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The Art of Cookery, 1747

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TITLE: The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy, which far exceeds any thing of the kind ever yet published
AUTHOR: Hannah Glasse
PUBLISHER: Self-Published
DATE: 1747
THIS VERSION: Based on the one online at archive.org, digitized by Google from a book in the collection of Harvard University. This is an Optical Character Recognition scan, it has been partly edited, but still contains very significant errors.

You can assist in proofreading it At Wikisource

This hugely popular cookbook went through 26 editions in its day. Mrs Glasse, though, found herself in debtor's prison when her dressmaking business went bankrupt and she had to sell the copyright to her cookery book. It is famous for the line "Hare Soup. First catch your hare...", though these words do not occur in this, or possibly any, edition.



The ART OF COOKERY,
MADE
PLAIN and EASY;
Which far exceeds any Thing of the Kind yet published.
CONTAINING,
TO WHICH ARE ADDED,
One Hundred and Fifty new and ufeful Receipts, And alfo Fifty Receipts for dilFercnt Articles of Perfumery,
WITH A COPIOUS INDEX.
By Mrs. GLASSE.

A NEW EDITION,
With all the Modern Improvements:
Aad alfo the Order of a Bill of Fare, for each Month, in the Manner the Diihes are to be placed upon the Table, in the prefent Talle.
LONDON-.
Printed for W. Strahan, J. Rivington and Sons, L. Da?wt, W. 6wen, T. Longman, B. Law, T. Payne, 6. Vhite, J. Robfon, J. Johnfon, G. Robinfon, T. CaWl, T. and W. Lowndes, T. Wilkie, E. Newberry, W. Nicoll, H. Gardiner, W, and C. Domville, R.Baldwin, J. Bew, William GoUfmitb, J. Sewell, T. Evans, J. Knox, W. Fox, and D Ogilvy.
MDCCLXXXIV.

Price Five Shillings baond.

TO THE
R E A D E R.



T Believe I have attempted a branch of Cookery which

nobody has yet thought worth their while to write upon:

bui as I have both feen and found by experience that

the generality of fervants are greatly wanting in thai pointy

therefore I have taken upon me to inJiruSf them in the befi

manner T am capable and I dare fay y that every ferv ant

who can but ready will be capable . of making a tolerable

good cooky and tbofe who have the leajl notion of Cookery

cannot mifs of being very good ones,

' If I have not wrote in the high pclite flyle I hope I

fhall be forgiven for my intention is to inJiruSl the lower

fort, and theirefore muft treat them in their own way.

For example - when I bid them lard a fowU if I fhould

bid them lard with large lardoons they would, not know

what I meant; but when I fay they muft lard with little •

pieces of bacon they know what I mean. So in many

other things in Cookery the great cooks have fuch a high

way of exprejfing tbemfehesy that the poor girls are at

a lofs to know what they mean: and in ail Receipt

Books yet printed there are fuch an odd jumble of things

as would quite fpoil a good dilh; and indeed fome things

fo extravagant y that it would be almoji a fhame to make ufe

of them when a difti can be made full as goody or bet

tery without them. For example: when you entertain ten

or twelve peoplcy you fhall ufe for a cullisj a leg of veal

and a ham whicby uith the other ingredientSy makes it

very expenjivCy and all this only to mix with other fauce.

And againy the effence of ham for fauce to one di(h; when

will prove ity for about' three fhitlings I wilt make as

A 2 rich



ii To tte RE DER.

rich and high a fauce as all that will be when done. Far example:

Take a large deep ftew-pan, .half a pound of ham, fat and lean together, cut the fat and lay it over tke bottom of the pan 5 then take a pound of veal, cut it into thin flices, beat it well with the back of a knife, Uy it all over the ham i then have fix-pennyworth of the coarfe lean part of the beef cut thin, and well beat, lay a layer of H all over, with fome carrot, then the lean of the ham cut thin and laid over that 1 then ctit two onions and ftrew over, a bundle of fwect herbs, four or five blades of mace, fix or feven cloves, a fpoonful of all-fpice or Jamaica pepper, half a nutmeg beat, a pigeon beat all to pieces, lay that all over, half an ounce of truffles and morek, then the reft of your beef, a good cruft of bread toaftcd very brown and,dry on both fides: you may ' add an old cock bet to pieces cover it clofc, and •let it ftand over a flow fire two or three minutes, then pour on boiling water enough to fill the pan, cover ic 4:lofe, and let it ftew till it is as rich as you would have ft, and then, ftrain off all that fauce. Put all your ingredients: together again, fill the pan with 'boil " ing water, put4n a frefti onion, a blade of mace, and a piece of carrot i cover it clofe,.and let it ftew till it is as Arong as you want it. This will be full as good as the cflfcnce of ham for all forts of fowls, or indeed modi made di(he, mixed with a glafs of wine, and two or three fpoonfuls of catchup, "Vhen your firft gravy is cool, fkim off all the fat, and keep it for ufe.-- r This falls far Jhort of the expnce of a leg of veal and ham snd anfwers every purpofe you want.

If you go to market y the ingredients will pot ami U above half a crown % or for about eighteen pence you may make as much good gravy as willferve twenty people

Take twelve-penny-worth of coarfe lean beef, which will be fix or fevenpound$ cyt it all to pieces, flour

• It

'



TV fbff READER. iii

k well; take si quarter of a pound of good butter, pu

it into a little pot or large dtep (lew-pan and put in

your beef 1 keep ftirring itj and whtn it begins to

look a little brown, pour iti a pint of boiling water;,

ft'ir it all together, put in a large onion, a bundle of

(Weet herbs, two or three blades of mace, five or fix

cloves, a fpoonful of all-fpicc, a cruft of bread toaft-

ed, and a piece of carrot 5 then pour in four or five

quarts of water ftir all together, cover cloie, and let

k ftew till it i as rich as you would have it; when

enough, (train it off, mix it vich two or three fpoon

fuU of catchup and half a pint of white wine s then

put ail the ingredients together again, and put in two

quarts of boiling water, cover it clofe, and let it boil

till there is about a pint; llrain it off well, add it ta

the firfl;, and give it a boil together. This will make

a grea£ deal of rich good gravy.

Totf may leave otH the wine aecerdmg to what ttfe you want it for; fa that really one might have a genteel enter tainment for the price the fame of one difh comes to: but if gentlemen will have Frcach cooks they muft fay for French tricks.

A Frenchman in his own coumtry will drefs a fine din net of twenty dijhes and all genteel and pretty for the ex pence he will put an Englifh lord to for drejpng one dijb But then there is the little petty profit. I have heard of a cook that ufed fix pounds of butter to fry twelve eggs; when every body knows (that underfiands cooking) that half a pound is full enough or more than need be ufed: but then it would not be French. So much is the blind folly of this age that they would rather be impofed on by French booby't than give encouragement to a good Englilh cook I

I doubt I fball not gain the efteem of thofe gentlemen;

however let that be as it will it little concerns me but

fhould I be fo happy as to gain the' good opinion of my own

fex I defire no more; that will be a full recompence for all

mj' Irdiible; and I only eg the favour of every lady to read

A3' my



IV



ro the READER.



my Book throughout before they tenfure me, and then I flatter myfelf IJhall have their approbation - I Jhall not take upon me to meddle in the phyjicalway farther than two receipts, which i)ill be of ufe to the public in general, one is for the bite of a mad dog-, and the other, if a manfhculd be near where the plague is, he fhaU ' be in no danger which if made ufe of would be found of ' very great fervice to thofe who go abroad.

Nor fhall I take upon me to direct a lady in the ceconotny of her family; for every miftrefs does, or at leafi ought to know, what is mofi proper to be done there; therefbre I Jhall not fill my Book with a deal of nonfenfe of that kind, which I am very well ajjured none will have regard to

J have indeed given fome of my difhes French names to dijiingutfh them, becaufe they are known by thofe names: and zvhere there is great variety of dijh, and a large table to ccver, fo there muji be variety of names for them and it matters not whether they be called by a French, Dutch, or Englifli name, fo they are good, and done with as little expece as the dijh will allow of.

IJhall fay no more, only hope my Book will anjwer the ends I intend it for -, which is to improve thefervants, and ' fave the ladies a great decl of trouble.



THE



THE



r .



editor's preface.



CJH E Art of Cookery y like all other arts isfidyeSto " the variations of fajhion and the improvements of tafie. - Therefore y notwiihjlanding the juft claim of Mrs. Glafle's Book on that fubjeS to the approbation of the Public yet it was apprehended that a careful revifyl might render this new edition of her workftill more acceptable and more ufeful; how far the Editor has fucceeded the Public will determine: but to enable them to judge of his perform ancty it will be necejfary to give a jfketch of the improve ments and alterations.

c

On a careful perufdl of the laft Edition the Editor noted the deficiencies in many receipts s which he hath fupplied hy adding what was wanting and reSlifying what ap feared to be wrong in the cbmpojttionsy either as to quantity cr quality.

In the Chapter on Roafting and Boiling, be hatb made fever al neceffary alterations in point of time, in per-forming thofe operations of the Culinary Art; and given bis direSions in as plain clear y . and comprehenfive a man Tier as poffible that the Lear Her may not be ai a lofs bow to proceed.

He hath alfo made many alterations and improvements in the Chapter on Made Difties.

In that on Soups and Broths, finding room for cor re£lion be bath made fuch amendments and alterations as were requifitCy and introduced feveral new ones.

The





Vi ne EDITOR'S PREFACE.

Tbe Chapters on Pics, and for Lent, have alfi received the necejfary additions and correSiions.

As to the Direftions for the Sick, the Editor hath mt presumed tc make any, alteration the Aulhor af fears U he tie tefi judge of the direS&ons Jhe kys doiM in this department of her book. - He hath, however, expunged ter dire£iions for Drcfling Turtle (both real and mock); and infirtvd dire3ions adapted to the mePhed ie bath $emJiMtfy and fucesfsfuUf paSifed for many years and wiiby be is perfeSly convmedy will anfwer the expe Sim of tit Reader,

In the courfe of the correSions alterations and addi-tions made in the work the Editor hath endeavoured ta be( as eoncijir hue as intelligible as poffible: be hath not laid dow$t a rules, or inferted any receipts, which are noi warranted by experience in a courfe of practice for ma years; and hopes he hasfnijbed his undertaking as a good a)okc which will fufficiently apolagife for every defe& of imiguage as m good writer - "the firfi has always been 'his teFofeSkn ta the latter he makes na tret'sions.



CON-



CONTENTS.



CHAP. I.

Of Roafiittg Briling ic



BEEF, ige c

Muttoo aod iBmhf ib.

Veal, fb.

Pork, . 3

To roaft a pig, 3, 4

DifiereoC forts of faace for a pig,

4 To road the hind quarter of a fig,

lamb faftiioiiy ib

To bake a pig, lb.

To melt butter, g

To roaft geefe, tarkies, &c. ibl

Sauce for a gooTe, ib.

Sauce for a tarkjr, ib

Siuce for fowls, ib.

Sauce for ducks, ib

Sauce for phealants and par-

cridgeSf 6

Sauce for larks, lb.

To roaft woodcodcs and foipes, ib

To roaft a pigeon, ib.

To broil a pigeon, ib.

DiredioQs for geefe and ducks, 7

To roaft a bare, ib

Diferent ibrta of lauce fox a hare,

ib.

To broil fteaks, ib.

Diredions concerning the iauce

for fteaks, 8

' General dircdions concerning

broiling, ib.

General diredions concerning boi) ing, ib.

To boil a haoi, ib.

To boil a tongae,

To boil fowls and hoofe-tambj ib.

Sauce for a boiled uiikey, ib

Sauce for a boiled gooie, ib.

Sauce for boiled ducki or rabbits, ib.



To roaft vonifeii, pgc t9

To drefs a hauodi of fliatton, lb. Different foru ef faiicc for veni foQ, ib.

To roaft matton veniibn fafiiion

ihb

To keep Tenifon or bare fweet

or to make them fre(h when

they ftink, i 1

To roaft a tootgue or udder, jb.

To roaft rabbits, ib

To roaft a rabbir hare fafliiooy ib.

Tuikies, pheafant?, &c. 0M
r be

iarded, ij

To loaft a fowl pheaiaot fafrioii,

ib. Rnles to be obftrvied in rodtiog.

Beef, '

Mutton, Jl,

Pork, ib.

Diredions concerning bee& amt-

ton, and pprk Veal,

Houfe Jamb, A pig. Abate, A turkey, A goofe. Fowls,

Tame ducks.

Wild docks,

Tjeal, wigeoa, &c.

Woodcocks, fnjpef, kbA tridges.

Pigeons and Luks,

DiredlioQS concersijosg loijltry.

To keep nc hat, ib!

To drefs greens, roots, &c. 1 5!

To



ib. ib. ib. ib.

ib.

"4

ib.

sb. ib. ib,

Jca" ib.



CONTENTS.



To drefs fpioach. To irpfs cabbagesj Src To drefi carrot;. To drefs turnips. To drefs parfnips. To drefs brcccoli. To dreA potatoes. To drefs caulifiower . Another way, To dreA French beans. To drefs grtichokes Todreiafparagas,



page ij Diredions concerning garden

ib things, page iS

ib To drefs beans and bacon, ib

1 6 To make gravy for a turkey, or ib any fort of fowl, ib ib To make mutton, beef, or veal ib, gravy, 19

1 7 Brown colouring for made di(bes,ib. lb. To make gravy, ib lb. To bake a leg of beef, ib, ib To bake an ox's bead, 20 ib To boil pickled pork, ib



CHAP. U.



TO drefs Scotch collops. To drefs white Scotch

lops,'&c. To drefs a fillet of veal with

lops, To make force-meat balls. Truffles and morels, 'good

fauces and foupF, Toftew ox palatcf. To ragoo a leg of mutton. To make a brown fricafee. To make a white fricafee. To friiafce rabbits, lamb.

Teal, A fecond way to make a w

fricafee A. third way of making a w

fricafee, To fricafee rabbits. Iamb, fw

breads, or tripe, Another way to fricafee tr'pe, To ragoo hog's feet and ears, To fry tripe. Tripe a la Kilkenny, A fricafee of pigeons, A fricafee of lambs ftoncs

fweetbreads. To halh a calf's head. To hafii a calf's head white, To bake a calf's head, To bake a (heep's head, ..



Made Dijhis.

20 To drefs a lamb's head, zy col- To ragoo a neck of veal, 28

2 1 To ragoo a bread of veal, ib. col- Another way to ragoo a breaft

ib. of veal, 29

ib. A bread of veal in hodge-podge,

in jb

ib. To collar a bread of veal, 30

22 Tc collar a bread of mutton, ib, ib. Another good way to drefs a bread ib. of mutton, ib, ib. To force a leg of lamb, 3 1 or To boil a leg of lamb, ib.

23 To force a large fowl, ib, hiie To coad a turkey the genteel

ib, way, 32

bite To ftcw a turkey or fowl, ib.

24 To dew a knuckle of veal, ib. eet- Another way to dew a knuckle of

ib. veal, ib.

24 To ragoo a piece of beef, 33 lb. Beeftremblonque, . ib ib. To force the infide of a firloin of

25 beef, 34 ib. Another way to force a (irloin,ib,

and Sirloin of beef en epigram, ib.

ib. To force the infide of a rump of

26 beef, 35 ib. A rolled rump of beef, ib

27 To boil a rump of beef the French b. faihion, ib

2 Bc9f



CONTENTS.



f



kefefcarioty page 36

leefaladaob, . ib.

To mikc beef af amode, 3 7

kfaiamode in pieces, ib.

kf olives, ib.

Teal olives, 38

JcefcolJop?, ib.

Toftewbeaf fteaks, . 39

Tofrybeeffteaks, ib.

jlfecond way to fry beef fteaks, ib. A pretty fide difli of beef, ib. To drefs a fillet of beef, 40

Mfteaks rolled, ib.

To Hew a ramp of beef, ib.

Another way to dew a ramp of

W, 41

rtogal beef, ib.

To flew a ramp of bf, or the

briiket, the French way, ib. To ftew beef gobbets, 42

tefioyal, ib.

A tOQgoe and odder forced, 43 Toimfeeneats tongues brownc ib. ToforceatODgae, ib.

