spoonful of sifted sugar; put some flour lightly over, and set in a warm place to rise. When risen, mould into cakes, put them before a fire, with a light cloth over, for half an hour; then wash them with warm milk, and bake.

234 ART OF COOKERY.

BREAKFAST CAKES {another way).

Mould with the hand, till it has a gloss like satin, one pound and a half of sifted flour, seven eggs, five drachms of salt, and four ounces of fresh butter; roll out the paste five or six times, mould again, and again roll it out; strew a little flour over, and set in a cool place till the following morning: then roll it out, cut into cakes with a round cutter, four inches in diameter, put them into boiling water, and boil till tiiey float on the surface; take them out, put them into cold water for five minutes, drain them dry, and bake. On serving, cut them open, and put in fresh butter.

RUSKS, OR TOPS AND BOTTOMS.

Add two eggs beaten up to half a pint of good mild yeast and a little milk. Sift four pounds of best white flour, and set a sponge with the above ingredients. Add boiling half a pound of fresh butter, and a sufficient quantity of milk to make the sponge the stifihess of common dough; let it lie in the kneading trough till well risen; then mould and make it into loaves of the size of small teacups; batch them flat, bake in a moderate oven, and when nearly done take tiiem out, cut the top from the bottom, and dry till of a nice colour on tin plates in the oven.

BRBAD, CAKES, &C. 235

TO MAKE BUNS.

Pat five pounds of the best flour into a wooden bowl, and set a sponge of it with a gill of yeast and a pint of wann milk; then mix with it one pound of sifted sugar, one of oiled fresh butter, and a small quantity of coriander seeds, cinnamon, and mace pounded fine. Roll the paste into buns, set them on a baking plate rubbed over with a little butter, put them into a moderate oven to prove, then wash with a paste brush dipped in warm milk, and bake of u good colour.

BUNS (another way).

Rub a quarter of a pound of fresh butter into two pounds of sifted flour, mix with it a pint of warm milk and a gill of yeast, set in a warm place to rise, and then knead with it a little nutmeg, mace, cloves, and carraway seeds, pounded and sifted, and a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar; roU out the paste, not too thin, and stamp of any shape chosen; put the buns on tin plates rubbed with oiled butter, set before a fire to rise, and bake in a quick oven.

BATH BUNS.

Knead well together four pounds of sifted flour, a pint of yeast, a little orange flower water, three eggs beaten, a little grated nutmeg, some salt,

236 ART OF COOKERY.

three ounces of oiied butter coloured with Baffron, and a pint of warm milk. Set in a warm place to rise, make into buns, wash them over with a little oiled butter, bake j'n a brisk ov^i, and strew comfits oven

BRIDE CAKE.

Take two pounds of sifted loaf sugar, fpur pounds of fresh butter, four pounds of best white flour dried and sifted, a quarter of an ounce of mace and cinnamon, the same quantity of nutmeg pounded and sifted, thirty eggs, four pounds of currants washed, picked, and dried before a fire, a pound of Jordan almonds blanched and pounded, a pound of citron, a pound of candied orange, a pound of candied lemon peels cut into slices, and half a pint of brandy; then proceed as follows: Work the butter to a cream with the hand, then beat in the sugar for a quarter of an hour, whisk the whites of the eggs to a solid froth, and mix them with the sugar and butter; add to the above the yolks beaten for a quarter of an hour, and the flour, mace, and nutmeg; beat all well together till the oven is ready, and then mix in lightly the brandy, currants, almonds, and sweetmeats. Line a hoop with paper, rub it with butter, fill it with the mixture, bake in a brisk oven, and when it is risen cover with paper to prevent it from burning. It may be served either iced, or plain.

BREAD, CAKES, &C. 237

BICH PLUM CAKE.

Mis: with the hand in an earthen, dish for a quarter of an hour a pound of sifted sugar, and one of firesk butter; beat well ten yolks and five whites of eggs, put two thirds of them to the sugar and butter, and mix together till it begins to be tough; after which add one pound and a half of currants washed and picked, a quarter of a pound of citron, a quarter of a pound of flour, a quarter of a pound of candied orange or lemon peel cut into slices, and a quarter of a pound of Jordan almonds blanched and bruised very fine. Then pound a quarter of a pound of muscatel raisins, put to them a gill of sweet wine and a spoonful of brandy, strain through a doth to the mixture, add the rest of the eggs, and mix all together as lightly as possible.

TWELFTH CAKES.

Take seven pounds of flour, make a cavity m the centre, and set a sponge with a gill and a half of yeast and a little warm milk; put round it one pound of fresh butter broken into small lumps, a pound and a quarter of sifted sugar, four pounds and a half of currants washed and picked, half an ounce of sifted cinnamon, a quarter of an ounce of pounded cloves, mace, and nutmeg mixed, sliced candied orange, or lemon peel, and citron. When the sponge is risen, mix all the ingredients together

238 ART OF cookery;

with a little warm milk; have some hoops well papered and buttered, fill them with the mixture and bake: when nearly cold, ice them over with sugar, or they may be plain.

POUND CAKE.

Mix a pound of sifted sugar, and a pound of fresh butter, with the hand for ten minutes; then put to them nine yolks and five whites of eggs beaten, whisk well, and add a pound of sifted flour, a few carraway seeds, a quarter of a pound of candied orange peel cut into slices, a few currants washed and picked, and mix all together as lightly as possible.

COMMON S££D CAKES.

To one pound and a quarter of flour put half a pound of fresh butter, broken into small pieces round it, with a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar and half a grated nutmeg; then make a cavity in the centre of the flour and set a sponge with a gill of yeast and a little warm milk; when well risen add slices of candied orange or lemon peel, an egg beaten up, and half an ounce of pounded and sifted carraway seeds. Mix the ingredients well together with a little warm milk, to a proper stiff- ness; mould the dough into a cake, prove it in a warm place, and then bake.

BREAD, CAKE89 kt. 2S9

SAVOY CAKE.

Beat well together the yolks of eight eggs and a pound of sifted sugar, and whisk the whites to a solid froth; add six ounces of flour, ai)d a little sifted cinnamon, and mix the whole lightly toge- ther; rub a mould with fresh butter, fill it three parts full with the mixture, and bake in a slackly heated oven.

Serve plain, or ornamented with gum paste.

DIET BREAD CAKE.

Break the whites of nine eggs into one pan, the yolks into another; whisk the whites to a solid froth; beat the yolks, and whisk them with the whites; add sifted sugar of the weight of nine eggs, with flour; mix all well together, put in a few carraway seeds, and bake in a hoop.

BATH CAKES.

Rub a pound of fresh butter into a pound of flour, mix them into a light paste with a gill of yeast and some warm cream, and set in a warm place to rise; then mould in with it a few carraway seeds, make into cakes the size of small Freiich rolls, and bake them on tins buttered.

2^0 AWT OF. COOKSHY^

BATH CAKES (qmt^way).

Mix togetiier one pound qf floats J^^-Q £ ^d of iresk batter, five eggs, a lUtl^^sd^ 9fki[9. 4j3a- cup full of good yeast, and put bofore a fire whe^L- sufficiently risen, add a quarter of a^ ^ufid . of sifted 9ugar, half an ounce of caj^^ay ^oid% and a few cloves pounded and sifted. RoU out into little cakes, and bake on tins well cleaned, and rubbed with butter.

BRISTOL CAKES.

Mix well together, in an earthen pan, with the hand, six ounces of sifted sugar, six ounces of fresh butter, four whites, two yolks of eggs, and nine ounces of flour; then add three quarters of a pound of picked currants, and drop the mixture with a spoon upon tin plates rubbed with buttery bake in a brisk oven.

HYDE-PABK-CORNER CAKES.

Take two pounds of flour, four ounces of com- mon sugar, and half an ounce of carraway seeds pounded; then set a sponge with half a gill of yeast and some warm milk, and when it Works ti^ some boiling milk, add to it five ounces of fresh butter, mix it up lighdy, and let it lie some time; then roll it out, cut into any shapes preferred, and bake in a moderate oven.

BREAD, CAKES, &C. 241

AN ENGLISH CAKE.

Mix into a cake a pound and a half of sifted flour, three drachms of salt, two ounces of sifted sugar, four yolks of eggs, a pound and a quarter of fresh butter, a gill of cream, and two ounces of chocolate grated fine, with some raisins stoned: put into a hoop rubbed with butter, and bake.

A SWISS CAKE.

Set a sponge with a pound and a half of sifted flour, till well risen; then mix thoroughly with it another pound and a half of sifted flour, two pounds of fresh butter, one ounce of salt, four ounces of sifted sugar, a gill of cream, the yolks of twenty- four eggs and twelve whites, a wine glass of rum, six ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, and a gill of whisked cream: set in a warm place for an hour, and bake for an hour and a half in a hoop.

A FRENCH CAKE.

Make into a paste two pounds of sifted flour, six drachms of chocolate pounded, twelve ounces of raisins stoned, two pounds of fresh butter, a wine glass of Marasquino, half a pound of Jordan almonds scalded, peeled, and pounded, and twenty- four eggs; mix with a sponge, well risen, of two pounds of sifted flour, put it into a hoop, set in a warm place for an hour, and bake for two hours.

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242 ART OF COOKERY.