'I'o kw neats tongaes whole, ib. To ragoo ox palates, 44

To frjcafee ox palates, ib.

To roaft ox palates, ' ib.

To drefs a leg of mutton a la

n''H' 45

A le
of mutton a la haut got, ibw

Toroafi a leg of mutton with oyftra, ib.

roaft a leg of mutton with

ockles, 46

Alkoulder of mutton en epigram,

Anarrico of mutton, ib.

To French a hind fiiddle of mut.ton. ib.

Another French way, called St.

Meoeboat, 47

V'Btleu i la Maintenon, a very

gooddiih, ib.

JO make a mutton hafli, 48

io drcfs a pigc8 petty toes, . ib. Wnd way to oafl a kg of . WWcn lyith oyffers, ib.



To drefs a leg of mutton to eat

like venifon, page 49

To drefs mutton the Turkilh way,

ib. A flioulder of mutton wittfa ra-

00 of turnips, ib.

To ftuff a leg or fhoulder of matc

ton, 50

Oxford John, 51

Mutton rump la braile, ib.

Sheep ramps with rice, ib.

To bake lamb and rice, cs

A forced leg of lamb, ib.

• To fry a loin of lamb, 53

Another way of fi'ying a neck oc

loin of lamb, ib.

To make a ragoo of lamb, ib. Lamb cutlets frtcafeed, 54

Lamb chops larded, ifaw

Lamb chops en cafrole, ib

To ftew a lamb's or calf s head, 5 $ To drefs veal a la bourgeois, ib A difguifed leg of veal and bacon

Loin of veal en epigram, ib. A pillaw of veal, ib.

Bombarded veal, cj

Veal rolls, fbl

Olives of veal the French way, ib. Scotch colbps a la Fran9oi8, 58 To make a favoury difh of veal, ifau Italian collops, ib.

To do them white, 59

Veal blanquets,' • ib.

A ihoulder of veal a la Pied• montpile, ib.

A calf s head furprize, 60

Sweetbreads of veal a la Dau-

phine, ib.

Another way to dreis fweetbreads,

61 Sweetbreads en gordoneere, ib. CalPs chitterlings, or andouilles, 6z To drefs calf's chitterlings curi-

oufly, ib.'

To drefs ham a la braife, ib.

To roaft a bam or gammon, 63 Tofiuffachineofporic, 64

Variouf



c: O K T £ N T S.



fige 6i Afigm9d1y 65

Collared pig cb.

TodfcTsapiglkeFrenQiiweft 46 To drefs a pig an
cere DniUet, ib. A pig madco 67

To drefs a p'g-like a fat lamb,

ib. Barbecued pig ib.

To make a fcrtty difli f a breail

ofveniibft 6B

To boil a hatmch or neckof vejEki-

Ibn, ibt

To boil fi leg of flmtlOD like iFf. nifoD, 66

To dr poultry, 69

To roaft a iskty, ib.

A white fauce for ft)w1 or chjck

ens, 70

To Aiftke mock oyfteriMice, el-

thier:£mr tJiHMS or iswk boHed,



To makemaihroom fadce for white fowls of 411 £ir(9 ib.

If ufliroom fauce for whttt fos .boiled, ib.

To make celery fauce, iftber i0r rotted or hM (Mn turkies, parcridgeSfOr any other ganeib.

To mokie brown ochry ianoe.

To ftew a turkey or fowl in celery

i fauce, ib

To make egg face, proper fer

roafted chickens, ib.

fibalot fauce for foafted fowls, ib jCarrior iftuce, yt

jBbalot fauce for a fcrag f cnut

ion boiled, ib.

To drefs livers with muihroom

fauce, ib.

A
cretty little fauce, ib.

To make kmon iancc kr toyed

fowls, ib.

A German iy of dfloffiic bwh,

ib.

I



To diofs a turkey or fowl M'pir

fedtioD, Pgc T3

To ftew a •turkey brown, itc.

To ftew turkey brown tbe oico

way, t
c.

A fowl i la braiie, y

To forcea fowl, j
c.

. lb roaft a fc wiih chcfnets, y P4)llecs a la Sainte Meotboat, ilc Chicken fnrprne, 6

Mutton cbope in dtfgosfe, iic.

Chickens rotfted wi focce-nieat

and cucumbers, 77

Qiickens a la hraife, ib.

To marinate ibwls, 7JB

To broil chickens, ib.

Fulled chickens, ill. .

A pretty way qf Aetring chick

ens, y

Chickens c)iii;iograte, uc.

Chickens boiled with bacon jood

cel'ryt 8

Cbtokens widi tongaes • A good

difh for a greet deal si som-

P?y i

Scotch chicknoa ib.

To ftew cidcena:thc Dutch way,

•• Toftewdnckens 1

Ducks alamode, . ib.

To drefs aivUd dock tbe faeft way,

ib. Another way to drefs a wild dick

z

To boil a duck or rabbit with

onions, ib.

To drefs a duck with green peas.

To drefs a dock witb cncumhens.

To drcfi a dnck a Ul braiA, ik. To boil clucks the Frencb way, 84 To dre(s n goofe. with onieos or cabbage, ib

Diredions it noaftiog a jonfet

lb. A green goofe, B; .

To



CONTEKT8.



To dry goofe, paje Sj

To drefs a goofe In ragoo, ib.

A gooie alamode, 86

To ftew giblets ib.

To make gibiets a la torde, 87

To road pigeons, 88

To boil pigeonsy ib.

To a la daube pigeons ib.

Pigeons au poire, 89

Pigeons ftoved 90

Pigeons furtoot, ib

Pigeons compote 91

A French popton of pigeons, ib.

Pigeons boiled with rice, ib.

Pigeons traDfmogrified, ib.

Pigeqns in fricando, 02

To roaft pigeons with a farce, tb.

To drefs pigeons a la foafTel, ib.

Pigeons in rimlico, 93

To jug pigeons, ib.

To ftew pigeons, 94 To dtefa sl calf's liver in a caul, ib

To roaft a calf's ILvcr, 95

To roaft partridges, ib

To boil partridges, ib. To diefs partridges a la braife, 96

To make partridge panes, ib

To roaft phealants, 97

A frewed pbeafant, ib. To drefs a pheafant a la braife,

98



To bpil a pheafant, page p9

To falmec a fnipe or woodcock, ib. Snipes in a furtoot, or woodcockl.

To boil fnipes, or woodcocks, .99 To drefs ortolans, ' too

To drefs rufB and rctfs, ibi

To djefs larks, ib.

To drefs plovers, ib.

To drefs larks, pear fafliion, lot To drefs a jugged harc ib

Florendine hare ib;

Ta fcare a hare, 102

To flew a hare, ib;

A hare civet, ib

Portuguefe rabbits 103

Kabbic furprise, lb.

To drefs rabbits en caflerole, 104. Matton kebobbed, ib

A neck of mutton, called the

hafly diih, ib.

To make a, currey the Indian

way, 105

To boil rice, ib

To make a pellow the Indian

way, ib

Another way to make a pellow,

106 To make eiTence of ham, ib.

Rules to be obferved in all made

diihes, ib.



CHAP. III.



I

Read this Chapter and you will find how expenjhe a prencb

Cooks Sauce is.



TH E French way of dreiTing partridges, 167

To make eifeuce of ham,. iO)3 A culh's for all forts of ragoos, ib. A cullis for all forts of butcher's meat, ib.



Cullis the Italian way, I09

Cullis of craw-fiih, ib.

A while cullis, 110

Sauce for a brace of partridges, pheafants, or any thing you pleafe, ib



CHAP,



€ N T B N 8L



CAP. IV.-

S% mate a Numhr ffpnH Utile DijhesJUfor a Sufpir or Side Dijb and little Corner Difies for a great Table j and e refi jou have in the Chapter for Lent.

HOGs ears forced, page 1 1 1 To force cockt comte, ib. To preferve cockv-combsy 1 1 z To prelerye or pickle pigs fefet and eari ib.

Pigs feet and ears anotker way ib.



ii6

ib.

ib:

ib.



To pickle ox palaies, ib.

To ftew cucumbers, 113

To ragoo cucumbers il.

A fricafee of kidney-beans, ib. To drefs Windfor beansc 114 To make jambalh, ib

To make a ragoo of onions, ib A ragoo of oyers, ib

A ragoo of afparagus, 1 1 g

A ragoo of liters,' ib.

To ragoo cauliflowers, ib.

Stewed peas and lettuce, 1 1 6 Another way to ftew pea, ib Cod-founds broiled with gravy,

ib..



A forced cabbae pag

Stewed red cabt.'e. Savoys forced ai' .'I'wt, To force cttcumbess, Fried faufages, Collops and eggs. To drefs cold fowl cm pigeoB

ib, To mince veal, ib.

To fry cold veal, iig

To tofs up cold veal white, ibc To ha(h cold mutton, fb.

To hafh mu&tofl Uke venifon

120 To make collops of cold bef, ib. To make a florendine of veal, ib To make a (almagundy, ib.

Another way, ' 121

I'o make little pafties, ib.

Pettit-patties for garnilhing of diihes, ib



CHAP. V.

To drefs Fijh.



LOBSTER fauce. Shrimp fauce, To make oyfier faucec.



122

123

ib.



To make anchovy fauce. To drefs a brace of carp, To drefs carp au bleu.



C H A P. VL

Of Soups and Broths.



TO make flrong broths for foups or gravy, 125

Gravy fbr white iauce ib.

Gravy for turkey, fowl, or ragoo,, ib. Gravy for a fowl, when you have no meat nor gravy ready, 1 26 Vermicelli foup ib. Macaroni ibttp, 12S



I2J

124

ib.



Soup craflu, i v6

To make muttoa or veal gravyc •

To make ftrong fifh gravy, izj To make plum- porridge for

Chriftmas, ib.

To make ftrong broth to keep

for ufe, 12&.

A crawc£ih foup, ib.

Ta



C O N t E N T S;



To ake (bop iantea or gravy ibap, J- page ia8

A green peas foup, 1 19

ther wjQT tb make greeo peat 00 p, lb.

ApeasToup for winter, 130

Another way to ciake it ib

A chfefnat foup lb

Hare foop, 131

Soup a fteine, ib.



To'iiiake;matton brdtb, pagei3t Beefbrotb, ib

To make I Scotch barley broth

ib. To make hodge-podge, 133

Hodge-podge of ibutcoht ib. Partridge foap, ib

To make portable foup,, 1 3f Rules to be obferved in tiiaking foups and broths, 135



A



C H A ic. Vll.

Of Puddings. N bat puddiiig to bake, A hunting pttdding,

_ _ _ _ _ - -



_ 136

To make a calf s foot padding,

ib To make a pith paddiJig ib. To make a marrow pudding, 137 A boiled fuet puddingc ib

A boiled plum pudding, ib.



A Vorkfhire pudding, A ileak pudding, A vermkelli pudding, Suet dumplings. An" Oxford pudding. Rules to be obferved !n making puddings, &c Jb



lb. ib. ib.

n9



To make a very fine fwect lamb or veal pie 140

A favoury veal pie, ib;

To make a favoury lamb or veal ' pic, ib.

To make a calf's foot pie To make an olive pie. To fcafon an egg pie To make a mutton pie, A becf'fteak pie, A ham pie

To make a pigeon pie. To make a giblet pie. To make a duck pie A chicken ple A Che (hi re pork pie, A Devonfhire fquab pip. An ox cheek pie.



CHAP, Yin.

Of Pitt.



A Shropihire pie, 145

Aorkihirc Chrlftmas pie, ib.



141

ibi

ib. 14a ib. ib. ib.

143 ib.

ib.

144

ib.

ib.

H5



V .



A goofc pie, 145

To make a vefiifon piif, 1 46 A calf's head pie, 147

To make a tort, ib.

To make mince pics the beft way,

14!

Tort de moy, I49

To make orange or lemon tart?,

ib. To mak different forts of tarts,

ib. Pafle for tarts, 150

Another paffte for tarts, ib.

Puff palle, ib.

A good crufl for great pies, ib. A ffanding crufl (or great pies', 1 5 i Acold.cruil, jhr.

A dripping cruft, " lb.

A cruil for cuftards, ib.

Pafte for ciacklig cruft, ib.

a 2 ' CHAf.



e o



TEN T S4



CHAP. IX. ' .



For Lent J or a Paft Dinner a you may make ufe of for a



Numhtr of good DiJhiS tvhidk Table at any other Time.



A PEAS foup, Grefen peas foup.



I



page 152

lb.

Another gtetn peas faup, 153

Soup-meagre ib.

To make onion foap, ib.

To make an eel foap . . 14

To make a crawfifti foup, ib.

To make a mufcle foup, 15 c To make a fcate or thornback

(bup, ib.

To make an oy(!er (bap, 156

To make an almond foop, ib.

To make a rice foup, ib

To make a barley foup, 157

To make a turnip foap, ib.

To make an egg foup, ib.

To make peas porridge, 158

To make a white- pot, ib.

To make a rice white-
yotc ib.

To make rice milk, ib.

To make an orange fool, ib

To make a Weftminfler fool, 1 59

To make a goofeberry fool, ib.

To make 'firmity, ib. To make plum porridge or barley

gruel, ib.

Battered wheat, 6b

PI am gruel, ib.

A flour haily pudding, ib.

An oatmeal haRy pudding, ib.

An'excellentlack poflet, ib.

Another fack polTet, 161

A fine hafty pudding, ib.

To make haily fritters, ib.

Fine fritters, 162

Apple fritters, ib.

Curd fritters, ib.

Fritters royal, ib.

Skirret fritters, ib.

White fritters, 163

Syringed fritters, ib.

Yine-leaf fritters ib



Clary fritters, Apple frazes. Almond fraze, Pancakes, Fine pancakes.



page 164 ib. ib.

ib.



A (econd forc'of fine pancakes,

ib. A thifd fort, ib.

A fourth fort
called a quire of

paper, ib.

Rice pancakes, 16&

To make a pupton of apples, ' ib. To make black caps, ib.

To bake apples hole, ib

To (lew pears, 167

To dew pears in a fauce-pan, ib. To flew pears purple, ib.

To flew pippins whole, ib.

A pretty made difh, i63

To make kickfhaws, ib

Pain perdu, or cream toafls, ib. Salnnagundy for a middle difh at

fupper, ib.

To make a tan fey,' 169

Another way, ib.

To make a hedge hdg, ib.

Another way, I70

To make preuy almond puddings.

To make fried toafls, ib.

To flew a brace of carpj ib.

To fry carp, I'jz

To bake carp, ib.

To fry tench, 73

To roafl a cod's head, 1 74

To boil a cod's bead ib.

To flew cod, ib.

To fricafee cod, 175

To bake a cods head, ib To boil flirimp, cod, ialmon,

whiting, or haddocks, 176

Or oyfter faace made thes, ib

To



CONTENTS.



Te ckcrs little fiCi,

To broil mackerel. To broil weavers. To boll a turbotf To bake turbot.



page 77 ib. ib. lb. 178



To drefs a jowl of pickled (almon, ib.

To broil falraon, ib.

Baked falmon, jb.

To broil ma. kerei whole, 1 79 Mackerel a la maitre d'hotelJe,

ib. To broil herrings, 1 80

To fry herriogs, ib

To make water-fokey, ib.

To (lew eels, ib.

To Hew eels with broth, ib.

To drcfs a pike, 1 81

To broil haddocks when they are io high feafon, ib.

To broil cod foaiuis, ib

To fricafee cod founds, 1 8 2

To dreis falmon au court Bouillon, ib. To drefs falmon a la braife, ib. Salmon in cafes, 183 To drefs flat £&, ib. To drefs fak fi(b, ib. To drefs lam prey s,,184 To fry lampreys, ib. To pitchcock eels, ib. Tolryeels, 185 To broil eels, ib. To farce eels with white (auce

ib. To drefs eels with brown fauce,

ib. Toroail a piece of frtfh fturgeon,

186 To roail a fillet or collar, of flur geon, ib.

To boil flurgeoD, 187

To crimp cod the Dateh way, ib. To crimp fcate, ib.

To fricafee fcate dr thornback white, ib.

To fricafee it brown, 188

To fricafee foals white ib.



To fricfliee foals brown, p, 188 To broil foals, 189

Another way to boil foals, ib. fo malfe a collar of fifh in ragoo, to look like a bread of veai col lared, ib.

To butter crab(or lobflers, 190 To butter lobdera another way.

To roafl lobflers, ib.

To make a fine difh of lobflers,

ib. To drefs a crab, ib.

To (lew prawns, fhriops, or crawfifh, 192

To make collopa of oyfters, ib. To flew'mafcles, ib.

Another way to ilew mufclei, 193 A third way to drefs mafdes, ib. To flew fcoUops, ib.

To ragoo oyfters, ib.

To ragoo endive,, ' '9+

To ragoo French beans, ib.

To make g ood blown gray 1 9$ To fricafee ikirrets, ib,

Chardoons fried and battered

Chardoons a la fromage, ib.

To make a Scotch rabbit, 19$ To make a Welch rabbit, ib. To make an Englifh rabbit, ib,. Or do it thus, ib,'

Sorrel with eggs, ib.

A fricafee, with artichoke bottoms, ib. To fry artichokes, 197 A white fricafee of mufhrooms,

ib. To make buttered loaves, ib. Broccoli nd eggs, ib.

Afparagus and eggs, icS

Broccoli in fallad, ib.

To make potatoe cakes, jh,

A pudding, ib.

To make potatoes like a collar cf veal Qt mutton, ib.

To broil potatoes, i

Jp fry potatoes, ib.

, a I Mafb(








CO H T E N T S:



page t99

ib. ib.



MaifliedfOta,oe% Ta grill ihrimps. Buttered (hrimps. To drefs rpjnach Stewed fpiaacb and eggs. 2cm:) To boil fpioach, j;vhen you have no roam on the fre to do i by jtfelf; ib.

Asparagus forced in French rolU,

ib. To maM Cyder loaves, To ftew parfnips, To maih parfoipsy Ko ilcw iQucumbers, To ragoo Frepch beans, ragop of beans, wkU

. ib.

Or thiir way beans ragooed with

a cabbage, ib.

B.eans ragooed with parfnips, zo



Fried celery, page ai f

Celery with cream, 212

Cauliflowers fried iH,

To make an oatmeal puddingy

ib. Tq make a. potatoe podding, ib. To make a fecond potatoe pudding, ib. To make a third fof t of potatoe pudding, 213 To make an orange pudding, ib. To make a fecond fort qf orange padding, ib. To makp a third orange pudding.

'To make a fourth orange pudding, 114 To make a lemon pudding, ib. Another way to make a lemonpdding, ib. Bjsns ragooed wi(h potatoes, ib. ' To bakf an ahnond pudding



201

"ib.

ib.

ib.

202

farce,



ib.'



To ragc50 celery, To ragoo t
Mihcoolbs, A pretty 4iih of egg5. Eggs a la tripe, A fricafe of eggs A ragoo of eggs, To broil eggs, To drefs, egg with bread. To farce eggs, '

ggs with lettuce, To fry eggi as round s
s balls,

ib. "0 ajc an egg aa big as twenty,

ZCJ

To make a gfand difh of eggs,

ib. To mak a pretty di(h of whitea



ib. 20c

lb.

ib.. 206

ib.

ib.



2r5

lb. ib, ib,

216

ib. ib;



To dreis beans in ragoo. An apiulet of. beans, _ To make a bean taiiiey. To make a water tanfey, feas FraD9oire, Green peas wi;h cream, A farce-meagre cabbage Tq farce cucumbers. To ftew cucumbers



204i To boil an almond podding) ib. To tnake fago pudding. To. make a millet pudding, To make a carrot pudding, A fecond carrot pudding, To make a cowflip pudding, To m4ke a quince, apricot or; white pear plum pudding, ib. To make a pead barley pudding


To make a French barley pud difig, ib, '

To make an apple pudding, ib. To make n Jtaliai) pudding, ib

ib.

ib ib.

K 219.



To make a rice pudding, A fecond rice pudding, Zo9 A third rice pudding, ib). To boil a cuft'ard pudding,

209 Tc) make a Hctur pudding, ib. To make a batter pudding, iU 'To make a vbatter pudding with ib. out egg?, il

210 To make a grateful puddifigi ib, ib. To make a bread puddingy ib;

M Tq qiaje a iin brpd pu4ding




C6n155IT8.



Yo make an ordinary bread pudding. page tto

To make a hi:td bread tcudding,

ibi

To make a boifed loaf, 221

To make a chefnut padding, ib.

To make a fine plain baked pudding, ib.

To make a pretty little cheefecord pu'dding, ib.

T6' make an apHcot padding.

222

o make the rpfcVich alitlohd pudding, ib.

"jTraDfparent pudding. ib.

Fudding for little dirties, ' ihi.

O make a fweetmeat pudding,

223

To make a fineplaih pudding, ib.

To make a ratana pudding, ib.

70 lAaka a.bread and butter pudding, 224

To make a boiled rice pudding,

ib,'

To make a cheap rice pudding, ib.

To make a cheap plain lice' j)udc ding, ib.

To'ikilrfce ti cheap bkked rice podding, 225

To make a' fpmach padding, ib.

To make-a ql!:ng pudding, ib.

To make a cream pudding, ib.

To niake a prime pudding, 226

To make a fpoonful ptsdding, ib

To mke an apple padding,. ib

To make yeaft darnplings, ib.

To make Norfolk cianipliogs; 227

To make hard duniplingi, ib

tnOttier vi'ay to make hard dumpJing?, ' 127



TomakeappTe dumplings, p. 227 Another way to make apple dm

plings, J 8

Citron paddingi, ib. To make a cheefe-curd. fioren-

dine, ib A florendinib of oranges or applet,

ib.

To make an artichoke pie, 2 29

To make a fweet egg pie, ib.

To make a potatoe pic, ib

To make an onion pie, ajo To make an orangeado pic ib.

To make a fkirret pie, ib.

To make an apple pie, ib.

Green codling pie, 2 3 1

To make -a cherry pie, ib.

To make a falt-filh pic, 232

To make a caip pie, ib.

To make a foat pie, ib.

To make an eel pie, 233

To make a flounder pie, ib.

Ty make a herring pie, ib

To make a falmon pie, 234

To make a lobfter pie, ib.

To make a mufcle pic, jb.

I'O make Lent mince-pies, ib.

To collar falmon, . 235

To collar eela,, ib.

To picklb or bake herrings, 236 To pickle or bake mackerel to

keep all th year, ib

To foufe mackerel, ib.

To pdf a lobiler, ib.

To pot eels, 237

To pot lampreys, ib.

To pot chars, 238

To pot a pike, ib

To pot (almon, ib

Another way to pot falmon, ib.



CHAP. X.

DireSlims for tbe Sici.



T



O make mnttdn broth, 239 To boil 4 fcrag of veal,

ib.



To make bef or mutton broth for

very weak people, who take but

little nouriihmenr, 239

a 4 To



CONTENTS.



To make beef drink, vviicb is ordered for weak people p. 24P

To make beef tea ib.

To make pork broth, ib.

To boj a chicken ib.

To boil pigeons, 24 1

To boil a partridge, or any other wld fowl, ib.

To boil a plaice or flounder, ib.

To minpe veal, or chicken for the fick or weak people, 242

To pull a chicken for. the iick,

ib.

To make chicken broth, ib.

To make chicken water, ib.

To make white caudle, 243

To make brown caudle, ib.

To make water gruel, ib.

To make panada, ib.

To boil fago, ib.

To boil falop, 244

To make jfinglafs jelly, ib.



To make peroral drink, page 244

To make buttered'watef, Or what

the Qermans call egg (bup, and

arc very fond of it for fupper

You have it in the chapter for

Lent, ib.

To make feed water, ib

To mak bread foup for the fick,

2145

To make artificial aifes milk, ib.

Cows milk next to afles milk, done

thus, ib

To make a good drink, Jb,

To make barley water, ib.

To malce fage tea, ib

To make it for a child, 246

Liquor for a child that has the

thrufh, ib.

To boil comfrey roots, ib

To make the knuckle broth, ib.

A medicine for a djforder in the

bowels, • 247



CHAP. XI.

For Captains of, Shipt.



TO make catchup to keep twenty years, 247

To make fifti faucc to keep the whole year, ib.

To pot dripping, to fry filh, meat, or fritters, &c. 248

To pickle mufhrooms for the fea,

ib.

To make muflirooqa powder, ib.

To keep muftirooms without

pickle, 249

To keep artichoke bottoms dry,

ib. To fry artichoke bottoms, ib. To ragoo articHoke bottoms, ib To drefs fifli, . ' ' 250

To bake fifti, ib.

To make a gravy foup, ib.

"to make a peas foup, ' ib.



To make pork pudding, or beef, &c. 250

To make a rice pudding, 25 1 To make fuet puding, ib.

A liver padding boiled,'
b.

To make an oatmeal pudding,

252 To bake an oatmeal pudding,

A rice pudding baked, ib.

To make a peas pudding, ib. To make a harrice of lrencji

beans jb.

To make a fowl pie, 23

To make a CheChire pork pie for

fea, . ib.

To make fea veniibn, . ib.

To make dumplings when you

have white bread, 24



CHAP,



CONTENTS



CHAP. XII.

Of Hogs Puddings J Saufagis &r.

r
0 make almond bogs pad- To make black paddiogt, p. 956



X dings, . page 255

Another way, ib.

A third way, ib.

To flsake hogs poddiogt with

currants, 256



Savolays, 257

To make fine faufaget, ib.

To make common faufiiges, ib.

Oxford faufiges, 25 II

To make Bologna (aufagef, ib.



CHAP. XIII.

To pot and mah Hams; He



TO pot pigeons, or fowls, 258 To pot a cold tongae, beef, or ?enifbn, 259

To poc venifbn, ib

To pot a hare, ib.

To pot tongues, 260

A fine way to pot a tongoe, ib. To pot beef like venifon, 261 To po( Cbe(hire cheeie, ib.

To collar a breaft of veal, ib. To make marble veal, 262 To collar beef, v ib.

To collar falmon, id.

To make Dutch beef, 263



To make (ham brawn, 263

To ibofe a taikey in imitation or

fturgeon, 264

To pickle pork, ib

A pickle for pork which is to be

eat foon, -ib.

To make veal bams, ib

To make beef hams, 26;

To make mutton hams, ifau

To make pork bams, iii.

To make bacon 266

To fave p tted birds that begin to

be bad, 267

To pickle mackerel called ca

veach, ib.



TO pickle walnuts green, 268

Td pickle walnuts white, ib.

I'o pickle walnuts black, 269

To pickle gerkins, 270 To pickle large cucumbers in

flices, ib.

To pickle afparagus, 27 1

To pickle peaches, ib.

To pickle raddifh pods, 27s

To pickle French beans, ib'.

'0 pickle cauliflowers, ib.

To pickle bcct-root, ib.



CHAP.;XIV.

Of Pitklmg.

To pickle white p!ttms



To pickle onions.

To pickle lemons,

To pickle mufhrooms



73 ib. ib. white, ' ib. To make pickle for muihrooms,

274 To pickle codlins, jb.

To pickle fennel, ib.

To pickle. grapes, 275

To pickle barberries, ib.

To pickle red cabbage, 276

To pickle golden pippins, ib.

To



CO NT E N T S.



To pickle naAertium buds an(l Jiraefl, you pick them off tho lime treet in the Aimmer, p 276

To pickle oyfters, cockles, add mikleSf 277

f9 pickle young fackert, or young arttchokea before the leaves ai hard. 177



To pickle artichoke bottoms, p. 278 To fkkUt famphirc, . • ib.

To pickle mock ginger, ib.

To pickfe nielbn mangoes, ib. BIder poeitS' in iiAitacioa of bsMI

boo, . yg

Rules (o be obferved in pickling.



CHAP. XV.

Of making. Gaies (sc.







TO make a rich' oake 280 To ice a great cake, ib. T& make ac pxyand cake, si Td make af eheapieedcdcer ib, Tc make a butter cake,- ib.

To make gingerbrtiad cakes,- ib. To make a fine feed or Mroih ' cake 81

To make a rich feedcak, called the nun's cake, ib.

To make pepper cakes, 183

To make Portugat cakes, ' ib. 0- make a pretty cake, ib.



To make guif erbread. To make little fine cakes. Another (ou of litde cake6. To make drop bifcuits, To make commoik bifcaits. To make French bifcuitty To make mackeroons To make Shrewfbury cakes Tamake madiing:keay' To make light wigsy Tcr make, very go wsgs To make buns. To make little plum-cake.



283

284

ity, ib.

ib.

285

ib;

ib, ib; 286 ib. ib.



CHAP. XVI.

Of Chief ecdkesy Creams J elites ffipt Syllabubs ic.



TO make fine cheefecakes,

To make lemon cheefecakes, ib.

A fecond fort of lemOn cheefe-

fsakes, ib.

To make almond cheefecakes, ib.




!b make fairy bi
tteri Almond coftardfi Baked cudards. Plain coftards Grange butter Steeple cream. Lemon cream, A fecond lemon creniif Jelly of cream. Orange cream, Goofeberry cream. Barley cream, "o make piitachio crearp



Hartfhorn cream, 29?

Almdndcream, ib.

A fine cream, ib,

Ratalia qream, ib,

Whipt cream, 295

Whipt fyllabubs, ib.

Everlading fyllabubs, ib.

To make a folid fyllabub, 294

ib. Tomake a trifle, ib.

lb,, To make hartfhorn jelly, ib. Orange jelly, 95

Ribba'nd jelly, ib.

Calves-feet jelly,. ib.

Currant jelly, 296

Rafpbrry gam, ib,

fo make hartfhorn flummery,

ib,

A fecond way to make hartfhorn

flummery, 297

Oat



2J89 ib.



ib,

o

ib.

ib.

ib,

ib.

ib.

292



CONTENTS.



Oatmeal flummery, page 207 To make a fine fyllaBub from tne

€0W 298

To make a hedge-hogk ib%



Fftnch ftumififryf A buitered tort, MooQ-fhine, The flMting tfland.



psge 99t 309



CHAP. XVIL

OfMadk Wines J Brewings French Breads Muffins, (fc.



TO make raifin wine Elder wine. Orange wine. Orange wine with raHins, To make elder-Howcr winf,

like FroDttniac, Goofebcrry wine, CiMTant wHie, Cherry wine. Birch wine Quince wine, Cowilip or clary winey Turnip wine, Rafpberry wine, (ttka for brewings



301

ib.

lb. 302 very

ib.

ib.

lb. ib.

'St

i.



The bcff thing for roped beer, 307

When a barrel of beer is turned foar, ' ib.

To. make white bread afiei th London way, ib.

French bread, 308.

MufHns and oat eakes, 309

A receipt for making bread with out barm, by the help of a leaven, 310

A method to preierve a large ftoek of yeaft which will keep andbe of uie for ieveral months, eicber to make bread or cakes,

ib,



CHAP. XVIII

yarring CherrieSy and Preferves, bfc.



TO jar cherries, la Mvth't wayi 3 III

To dry cherries, ib.

To prcfervc- cherries with' the

leaves and iUlka grsea, 312 To make orange mfarmalftde, ib White marmaUnde ib

To preferve oranges whole, 313 To muke red mwnialadej, ib Quinces whole, 314

To make conferve of red rak, or

any other flowers ib

Conferve of hips, 3I j

To make fyrup of roiei ib.

Syrup of citroDi lb.



Syrup of elove-gilliflowerst 3 1 j Syrjup of peach bkiflbms, ibv

Syrup of qfiinces, 3 1 6

To preierve apricots, ib.

Toc prefe i ve dcm(bii9 whole, ibC To candy any forr of dowers

317 To preferve gooftilefyies whole,, without ftoning, ibi

To- preferve white walnuts 3 1 To preferVe waiiut green, ifaw To;prtfenfe the large green pUms

ib. To- preierve peaches, 3 1

To make quince oetof ibi



CHAR



!



CONTENTS. CHAP. XIX.

Tv maki Jruhovies Vermicelli Catchups Vinegar j and to keep Jr



ticbokes French Beans, isfc

TO make anchoviesy p 319 To pickle fmelts, where you have plenty, ib.

To make vermiceUi 320

To make catchup, ib.

Another way to make catchup,

ib. Artichokes to keep all the year,

321

To keep French beans all the

year, ib.