A RUSSIAN CAKE*

Form a paste with a pound and a half of sifted floar, half an ounce of salt, six ounces of sifted sugar, an ounce of aniseeds sifted and pounded, six ounces of currants washed and dried in a cloth, twelve whole eggs, twelve yolks, the rinds of two lemons grated, two pounds of fresh butter, two ounces of citron sliced, and a pint of cream whipped to a solid froth; set a sponge with a pound and a half of sifted flour, an ounce and a quarter of yeast, half an ounce of salt, and a little warm milk; when well risen, mould it with the hands into a dough, add it to the above paste, set in a warm place, and bake for two hours.

A TURKISH CAKE.

Set a sponge with a pound and a half of sifted flour, an ounce and a quarter of yeast, and a little warm water; when well risen, add to it die same quantity of sifted flour, four ounces of sifted sugar, half a pound of rice boiled till tender, and rubbed through a sieve, two ounces of salt, six ounces of currants washed and dried in a cloth, six ounces of raisins stoned and pounded, an ounce of citron sliced, a wine glass of Madeira, a gill of cream, a drachm of saffron boiled in water and strained to the ingredients, twenty eggs, and two pounds of fresh butter: mix the whole well together into a

BREAD, CAKES, &C« 243

paste, mould it; put it in. a hoop, or mould, set in a warm place for half an hour, and bake for two hours.

SHREWSBURY CAKES.

Beat half a pound of fresh butter to a cream; add to it the same quantity of flour, one egg, six ounces of sifted sugmr, and a quarter of an ounce of carraway seeds; mix all together into a paste, roll it out thin, stamp it with a tin cutter, prick the cakes with a fork, lay them on tin plates rubbed with butter, and bake in a slow oven.

PORTUGAL, OR HEART CAKES.

Mix with the hand, or a whisk, to a fine batter, a pound of flour, a pound of sifted sugar, and a pound of fresh butter; then add two spoonsful of rose water, two of brandy, half a pound of currants washed and picked^ and ten eggs, whisked, and mixed well together; Butter tin moulds, fill them three parts full with the mixture, and bake in a brisk oven.

TO MAKE AN ALMOND CAKE.

Take eight ounces of Jordan and one of bitter ahnonds, blanched and pounded very fine; whisk in with the almonds the yolks of eight eggs, and let the whites be beatf p up to a solid froth. Then

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244 ART OF COOKERY.

take eight table spoonsful of sifted sugar, five of fine flour, a snu^ quantity of gxmted lemon peel and pounded eian^mod, and mix all the ii gre- dients. Rub the inside ^ a mould with fre^h butter, fill it with the mixture, and bake oi a light colour.

CIKNAMOM CAKES. .

Break six eggs into a pan with three table spoonsful of irose water, wh^k them well .together^ add a pound of sifted sngar^ a dessert spoonful of pounded cinnamon, and as much flour as w31 make it into a good paste: then roll it out, cut it into any shapes preferred, bake on white paper, and when done take them off, and preserve them for use in a dry place.

YEAST CAKE*

Take one pound of flour, two pounds of currants washed and picked, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, a quarter of a pound of LidJMm sugar, the same quantity of citron and candied orange peel cut into slices, and a small quantity of cinnmnon and mace, pounded and sifted. Make a cavity in the centre of the ingredients, add a gill of sweet wine, a little warm milk, a tea*cupful of yeast, and let it stand till the yeast works; then put a little more warm milk, mix all together, fill a hoop with it, let it remain till risen, and bake.

BREAD, CAKES, &C. 245

A BBST BIQE CAKE.

Blanch and pound very fine a ponnd of Jordan almonds, and half an ounce of bitter almonds; add a pint of water, and press the liquor through a cloth to a pound and a half of rice half-boiled; add three quarters of a pound of fresh butter, eight ounces of sifted sugar, a little sifted cinnamon, and salt: stew g^tly till very tender, rub the whole through a hair-sieve, add to the pulp the yolks of four eggs and some currants, and bake in a hoop well papered and buttered*

RICE CAKES.

Whisk the yolks of seven eggs for a quarter of an hour, add five ounces of sifted sugar, and mix them well; put to them a quarter of a pound of rice, flour, a little brandy, the rind of a lemon grated very fine, and a small quantity of pounded mace; then add six whites of eggs well beaten, and mix all together for ten minutes; fill a hoop with the mixture, and bake in a brisk oven.

SMALL CAKES.

Rub together half a pound of sifted sugar, the same quantity of fresh butter, and three quarters of a pound of sifted flomr; wet it with a gill of boiUng milk, strew in a few canaway seeds, and let

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246 ART OF COOKERY.

it lie till the next day; then mould and cut it into eleven dozen pieces, roll them as thin as pos^le, and bake in a moderately heated oy^en.

NAPLES BISCUITS.

Mix a pound of Lisbon sugar with half a pint of water, and two table spoonsful of orange flower water; add eight eggs well whisked; whisk the whole till nearly cool, and add lightly a pound of sifted flour. Cut it into shapes, bake on paper, or in tins, and sift sugar over the top before putting into the oven.

SPONGE BISCUITS*

Take the same mixture as for dic»t bread, omit- ting the carraway seeds, rub the inside of small tin pans witii fresh butter, fill them with the mixture, sift sugar over, and bake in a moderate oven.

ALMOND NUTS.

Take three eggs, their weight of gifted sugar, flour of the weight of two eggs, and two ounces of almonds blanched and pounded fine; then beat the whites .to a solid froth, and mix the ingredients well with it. Have repdy wafer, or writing paper, rubbed over with ftesh; butter; drop the mixture upon the paper in rows with a tea-sppon and bake.

BREAD, CAKES, &C. 247

GOOD GINGERBREAD NUTS.

Mix inlK a paste with a pound of treacle or honey, and a gill of cream, warmed together, four pounds of flour, half a pound of sifted sugar, one ounce of carraway seeds, half an ounce of ginger pounded and sifted, six ounces of fresh butter, and two ounces of candied orange peel cut into small sKeefl; let it lie six hours; then roll it out, make it into nuts, and bake in a moderate oven«

DUTCH GINGERBREAD.

Mix into a 8ti£F paste four pounds of sifted flour, two ounces of beaten ginger, the same quantity of carraway seeds beaten and pounded, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter oiled, a gill of cream, two ounces of candied orange peel in shreds, two eggs and two pounds of treacle: let it lie for six hours, roll it out into small cakes or nuts, wash them over with a little white of egg, and bake on thick paper in a moderately heated oven.

RATAFIAS.

Blanch and pound half a pound of Jordan al« monds, and a quarter of a pound of bitter almonds, preserving them from oiling with rose water; mix lightly with them a pound of sifted sugar, and the whites of four eggs well beaten, then put the mix- ture into a preserving pan, set it over a moderate

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248 ART OP COOKERY.

fire, stirring till it is pretty hot, and when cold roll it into small rolls, cut them into small cakes the size of a shilling, dip the top of your finger into flour, and taking up each cake lightly, put them on wafer paper, sift sugar oyer, and bake in a slow oven.

WAFERS.

Beat together for twenty minutes a table spoon- ful of orange flower water, one of flour, the same of good cream, some sifted sugar, and a dessert spoonful of syrup of cinnamon; then make the wafer-tongs hot, and pour a little batter just suf- ficient to cover the irons; bake over a slow fire, and when taken from the tongs roll the wafers round and preserve them in a dry place.

CRACKNELS.

To half a pound of best white flour i^ifted, add the same quantity of sifted loaf sugai:, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, two table spoonsful of rose water, a little salt, and the yolks and whites of three eggs beaten up: mix all well together for twenty minutes. Then roll it out, cut it with a pastry cutter, into any shapes chosen, put them on baking plates rubbed with butter, wash the tops with whites of eggs well beaten, and bake in a brisk oven.

BREAD, CAKIIS, &C. 249

MACAROONS.

Take a pound of Jordan almonds blanched^ and pounded fine, with a little rose water to preserve them from oiling, and a pound of sifted sugar; add the whites of ten eggs whisked to a solid froth, and beat all together for some time. Have ready wafer paper on tin plate?, drop the mixture over it sepa- rately in sizes of a shilling, or smaller, sift a little sugar over, and bake.

TO FRY BREAD CRUMBS.

Rub crumbs of bread through a hair-sieve, have ready a clean frying-pan, put them into it with a piece of fresh butter over a moderate fire, keep stirring with a wooden spoon till they are of a light brown colour, and put them upon a plate.

SMALL CRUSTS TO BE EATEN WITH CHEESE, OR

WINE, AFTER DINNER.

Pull the crumb of a new-baked loaf into small pieces, put them on a baking plate, and set in a moderately heated oven till they are of a nice brown colour.

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^0 aUT of COOKERr.

SWEET DISHES, PRESERVES, SWEETMEATS, &c.

A MACEDOIKE Ot FRUIT,

Oil the inside of ft mould, and decorate the bot- tom with dried cherries and slices of citron; line the sides with pear jam eoloored with coduBeal; fill the cavity with:apple. jam mixed with some quince marmalade and a little brandy, and «et in ice. When to be served, turn it out of the mould on a dish, and put a little perfumed cream round.

CHARLOTTE OF APPLES.