To keep green peas till Chrift

masy ib.

Another way to preferve green

peas, 322



To keep green goofeberries till

Chriilmasy page 322

To keep red goofeberries, ib.

To keep walnuts all the year

323

To keep lemons, ib.

To keep white bull ice, pearpluqas, or damfons, &c. for tarts or pies, ib.

To make vinegar, ib

To fry fmelts, 324

To drefs whitecbait, ib.

To roaft a pound of buttr,

35-



CHAP. XX.

Of Dimming.



TO dillil walnut water, 325 How to ufe this ordinary mil, ib.

To make treacle water, 326

Black cherry water, ib.



Uyfterical water, To diflil red-rofe buds. To make plague water. To make fur&it water. To make milk water.



326

ib.

37 ib,

328



CHAP. XXL



H&w to market, and the Seafons of the Tear for Butchers Meat

Poultry, Fijh, Herbs, Roots, and Fruit, isfc. TIECES in a bullock, 328 Cbriflmas quarter.



In a ibecp, 327

In a calf, ib.

In a houfe lamb, ib.

lo a hog, il).

A bacon hog, 330

To chgfe butcher's meat, ib. How to chufe brawn, venifon,

Weftphalia hams, &c. 332

How to chufe poultry, 333 fiOi in feaioD, Candlemas quac-

tcr, 336

Midfammer quarter, ib.

Michaelifias quarter, ib



How to chufe fi(h, January.- -Fruits which

lading, February.- Fruits yet



337 ib.



arc yet

338 lading,

' . 339

March. - Fruits yet lafting, ib.

April. - Fruits yet lading, ib.

May. - The product of the kit-

, chen and fruit garden this

month, ib.

June. - -The pFodu6l of "the Itit-

cheq and fruit garden, ib.



CONTENTS.



Jtily. - The produa of the kitchen ' and frait garden, Pg 340 Aogaft. - The pr€cdaa of the

kitchen and fruit garden,

ib. September. - The produa of the

kitchen and fruit garden, 341



Odober. - The produ6l of the kitchen and fruit garden.

page 341

Novemher.- the produd of the kitchen and fruit garden, ib.

December.- The produft of the kitchen and fruit garden, ib



CHAP. XXIL

A Certain core for the bite of How to keep clear from bugi,

a mad dog, 342 33

Another cure for the bite of a mad An effedual way to clear the bed

dog, ib. dead of bugs, 344

A receipt againil the plague, ib Directions for the houfe-maid ib.



T



ADDITION

O drefs a turtle tke Well Jn- To make citron.



s.



dia way.

Another way to drcfs a

To make mock tartlcj To pake ice cream, A turkey, &c. in jelly.



349

344 To candy cherries or greea

turtle, gages, ib.

346 To take iron molds out of linen, ib.

347 To make India pickle, ib ib. To prevent the infecflion amon

348 ' horned cattle, 3J0



NECESSARY DIRECTIONS FOR CARVING.



TO cut up a turkey, 350

To rear a goofe, ib.

To unbrace a mallard or duck, ib. To unlace a coney, 351

To wing a partridge, or quail, ib.



To allay a pheafant or teal. To difmembcr a hern. To thigh a woodcock, To difplay a crane. To lift a fwan.



35 ib.

ib.

ib.

3S



APPENDIX.



"



OBiervations on preferving fait meat, fo as to keep it melkcw and fine for three or four months; and to preferve potted butter, 353

To drefs a mock turtle, 3 $4

To drefs haddocks after the Spanifh way, ib.

To drefs haddocks the Jews way,

354 ASpaniihpeMfoup, 355

t



To make onion fbup the Spanifh

way, 355

Milk foup the Dutch way, ib.

Fifh paflies the Italian way,

ib.

Afparagus the Italian way, '356.

Red cabbage dreffed after the Dutch way, good for a cold in the bread, - ib.

Cauliflowers drelTed the Spanilh way, ib.

Carrots



CONTENTS.







(roU aod Frepcb beans drtSki

the Dutch way, page 36

Beaut drelTed the German way,.

ib. Artichoke fuckers drefled the

SpanTfh way, 357

To dry pears without fugarj ib. GiDger tablet, ib

Artichokes preferved the Spanifh

way, ib.

To make almond rice, 358

To make fham chocolate, ib Marmalade of eggs the Jews way

ib. A cake the Spanifh way, ib.

A cake another way, 359

To dry plums, b.

To make fug.of prl, ib.

To make fruit wafers of codlins,

&c. ib.

To make white wafers, 360

To make brown wafers, ib.

How to dry peaches, ib..

How to make almond knots, ib To prefcrve apricots, 361

How to make almond milk for a

wa(hc ib.

tLQft to make goo&betry wairs,

ib. How to make the thin apricot

chips, 36a

How to prefervegolden'pippins, ib. To preserve grapes, ib.

To preferve green codlings, ib. How to make blackberry wine.

The bed way to make raifin wine,

ib. How to preferve white quinces

whole 364

How to make orange wafersi, ihi How to make orange cakes ib. liow to make white cakes, like

china difhes 36;

To make a lemon honeycomb, ib. How to dry cherries j ib.

How to make fine sdmond eakes,

ib;



How to make Uxbridge catceti

page 465 How to make mead. ib

To make marmalade of cherries,

ib To' dry damoilns, 367

Marmalade of quince white, ib To preferve apricots or plums

green, ib.,

To preferve cherries, ib.

To preferve barberries 368

How to make wigs, ib.

To make fruit wafers; codlins ot

plums do befl;. ib

To m2ke,German plums, ib. To make cracknels, 369

To make orange loaves, ib

To make a lemon-tower of pud

ding, ib

How to make the clear lemon

cream, ib

How to make chocolate, 370 Another way to make chocolate, ib Cheefecakes without currants, ib How to preferve white pear-

plums, 37 1

To preferve currants, ib.

To preferve rafpberrieot ib

To make bifcuit bread, ib

To candy, angelica, 372

To preferve cherries, ib

To barrel morello cherries, ib To dry pear- plums, ifaw

The filling for the aforefaid plums

373 To candy cafiia ib

To make carraway cakes, ib

To preferve pippins in flices, 374 Sack-cream like butter, ib

Barley' cream, ib.

Almond butter, lb.

Sugar cakei, 37 j

Sogar cake another way; ib. Clouted cream I ib

Qoince cream, ib.

Citron tream, yB

Cream of apples, quince goofeber rie prunes or lafpberries, ib

Sugar



CONTENTS.



SppR4aaf iea, page 376

CMftrfre of fofee boiled, 377

How.to ibake oraiigebi(cks ib.

How to make yellow varnilh, ib.

How to make a pretty varniih to coipr lit0ebjdl(e

bQwk, or any board where nothing hot is kt on, 37$

iccw to clean gold or fikar laee

ib.

How to make (Weet powder lor cloatfasy ib.

To clean white ititkis flowered filks, with gold and filver in them, . 379

To keep arms, iron or ikel, from rufiing, ib.

Tke Jews way tq kle beef which will go good to the Weft Indies, and kep a year good in tbepiekle; and with care will £0 CO the Eaft Indies, ib.

Honr to make oycfer,' 380

For fitring cyder, ib

To make cfaouder, a iea difh, 381

To dariljt iuga; after the Spanifh way, ib.

To make Spanifh fritters ib.

To fricaiee figeons the Italian way, ib.

tickled beef fof prefent iife, 382

jeeffieaks after the French way,

ib.

A capon done aifter the French way, ib.

To make Hambuh ianfages, ib.

Saufages after the jermau way,

ib.

A turkey Raffed after the Ham burgh way, 383

Chkkena dreHed the French way,

ib.

A calf8 head dreffcd after the Doech way, ib.

Chickens and tarkies dreTed after the Datch way, ib.

To make a frioafeo of calves foet



and chaldron, after the Itatiatt

way, pag 383

To pickle the fine purple cabbage • £c flMich admired at the great

tablet, 384

To make the pickle, ib.

To raile ma(hroem9, ib.

The tagVheart water,
8;

To make aneeliea water, ib.

To make muk water, ib.

To make fli p-eoat cheefe, 3S6 To make brick- bat cheefe. It mtift

ke made in September, ibl To make cordial poppy water, ib. To make white mead, ib.

To make'brown pottage, 387 To make whke barley pottage

with a large chicken in the - middle, ib.

To make a frangas incopades, ib. To make a Scoteh hagga(s, j%9 To make it with fveet fraie, ib To make foar croot, ib

To keep green peas, beans, &e

and frttir, frefli and good till

Chriftinas, ib.

To make paoo-lilla, or hidii

pickle, the ihme the mangoe

come over in, 389

To preferre cocamber equat

with any India (Vveet-meat,

The Jews way of preferring falmon, and all (brts of fih,,

ibi,

To preferve tripe to go to the Eaflr

Indiea, 39.1

The manner of dreffing rariour

forts of dried fi(h: ar ftock-

£01, cod,, falmon, whitings,' 2fc.

ib. The way of caring mackerel, 39 To drefs cured. mackerel, ib.

Calves feet ftewed, 394.

To make fricandillas, ib.

To make a fine bitter, 394.

An approved method praClifed by

Mrs



CONTENTS. '

I

by Mrs. Dokely, the qacfns A Caroliaa rice pnddingft
tyrewoinan,toprerervehaircand. Todiftil treadewatcr, lai makti it grow thicky page 394 moiitfa's way. To make Carolina fDow-balls, ib, .

RECEIPTS for PERFUMERY,

Virgins milky

Eau de bouquet

Ambrofia nofegay

Pearl water, j

Eau de looe.

Milk flbde watir,

Mifs in her teem

Lady Lilley's bail.

Hard pomatum.

Soft pomatum,

Non's cleam9

Eau fans pareil.

Beautifying water.

Lozenges for (he heart-'icun

Lozenges for a cold.

To make dragon roots,

Shaving-powder,

Windfor foap, '

Soap to fill fhaving-boxes.

Tooth-powder,

Cold cream,

Turlington's balfam,

Sirop de capilUire,

Remedy for a confumption,

Tq Bop a violent purging, or

For obftrudtSons in the womb. Another for obftrudions. For a hoarfenefs



TO mte red, light, or purple wlh-balls 399

To make red, Uue, or purple waih-balls, or tp marble ditto.

White almond wafb-balls, 400 Brown almond waih-balls, ib. To make lip-falve, 401

A ftick or compoiition to take . hair out by the roots, ib

To make white lip-falve, and for

chopped hands and face, ib. French rouge,Opiate for the teetb, Delefcot's opiate. To make (having oil. To take iron molds out of linen,

and greafe out of woollen or

filk, ib.

WaOi for the face ib.

Liquid for the hair ib.

To make white almond pade, ib To make brown almond pafte, ib. Sweet- fcenced bgs to lay with

linen, 403

Honey water, ib.

Orange butter, ib.

Lemon butter, ib.

Marechaile powder, ib.



ib. ib.

ib. 402



Tfl















!1-











)











THE

ART of COOKERY



J



PLAIN AND EASY. CHAP. I-

0 R O A S T I N G, BOILING, c.

THAT profefled copies will find fault with touching opoa a branch of cookn'y which they never thought worth tbeir notice, is what I expedl: however, this I know, it 19 the mofl neceiTary part of it; and few fervants there are, ttiat know how to roaft and boil to perfedion.

I do not pretend to. teach profefled cooks, but my dcliga t to inflruft the ignorant and unlearned (which will likcwife be of great ufe ii all private families, and in To plain and full manner, that the moft illiterate and ignorant perfoiv who can but read, will Icnow bow to do every thing in Cookery well,

I Ihall iirft begin with roaft and boiled of all forts, and muA re the cook to order her fire according to what the ii to drefg; if any thing very little or thin, then a pretty little briflc % that it may be done quick and nice; if a very large joint, (hen be fure a good fire be laid to cake. Let it be clear at th bottom; and when your meat is half done, move the dripping-







!'.-• " - ...;'., "

pan aidvfpit a Iktlc from the fite, aiiid ftir up a good briflc fii.j for according to tfie goodncft )tcf your fire, your meat will 6c done fooner or later

B E E Fi

IF beef, ht urt to paper the top, and bafte it well all the . time it is roafting, and throw a handful of fait on it. Whea you fee the fmoke draw to the fire; it is near enough; then take ofF the paper, bafte it well, and drudge it with a little flour to make a fine froth. Never faljt your roaft meat before ' you lay it to the fire for that drws outsl the gravy. If y6u would keep it a few days before you drefs it, dry it very well with a clean cloth, then flour it all over, and hang it vhere the air il CGe to it j but be fure always to mind thftt ?'here isflp damp place about it, if there is you muft dry it Vlell with a cioth. Take up your meat, and garnifli your difli with nothing but horfe-raddiih.

MUrrONandLJMB.

AS to, roafting of mutton, the loin, the chincpf mutton, (whieh is the two loins,) and the faddle (which is the two necks and pact of the (houldecs cut together,) mun have the fkin raifed and (kewered on, and, when near done, take ofF the fkin, bafte, and floor it to froth it: up. All other forts of, mutton and lamb muft be roafted witb a quick, clear fire, without the fkin being raifed, or paper put on. You fliould always dbterVe to bafte yourmeat as focfn 'as you lay it down t roaft, fpr inkle fome fait on, aivd, when near dorif, drudge iwith a little flour to froth it, up. Garnifli mutton with korfe-radciih; lamb, with crelTes, or fmall-falUding.,

VEAL.

AS to veal, you muft be careful to roaft it of a fine brown if a large joint, a very good fire j if a fmall joint, a pretty Hitlc brijQk fire; if a fillet or loin, be fure to paper the? fat, that yon Ibfe as little of that as poffible. Lay it fome drftance from the firetillit is foaked, then lay it near tht: fire. When you Tay it down, bafte it Well with good butter; ind when it is har chough, bafte it again, and drudge kcith a little fibur. -The MeafTyoii muft roaft with the cauloil till it is enough and Ikewer the lweecbreac
on ihe backfide of the'breafr. When It is nigh enough, take off the caul, bafte itj airf drudge it with a link flour.

P RIL



Made" JXa-i j aiO jsas Y.

p. 6 Jt jr.

PORK inttft be weU done, or it is apt; to forfeit. Whil ou roaft a loin, take a fbarp pen-knife and cot tb (kin acrofsto make the crackling tat the better. The cbine'tnuft be tn and fo muft all pork .that hai the rind on. Roafl" a leg' Or c pork thus I take a . ihife, .6 . above, and fcore it ' ftuff the knuckle part with fage and onion, chopped fincf urith peppftr and fait: or cut a hole under the twift, and put the (age &C4 there, and (kewer it Ufi Wtlh afkewef; Koaift it crifpV be caufe mod people like the rind crifp, which they call crackling. Make feme good apple- fauqci and fend up in a boat
then have a little drawn gravy to )ut in the difh Tbisrthej; call a mock goofe. The fpring, or hand of pork, if i vary. ung, roaided like a pig eats very well; or take the fpringf and cut off the Qiank or knuckle and fprinkle fage and onioii: over it, 'and roll it round, and tye it with a firing, and oaic.; it two hours, otherwife it is better boiled. The fparerb (boiild . be bafted with a little bit of butter, a very little duft of Bour, and fome fa
e ihred fmall: biit we never make any fauce to it but apple-fauce. The beft way to drefs pork grifkins is toroaife • them bade thepi with a little butter and fage, and a Uttle pep per an J fait. Few eat any thing with thefe but muilard

To roajl a Pig.

SPIT your pig and lay it to the fire, which inuft be a very good one at each end, or hang a flat iron in the middle of thel. grate Before you lay yur pig down, take a little fagtf (hred fmall, a piece of butter as big as a waltiut, and a little pepperc and fait; put them into the pig, and fow it up with'corfathread j then flcAjr it all over very wll, and keep flouripg ittill the eyes drop out, or you findthe crackling hard. Befure to fave all the gravy'that conies out of it, which you Q
uft do by fetting bfpns or pans under the pig in the dripping-pai7 as foon as you find the gravy begins to run. When the pig is cnouh ftij the fire up brifk; take a coarfe clothj with about a quarter of a pound of butter iti.it, and rub the pig a) 1 over till the crackling is quite crifp, and then take it up. Lay it in your difli, and with a ihafp knife cutpfF the head, and then cut the pig in two, before you draw out the fpit. Cut the ears off the head and lay at each end, and cut the under-jaw inrtwo arid lay on each fide: meU fome good butter, take th6 gravy yotf faved and put into it, boil it, and pduf it into' the diib virithr the brains bruifad fine, and the fage mixed all togetii and then fend it to table.

B a Jnoibif



4 ' THE ART OF COOKERY

Amtber way U roaft a Pig.

CHOP fome fage and onion very fine, a few crumbs of breads a little butter, .peppery ahTalt rolled up together, put it into the belly, and. few it ugi)efore you lay down the pig: rub it all oyer, iith Iweet tcif; 'Mn it is done, take a dry cloth and pfi it, then tal jt into'4,diffi cut it xipt d fend it to table with, the! fauce 'as' ahbm T-;



:t '



•-)



Diffprinf ftrts of Sauct for a Pigm

NOW you arcto obfcrvc there are feveralways of malcjng fauce for a pig Sooie do not love any fage in the pig,, only a cruft of bread; butthen you (hould have a little dried fage rubbed and mixed with the gravy and butter. Some love breadfaufce' in a bafoh; made tbUs: take a pint of water, put in a good piece of crumb of bread,' a blade of mace, arid a little whole pepper boil it for about five; or fix mitiutes, and then pour the water oiF: take out the fpice, and beat up the bread with a good piece of butter, and a little milk or cream. Some love a few currants boiled in it, a glafs of wine, and a little fugar; but that you muft do juft as you like it. Others take half a pint of good beef gravy, and the gravy which comes out of the pig, with a piece of butter rolled in flour, two fpoonfuls of catchup, and boil them all together; then, take the brains of the pig and bruife them fine; put all thefe together, with the fage in the pig, and pour into your difh. It is a very good &uce When ybu have not gravy enough comes out of your pig with' the butter for faute, take about half a pint of veal gravy and add to it; or flew the petty-toes, and take as much of that liquoi as will do for fauce, mixed with the other, i- N B Some like the fauce fent in a boat, or bafon.

Sri roaft the Hind-quarter of Pig kmb-fafiion.

AT the time of the vear when boufe-lamb is very dear, take th hind-quarter of a large roafting pig; take off the ikin and roaft it, and it will eat like lamb with mint-fauce, or with a fallad, or Seville-orange. Half an hour will roaft it.

To bah a Pig.

' IF vou fhould be in a place where you cannot roaft a pig,

lav it in a di(fa, flour it all over well, and rub it over with

'byitter; butter the difli you lay it in, and put it into the oven.

Wbeii it is enough, draw it out of the oven's moutbi and rub

it



Made plain and easy.



i



it over with a battery cloth; then put it into the oven again till it is dry; take it put, and lay it in a difli: cut it up, take a little veal gravy, and talce off the hi in the diih it was baked in, and there will be fome good gravy at the bottom; put that to it, with a little piece of butter rolled in flour $ boil it np, and put it into the difli, with the brains and fage in the belJy. Some love a pig brought whole to table $ then yo fire only to put jii(bacfauce ypu like into the diil). ''•"-?• •' . .

'tx"'''- To melt Butter. '

' IN melting of butter you nagftbc. very careful; let tour faucepan be well tinned; take a fpoon'ful of cold water, a .little duft of flour, and half a pound o butter 9ut to pieces: be fure .1 jcp-fliaking your pan oiie way, for fear it fliould oil wheii it is allmelced, let it boil, and it will be'foibpth and fine. A jilvcr pan is bcft, if you have one - • -



V •



, WHEN youroaft a gpof,tfCkey''or fowls of an cbrtc take care to Onge fhemwJth'a piece' of- white paper, and bafte them with a pie of butter; drudge 'them with a little flour, and fprjnklea little JTalc on; 'ai
d; When 'the fmoke begins to draw to the fire,, and they lookplunip,' bafte theft) again, and grudge them with a little flour, and take them up,

Sauci'for a Goofe.

FOR a goofe make a little good gravy, and put it into . iafon by itfelf and fome applefauce into another.

Sauce for a Turkey.

FOR a turkey, good gravy in the difli, and either bread or enlbn aucc in o bafon, or both.

&auu for Fowb.

TO fowls, you (hould put good gravy ii
tbcf difli and either bread, parfly, pr egg-fauce in a bafon

'Sauce for Ducks.



FOR ducks, a little gravy in (he difli
an$ionion-fiiuce in a cup, if liked. '



?• c %



4. . TE ART QP CQOKfiRY

• ..BIJEAfiANTS kni partridges ftwuld have gravy in the liifbi ' and btczimctui a cup, and poverroyfauce.

•, To rpqfl. iarks. .

PUT a. foirilirdrpit through them, and tie them bft an-

fibber i Jioiift tfalero' and all thje.time they are roafting Iceep

bafting them very gehtly withr biitter, and fprinkle cwmbs of

bread on them till they are almoft done then let them brown

' before you take them up.

The beft way of making crumbs of bread i to rub them tjiroujgh a fine cullender, and put in a little btter into a fteypan; pieltit, put in your crumbs pf bread, and keep them ilirrlhg till they are of a light brown; put them on a fieve,t9 raina hsu minutes; lay your a;ks in a dilh and the cruipbs
dlroind almoft as high as the larks, with pfain butter in,fi ppp, apd Tome gravy in another,

T(i raal WoodtocU arid Snipes

e ffWT tbeoi on a little bird-.ipit, and tie them on ariother, 'nd put ihem dowii to roaft take a. round of a threepenny loaf, JndllQ&.it brown and butter It; then lay it in a difli under e biJrd&;.bai:e them with a little butter; take the trail out elbe you jpit them, and put into a fmall ftew- pan, with a little gravy; fimmer it gently over tlie fire for five or fix miliutes; add a little melted butter to it, put it over your toaft in the di(h, and when your woodcocks are roafted put them oq
lje tpaftj and fet it oyer a lamp or chaffing-difc for tbfree mi-

hutes, and fend them to table.

1 . • - •

Tq roqfl a pigeon.

TAKE fome paffley (hred fine, a piece of butter, as big % a walnut, a little pepper and fait; tie the neckcend tight; tie a firing round the legs and rump,' and fallen the other end to the top of the chimney-piece. Bade them with butter, and when they are enough lay them in the difh, and they will iTwjm with gravy. You may put them n a little Ifpit, and . then tie both end (cloje.

To hnl BJm

iyHEN you broil them, do them in the .fapie oanner,

and take care your fjre is vfery clear, and fet your gridiron

iiigbi that they may not burn, and have a little parfley and

iuttr 'm a cup. Yqu n
ay;fplit them, aqd broil them with a



MADj; PLAI AND £ASY. f

iktk ice.ppcr and fait: a(d you may rosft thcpi oiIy ith % UuW parley and butter in a difli

Direioifs f$r. Geefe and Duds. '

AS td geefe and ducks, you houl4 bave Aige vi olipna fiired fine', tli pepper aud fait, put into the belly..

Put only pepper apd fait into wild-ducks, eaftrliilgSy wigeon, teal, and all other Tort of wild-fow)c with gravy in the lifli, or fooie like fage and onion in one.

To roaji a Hare.

TAKE your hare when it is cafed; trufs it in this manner, bring the two hind-legs up to itsiis, pujl the fore-legs kapk,. put ypur.fkewer firft into the hind-leg, then into the fore-leg and thru(i it through the body; put the fore-leg on, and then ihe ..hii)dleg, and a ikewer through the top of the (boulders and back part of the head, which will hold the head up. Make a pudding thus; take a quarter of a pound of beeffuet, as much crumb of bread, a handful of parfly clipped fine, fpose fw.eet herbs of all forts, fuch as bafil, rnarjoram, winyr-favpry, and a little thyme, chopped very'fiiie, a little nutmeg grated, fqoie lemon-peel cu'fine, pepper and fait, chop the liyer fine, and put in with two egs, mix it up, and put it ito the blly, and few or ikewer it Up; then fpit it and'lay it to the' fire. Which muft be aood one, A good fized hare takes one hour and fo on in proportion. '

Dtffereni forts of Sauce for a M?H?, '"

TAKE for fauVe, a pint oTcream and hffla poundof fifli butter; put them- in a fauce-pan, and keep flrirring it'witha fpoon till the butter is melted, and the fauce is thick; then take iip the' hare, and dour the feuce irito the difli. Anxjther way to make fauce for a -hare is, to entice g6od gravy, thickenedi with a little piece of butter rolled in Hour, and pour it JiUQ your di(h. You may leave .the butter out, if y6u do not like it, and have fome currant-jclly'warnied in a cup, or' red wine and fugar boiled to a fyrpp) done. thus:. take a pint of red wsie 9 quarter of a pound of fugar, and fet over a flow fire to fimmer for about a quirter of an hour. You may do half the quantity, and put U intQ yottr fauce-bpat or bafom

• f ' ...

To hroil Steaks.

FIRST have a very clear briflc fi-e: let your gridiron be VCfy clean; put it on the fire, and take O; chaifing-difh with a,

B% . few



S THE ART OF COOKERY

few hot coals out of the fire. Put the difii on it which is to Hy your fteaks on, then take fine rump fteaks ahout half an inch thick; put a little pepper and fait on them, lay them oh the gridiron, and f if you like it) take a fhalot or two, or a fine onion and cut it fine 3 put it into your di(h. Keep turning jrpur fteaks quick till they are done, for that keeps the gravy in them. When the fteaks are enough, take them carefully oft into, your dift, that none of the gravy be loft; then have ready a hot diih and. cover, and carry them hot to table witl the. cover on. You may fend (halot Iq a plate, chopt fine,

Dinpiom C9nceming the Sana for Steaku

IF you love pickles or horfe-raddifli with fteaks never gar-" ni(h your diih, becaufe both the garnifliingwill be dry, and the fteaks will be cold, but lay thbfe things on little plates, and carry to tahle The great nipety is to have them hot and full of gravy.

Qeneral Diredions concerning Broiling,

AS to mutton and pork fteaks, you muft keep them turn ing quick on the gridiron, and have your difh ready over 4 chaffing- di(h of bpt coals, and parry them to table covered hot. When you broil fowl$. or pigeons, always take care your finQ is clears and never bafte any thing pi the gridiron, for i( only makes it fmoked and burnt

• General DireAion concerning Boiling.

AS t0 all forts of boiled meats, allow a quarter of an hour to every pound; be fqre the pot is very clean apd fkim it well, for every thing will have 9 fcum rife, nd if that boils down, it makec the meat black All forts of frcfli meat you are ta put in hen the at bpUy hut fait meat when th water in

yc hoil Hani

1IHEJ yop boil a hainj put it into your copper when the iprater is pretty warm, for pold water draws the colour out i heii i bcci)s, be careful it boil 9 very flowly. A ham of twenty ppunjs takes four hours apd a half, larger and fmalkr ii proportion. Keep the copper well ikimmed. A green ham wants no fbaking, but an old ham muft be foakd fifteen bouri m a large tub of foft watpr



MADE PLAIN AtlD EAST. 9

' To hil a Tongue.

A TONGUE, if fait, foak it in foft water til Jiigbt, lHcil it three hours i if frefli out of the pickle, two hours and in half, and put it in when the water boils; take it out and puU itf trim it, garnilh with greens and carroti',

•

To boil Fowls and Houft'-lamb

FOWLS and houfe-lamh boil in a pot by tbemlelret in a good deal of water, and if any fcum arifes take it off. They will be both fweeter apd whiter than if boiled in a cloth. A little chicken will be done in fifteen minutes, a large chicken in twenty minutes, a good fowl in half an hour, a little turkejf or goofe in an hour, and a large turkey in an hour and a hal&

Satui for a boiled Turkey.

THE beft fauce for a boiled turkey is good oySer and cel lery fauce. Make oyfter- fauce thus: take a pint of oyfters and fet them off, ftrain the liquor from them, put them in cold water, and waib and beard them; put them into yonr liquor in a ftew-pan, with a blade of mace, and feme butter rolled in flour, and a quarter of a lemon; boil them up then put in half a pint of cream, and boil it all together gently; take the lemon and mace out, fqueeze the juice of the lemon into the fauce, then ferve it in your boats or bafons, Makecellery fauce thus: take the white part of the cellery cut it about one inch long; boil it in fome water till it is tender, then take half a pint of veal broth, a blade of maee, and thicken it with a little flour and butter, put in half a pint of cream, boil them up gently together, put in your cellery find boil it up, then pour it into your boat.

Sauce for a boiled Goofe.

SAUCE for a boiled goofe muft be either onions or cabbage firft boiled, and then ftewed in butter for five minutes.

Sauce for mUd Duels Rabbits.

TO boiled ducks or rab
)tt8, you muft pour boiled onions pver them, which do thus: take the onions, peel them, and boil them in a great deal of irater % ihift your water, then let diem boil about two hours, take them up and throw them into I cullender to drain then
if ith a knfe chop them on a board.



fo



7JI£ AftT OP eOtO£eRV



ancf rub them through a, cpl€n4er i fft them into fauce-pan, luft (hake a little flour over them, put in a little milk or cream, fritJi a good piece of butter, and a little fait; fet lliem over the fire and when the butter is melted they are enough, But i- you -would 'Mve dnion-fattce in half rt hour, take yxtrr onions, peel them, ndeutlhem in thin dices, plitth Inco milk and water, and when the water boils they will be donq in twenty minutei, then throw them into a cullender to dram, i 9ppi)pfl( Dd pir,them iJp a.&Mce-pfi; ftake in a lft
)&floi
r
.ith j iiitile cream if yqu have it, aii4 a good piece gf biiltf; ftir til Ipgeth over the fife till the butter is mel4, fi4 lbpy will hp ieMy fine. The faucp is very gopd with r-oaft kt9n m it 13 tkeh way pf btoiUng onHU)$. . '

' Ti roqfi Venifon,

TAKE a haunc
k!.o£ venifon and (pit it; rub fome butter aU9Vr jTQur bunf;
i.;. take fpur (heets of paper well buttcfcd, puf tyfo on th fiayncli;. theo qake a p;ifte with fome flour, a ijtl tcMtter find water; roll it out half as big as your hunph ' d 'put it over the ft part, then put tUe other two (lieetjs of Papier on, and tie them with fome pck-thread; lay it to a bpijk fi, affl baftp it wel all the time of roafting; if a largjcr Iaunf;h of twenty-four pounds it will tke three hours nd an hjlf. jepept it 13 a ypty large fire, then three hours wi
l do: Iqiier iic Bcoportiorl.

' ' ' ' to drefs a Haunch of' Muttm

, .IJAIWJ is Ujxfor a fortnighf, aid dei it as direSled for a ' iuc pf vfaifpif. . .:

'Different fgrfs of Sauce for Venifon

YOU may take either of thefe fauces for venifon. Currantjelly warmed; or a pint of red-wine, with a quarter of a pound ofMgar, ifiered over clear ire for fjye or fi minutes; or a pint of yinCjg, nd g .quarjtef f J??p of Jugar, fimn
ere4 till it is a fyrup. . "

7% roajl Muttoni i)intf(m fajbion.

TAKE a hind-quarter 9? far miittot, and cut the leg like a

' hauhchjiay ft iri a pan with the backfide of it down, pour

a bottle of red-winc' over i and let it lie twenty-four hours,

heri fpit it, and:baflS'it with the fame l&jupr and butter aU

' e' tfiiitf It'is xoSsftkig ata;go6d quictfirej twp hours will da



it Have a ittle gopd gravy ui a cup,,d bfeet fauce ia another.- A good ft neCc of mutton eats finely done thus

7 i'c Ventfin ar Haret fuitet; or U matt tbtm fiebfti Ata

fiink.

IF your venifon be very fweet, only dry it with a cloth and h% U. whpce.th rxomep. I yifw would (eejp -it arty mie, idry it ry WJcH witb irlen cloths, rub it ali.avtr wifh grdti'liid fRfijr . od baug it in an ry pUuce, and k itl keep U iat while. If it ilinicdj x)r ia mufty, take ipme lukewarin WaCek find waih it clean: then take freih milk and water lukewiirmy and wQi.Ugain.; then dry it .m deaDEidotbs very wdl, and rub it 11 over with firpufid5gpcr,aj hangiit
n,J
n nifiy pti:e. 'When you roft U, ypif flepd 9?ly wj pf.it .yi
b a ckanJcloth. cnd paper it as befqre pifioned. Njvgr .9. gny tbiug elfc tovenifon, for allotjipr,chings fpil X9ur Yfiixiliin, Jd Jate away the ilne flavour, and this preferves it better than any thing you can do. A hare you iQayjnanage jiift the fame way,

- j?J r4afi -a fTmgue and tJdder.