Stew some apples wiA a bit of fresh butter, a little syrup of quinces, half a pound of apricot jam, and half a gill of brandy; rub all through a hair-sieve, add a few dried cherries, and put into a mould lined with bread cut in diamonds of four inches square and half an inch thick, and previ- ously dipped in oiled butter. Cover with slices of bread, likewise dipped in butter, bake of a light colour, and sift sugar over.

SWEET DISHES, PRESERVES, &C. 251

PULPTON OF APPLES.

Pare, cut into quarters, and core eight good- sized baking apples; put them into a stewpan, add a bit of lemon-peel, and a table spoonful of rose water, cover the pan close, place it over a slow fire, and when the apples are tender, rub them through a hair-sieve; then add to the pulp a small quantity of sifted cinnamon, cloves and sugar, four eggs well beaten, and a quarter of a pound of the crumb of French bread soaked m a gill of cream, and mix all tbe ingredients together. Rub the inside of a mould with fresh butter, fill it with the XDixtttre, bake in a moderately heated oven, when done turn it out on a dish, and serve with sifted sugar over.

SOUFFLE OP RICE AND APPLES.

Boil two ounces of rice till tender, pound it fine, add the yolks of two eggs, sugar, nutmeg, and pounded cinnamon; edge a dish with puff paste, and place the rice round the dish within the paste; in the centre lay apple marmalade, a little quince jam, and brandy; beat the whites of four eggs to a good froth, pour it on the fruit, sift sugar over, and bake.

GOLDEN PIPPINS A LA CREME.

Sweeten with lump sugar, and boil togedier for ten minutes, three gills of Lisbon wine, a gill of

M 6

3² V .J^EV Q¥ eOOUBKXi

^^^^9 ^.Hick of/cia««u)ac»i« a bit of ieimik:peBili a small qp^tity. oft the itt ^ . aad^. f0w;.,oorfafldar seeds. Have ready twelve large ripe golden pippins pared, and cored with a small iron apple scoop; put them into a stewpan, strain the above liquor to them, and stew gently till done: then take ^em out, put them into a trifle dish, and reduce the liquor to a strong syrup. After which mix with it a pint of cream, the yolks of ten eggs, and a des- sert spoonful of syrup of cloves; then strain, set over a slow fire, and whisk till of a good thickness. Put the pan in cold water, stir the mixture some time, let it cool, and when the pippins are to be served pour the cream over, and put round the edge of the dish leaves of puff paste, baked of a pale colour.

The same kind of cream may be put over codlins, gooseberries, or cranberries^ when made into pies, only omitting the pippins.

GOLDEN PIPPINS {another Way) ,

Boil for a quarter of an hoar half a pint of white wine^ a gill of water, a stick of cinnamon, a £ew cloves and coriander seeds, a bijb of lemcm peel, a little juice, and plenty of loaf sugar. Then strdn the liquor to twelve large pippins pared and cored, stew gently till done, and the liquor reduced to a strong syrup of a consistence sufficient to adhere to the

SWEET m8MB»» PRESERVES, &C. ^^

upfkuy attdfiat theHviato aSiili; Wb^n Cbld d^e ntkdiopped, oteared^ eslf 's feet jeUy round.

STEWED PIPPINS.

Take tbe same ingredients as directed in the preceding receipt; but wheathe apples are half done lay them on a dish to cool, and add to the syrup the yolks of eight eggs and three gills of cream; then strain and set over a fire, whisk till of a good thickness, and let it stand till cold. Have ready boiling lard, dip the apples in batter of the same kind as for fritters, and fry of a light colour; then drain, and when cold serve with the cream under and sifted sugar over.

PIPPINS WITH RICE.

Boil two ounces of whole rice with half a pint of milk, and when it is nearly absorbed put the rice into a mortar: add a table spoonful of brandy, a little grated lemon peel, a small quantity of pounded cinnamon and cloves, two ounces of sifted si^;ar, two eggs, and pound all together. Then pare twelve large ripe golden pippins, core them with an apple scoop, mould over them some of the mixture widi the hand, put writing paper on a tin plate, rub it over with sweet oil or butter, put the apples on it, and bake gently till done; then serve

864 ART OF COOSIERY.

in a deep dish with melted batter oyer, and a little of the syrup of qimices mixed with it

GREEN CODLINGS^ Fl^OSTED WITH SUGAR.

Blanch twelve codlings in water with a little roehe*alam and some vine leaves in it; when neariy done tske off the outside skiD, rub the apples over with oiled fresh butter, and sift plenty of sugar over; dien lay ^m on a dean tin, pot them into a. slow oven, and when the sugar sparkles Uke frost, take them out Serve cold in a trifle -glass with perfumed cream round made as for apple pie,, and on die top of each codling stick a small flower for garnish.

TO BAKE PEARS.

To a pint of water add the juice of three Seville oranges, a small quantity of cinnamon, doves, and mace, and a bit of lemon peel, and boil a quarter of an hour; then strain and add to the liquor a pint of Port wine, plenty of loaf sugar, and a little cochi- neal; after which pare, cut into halves, and core, twelve large baking pears, put them into a pan, add the liquor, cover the pan with writing paper, and bake in a moderate oven, or in a stewpan over a fire.

SWEET DIBKE8) PHESEBIVES, &C. 255

Put a quart of green gooseberries and a gill of water in a stewpan closely covered over a fire, when the fruit is tender rub it through a fine haiir-sieve, a;dd to the pulp sifted loaf sugar, and let it stand till cold. In the mean time put a pint of cream or new milk into a stewpan, with a stick of cinnamon, a small piece of lemon peel, sugar, a few cloves and coriander seeds» and boil the ingredients ten miDtttes; then stiain the yolks of six eggs and a Hide flour and water well beaten, whisk it over a fire to prevent it from curdling, when nearly boil- ing set the pan in cold water, stir the cream for five minutes, and let it stand till cold. Then mix the pulp of the gooseberries and the cream toge- ther, and add a little grated nutmeg.

Strawberries, raspberries, apricots, or other ripe fruits, may be rubbed through a sieve, and the pulp added to the cream.

' BEIGNETS A l'iTALIENNE.

Boil a quarter of a pound of rice in milk till very tender; then add a little sifted sugar, a des- sert spoonful of orange flower water, grated lemon peel, a little salt, flour, and four eggs, some clean washed currants, and two good-sized apples, stewed and rubbed through a sieve. Mix all well together; butter writing paper; drop the mixture upon it

2

256 ART OF COOltERY.

with a spoon in rows, in pieces ithe size of a large nutmeg, and put the paper into boiling lard. Re- move the paper as soon as the beignets fall from it; fry them of a light colour; then- drain them dry and. serve with sifted sugar over, or the mixture, may be put into boiling water, in pieces the size of a walnut, and boiled a quarter of an ho.ur; then drain and serve with sailce over, made with butter, sugar, and white wine.



BEIGNETS A l'eAU.

Boil half a pint of water, a stick of cinnamon, a bit of lemon peel, a gill of Rhenish wine, a few coriander seeds, and some sugar for ten minutes, add an ounce of fresh butter well beaten, and when it is melted strain the liquor to a sufficient quantity, of flour to make it into a batter; return it to the fire, simmer gently, and add six yolks of eggs. Have ready boiling lard, put into it pieces of the mixture of the size of a damson; fry tihem of a light brown colour, drain, and serve with sifted sugar over.

LEMON BUTTER WITH SWEETMEATS.

To a quart of boiling cream, add an ounce of Jordan almonds blanched, and pounded very fine, * the whites of three eggs well beaten, a little orange flower water, and sugar. Then rasp the rind of a

SW££T DISHES, PRJSSBBVES, &C« 257

lemon into some lemon juice, add it to the cream, boil, and put the mixture into a hair-sieve; when well drained, beat it together and lay it high in a dish, with sweetmeats oi; ratafia cakes round.

Orange or cnocolate butter may be done in the sam'e manner, substituting the yolks for the whites of ej^.

LEMON AMD ORANGE LOAVES.

Cut the fruit into halves, squeeze them and pre* serve the liquor, boil the peels till the bitter is extracted, lay them iti syrup for two days, then boil the syrup to a good consistency, add the peels, and put into glasses for use. When wanted, take suffi- cient for a dish, and fill them with some pudding mixture, either marrow, bread, plum, &c. or with a custard, and bake.

COMPOTE OF ORANGES.

Peel and quarter China oranges, put them into a clear syrup, boil gently five minutes, and take them out. Boil for ten minutes a small quantity of cin- namon, cloyes, and mace, the juice of two oranges, and a bit of the peel in a gill of water; strain the liquor to the syrup, and reduce it to a strong con- sistence. Then put in the quarters of the oranges, and, when cold set them in a trifle dish, and lay round some cleared calf's feet jelly chopped.

258 ART OF COOKXRT.

CHANTILLY BASKET.

• t

Have ready a • small quantity of warm clarified sugar boiled to a carmel height, dip ratafia cakes into it, and place them round the inside of a dish; then cut more ratafia cakes into squares^ dip into the sugar, and pile them on the others till raised two or three stories high. After which, line the inside with wafer paper, fill with sponge biscuits, sweetmeats, blanched ahnonds, and some cream made as for apple pie, put some trifle froth over that, and garnish the froth with rose leaves; or coloured comfits, or carmel of sugar, may be thrown lightly over the top.

DEVILLED ALMONDS.

Blanch half a pound of Jordan almonds and wipe them dry; then put into a fr)ring-pan two ounces of fresh butter, make it hot, add the almonds, fry gently till of a good brown colour, drain on a hair-sieve, strew over Cayenne pepper and some salt, and serve hot

ALMOND CUSTARDS.

To a pint a&d a half of cream add a small stick 0f dnnamon, a blade of mace, a bit of lemon peel, some nutmeg and sugar. Boil the ii^rredients together ten minutes, and strain; then blanch and

SWEET DISBCe, PRESERVES, &C. 2&9

pound fine, three ounces of Jordan, and eight single bitter almonds, rub through a hair-sieve, add the fine puip to the cream, with a little syrup of roses^ and Ae yolks' of -six eggs beaten up, aad pour the mix* tHreintO'Smllciqps; or^bakeinadishwitharimof puflF paste round.

Plain custards maybe made in the same manner, but instead of almonds add a little orange flower water, or add to the plain custard a sufficient quantity of .the essence of coSee to make it grate- ful to the palate.

ALMOND hog's puddings.

Blanch and pound a pound of Jordan almonds, with two spoonsful of rose water; add a pound of marrow, or of kidney suet, shredded very fine, a pint of creatn, the yolks of twelve eggs, a glass of Mountain wiBe,^! litde §rated nutmeg, some beaten spices, and the crumb of. two penny loaves finely grated^ Mix well together, sweeten, and fill with the mixture some ox's entrails; tie the ends, wash them, and boil.

ALMOND PASTE.

Blanch and pound very fine half a pound of Jordan almonds, add six yolks of eggs, a sufficient quantity of flour to bind well, an ounce of oiled iVesh butter, sweeten with sifted sugar, and mix the

260 • ART OF COOKEHY.

ittgj^dients tboronghly in a mortar $ wheii it he* coihe» a stiff paste roll it ont, cut into any shapes chosen, bake them, and 'when cold fill them- with creams, or jellies. Or make into pu& and bake, substituting a little powder of dried orange flowers, for die flour and oiled butter.

Grate the rind from an orange and a lemon, vrith a piece of loaf sugar, dry the mixture in an oven, and then sift it through a hair-sieve; beat to a solid froth the whites of six eggs, adding by degrees, and as lightly as possible, six ounces of sifted sugar; have ready a tin plate, covered with wafer paper damped, put the mixture upon it with a tablespoon, in the form of half an eggy sift sugar over, and bake in a moderate oven. Before serv-   ing, fill each half with some marmalade, join them with some white of egg^ and set in a warm place to dry.

GAUFRES.

Set a sponge till well risen, with eight ounces of sifted flour, an ounce of yeast, a gill of waim milk, and a little salt; add to it two whole eggs, and four yolks, some grated lemon peel, and eight ounces of fresh butter; when just warm incorporate with it the whites of four eggs beateu to a solid

SWEET DISHES, PRESERVES, &C. 261

ftQjih wiUi a gilLof cceam, and;pu^.4bei batter m^Q shapes: or, put over a firo in wafer-lropft, rubb^ ypih butter.

NOUGATS.

Cut into halves a pound of Jordan almonds blanched, and bake them on a tin plate, in a brisk oven, of a light colour^ lay six ounces of sifted sugar, ^ized with a table spoonful of infusion of cochineal, on a tin plate of equal thickness and well buttered ^ put the almonds over, cover with sifted si^gar, bake in a brisk oven, and cut into i^hapes.

DAfilOLES.

Mix over a fire for five minutes, in a stewpan^ four ounces of fresh butter, one ounce of sifted flour, and an egg; then add the yolks of six eggs, four ounces of sifted sugar, eight ratafia cakes bruised, and a little salt; add another egg, four cupsful of cream, and some candied orange peel chopped fine. Put a piece of fresh butter into each mould, pour in the mixture, and bake in a brii& oven. Or two ounces of ground coffee may be infosed for a quarter of an hour in the cream, vrhiA should, in this case, be made to boil; then' strain, and add as directed above.

Creams made in this manner may be boiled in a

d62 ART or COOKERT.

mould, previously adding the whites of two eggs beaten to a solid froth, and served as a pudding.

CARRAWAY PUFFS.

Beat the whites of four eggs to a solid froth, add to them sifted sugar and some carraway seeds, pounded very fine; lay the mixture with a spoon in pieces the size of a shilling, as high as you can, on sheets of damp wafer paper, and bake in a slack oven.

Puffs with cinnamon, or ginger, &c. may be made in the same manner.

CURD PUFFS.

Drain the curd of two quarts of new milk, add the yolks of seven eggs and two whites, sugar, rose water, nutmeg, and bread crumbs; make the whole into a paste, cut into any shape, fry in boiling lard, and serve with a sauce made with butter, sugar, and white wine*

WAT£R ICES OF ORANGES, OR LEMONS.

To a pint of juice put a pint of water, and half a gill of brandy, sweeten with clarified sugar, and freeze it well.

SWEET DlSHESy PltE8£RV£S, &C. 2S3

ICE CREAM*

To a pint and a lialf of good cream, add half a pound of raspberry or other jams, or of ripe fruits, and sifted sugar; mix well together, rub through a fine sieve, put into a freezing mould, set in ice and salt, and stir till it begins to congeal. Then lay white paper at the bottom of a mould, fill with the cream, put more paper over, cover close, set in ice till well frozen, and when to be turned out for table dip the mould in cold water: or serve in glasses, taddng the cream out of the freezing mould. Other ingredients, such as essence of coffee, ginger, &c. may be put into the cream in- stead of fruits, sweetening them and adding a little brandy. Or a cold custard of four yolks of eggs, rubbed through a sieve, with cream, may be added to the fruit.

TEA CREAM.

« Boil together for ten minutes a pint of cream, a few coriander seeds washed, a stick of cinnamon, a bit of lemon peel, and sugar; then add a gill of very strong green tea. Have ready the whites of six eggs beat up, and strain the cream to them; whisk it over a fire till it begins to thicken, then fill cups or a deep dish, and when cold garnish with whole ratafias.

264 ART OF COOKEBT.

VIRGIN CREAM.

To be done in the same manner, only omitting the tea, and adding slices of citron when put into a dish.

COFFEE CREAM.

To be done in the same way, but, instead of the liquid, boil an ounce of whole coffee in the cream.

COFFEE CREAM {ajiother way)^

Put three ounces of ground coffee into a stew- pan, pour over five glasses of boiling milk, and cover; when nearly cool, strain through a tamis cloth, and mix a little powdered sugar and salt with it; add the yolks of eight eggs well beaten, stir with a wooden spoon, when it begins to thicken pass it through a tamis cloth, and add an ounce of dis- solved isinglass: when nearly cool put it into a mould rubbed with sweet oil of almonds, and set in ice.

Chocolate, and Vanilla cream, &c. may be made in the same manner.

BURNT CREAM.

To be done in the same manner as virgin cream; but when quite cold and ready for serving put sif- ted sugar over, and burn it with a clear red-hot

SWEET BISHESy PRESERVES, &C. 265

salamander. Lay some ratafias round the* edge of tbe dish.

PASTRY CREAM.

To a pint of cream add half a table spoonful of pounded cinnamon, a little grated lemon peel, three table spoonsful of flour, two ounces of oiled fresh butter, eight yolks and the whites of three eggs well beaten, half a pound of sifted sugar, and a table spoonful of orange flower water; put the mixture over a fire, and when it begins to thicken, add four ounces of ratafias and two ounces of pounded citron, mixing all well together. Let it stand till quite cold, cut it into any shapes that may be chosen, dip singly into yolk of raw egg, breadcrumb and fry in boiling lard till of a light colour^ drain dry, and serve hot,

A WHIP FOR TRIFLE, OR MARMALADE.

.Set in ice for half an hour a pint of cream, a gill of sweet white wine, a gill of Noyau, some sifted loaf sugar, the juice of half a lemon, and a tea spoonful of Gum Dragon whisked to a solid froth: put on a hair-sieve to drain.

A WHIP FOR CREAMS, OR TRIFLES.

Set a quart of cream in ice for half an hour, then add a drachm of Gum Dragon, and an ounce

N

266 KS,T OV COOKERY.

of enenoe of coffee; ouz the whole well to^ethw, sweeten, and whisk to a solid firoth: drain on a hair-sieve.

WHIPPED JELLY FOR A MOULD.

Whisk to a solid froth, a pint and a half of calf s feet jelly, cleared and nearly cool, with the whites of four eggs; when well mixed, add a small tea spoonful of cochineal: put in a mould, and set in ice; on serving, dip in waitn water, and turn it out imme fiately on a dish.

TRIFLE.

Put into a deep china, or glass (Esh, half a pound of sponge biscuits, two ounces of ratafias, two ounces of Jordan almonds blanched and pounded, an ounce of citron and one of candied orange peel cut into small slices, some currant jelly and raspberry jam, a small quantity of grated nutmeg and lemon peel, half a pint of sweet wine, and a little of the liquor of a syllabubs Pour over cream made as fer pies, and when to be served put plenty of the stiff fmdi of a syllabub raised high on the cveam^ and g«r« nish with coloured comfits, or still better^ with rose leaves.