PAR4JOIL them firft for two. hours, then roaft it, ftick eight or ten cloves about it; bafte it with butter, and have fomd gravy, and galintine'fauce, ade th)js: take a few bred •crumbs, arid boil in a little yater, beat it up hefi put in f gill of red- wine, fome fugar to fweeten itj put it in a bafon pr boat, ...

To roqft Rabbits.

BASTE them with good butter and drudge them with f little iloiir. Haf ?in hour will do them t a very quick, cJcaJT iire; and, if tlrey re very final), tventy minute will dp theip, Take the fiver, nyith a little bunch of parjley, an
d boil themj and then chop them yeyy fine together. Melt'fome ggod butter ind put half the liver apd parfley into the bijttejf j pour If, iptp •the difli, and garb tjBi the difti.With the other fialf. Lft yguf rabbits be done of a fine light bron j or put the face in a99
;.







Xo foajl a Rahhtt harefajhion.

LARD a rabbit with bcop
roaji it as you do a hare, wfth fi ftufing in the belly, and it eats ytry well. But then you jnuft mal; gravy £iuce; but if you do hot larcl it, white faiticey jnade tbqj:,a a LUIle veal broth, ioil it up wit a little flour and bjitt, tp tbickn ii, then add a gillof cream; keep it ftirring one way till it is fmooth
then put it in a boat or in

TurkteSf



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TO rpaft a piece of beef about;tefl upds will take an hour and an half, at a good fire. Twenty pounds weight will take three 'hours, if it be a thick piece but if it be a thin piece of twenty poyinds weight, two hours and an half will do it; and fo on according to the weight of your meat, more or lefs. Ob ierve, in frofty weather your beef will takealf an hour longer

MUTTON.

A leg of mutton of fix pounds will take an hour at a quik; fire; if frofty weather, an hour and a quarter; nine pounds an hour and a half; a leg of twelve pounds will take two hours; if frofty, two hours and a half; a lrge faddie of Wutton will take three hours, hecaufe:of papering 'iV; k fmall faddle Wi! take an hour and a half, and fo on,' according to the fie; ji breaft will take half anhbiir aiafquick fire; a neck, if large, an hour; if very.fmall, ittle better than half an hour; a fhoulder much about the fame 'time as ra leg; a chine of twelve: . pounds an hour .and a half and'f oo;



.9 V





If I. 1: -



PORK muft be well dbne ToevpryrpAtiiliow a quarter of an hour; for example,, a Jicintof;twelve pounds weight, three hpurs, and fo qn; if it be a thin piece of that weight, (yvp hours wiU roa
l it.





t% .THE-AUT OF COOKERY

•,' ",

YOU may lard a turkey &r pheafant, or any thing, ii M you like it. ';;

IF you.lbouTd have biii'iQAe pheafant 'and:iin(;.ijita' difli, take a. large inlUgnoVo -fwl, lep tiiei'hed'bn-. and truls it juft as you do a pheafant; lard it itfa bacon, but d6 ot lard the pheafant, and hobcdy: 1 know il, •

RULES tQ i obfciircl In %-ixks T I N G

• IN Jthe firft filSlce, take great care the.'iflit be very clean; ahd 4)6 fire- to dean it with nothinjgbiii fand and water. ' Wa(h it clean, and wipe it with a dry cloth; 'for oil, brickdufty and fuch things, will fpoil your mesit; .; '



MADE. PLAIN AND EASY. 13

I

THESE three you may bafte with fine, nice dripping. Be fure your fire be very good and brifk $ but do not lay your meat too near the fire, for ftar of burning or fcorcbing.

VEAL..

VEAL XsiLtz much the fame time i?oafting as pork; but be fure to paper the fat bf a join or fillet, and bafte your veal with good butter .'- " '- Z ...

. - HpJS E-LJ MB.

IF a large fore-vTtet, 9jihp
jr'van4.a;half; if a fmall one, an hour. The putfide cipuft be papered . bafted with good batter, and you jniil Ifkve a very quick fie. If a leg, about three quarters of aii lours a neck, a breaft,or (boulder, three quarters of an liour if ycry fmally half an Jiouj:. wjll do

c' A ' P I G • T r

If juil kiilib,' an4iour; if killed the day before, an hour and a quarter if ayery large Qfi. an hpur.and a half. But the beft way to judge, is when the eyes drop out, and the (kin is grown jvery hard; then you mu0: rub it with a cbarfe cloth, wit(( a. good piece of .butter rolled in it, till the crack ling is Qtit Studr of a fine light brown,

A HARE.

- • • '

You muft have a quick fire. If it be a fmall hare, put three pints of milk and half a pound of fre(h butter in the dripping-pan, which muft be very clean and nice; if a large one, two quarts of milk and half a pound of fre(h butter. You muft bafte your hare well with this all the time it is roafting $ and, when the hare has foaked up all the butter and milk, it will be enough. Put your gravy, and hot currant jeUy in boats.

A TURKEY.

A middling turkey will take an hour; a very large one, an hour and a quarter; a fmall one, three quarters of an hour. You muft paper the breaft till it is near doiie enough, then tsike the paper off and froth it up. Your iire muft be very

A GOOS.



- ft



c

I



m TB jAfi-r olf06icist



.



J- & O S B. 6bflWrfc A ftm rtilds.

•, - •

A large fowl, three qufirters of; an hour; a middling orfeV half an hour; vet'y fmalT chickens, tWenty minutes. Yquf B6 miift be very cprttft sd clea when you IfiFjr thciri d6Wn.

T A M E DM C K S. Obfervc the famefiiles.

IP" I L D icUC K S. '

ihMenty minutes 5 if you love theoi weli doncj twentyi five mlnotesi







TEAL, fI G E O N,- iSc.



Wigcon a quarter of airhor. Taul eleven or twelve minutes. - .

WOOD C O d K S. '

Twelity-liVtf miriutes,

FJ'A tRfDGE $: and SNIP 5. Twenty minutes.

PIGEONS and LARKS. Twenty minujbes.'

. DirMUkns cancerHitg Pmdtff. ' '

IF your fire is not very quick and clear whea yote lay yoiif poultry down to roaft, it wUl not eatftear fo fweet, or look fo besuttful to the eye.

TV hep Medt Uu

.THp bcft way to keep meat hot, if it be rforie before ydctf company IS reaciyj is to fct the diflx over a pan of boili% Watr, GQver the dilh with a deep cover, fo as mi tb touch tie tftciifand throw a.cloA over all. Thus yoii m kc€p yOur meat hot a long time, and it is better than over-roaftihg and fpoif-



MADE PLAIN AND EAST. 19

ing the meat. The fteam ofthe water keepi the meat hot, and does not draw the gravy out, or dra! tt up; whereas, if you ki a difh of meat any tiipe over a chafflng-difll f xd4lsj' it wiil dry up all the gravy, and fpoU the meat t

To drefs GREENS, ROOTS, &c

ALWAYS be very careful that your grecris Be nittly )ieked and waflied. Yoo Inould Kiy them-in a clean pan, f6r ftJar' of fand or duft, which is apt to hang found wooden veflels. Boil all yoor greens in a copper fauee-pan by themfdves, with a great quantiiy of water. Boil no -meat with then, M that' difcolours them. Ufe no- iron pans,- Sec, for they are not proper but let them be copper, brafs, or filver.

To tb-es Spinach. -

PICK W very clean, and wafli it iti fie or fk Waters; ptfk it in a fauce-pan that will juft hold it, throw a little fait ovdt' it, and cover t1ie pan clofe. Db not prcit any Wslttr in, but ibake the pan often. You muft put your fauce-pan oti a clear quick fire. As foon a.you find the greens are (hrunk and fallen to the bottom, and that the liquor which comes out of them boils up, they are enough. Throw them into aclekn fieve to drain, aid fqueeze it well betweeh two plates, ztfd cut) it in any form you like. Lay it in a plate, or fmall diffi, and never put any butter oh it, but put it in a cup

Tq drefs CabbageSy isfc

CABBAGE, and all forts of young fprouts, muft be boiled in a great deal of water. When the flalks are tender, or fall to the bottom, they are enough then take them oiF, before they lofe their colour. Always throw fait in your water before you put your greens in. Young fprouts you fend to table juft as they are, butcab'bage is beft chbpfed and put' fnto a failct;-pan with a good piece of better, fiirring it for abouf five or fix minutes, till the butter rs all melted, and thenfend it to table

To drefs Carrots,

LET them be craped very. clean, and when tHfey are e nOiJgh, rub them in a clean cloth, then (lice them into aplate and pour fome melted butter over them. If they are young fprihg catrots, half an hour will boil them $ if large, an hotor $ but old Sandwich carrots will take two hours,

2 r



I.



x6 THE ART OF COOKERY

7i drefs Turnips,

TH£Y ea beft boiled in the pot, and when enough take them out and put them in a pan, and mafli them with batter a little cream, and a little fall and fend them to table. But you may do them thus: pare your turnips, and cut them into dice, as big as the top of ones finger; put them into a clean fauce-pan, and juft cover them with water When enough, throw them into a fieve to drain, and put them into a faucepan with a good piece of butter and a little cream; ftir then over Che fire for five or fix minutes, and fend them to table.

;.7i dres Parnips

THEY (hould be boiled in a great deal of water, and when you find they are foft (which you will know by running a fork into them), take them up, and carefully (crape all the dirt off them, and then with a knife fcrape them all fine, throwing away all the fticky parts and fend them up plain in a difli with melted butter.

To drejs Broccoli.

STRIP all the little branches off till you come to the top oncy then with a knife peel off all the hard outfide Mn whicb g on the ftalks and little branches, and throw them into water. Have a ftew-pan of water with fome fait in it: when it boils put in the broccoli, and when the fialks are tender it is enough, then fend it to table with a piece of toafted bread toaSmi in the water the broccoli is boiled in under it, the iame way as afparagus, with butter in a cup. The French eat oil and vincfgar with it.

To drefs Potatoes

YOU muft boil them in as little water as you can, without burning the faucepan. Cover the fauce-pan clofe, and when the (kin begins to crack they are enough. Drain all the water out, and let them ftand covered for a mioiite or two; then peel them, lay them in your plate, and por fome melted butter over them. The beft way to do them is, when they are peeled to lay them On a gridiron till they are of a fine brown, and fend them to table. Another way is to put them into a fauce-pan with fome good beef dripping, cover them clofe, and fiiake the faucp-pan often for fear of burning to the bottom. When they are of a fijie brown, and crifp, take them up in a pUte

then



Made plain and easy. 17

then put them into another for fear of the fat, and put butter in a cup.

To drefs Cauliflowers.

TAKE your floWers, cut olF all the green part, and then cut the flowers into four, and lay them into water for an hour: then have fome milk and water boiling, put in the cauliflowers, and be fure to (kirn the fauce-pan well. When the ftaiks are tender, take them carefully up, and put them into a cullender to drain: then put a fpoonful of water into a rleaii fiew-pan with a little duft offlour, about a quarter of a pound of butter, and ihake it round till it is all finely melted, with alitt)e pepper and fatt; then take half the cauliflower and cut it as you would for pickling, lay it into the ftew-pan, turn it and ibake the pan round. Ten minutes will do it. Lay the ftewed in he middle of your plate, and the boiled round ic Pour the butter you did it in over it, and fend it to table.

Another way,

CUT the cauliflower ftalks off, leave a little green on, and boil them in fpring water and fait: about fifteen minutes will do them. Take them out and drain them fend them whole in a diOi, with fome melted butter in a cup.

To drefs French Beans.

FIRST ftring them, then cut them in two, and afterwards acrofs: but if you would do them nice, cut the bean into four, and then acrofs, which is eight pieces. Lay them intcc water and fait, and when your pan boils put in fome fak and the beans; when they are tender they are enough; they will be foon done. Take care they do not loofe their fine green Lay them in a plate, and have butter in a cup%

To drefs Artuhokes.

WRING off the ftalks, and put them into cold watcr and Wa(h them well, then put them in, when the water boils with the tops downwards, that all the duft and fand may boil out An hour and a half will do them.



To drefs Afparagus

SCRAPE all the ftalks very carefully till they look white, then cut all the ftalks even alike, throw them into water, and bave ready a ftew-pan boiling. Put in fome fait, and tie the

U afparagus



%



THE ART OF COOKERY

afparagus in little bundles. Let the water keep boiling, And when they are a tittle tender take them up. If you boil them too much you loofe both colour and tafte. Cut the round of a fmall loaf, about half an inch thick, toaft It brown on both fides, dip it in the afparagus liquor, and lay it in your difli; pour a little butter over the toaft, then lay your afparagus on the toaft all round the difii, with the white tops outward. Do not pour butter over the afparagus, for that makes them greafy to the fingers, but have your butter in a bafoiic and fend it to table.

Dlreions concerning Garden Things

MOST people fpoil garden things by over-boiling them All things that are green (bould have a little crifpoefs, for if they are over-boiled they neither have any fweetnefs or beauty.

To drefs Beans and Bacon.

WHEN you drefs beans and bacon, boil the bacon by !t felf, and the beans by themfelves, for the bacon will fpoil the colour of the beans. Always throw fome fait into the water and fome parfley, nicely picked. When the beans are enough (which you will know by their being tender), throw them into a 'Cullender to drain. Take up ihe bacon and fkih it; • throw fome rafpings of bread over the top, and if you have an iron, make it red hot and hold over it, to brown the top of the bacon; if you have not one, hold it to the fire to brown; put the bacon in the middle of the difti, and the beans all round, clofe up to the bacon, and fend them to table, with parfley and butter in a bafon.

To make Gravy for a Turkey or any fori of Fowls.

' TAKE a pound of the lean part of the beef, hack it with a knife,, flour it well, have ready a ftew-pan with a piece,of frelh butter. When the butter is melted, put in the beef, fry it. till it is browq, and then pour in a little boiling watery fhake it round, and then fill up with a tea-kettle of boiling water. Stir it altogether, and put in two or three blades of mace, four or five cloves, fome whole pepper, an onion, a bundle of fweet 'herbs, a little cruft of bread baked brown, and a little piece of carrot. Cover it clofe, and let it ftew till it is as good as you woujd have it. This will make a pint of rich gravy.

To



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 19

7i make Veal JUkttorij or Beef Gravy n

TAKIE a ralher or two of bacon or ham, lay it at the bottom of your ftew-pan; put your meat, cut in thin fiices, over it; then cut fome onions, turnips, carrots, and cellery, a little xhyme and put over the meat, with a little Il-fpice; put a little water at the bottom, then fet it on the fire, which mud be a gentle onec and draw it till it is brown at the bottom (which yott may know by the pan's hiiSng), then pour boiling water over it, and ftew it gently for one hour and a half: if 9 fmall quantity, lefs time will do it. Seafon it with fait.

Brown Colouring for fAode £Jbit



TAKE four ounces of fugar, beat fine; put it into an iron frying-pan, or earthen pipkirt'; fet ii Qvct a clear fire, and wbeii the fugac' Id melted it will bb frothy; put it higher from the £re until it is a fine brown; keep itdirring.all the time, fill the pan up with red wine; take care it don't boil over, add a little fait and lemon; put a little cloves and mace, a ihallot of two, boil it gently for ten minutes; pour it in a bafon till it is cold, tbca bottk iufor uie.

To make Grany.

IF you live in the country, where ypu cannot always have gravy-meat, when yodrtneat comes from the butcher's, take a piece of beef, a piece of veal, and a piece of mutton: cut them into as fmall pieces as yoit can, and take a large deep fauce-paa with a cover, lay your beef at bottom, then your mutton, then a very little piece of bacon, a dice or two of carrot, fome mace, cloves, whole pepper black and white, a large onion cut in flices, a bundle or fweet herbs, and then lay in your veal. Cover it clofe over a flow nre for fix or feven mihutes, &aking the fauce-pan now and then; then ihake fome flour in, and have ready fome boiling water; pour it in tin you cover the meat and (bmething more. Cover it tlofe, and let it flew till it is quite rich and good; then feafon' it to your tafte with fait, and ilrain it ofi. This will do for mofl things.