TO MAKE SYLLABUB.

To a pint and a half of cream add a pint of sweet wine, a giU of brandy, sifted sugar, and a

SWEET DISHES, PRESBRYES, &C. 267

little lemon juice; whisk it well, take off the froth with a spoon, lay it upon a large sieve, fill glasses three parts full with the liquor, add a little grated nutmeg, and put the froth over. If the above does not froth well, add three drops of rennet, or the wUtesoftwoeggs.

8Y&UPOF CK)LDBN PIPPINS.

Pare, core, and cut into very thin slices, pippins when nearly ripe, or bruise them a little in a mor- tar. Then put them into an earthen vessel, add a small quantity of water, the rind of a lemon, plenty of sifted sugar, and a little lemon juice; let the ingredients remain in the pan close covered for two days, then strain the juice through a piece of lawn, add more sugar, clear it with white of egg, and boil to a syrup.

Nonpareils, quinces, pine-apples, or the rind of lemons peeled very thin, may be done in the same manner,

SYRUP OF CLOVES, &C.

Put a quart of boiling water and a quarter of a pound of cloves into a stewpan, cover the pan dose, set it over a fire, and let the cloves boil gently for half an hour; then drain them dry, and add to a pint of the liquor two pounds of loaf sugar. Clear it with the whites of two eggs beat up with a little

n2

268 ART OF COOKERY.

cold water, and simmer till it becomes a strong syrup. Preserve it in well owked phials.

Cinnamon or mace may be made into syrnp in the same manner.

NUTMEG SYRUP.

Pound a quarter of a pound of nutmegs, put them into a stewpan, and boil for half an hour in a pint and a half of hot water, then strain, and put to a pint of liquor two pounds of sifted sugar and one egg beaten up with a little cold water; set over a fire, and when boiling skim it till per- fectly clean and reduced to a good syrup. When cold, mix half a pint of brandy with it.

This syrup should be always at hand for pud- dings, &c. as it answers better than grated nutmeg and brandy prepared at the moment

SYRUP OF RO$ES.

Put into an earthen vessel one pound of damask rose leaves gathered when in high season, with a quart of boiling spring water, cover the pan close, and let it remain six hours; then run the liquor through a piece of lawn, and add to a pint of the juice a pound and a half of loaf sugar: boil it over a brisk fire till of a good consistence, carefully skim- ming it, and preserve it in bottles closely corked.

The syrup may be cleared with two eggs.

SWEET. DISHES) PRESERTES, &C. 269

SYRUP OF CAPItLAIRE*

: Clarify four pounds of loaf sugar, mixed with three quarts of spring water and a quarter of an ounce of isinglass with three whites^ of eggs; when cold add to the syrup a sufficient quantity of orange flower water to make it palatable, and a little syrup of cloves* Put it into bottles, corked well.

TO MAKE CAPILLAIRE.

Mix together six pounds of lump sugar, half a pint of orange flower water, the juice of three lemons, their rind cut thin, a few cloves, mace and cinnamon, one gallon of spring water, and the whites of three eggs well beaten; put over a fire, and when it has boiled a quarter of an hour, run it through a jelly bag, and preserve in small bottles closely corked.

ORGEAT.

Blanch and pound a pound of Jordan, and an ounce of bitter almonds, very fine; put to them a pint of pump water, rub them through a tamis cloth till quite dry, add to the liquor more water to make it of a proper consistence, and sweeten with   ?larified sugar, or sugar-candy, or capillaire; then put it into a decanter, and when to be used shake it well.

N 3

270 AAV or COMtBKT,

UKMOITAIMS, OR OBANQBABE.

To a gaUon of spring witer add some dnmnion and cloves, and plenty of orange! and lemon jnke, with a bit of their peel: sweeten well wilii ioaf sugar, and whisk with the whites of six eggg and one yolk* Put over a brisk fire, and when boiling let it simmer ten minntes*; then runr lb through a jelly bag, and let it stand till cold.

^ 4

MILK PUNCH.

To a gallon of milk add a little cinnamon, ^loyes^ mace, lemon and orange peel, a pint o£ brandy, a pint of rum, and plenty of orange and lemon juice: sweeten, and whisk in the yolks and whites of eight eggs, put over a brisk fire, and wben boil- ing, let it simmer ten minutes; run it through a jelly bag till quite clear, put it into boUleSgi and cork close.

The rum and brandy should be added when the milk is cleared.

BLANCMANaE.

To a quart of new milk add an ounce of picked isinglass, a small stick of cinnamon,, a piece of lemon peel, a few coriander seeds washed, six bitter almonds blanched and pounded, or a laurel leaf. Put over a fire, and when boiling simmer till the isinglass is dissolved, and strain it through a tamis

SWEET DISBXBy PttESERVES, &C. 371

siere into a basin. Let it stand ten minutes, skim Uif ponr it gently, and free from sediment, into anedier basin^ and wben beginning to congeal stir U well and fill tbe shapes.

BLANCMANGE OF ALMONDS.

Pound finely in a mortar, with a little water to prevent oiling, a pound of Jordan almonds scalded, peeled, and washed; add a pint oS new milk, and rub throng^ a tamis doth; sweeten with loaf sugar, add an ftunceof warm isinglass, and when it begins to congeal mbc with it a glass of l^oyaa: then beat to a solid froth a gill of cream and the whites of two eggs, add them to the mixture, and set the mould in ice.

BLANCMANGE OF FLOWERS.

Proceed as with the above, only add with the Noyau the liquet of half an ounce of the leaves of any flowers, infused for a quarter of an hour in a gill of boiling water, strained, sweetened, and coloured with cochineal.

Blancmange of coffee, or tea, may be made in die same manner by adding half a gill of their essences.

BLANCMANGE WITH FRUIT.

Boil an ounce and a half of isinglass in three piqts

N 4

2752 ART OF COOKERY.

of new milk, when quite dissolved strain it. Let it cool for half an hour, take the skhn off, pour it free from sediment into another pan, and whisk with it a table-spoonful of leederat and half a pound of currant jelly, or raspberry or strawberry jam. When it begins to jelly fill the moulds.

RIBAND BLANCMANGE.

Put some whioe blancmange two indi^ deep into a shape, and when quite cold lay in alternately, cleared calf s feet jelly, white blancmange coloured with cochineal, or Dutch blancmange.

DUTCH BLANCMANGE.

Mix a pint of warm, cleared calTs feet jelly with the yolks of six eggs, set it in a stewpan over a fire, and whisk till it begins to boil; then set the pan in'cold water, and stir the mixture till nearly cold, to prevent it from curdling. When it be« gins to thicken, fill the shapes, and on serving dip the shapes in warm water.

CLEARED calf's FEET JELLY.

Scald and chop the feet, put them into a pot with water to cover them, boil gently four or five hours, strain the liquor, and preserve it till the next day, so that it may be quite stiff. Then take off the fat, and wash it perfectly clean with warm

SWEET mmOMMf PKESCaiVES, &c. 273

water, put it iato a stowpan over a firet and wheir dissolyed season it w«U with lemon and Seville oraqge juice, white wine and sngiar, a piece of lemon peel, cannamon and coriander seeds whde, and whisk into it plenty of whites of eggs, a few yolks, and some shells; a few drops of oolouring Hquid may be added. Boil gently a quarter of an hour, run it through a fine flannel bag several times tiU quite bright, a] d when nearly cold fill the shapes*

When Seville oranges are not in season, orange flower water may be added, or syrup of roses or of quinces. Old hock or Madeira will be a great improvement.

MARBLED JELLY.

Lay cleared calTs feet jrily one inch deep hito a mould, and when cold put on the centre a me.* dallion of wafer paper with the ornamented side downwards; or ripe fruits, such as halves of peaches or nectarines, or black grapes; or dried fruits, as, cherries, barberries, greengages, &c. or small shapes of cold blancmange. Then set with a little luke- warm jelly, and fill the mould when this is quite cold.

SAVORY JELLY.

Warm the liquor in which either poultry or meat has been braked, or some veal brdth, taking care that it is free from fat, and strain it through a tamis

n5

274 /, ^»r: OP. t: imBBV.

sieii^into a fSUsoAi^^e^stpm^ 'soaiop ijotli arii^ lemoir I«eHI%l Cayenne pepfieiy noA I^JMgaOf «r plak riiMigpsr; adU^ a suffittmtqimnlitjr of dissolved) im^ g^ass to make k of a propev stiAna^ irUsfc into k plenty of whites- ci 0gg»i vilb « snail a«itky of the yelks and shells^ and add a littfe cehHtmg UilukL Then jsetovo? afire, and wiici» )m^&^ kNi it simmer a qwstei^ ol an hour*; mti it. tbougii a ysSey bag sev^ml timed till peeftetif fai%kt»

TO PRESERVE CH£RRI£S FOR TARfS..

Take moreDa cherries, prick ei^ck with a needle three or &iur times, pot them Intb a' dish, silt st^ar over, and let them remain all night"; th^ next day put the cherries into a boiling syrup fo^ one day; then pour the syrup from the cherries and boil it to a strong consistency; pub a litde brandy to it, and add to the cherries; when eold put into glasses, cover with bladder and' leufdier, and* preserve in a cool place.