7i hake a Leg of Beef

DO it juft in the fame manner, as before dire£led, in the making gravy for foups, &c. and when it is baked, ftrain it through ii coarfe fieve. Pick out all the finews and fat, put Chem inCQ a iauce-pan with a few fpoonfuls of the gravy, a little

C a red-wincn



M THE ART OF COOKERY

red-wine, a tittle piece of butter rolled in flour, and fome muf tard i ihake your faucepan often, and when the faijce, is hot and thick, di(h it up, and fend it to table. It is a pretty diib

To baki an Oxs Head,

DO juft in the fame manner as the leg of bf is dircded to be done in making the gravy for foups,,&c, and it does full sftwell for the fame ufes. If it (bould be too ftrong.for any thing you want it for, it ia only putting fome- hot water to-it- Cold water will fpoil it. ., . . . ., . c . Hm, i: .

To boil PickUd Pork.

m V •• v.

' BE furc you pvt it in when the, water boils. If aHn,dg piece, an hour will boil it if a very Irge piece n nour .sind a half, or two hours. If you boil .picUec) pork too long, i will go to a jelly. You will know wbctn it is dope oy trying k with a fork ...



CHAP, ii:

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Made Dishes



.1 ••

V • I



To drefp Scotch Colhps,

TAKE a piece of fillet of veal, cut it in thin pFcccs, aboud as big as a crownpiece, bdt very thin; fhake a little flour over it, then put a little butter in a frying-pan, and melt it; put in your collops and fry them q,uick till they are brown, then lay them in a difli: have ready a good ragoo made thus; take a little butter in your flew- pan, and meft it, then add a large fpoonful of flouf, flir it about till it i fmooth, then put in a pint of good brown gravy; feafon it with pepper and fait, pour in a fmall glafs of white-wine,, fome veal fweet-breads, force-meat balls, truffles and morels, ox palates, and miiflirooms •, flew them gently for half an hour, add the juice of half a lemon to it; put it over the collops, and garniih with rafliers of bacon. Some like the Scotch collops made thus: put the collopa into the ragoo, and ftew them for five minutes

7i



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. ai

T$ infi Wbiu Cottopi.

CUT the veal the fame as for Scotch coHops; throw then into a ftew-pan; put fome boiling water over them, and ftir them about, then drain them ofF; take a pint of good veal broth, and thicken it; add a bundle of fwcet herbs, with fbroe mace; put fweetbread, force-meat balls, and freih niuihrooms; if no frelh to be had, ufe pickled ones.waflied in Warm water; ftew them about Afteen minutes; add the yolk of two eggs, and a pint of cream; beat them well together with fome nptmeg grated, and keep fUrring till it boils up; add the juice of a quarter of a lemon, then pUI it in your ttlifh. Garnifli with lemon.

To drefs a Filltt of Feal with Collofs.

FOR an alteration, take a fmall fillet of veal, cut what
n)iIops you want, then take the udder and fill it with force meat, roll it round, tie it with a pack-thread acro(s, and r9aft it I lay your coUops in the di(b, and lay your udder in the middle. Garnifli your diflies with lemon.

To male Force-meat Balls.

, NOW you are to obfcrve that force-meat balls rc a great gddjtioQ to all made dilhes made thujs: take half a pound of veal, and half a pound of fuet, cut fine, and beat in a marble mortar or wooden bowl; have a few fweet-berbs and parfley tbred £iie, a little mace dried and beat fine, a fmall nutmeg grated, or half a large one, a little lemon-peel cut very fine, a Jittle pepper and fait, and the yolks of two eggs; mix all thefe well together, then roll them in little round balls, and fome in jittle long balls; roll them in flour, and fry tbem brown If they are for any thing of white fauce, put a little water in a .&uce pan, aod when the water boils put them in and let them boil for a itw minutes, but never fr them for white fauce.

Truffles and Morels good in Sauces and Soups

TAKE half an ounce of truiBes and morels, let them be well waded ia warm water to get the fand and dirt .out, then limmer them in two or three fpoonfuis of water for a few minutes, then put them with the liquor into the fauce. They thicken both fauce and foup, and give it a fine flavour.

C T0



M f HE ART OF COOKERY

STEW them vAy tender; which mufl be done by putng -them into cold water and let them ftew very foftly over ft flowiire till they are tender, then take off the two fKJns, cut them in pieces, and put them either joto yeur Enade-diXb or ibup; and cockVcombs and artichoke-bottoms, cut Anally and put into the made-difli. Gai;ni(b jrour difhes'with lemon fweetbreads fiewed, or white difhes and fried for brown pnes and cut in little pieces.

To Ragoo a Leg of Mutton.

TAKE all the (kin and fat ofF, cut it very thin the right "Way of the 'grain, then butter your ftew-pan, and (hake fome flour into it (lice half a lemon and half an onion, cut them very fmall, a little bundle of fweet herbs, and a blade of mace. Put altogether with your meat into the pan, fiir it a minute or two, and then put in fix fpoonfuls of gravy, and have ready an anchovy minced fmall; mix it with fome butter and £our, ftir ic altogether for fix oninutes, and then difh it up.

To make a Brown Fricafey.

YOU muft take your rabbits or chickens, and (kin the rab- bits, but not the chickens, then cut them into fmall pieces and rub them over with yolks of eggs Have ready fome grated bread, a little beaten mace, and a little grated nutmeg mixt together, and then roll them in it: put a little butter into a ftew-pan, and when it is melted put in your meat. Fry it of a fine brown, and take care they do not ftick to the bottom of the pan; then pour the butter from them, and pour in half a pint of brown gravy, a glafs of white wine, a few mu&rooms or two fpoonfuls of the pickle, a little fait (if wanted), and a piece of butter rolled in flour. When it is of a fine thicknefs difh it up, and fend it to table. You may add truffles and morels, and cocks-combs.

To make a White FrUafj

TAKE two chickens, and cut them in fmall pieces; put them in warm water to draw out the blood, then put them into fome good veal broth; if no veal broth, a little boiling water, and ftew them gently with a bundle of fweet herbs and a blade of mace, till they are tender; then take out th$ fweet herbs, add a little flour and butter, boiled together, to

thicken



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 3

thicken it a little, then add half a pint of cream, and the yolk of an egg beat very fine; feme pickled muthrooms: the beft way is to put fome fre(h muflirooms in at firft; if no freih, then, pickled; keep ftirring it till it boils up, then add the juice of haif a lemon, Hit it well to keep it from curdling then put irt in your difli. Garnifh with lemon.



To fricafey Rabbits Lamby dr Veal, Obferve the direions given in the preceding article.



A fecond Way to make a fVhite Fricafey

YOU moft take two or three rabbits, or chickens, Ikiit them, and lay them in warm water, and dry them with a clean cloth. Put them into a fteW-pan, with a blade, or two of mace, a little black and white pepper, an onion, a little bundle of (weet herbs, and do but juft cover them with water: few them till they are tender, then with a fork take them out, ftrain the liquor, and put them into the pan again with half a pint of the liquor, and half a pint of cream, the yolks of two eggs beat well, half a nutmeg grated, a glafs of white wine, a little piece of butter rolled in flour, and a gill of muflirooms, keep ftirring all together, all jhe while, one way, till It is fmooth and of a fine thicknefs, and then di(h it up. Add what you pleafe,

A third Way of making a White Fricafey .

TAKE three chickens, (kin them, cut them into fmall pieces, that is, every joint afunder; lay them in warm water for a quarter of an hour, take them out and dry them with a cloth, then put them into a ftew-pan with milk and water, and boil them tender; take a pint of good cream, a quarter of a pound of butter, and ftir it till it is thick, then let it ftand till it is cool, and put to it a little beaten mace, half a nut- meg grated, a little fait, and a few muflirooms; ftir all together, then take the chickens out of the ftew-pan, throw away what they are boiled in, clean the pan, and put in the chickens and fauce together; keep the pan ftiaking round till they are quite hot, and difti them up. Garnifti with lemon.

To fricafey Rabbits Lamby Sweet'bnads or Tripe.

Do them the fame way.

C 4 Another



I .



$4 THE ART OF COOKERY

Another Way to fricafey Tripe.

' TAKE a. piee of doMble tripe, and cut it In pieces Qf fibout two inches; put them in a fauce-pan W water, with an pnion and a bundle of Tweet Kerbs; boil it till it is quite tenc der, then have ready a bifliemel made thus: take fome lean ham, cut it in thin pieces and put it in a ftew-pan, and fome veal, having firft cut off all the fat, put it over the ham; cut an onion ih ilices, fome carrot and turnip, a little thyme, cloves, and mace, and fome frefti muflirooms chopped; put a little milk at the bottom, and draw it gently over the fire; be careful it does not fcorch; then put in aquart of milk, and half a pint of cream, ftew it gently for an hour, thicken it with a little flour and milk, feafon it with falt,and a vtry little Kian-pepper bruifed fine, then ftrain it off through a tammyc put your tripe into it, tofs it up, and add fome force-meat balls, mufbrooms, and oyffers blanched; then put it into your difli, and garnifh with fried oyfters, or fweet-breads, or lemons.

To ragoo Hogs Feet and Ears. '

TAKE your ears out of the pickle they arc foufed in, or ' boil them till they are tender, then cut them into little long thin bits, about two inches long, and about as thick as quill; put them into your ftew-pan with half a pint of good gravy, or as much as will cover them, a glafs of white wine a good deal of muftard, a good piece of butter rolled in flour, and a little pepper and fait; ftir all together till it is of a fine thicknefs, and then diO) it up. The hogs feet muft not be jlewed but boiled tender, then flit them in two, and put the yolk of an egg over and crumbs of bread, and broil or fry them j Iput the ragoo of ears in the middle, and the feet round it.

Note, they make a very pretty diih fried with butter and muftard, and a little good gravy, if you like it. Then only ut the feet and ears in twoi You may add ialf an onion, cut jfmalU

To fry Tripe.

CUT ypur tripe in long pieces of about three inches wide, and ali the breadth of the double; put it in fome fmall-bcer batter, or yolks of eggs; have a large pan of good fat, and fry it brown, then take it out and put it to, drain j difli it up Ub plain butter in a cup,



I at Tirti



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. a$

Tripe a la Kiliennf

THIS is a. favourite Iri(h diib, and is done thus: take a piece of double tripe cut in fquare pieces, have twelve large onions peeled and waihed clean, cut thent in two, and put them on to boil in clean water till they are tender; then put in your tripe, and boil it ten minutes; pour offalmoft all the liquor, Ihake a little flour iq, and put fome butter in, and a little fait and muftard; (hke it all over the fire till the butter is melted i then put it in your difli, and fend it to table as hot as poffible Garnifh with barberries or lemon.

J Fricafey of Pigeons

TAKE eight pigeons new killed, cut them in fmall pieces, and put them in a ftew-pan with a pint of white wine and a pint of water. Seafon your pigeons with fait and pepper, a blade or two of mace, an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, a good piece of butter juft rolled in a very little flour: cover it clofe, and let theooi flew till there is juft enough for fauce, and then take out the onion and fweet-herbs, beat up the yolks of three eggs, grate half a nutmeg in, and with your fpoon pu(b the meat all CO one fide of the pan and the gravy to the other fide, and fiir in the eggs; keep them ftirring for fear of turning to curds, and when the fauce is fine and thick (hake all together, and then put the meat into the di(h, pour the fauce over it, and have ready fome flices of bacon toafted, and fried oyfters; throw the pyfters all ovtr and lay the bacon round. Gar jiiih with lemon.

A Fricafey of. LambJlones and Sweetbreads.

HAV£ ready fome lamb-ftones blanched, parboiled and fliced, and flour two or three fweetbreads; if very thick, cut them in two; the yolks of fix hard eggs whole, a few piftachio-nut kernels, and a few large oyfiers: fry thefe all of a fine brown, then pour out all the butter, and add a pint of drawn-gravy, the lambflones, fome afparagus-tops about an inch long, fome grated nutmeg, a little pepper and falt two jhalots bred fmall, and a glafs of white-wine. Stew all thefe together for ten minutes, then add the yolks of three eggs . beat very fine, with a little cream, and a little beaten mace; ftir 11 together till it is of a fine thicknefs, and then dilh it up parnifh with lemon.



THE ART OF COOKERY

TV hajh a Calfs Hnti.

BOIL the bead almoft enough, Chen take the beft half, and with a (harp knife take it nicely from the bone, with tbetwd eyes. Lay it in a little deep di(b before a good fire, and take great care no aihes fall into it, and then hack it with a knife profs and crofs: grate fome nutmeg ail over, the yolks of two eggs, a very little pepper and fait, a few fweet herbs, fome crumbs of bread, and a little lemon peel, chopped very fine bafte it with a little butter, then bafte it again; keep the di(b turning that it may be all brown alike: cut the other half and tongue into little thin bits, and fet pn a pint oif drawn gravy in a fauce-panc a little, bundle of fweet herbs, an onion a little pepper and fait, a glafs of white-wine, and two (halots; boil all thefe together a few minutes, then flrain it through a jieve, and put it into a clean ftewpau with the hafli. Flour the meat before you put it in, and put in a few mulbroomsy m fpoonful of the pickle, two fpoonfuls of catchup, and a few truffles and morels; ftir all thefe together for a few minutest, then beat up half the brains, and ftir into the ftew-pan, and little piece of btter rolled in flour. Take the other half of the ybrains, and beat them up with a little lemon-peel cut fine, a little nutmeg grated, a little beaten mace, a little thyme (hretl imall, a little parfley, the yolk of an egg, and have fome good dripping boiling in a flew-pan; then fry the brains in little cakes, about as big as a crown-piece. Fry about twenty oyflers dipped in the yolk of an egg, toafl fome dices of bacon, fry a few force-meat balls, and have ready a hot difh; if pewter, over a few elear coals; if china, over a pan of hot water. Pour in your haft, then lay in your toafled head, throw the force meat balls over the hafh, and garniSi the difh with fried oyfiers, the fried brains, and lemon; throw the reft over the hafh, lay the bacon round the difh, and fend it to table.

ta hajb a Calfs Head white.

TAKE a pint of white gravy, a large wine- glafs of white .wine, a little beaten mace, a little nutmeg, and a little fait; throw into your hafh a few mufhroomi, a few truffles and morels firft parboiled, a few artichoke bottoms, and afparagus tops, if you have them, a good piece of butter rolled in flour, the yolks of two eggs, half a pint of cream, and one fpoonful of mufhroom catchup; flir it all together yt%f carefully till It is of a fine thicknefs; then pour it into your difh, and lay the ather half of the head, as before mentioned, in the middle, and

garniiii



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. %j

garaift as before direded, with fried oyflers, braini, kmonp and force-meat balls fried.

To bate a Calf's Head.

TAKE,the head, pick it and walh it rery clean; take an

earthen difli large enough to iaj the head on rub a little piece

of butter all over the di(h, then lay fome long iron ikewers

acrofs the top of the di(h, and lay the head on them; ikewer

up the meat in the middle that it do not lie on the difh, then '

grate fome nutmeg all over it, a few fweet herbs Ihred fmall,

fome crumbs of bread, a li
t)e lemon-peel cut fine, and then

Hour it all over: ftick pieces of butter in the eyes and all over

the head, and flour it again. Let it be well baked, and of i

fine brown you may throw a little pepper and fait over it,

and put into the difli a piece of beef cut fmall, a bundle of

fweet herbs, an onion, fom& whole pepper, a blade of mace

two cloves, a pint of water, and boil the brains with fome

fage. When the head is enough, lay it on a di(h, and fet it

to the fire -to keep warm, then ftir all together in the di,

and boil it in a fauce-pan; ftrin it oiF, put it into the fauce-

pan again, add a piece of butter rolled in flour, and the fage

in the brains chopped fine, a fpoonful of catchup, and two

fpoonfuls of red-wine ( boil thera together, take the brains

beat them well, and mix them with the fauce: pour it into

the di(h, and fend it to table. You muft bake the tongue with

the head, and do not cut it out. It will lie the handfomer

in the difli.