Plums, gooseberries, fte. may be d me In the same manner.

DRIED CHERRIES.

Gather the largest Flemish cherries (or English bearers) when neajrly ripe, pick off the stalks and take the stones away; hi^ve ready a thin spop boil- ing, put the cherries into it, and let them remain

SWEET DI8BE8, PRSSEBYES, &C. 276

tili ihe next daj; tlwn stnin and boil the liquor agaiB, ttod add to the dieiries; repeat this jm^* eeos on the tiiird day; on the fourth day strain the sjrntp) add more mtg^^ and chuify it; boil it to a strong eonsistenee) add die cherries, put them into jars, and when cold cover elose. When wanted for use take them out, lay them on large drjring sieves, and pnt them in a very sladk oven.

Apricots, pears, plnms, &c. may be done in the same manner.

CHEERIES IN BRANDY, VOB. DESSERTS.

Qatlier the largest ripe morella cherries on a ixy day» and be careful n^t to bruise them; . eut off the stidk half way, prick each cherry with a needle three tiine9, put them into glasses^ add brandy suf- Heient to cover them, and aweeten with clarified sugar. Put into glasses closely covered with bladder and leather, and turn them bottom up- wards.

Grrapes, or apricots, may be done in the same manner.

TO PRESERVE CURRANTS.

Make a thin syrup with sugar and water; set it over a fire; when it boils put in the fruit in large bunches, and let them remain in a cool place' till the next day; Aen take tiliem out carefully, lay them on a dish, boil the liquor again, and

N 6

270 ABT or cQCMcsmr.

put in tbe conantfi^ taldi^ care not to let them break. Take them outaseoond time, add more sugar to the syrup» mik a quart of eairant jqioe; clarify it, boil to a strong ^rrup^ aad when cold pat the currants into glasses, pour the syrap over^ and tie them down dose.

TO PRESERVE BARBERRIES*

Bruise a quart of ripe barberries, add a quart of spring water, put them over a fire, when boiliog run the liquor through a fine sieve, and put to it three pounds of clarified sugar. Then add a suflSdent quantity of large bttaches of ripe bar- berries, put them over a fire, when boiling* set them away; the next day take the barberries out of the syrup, and put them into glasses, boil the liquor to a good consistence, pour it over, and cover close.

TO BOTTLE GOOSEBERRIES, &C. FOR TARTS.

Gather gooseberries on a dry day when about half grown, and pick off the stalks and blossoms; then put the fruit into wide-mouthed bottles and shake them down; cork very close, bake in a mode- rate oven till thoroughly heated through, and set in a dry cool place.

Damsons, currants, cherries, or plums may be done in the same way.

SWEET mmusj pitBsnTEs, &c. 277

in-petoenee to lhein««f flugftr, as it frequently lisppeii9 tiiat frrits preserved with syrup wQl ft et, and the whole be spoiled.

TO BOTTLE GOOSEBERRIES {atwther woy).

Pick the gooseberries, put them into the bottles and cover with spring water; then setting in a large pan of cold waler,' pat them, closely corked, over a nradeiate fiie,r and when the gooseberries atppearto be aealded enough, take oat the bottles, and set in a cool place.

This mode has been found to answer extremely well: the small champaign gooseberry will be found the best for the purposcr

PRESERVED- APRICOTS FOR TARTS, OR . DESSERTS..

Cut ripe apricots in halves, blanch the kernels and add them to the fruit. Have ready fourteen ounces of clarified sugar boiling, to every pound of fruit: put the apricots into it, and let them stand till cold. Then boil the syrup again, add t&e apricots as before, and when cold put the halves into small pots or glasses; if the syrup is too thin boil it again, and when cold put it to the fruit, and cover with, paper dipped in brandy.

Greengages may be done whole in the same manner, or green gooseberries with the seeds

278 AST €Uf COOKKBT.

talum ovt Tkcse frnilB vmj be 8Qn«d with the synqp; or they may be inmi on tin pbtefl^ in a moderately heated oven, a»d when abMat oM put sifted sugar oyer.

PEACHES* VSCTABINE8,&e* PESSSRVB]) IKBEANDY.

Put the fimit, when three parti ripe^ into a sttw- pan over a alow fire* corer with piqyery and when sirft take them out and hiy them on a foUed doth. Sweeten bnmdy with clarified smg^atf. pat the frnit into glass jars, fill vp wiA the brandy^ and tie them over with bladder and leather.

iUSPBEKRY JAM.

To every pound weight of r^e pioked ibs{ - berries, add fourteen ounces of sifted sugar and half a giU of enmait jnice; put into a preserving pauy set over a brisk firei and when boilii^ skim well and simmer tUI of a good oonsistenoe.

The raspberries may be mashed with a spoon previously to adding the sugfr, or rubbed through a wicker sieve.

APRICOT JAM.

Pare and cutapricots when nearly ripe into halves; break the stones, blanch the kernels, and add them to the halves. To a pound of fruit put fourteen ounces of sifi(ed sugar and a gill of the water in

SWEET SnHBS^ PSB8B1BVES, &C« 279

wUdi the pariBgt bam bpeiv boiled. Set orer a htitk fiiOf slar the mixture well together ti)i ef a good strength, but not very stiff.

GAEENGAGE JAM.

Rnb ripe gages through a large haix-gie¥e, and put them into a preserving pan; than, to a pound oS pulp add a pound of sifted sugar; after wldeh hcxil to a proper thickness, skim ckan, and pr^erve in small pots«

gUINCE JAM.

Pare and cut ripe quinces into thin i^Uces, put them into a stewpan, with sufficient water to cover them, cover close, boil gently till tender, and rub them through a large hair-sieve; add to a pound of the pulp a pound of sifted sugar and half a gill of syrup of cloves; then put into a preserving pan, and simmer till of a good con3istence.

A little of this jam mixed with the apples will improve the flavour of apple pie.

cubkant jelly.

Take two thirds of ripe red currants, and one third of white, pick them, put into a preserving pan over a good fire, and when they are dissolved run their liquor through a flannel bag. To a pint of jttiee^ add fourteen ouneesf of sifted ragor^ Set over a brisk fire, boil quickly, skim clean, aiKt re- duce to a good stiffness.

2

2M ART OF COOKBST.

Biaek canant jelly may be 'made in Ike same Buuuary but aUomiig aiicteen oimoes ef sugar to a pint of juioe*

PEACH, OB NECTARINE JELLT*

To calf's feet broth, well boUed and strained, add the juice of twenty-four ripe peaches, or nec- tarines, the juice of a pound of green grapes, a pint of old hock, some sugar to sweeten; a piece of cinnamon, and a bit of lemon-peeL Boil twenty minutes, and run through a jelly bag till perfectly clear.

CANDIED ORANGE, OR LEMON PEELS.

Take either lemon or orange-peels, well cleaned from the pulp, and lay them in salt and water for two days; then scald and drain them dry, put them into a thin syrup, and boil till they look clear: after which take them out, put them into a thick syrup made with fine loaf sugar, and simmer till the sugar candies about the pan and peels. Then lay them separately on a hair-sieye to drain, strew sifted sugar over, and put to dry in a slow oven; or the peels may be cut into chips, and done in the same manner.

TO MAKE MELON CITRON.

Cut into quarters middling^sized melons when half ripe, take away the seed, and lay the melons in salt and water for three days. Have ready a thin

SWEET DISHES) PRXBERTES, &C. 281

syrup;. drain and wipe ^by the quarters, put them into the flngar, and let them auanier a quarter of an hour: the next day boil them up again, and sor on for tliree days; then take tliem out, and put to Ae syrup some Mountain wine, a little brandy, and more sugar; clarify and boil nearly to a candied height, put the melona in and boil them; then put them in glasses, and cover close witb bladder and leather.

ORANGE MARMALADE.

Take Seville oranges when in season, which is generally at the beginning of March, out them into halves, and the halves again into thin slices, which put with the juice, but not too much of the core, and take away the pips. To every pound weight of orange add two pounds of sifted sugar, and a gill of water; set in a preserving pan over a quick fire, and when the mixture boils keep stirring and skimming till it becomes of a proper stiffness, which may be known by putting a little into a saucer and setting it in cold water. Then fill the pots with the marmalade, and when cold put over white paper dipped in brandy; after which cover the pots with paper and white leather, and preserve in a dry place for use.

The stiffness of other jellies, or jams, may be tried in the same way, and they must be covered in like manner.

38S ABT OF COO&BRT.

OWLASOm 1CAKHA3LADS (OTUnA^T U^).

Halve and squeeze the oranges, and strain tlie liquor; boil the peels till tender, cut them into thin slips, and add to the Hquor with sugar, in ilhe pro- portion of two pounds to erery pound of peel; boH till the syrup is quite transparent, set in cold water, and, when stilF enough, put into small pots.

The pulp must be removed from the peeh.

APRICOT CHEESE.

To half a pound of apricot marmalade, add a solid froth of three gills of cream whisked with an egg, and then an ounce and a half of dissolved iafnglass nearly cold; mix the whole well together, oil a mould, put in the mixture, and when it coq- gieals, set in ice till frozen.

The above may be made with ripe fruit, instead of marmalade.

TO PRESERVE BEEF-SUET FOR FRYING, OR PASTE.

BqiI, till dissolved, si^ or eight pounds of picked beef-sue^ let it stand till cold, skim, and preserve in a pan clo3eIy covered, io a dry place. When wante4f pound in 9 mortan

MONTPEJ^IER BUTTER.

Pick, waab, and scald in sak and water, chervH, tarragon, bumet, and chives, a handful of each;

T

»¦

SWEET mnSMBj PRBSBRTES, &C« 288

drfdn and povnd finely in a mortar f add three aadMwieflr boned and lubbed dirougk a hair-sieve, the yolks of two hard-boiled ej^ a spoonfnl of sweet oil rubbed thvoogh a hairHuere, and a spoonful of capers ohofyped ine; miac these ingre- cBento with half a pound of fresh batter, set in ice to cool, and, if not sufficiently green,^ add a little spinach juice.

TO PRESERVE BUTTER.

Mix well together two parts of best common salt, one of saltpetre, and one of sifted sugar; add one ounce of this CQQ^ osition to every pound 6f butter, put into a pan or tub, cover close, set in a cool dry place, and let it remain for three weeks.

TO CLARIFY BUTTER FOR POTTING.

Put fresh butter into a stewpan with a spoonful of cold water, set over a gentle fire till oiled, skim and let it stand' till the sediment is settled; then pour off the oil, and, when it begins to congeal, put it over the different ingredients.

OBSERVATION ON STORIES.

As frequent nientibB is made of syrups, jams, poaadad spices, sifited sugsir, grated nutmegs and orange flower water, to be used in paddings and pies; and as a very small quantity of each is wanted at a time; it is recommended as sonng

28t AAT OV COOKEttr.

b^tbtronble and expense, diat the syrups, &c. be made when the fruits are in season, and preserved in smali bottles with the different stores. Bdt should any of the receipts be thought tbo expensive or rich^ the proportions of the articles mecy be lessened, but the same process must be pursued* The same observation will ap^ly to made dishes, pastry, sauces, &c.

VARIOUS RECEIPTS.

PYRAMID OF PASTE.

. Roll a ^eet of puff paste half an inch thick, cut or stamp it into oval forms, the first to be the size of the bottom of the dish in which it is to be served, the second smaller, and so on till it be- comes a pyramid; then put each piece separately on paper laid in a baking plate, and when the oven is ready, e^ the tops of the pieces and bake of a l^rht colour. When done take them off the paper, lay them on a large dish till quite cold, and when t0 be served set the largest piece in the dish for which it was shaped, cover it widi raspberry, or apricot jams, or currant jelly, put the next sized

VARIOUS B£C£JPTS« S85

piece on (bis with more sweetmeatS} and procecdift the same manner till sH the pieces are plaeed on each other. Lay dried fruits round the pyramid^ aa greengages, barberries, or cherries.

Instead of stamping the pieces it may be better to cut them with a sharp knife^ and then to cut out small pieces round the edges, so as to make them appear like spires: prepared in this manner, the paste appears lighter. A silver-coloured carmel of sugar may be spun over the pyramid, and will add to its effect.

PYRAMID OF PASTE (another way).

Proceed as above directed, but when baked and cold, wash over each piece of paste with white of egg beaten to a solid froth, and strew over chopped almonds and sifted sugar; set in a moderately warm place to dry,, and then pile into a pyramid with dif- ferent sweetmeats on each.

A HERMITAGE OF PASTE.

Make a paste with four ounces of flour, a little sugar and some boiling water; knead well, roll into pieces, and form into three or four arches of different sizes, with some straight pieces for sup* porters; bake on tin plates. Have ready some very small fruit pu£k made with puff paste, baked of a light colour, and some pieces of rock sugar of dtf*

286 AST OB COOKERY.

fi^rent celovs; thmi dip ike ends of the pieces of paste iolo wana earmel sugar^ set tliem upright in a dish in any ft»rm you choose for the hermitage^ and fill the cavities with the puffs and pieces of rode sugtur which are to be joined with the ewoael. Put a litde clean moss upon the rock sugar which covers the top^ as it will have a good effect. When the heroutage is complete,, ^in a earmel ov«r the whole^ and set ia a dry place.



ALMOND PASTE FOR ORNAMENTING*

Scald, and pound finely a pound of Jordan almonds with a little water to prevent their oiling; add three quarters of a pound of sifted sugar, set OB a slow fire^ and stir with a woodm spoon till the aiixture s^pears white and dry; tilien pou&d again with a little OumTragaoanth stoained through linen; add stay perfume preferred^ and pireserve in a pot covered with a damp clotL

If formed in a mould, roll the paste very thin for shapes, and oil the mould.

TO PREPARE SUGAR FOR A CARMEL, OR BASKET.

First deffree.-^T0 every pound of sifted sugar add half a pint of water, with the qvarter of an egg beaten i^ with it; boil three times^ skim^ and strain through a eloth strainer. Boil agsdn^ and when dipping your forefinger into tl^e syrup, it

VAAIOUS REGEIPTS. 287

dmw8 (»iit between the finger and thttmb into a thread, wUch breaks before extended to imy di»^ tance: this constitutes the first boUing, and is termed the thread*

Setcnd degree.-^-^^oW again, when tiie diread will stretch without breaking: this is termed a J9^ar/.

Third degree.'^Tio% take up some of the syrup in a small skimmer, shake it into the holes, and blow through them; if sparks or bubbles appear, this is termed a blow.

Fourth degree. - Boil, repeat as for the third degree, and if the bubbles are lai^er, and ittore adherent, they become feathers.

Itfih degree. - Dip your finger into cold water^ llien into the sytup, and again into the wateii^: the sugar will roll into large or small boBi.

Sixth degree. - Repeat the last process; if the sugar on rolling, breaks with a slight noise, this is called a crack.

Seventh or last £fcyf«f .- Wheti Ht a eraek^ add five or sht drops of lemon juice, to prevent the BtigtO' from graining; boil, and then set the pan in cM water. This is the carmeL

TO CLARIFY SUGAR, OR CARMEL.

Put two quarts of water with fo ur poiuads of loaf sugar into a preserving pan, set over a fire, and add, when warm, the whites of three eggs beat up

288 ART OF COOKERY.

with half a pint of water; when the syrup boils skim it clean, and simmer till perfectly clear.

To clarify sugar for carmel requires but a small quantity of water; and the different degrees of strength will be learnt by practice. It is generally thrown over a mould, rubbed with sweet oil; and strewed over cakes, with a fork dipped in it

FLOWERS IN SUGAR.

Clarify sugar to a carmel height (which may be known by dipping in a fork, when the sugar should draw out as fine as thread) and put in the flowers. Have ready teacups with the insides rubbed with sweet oil: put into each cup four table spoonsful of the sugar and flowers, and when cold turn them out of the cups, and serve piled on each other.

TO MAKE WAX BASKETS.

Take one pound of white wax, half a ppund of spermaceti, an ounce of flake white, and half an ounce of hog's lard: mix together over a fire, oil the basket mould with a clean cloth, let the wax be of a moderate heat, and run it entirely round the inside; when cool take it out of the mould and garnish with flowers of fat or coloured gum paste, or paint landscapes, &c.

YAHIOUS RECEIPTS. 289

TO CLARIFY ISINGLASS.

To a quarter of a pound of melted isinglass add the tenth part of the white of an egg beaten up with a pint of water; boil over a moderate fire, skim it clean, and run through a silk sieve.

ICEING FOR TARTS.

Wash the top of the tart with a small quantity of yolk of egg and oiled butter mixed together, and sift sugar over, just before setting in the oven.

ICEING FOR A CAKE.

Whisk the whites of four eggs to a solid froth, with as much treble refined sifted sugar as it will take up; then add the juice of a lemon, and. a grain of ambergris; mix all well together with a spoon, and spread it over the cake when warm.

TO MAKE RED COLOURING FOR PIPPIN PASTE, &C. OR FOR GARNISHING TWELFTH CAKES.

Boil for twenty minutes an ounce of cochineal beaten very fine, three gills of water, a quarter of an ounce of roche-alum, and two ounces of lump sugar; strain through a fine sieve, and preserve for use closely covered.

GUM PASTE FOR ORNAMENTING CAKES, &C.

Dissolve Gum Dragon with water, strain and

290 ART OP COOKERY.

pound it for half an hour in a mortar with a little sifted sugar; add some hair powder, and pound it again a quarter of an hour. It may be made of any colour by adding cochineal, gamboge, &c., and formed in moulds of any shape.

TO CHOOSE COCHINEAL.

It shoijdd be large, clean, heavy, dry, and of a silvery shining white, but, when broken, of a dark red.

TO PREPARE COCHINEAL.

Boil a pint of soft ley of wood ashes, strained through a flannel bag, with an ounce of pounded cochineal, and add a quarter of a pound of pounded alum, and a quarter of an ounce of powdered cream of tartar: boil till of a good dark colour, add a little sifted sugar, and preserve in a closely corked bottle.

COLOURS FOR GARNISHING.

Red. - Mix the liquor of prepared cochineal with a little alum and water, strain through a tamis- cloth, and add to some gum paste. Cut into any shapes chosen.

Yellow. - Rub through a tamis-cloth the yolks of four hard eggs with some water, and a little saffron; add to gum paste.

VARIOUS RECEIPTS. 291

Green. - Pound spinach, boiled in salt and water till three parts done, strain the liquor to gum paste, and mix well together.

A PERFUME FOR GENERAL PURPOSES.

Beat well together in a mortar ambergris, white sugar-candy, musk, and civet, six grains each, and then bottle the powder with four ounces of the best rectified spirits of wine: set in a warm place for a week, strain clear, and put by closely corked in a dry place.

Five or six drops will be sufficient for a middling sized cake, or for a quart of cream.

YORKSHIR*^ CAKES FOR BREAKFAST.

Set a sponge with a little good yeast, and, when well risen, half a pound of sifted fiour with a little salt, a tea-spoonful of sifted sugar, a bit of fresh butter, and some milk; mould well with the hands, form into middling sized cakes, and set them in a warm place. Bake, and when done, serve them buttered; or they may be toasted, and then buttered.

POTATOE BALLS.

Mash potatoes, previously boiled, with a wooden spoon, adding salt, fresh butter, milk, the yolk of an eggy and half an ounce of flour; mix well to-

o2

292 ART OV COOKERY.

gether, then roll into pieces, and each piece into round balls of any size chosen; dip them into white of eggs, roll in fine bread crumbs, and fry in boiling lard till brown, then dry before the fire on a hair sieve.

Serve with roast mutton, mutton chops, or rump steaks.

BILL OP FARE

FOR THE SEVERAL MONTHS.

JANUARY.

nRST COURSE. Gravy Soup. A small Ham. Tendrons of Veal.

Slices of Crimped Cod.

-n . ^ 1 1 Rmnp of Beef

Potatoes whole, ^ B.^^^li

and mashed. with Haricot.

Broiled Whitings.

PuUet with Oyster Sauce. Raised Lamb Pies.

Mock Turtle.

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Woodcocks. Scollop Shells. Stewed Mushrooms.

Apple Fritters.

Trifle. Shellfish in an Ornamented Basin. JeUy.

Fried Pufi with Sweetmeats.

Stewed Cardoons. Omelet with Cullis.

Roasted Partridges. 03

294 BILL OF FARE.

FEBRUARY. FIRST COURSE.

Cress Soup.

Fricandeau of Veal i ^4.:*„ iia4./«

with Sorrel Sauce. ^^^'^ ^^'

Tongue, with Roasted Fillet of Mutton BoDed

mashed Turnips. with Celery Sauce. Chickens.

Pork Cutlets, with stewed Beef Palates. red Cabbage

Rice Soup.

(Removc^-Crimped Skate, or Water Souchy.J

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Capon.

Golden Pippins Lobster Salad,

with Cream.

Forced Asparagus. Roasted Sweetbread, ^^^^gg^^"^^

Sliced Brawn. Riband Blancmange.

Roasted Teal.

BILL OF FARE. 295

MARCH.

FIRST COURSE. Soup and Bouilli.

Soles, fried and boiled.

Crimped Cod's Head.

Soup k la Reine.

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Fillet of Pork. Haricot of Vegetables. Mashed Potatoes

Raised Pie.

Mashed Turnips. Veal Olives.

Leg of Lamb, and Spinach.

THIRD COURSE.

Roasted Turkey.

Marbled Jelly. Tourte.

Brocoli k la sauce. Picked Crab. Sausages.

Pyramid of Paste. Pippins with Rice.

Roasted Pigeons. o4

296 BILL OF FARE*

APRIL.

HRST COURSE.

Mock Turtle.

1, ., J m o ^ Chickens, with Sweet-

Boded Tongue. &c. ^,^ ^^^^^

Q I ^ Beef Forced and Roasted, n;

»alaa. ^^^ ^^^^ g^,^ mce.

Currie. Lamb Cutlets.

Vermicelli Soup. ifianoce. - Crimped Salmon and Fried SfneUs, or Stewed Tench.)

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Leveret. Apricot Tart, with Carmel. Dutch Blancmange.

Stewed Celery. Prawns. Broiled Mushrooms.

Almond Cake. Apple Tart.

Roasted Ducklings.

BILL OF FARE. 297

MAY.

FIRST COURSE. Giblet Soup.

Broiled Mullets.

Turbot.

Soup k la Julienne.

SECOND COURSE. Roast Haunch of Mutton.

Potatoes {different ways). Compote of Pigeons.

Chickens.

Stewed Beef Tails. Fried Vegetable Pn£b.

Ham Glazed.

THIRD COURSE. Green Goose, Roasted.

Jelly with Strawberries. Gooseberry Tart.

Asparagus. Ornament with Flowers. Artichoke Bottoms.

Pine-apple Tartlets. White Blancmange.

Roasted Turkey Poults, o 5

298 BILL Ot FARE.

JUNE.

FIRST COURSE.

Green Peas' Soup

Chicken Tourte. Mutton Cutlets.

Cauliflowers. Roast Beef. New Potatoes.

Tendrons of Veal, with Peas. Minced Lamb's Head.

Crimped Trout.

SECOND COURSE. Roast Ducklings. SheU Fish. Cherry Tart.

French Beans k la Creme.

Roast Sweetbread. Jelly and Blancmange. ilmb^ ^c^^ed

Green Peas.

Codling Tart, with Cream. Plovers' Eggs.

Roasted Pigeons.

BILL OF FAftE. 299

JULY.

FIRST COUBSE.

Turtle. Rabbits with Onions. ^GhickeQS.

Garden Beans. Callabash. Cauliflower.

Q^oii TT«^ ru„^A ^^^^ ®^ Lamb, with

Small Ham Glazed. Cucumbers.

Turtle.

rRemovefor Thtrtle. - 7\do small dishes of Fish J

SECOND COURSE. Roast Haunch of Venison.

Gooseberry Cream, in Cups.

Apricot Tart.

French Beans. Picked Crab.

Artichoke Bottoms.

Raspberry Tourte.

Mirangles.

Roasted Pullet.

06

300 BILL OV FARE.

AUGUST.

FIRST COURSE.

Soles {each way).

Breast of Lamb, with i .,n««. 's,x. r\ a.

Celerf SauM. PuUet with Oysten

Potatoes. Onion Soup. Stewed Spanish

Onions.

Fillet of Beef, Larded u • j tt ™

and Ghoed. ^^ Ham Pie.

Salmon and Fried FiUets of Haddock.

(Rmove'for Soup-SmaU Chine of Mutton, Roasted),

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Wheatears.

Orange Puffs. Jelly with Peaches.

Scollop Shells. Frame. Stewed Mushrooms,

(white).

Almond Custards. Pulpton of Apples.

Roasted Leveret.

BILL OF FARE. 901

SEPTEMBER.

FIRST COURSE.

A Pike, Baked.

Fricassee of Chickens. Fillet of Mutton, and

Stewed Endive.

Fried Celery. Turnip Soup. French Salad.

Roast Fillet of Pork. Veal Cutlets,

Larded.

Crimp Cod, and Fried Smelts.

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Partridges. Ragout of Sweetbreads. Macaroni.

Muffin Pudding, with Chantilly Basket. Damson Tart, dried Cherries.

Eggs h la Tripe. Lamb's Fry.

Roasted Larks.

302 BILL OF FARE.

OCTOBER.

FIRST COURSE.

John Dory.

Pigeons k la Crapaudine. Fowl, with Truffle Sauce.

Cauliflower. Partridge Soup. Stewed Spinach.

Chicken Puffs. Rump of Beef, with

Spanish Onions.

Trout.

SECOND COURSE. Roast Wild Duck. Raspberry Tourte. Jellies.

Fried Sweetbreads. ^^^ RSted. ^°'^' ^^^^^^ ^"®1^*«'

Frosted Apples. Marrow Pudding.

Roasted Pheasant.

BILL OF FARE. 308

NOVEMBER.

FIRST COURSE.

Water Souchy.

Pickled Tongue, Raised Pie, with

Forced. Macaroni.

Ragout of Vegetables. Soup and Bouilli. FrenchBeans.

Chickens with Pork Cutlets, with

Bechamel. Fried Potatoes.

Slices of Cod Fried, with Oyster Sauce. (Remove for Soup - Loin of Veal h la Crhne,)

SECOND COURSE.

Roasted Woodcocks. Fritters. Coffee Cream.

Jerusalem Artichokes. ^°^ ^'f' Stewed Water-

Moaellea. cresses.

Preserved Apricot Golden Pippins,

Tart. with JeUy.

Roasted Partridges.

304

BILL OF FARE.

DECEMBER.

FIRST COURSE.

Turbot.

Leg of Lamb, with. Spinach.

Wings and Legs of Fowls, Glazed.

Pigeon Tourte. Hodge Podge Pickled Beet Roots.

Pheasant auz Choux.

Small Chine of Mutton, Roasted.

Crimp Cod's Head.

SECOND COURSE.

Roast Turkey.

Apple Tart, with Perfumed Cream.

Pancakes.

Potted Char.

Stewed Cardoons, (broumj.

Jellies.

Lambs' Tails, with B^chameL

Prawns.

Minced Pies.

Potatoe Pudding.

Roasted Snipes.

305

INDEX. [Omitted]

THE END.








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