To bale a Sheeps Head it the fame way, and it eats very welh



Do

To drefs a LamVs Head.

BOIL the head and pluck tender, but do n6t let the liver be too much' done. Take the head up, hack it crofs and crois with a knife, grate fome nutmeg over it, and lay it in a di(b, before a good fire; then grace iome crumbs of bread, fome fweet herbs rubbed, a little iemonpeel chopped fine, a very little pepper and talt, and bafte it with a little butter: then throw a little fiogr over it, and juft as it w done do the fame bafte it and drudge ic. Take half the liver, the lights, the beart and tongue, chop them very fmall, with fix or eight ipoonfuls of gravy or water; firft fhake feme flour over the meat, and ftir ic together, then- put in the gravy or water, a ood piece pf butter rolled in a little flour, a little pepper and

fait.



ft THE ART OF COOKERY

alt, and what .runs .from the head in the difh; iimmer all together a kw minutes, and add half a fpoonful' of vinegar pour it into yoiir di(h, lay the head in the middle of the mince-meat, have ready the other half of the liver cut thin, with fome Hices of bacon broiled, and lay round the headir Garniih the diib with lemon, and fend it to table.

To ragM a Neck of VeaL

CUT a neck of veal into (leaks, flatten them with aroJingr pin, feafon them with fait, pepper, cloves, and mace, Iar4 them with bacon, lemon-peel, and thyme, dip theqi in the . yolks of eggs, make a fheet of flrong cap- paper up at the fouif corners in the form of a dripping-pan; pin up the corners, butter the paper and alfo the gridiron, and fet it over a lire of charcoal; put in your meat, let it do leifurely, keep it baft ing and turning to keep in the gravy; and when it is enough have ready haU a pint of ftrong gravy, feafon it high, put in muihrooms and pickles, force-meat balls dipped in the yolks of .eggs, oyfters (lewed and fried, to lay round and at the top of your difb, and then ferve it up. If for a brown ragoo, pu$ in red- wine. If for a white one, put in white- wine, with th yolks of eggs beat up with two or three fpoonfuls of cream

To ragoo a Breajl of Veal.

TAKE your breaft of veal, put it into a large ftew-pan. put in a bundle of fweet-herbs, n onion, fome black ana white pepper, a blade or two of mace,, two or three cloves, a very little piece, of lemon-peel, and juft cover it with water: when it is tender take it up, bone it, put in the bones, boil it up till the gravy is very good, then ftrain it off,,and if you have a little rich 'beef gravy, add a quarter of a pint,' put in half an ounce of truffles and niorels, a fpoonful or two of catchup, two or three fpoonfuls of white-wine, and let them all boil together: in the mean time flour the veal, and fry it in butter till . ic is of a fine brown, then drain out all the but ter, and pour the gravy you are boiling tohe veal, with at few mufhrooms: boil all together till the faUce is rich and thick, and cut the fweetbread into four. A few force-meat balls are proper in it. Lay the veal in the di(b, and pour the faiiceall pver it. Garnifb with lemon.

Or tbus: half road a breaft Of veal, then cut it in fquars pieces put it into a (lew- pan, with half a pint of gravy, aptnt of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion ftuck with cloves a little mace, and (lew it till it is tender; then take it ut, and pull out all the bones, ftrain the ravy through

c 7 ficve.



MADE PLA.IN ANU EASY, ag

fieve, then put it into the ftewpan again, with a fpoonful of muftaid, fame truffles aqd morels, a fweet-bread cut in pieces one artichoke bottom about twenty- force-meat balls, fome butter rolled in flour, enough to thrcken it;. boil it up till it is of a proper thicknefs; feafon it with pepper and (alt, then put in your veal, ftew it for five minutes, add the juice of half a lemon, then put your meat into the diih, the ragoo all over iu Oarnifk with lemon and beet-root.

jtnother way to ragoo a breaft of VioL

YOU may bone it nicely, flour it, and fry it of a fine brown, then pour the fat out of the pan, and the ingredients as above, with the bones; when enough, take it out, and firain the liquor, then put in your meat again with the in gredients, as before direded.

A Breaft of Veal in Hodge-podge TAKE a breafl: of veal, cut the brifkit into little piccca, and every bone afunder, then. flour it, and put half a pound of good butter into a fiew-pan; when it is hot, throw in the vcal, fry it all over of a fine light brown, and tl)en have ready a tea-kettle of water boiling; pour it in the flew-pan fill it Hp and ftir it round, thrw jn a pint of green peas, a fine lettuce whole, clean waflied, two or three blades of mace, a little whole pepper tied in a muflin rag,,a little bundle of fweet herbs, a fmall onion iluck with a few cloves, and a little fait. Cover it clofe, and let it (lew an hour, or till it is boiled to your palate, if you would have foup made of it; if you would only have fauce to eat with the veal, you muft ftew it till there is juft as much as you would have for fauce, and feafon it with fait to your palate; take out the onion, fweet herbs, and fpice, and pour it all together into your difh It is a fine difh. If you have no peas, pare three or four cucumbers, fcoop out the pulp, and cut it into little pieces, and tafke four or five heads of cellery, clean walfaed, and cut the white paft fmall when you halve no lettuces, take the littlehearts of favoys, or the little young fprouts that grow on the old cabWe-ftalks, about as big as the top of your thumb.

Note, if you would make a very fine difli of it, fiU the infide of your lettuce with force-meat, and tie the top clofe with a thread; ftew it till there is but juft enough for lauce; fet the lettuce in the middle, and the veal round, and pour the fauce all over it. Garnifti your di(h with rafped bread, made into figures With your fingers. This is the cheapeft way of drefling. a breaft of veal to be good, and fer ve a number pf people.

7i



jtt THE ART OF COOKERY

To cUar a Snaji of Vtah

TAKE a very fliarp knife, and nicely take oat all th lbones but take great care you do not cut the meat thr6ugb; pick al! the fat and meat off the bones, than grate fome hut-'' meg all over the inlide of the vea), a very little beaten macae a little pepper and fait, a few fweet herbs (bred fmall, fomef parfley, a little lemon-peel (bred fmall a few crumbs of brettd, and the bits of fat picked off the bones; roll it up tight, ftider 0ne flcewer ia to hold it together, but do it clever, that it fiands upright in the diib: tie a pack-thread acrof it to held it together, fpit it, then roll the caul all round it, and roaft It. An hour and a quarter. will do it. When it has been about an hour at the fire, take off the caul, drudge it with flour, bafte it well with frefb butter, and let it be of a fine brown. For fauce take two pennyworth of gravy beef, cue it and hack it c₯ell, then flour it, fry it a, little brown, then pour into your ftew-pan fdme boiling water, ftir k well togec iher, then fill your pan two parts full pf water put in an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, a little eruft of bread toafiedy two or three blades of mace, four cloves, fome whole peper and the bones of the veaK Cover it clofe, and let it ftew till it is quite rich and thick; theii ftrain it, boil it up with foitic truffles and morels, a few muOirooms, a fpoonful of catchup two or three bottoms of artichokes, if you have them j add a little fait, juft enough to feafen the gravy, take the pack-thread off the veal, and kt it upright in the difli; Cut the fweetbread into four, and broil it of a fine brown, with a fevip force-meat balls fried; lay thefe round the di(h, and pour in the fauce. Gamifli the difli with lemon, and fend it to table

To collar a Breqfi of Mutton.

. BO it the fame way, and it eats very well. But you muft take off the ikin.

Another good wt to drfs a Breaji of Mutton.

COLLAR it as before; roaft it, and bafte it with half a int of red-wine, and when that is all foaked in, bafte it well with butter, have a little good gravy, fet the mutton upright in the difli, pour in the gravy, have fweet fauce as for ventfon, and fend it to table. Do not garni& the difli, but be fufe to fake the flcin off the mutton.

The infide of a furloin of beef is very good done this way.

If you do not like the ine, a quart of milk, and a quarter of a pound of butter, put into the dripping-pan, does full as well to bafte it

5 Td



MADE PLAIN ANIc EAY. ji

To farce a Leg ef Lamb,



WITH a (harp knife carefully take out all the meat, and leave the Ikin whole and the fat on it, make th lean you cur out. into force-meat thus:. to two pounds of meat add two. pounds of beef-fuet cut fine, and beat in a marble mortik till it is very fine, and take away all the (kin of the meat and fuetn then mix it with four fpoonfuls of grated bread, eight or tea cloves, five or fix large blades of mace dried and beat finej half a large mitmeg grated, a little pepper apd fait, a little le mon-peel cut fine, a very little thyme, fome parfley, and four eggs; mix all together, put it into the fkin again juft as.it was, in the fame (hape, lew it up, roaft it, bafte it with butter, cut the loin into fteaks and fry it nicely, lay the leg in tho di(h and the loin round it, with ftewed cauliflower (as in page 17) all round, upon the loin: pout a pint of good gravy into the difl), and fend it to table. If you do not like the cauli flower, it may be omitted.

To hoil a Leg of Lamb

LET the leg be boiled very white. An hour will do ft Cut the loin into fteaks, dip them into a few crumbs of breadi and egg, fry them nice and brown, boil a good deal of fpinach, and lay in the difh; put the leg in the middle, lay tb loin round it, cut an orange in four and garnifii the difh, and have butter in a cup. Some love the inach boiled, theri drained, put into a fauce pan with a good piece of butter,, and ftewed

To force d large Fowh

: CUT the fkin down the back, and carefully flit it up fo as to take out all the meat, mix it with one pound of beef-fuer, cat it fmall, and beat them together in a marble mortar: take a pint of large oyftes cut fmall, tw( anchovies cut fmkll, one ihalot cut fine, a few fweet herbs, a little pepper, a little nutmeg grated, and the yolks of four eggs •, mix all together and lay this on the bones, draw over the fkin, and few up the back, put the fowl into a bladder, boil it an hour and a quarter, ftew fome oyfters in good gravy, thickened with a piece of butter rolled in flour; take the fowl out of the bladder, lay it in your difh, and pour the f&uce over it. Garnifh with lemon, i Ic eats much better roafled with the fame fauoe.

To



ft THE ART OF COOKElV

To roajt a Turkey the genteel way

FIRST cut it dovirn the back, and with a iharp penknifd bone it, then make your force-meat thus: take a large fowl, or a pound of veal, as much grated bread, half a pound of fuet cut and beat very fine, a little beaten mace, two cloves, half a nutmeg grated, about a large tea-fpoonful of lemon peel, and the yolks of two eggs; mix all together, with a little pepper and fait, fill up the places where the bones came out, and fill the body, that it may look juft as it did before few up the back, and roafl it. You may have oyfter-fauce, eellery-fauce, or jufl as you pleafe; put good gravy in the difb, and garnifh with lemon, is as good as any thing. Be fure to leave the pinions on.

To Jlew a. Turkey er Fowl.

tiRST let your pot be very clean, lay four clean (kewers at the bottom, lay your turkey or fowl upon them, put in a quart of gravy, take a bunch of cellery, cut it fmall, and wafh it very clean, put it into your pot, with two or three blades of mace, let it flew foftly till there is jufl enough for fauce, then add a good piece of butter rolled in flotir, two fpoonfuls of red wine, two of catchup, and jufl as much pepper and fait as will feafon it; lay your fowl or turkey in the difb, pour the fauce over it,' and fend it to table. If the fowl or turkey, IS enough before the fauce, take it up, and keep it up till the (auce i boiled enough, then put it in, let it boil a minute or two, and diih it up.

To few a Knuckle of Veal

BE fure let the pot or fauce-pan be very clean, lay at the bottom four clean wooden fkewers, wafh and clean the knuckle very well, then lay it in the pot with two or three blades of mace, a little whole pepper, a little piece of thyme, a fmall onion, a cruft of bread, and two quarts of water. Cover it down clofe, make it boil, then only let it iimmer for two hours, and when it is enough take it up, lay it in a difh and ftrain the broth over it.

Another way to Jlew a Knuckle of Veal.

CLEAN it as before direAed, and boil it till there is juft enough for fauce, add one fpoonful of catch up, one of red

winc



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 33

c9irine, and one of walnut- pickk, (ome truffles and moreh, or fhme dried muihroonns tut fcnaH; boil it all together, take up the knuckle laj it in a di(b, pour the fauce over it, and fend if to table Notrc it eats very well done a$ the turkey, before dire£ted

2V ragoo a Piece of Btef.

TAKE a large piece of the Bank, which has fat at the top cut fquare, or any piece that is all aieaf and has fiat 4it the top but no banes. The rump does well. Cut atl nicely off thebone (wiiich makes fine foup); then take a large ftewpan, and witft a good: piece of batter fry it a little brown all over, flouriagyoor meat well before you put it into the pan, then pour in ai(toach gravy as will cover it, made thus: take about a pound of ooarfe beef, a littU piec4f of vesri cut fmalJ, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, feme whole blaclg pepper and white pepper two or three large tk'des of mace, four or five cloves, a piece of carrot, a little piece of bacon, deeped in vinegar a little while, % cruft of bread toafted brown; put to this a quart of white wine, and let it boil till half is wafted. While this is making, pour a quart of boiling water into the ftewpan, cover it clofe, aid let it be ftewing (ofrly; when the gravy is done, ftrain it, puf it into the pan where the beef is, take an ounce of trufBes aiid morels cut fmall, fome frefh or dried mufhrooms cut fmall two fpoonfuls of catchup, and cover it dole. Let all this ftew till the fauce is rich and thick; then have ready fome articfapke bottoms cut into four, and a few pickled mufhrooms, give them a boil or two, ahd when yptir meat is tender, and your fauce quite rich, ayc the meat into a diih and pour the fauce over it.. You may add a fweetbread cut in fix pieces a palate ftewed tender cut into little pieces, fome cockscombs, and a few force-meat balls. Tbefe are a great addition, btit ic will be good without.

Note, for variety, when the beef is ready, and the gravy put to it, add a large bunch of celery cut fmall and walhed clean, two fpoonfuls of catchup, and a glafs of red wine. Omit all the ptber .ingredients, Wlen the meat and celery are tender, and the fauce rich and good, ferve it up. It is alfo very good this way: take fix large cucpmbers, fcoop out the feeds, pare them, cut tKe(i into dices, and do them juft as you do the celery.

Bef TremMonque

TAKE the fat end of a brifcuit of beef, and tie it up clofe.

with pack-thread; p9t it in a pot of water, and boil it fix hours

? D very



1



34 THE ART OP COOKERY

very gently; feafon the water with a little fait, a homdfal of alUfpice, two onions, two turnips, and a carrot; in the roeati while put a piece of butter in a ftew-pan and melt it, then pat in two fpoonfuls of flour, and ftir it till it is fmooth; put in ac quart of gravy, a fpoanfol of catchup, the faoie of browning,. a gill of white wine, carrots and turnips, and cut the fame as for harrico of mutton; ftew them' gently till the roots ani tender, feafon with pepper and fah, fkiriti all the fat clean' ofF' put the beef in the di(h, and pour the fauce all over. G;rniih with pickle of any fore; or make a fauce thus: chop a handful of parfley, one onion, four pickled cucumbers, one walnut, and a gill of capcis; put. them in a pint of good gravy, and thickea it with a little butter rolled in flour, and feafon it with pepper and falti boil it up for ten minutes, and then put over, the beef or you may put the beef in a diih and put greens and carrots round t

To force thi Injidi of a. Sirloin of Bief

TAKE a fharp knife,, and carefully lift up the fat of the infide, take out all the meat clofe to the bone,, chop it fmall, take a pound of fciet and chop fine, about as many crumbs of. bread,, a little thyme and lemon-peel, a little pepper and fair,, hatf a nutmeg graced, and two (balots chopped fine; mix and bealc all very ne in a marble mortar, with a glafs of red wine,' . then put it into the fame place, cover it with the fkin and fat, fkewer it down with fine fkewers, and cover it with paper. Da Dot take the paper off till the meat is on the dtfh; Take a ijAaFter of a
cint of red wine, two fhalots ihred fmall, boil' them, and pour into the difb, with the gr4vy which comes out 5cf the meat i it eata welK Spit your meat before you take out the infide.

• Another way fa force a Sirloin t,

WHEN it is quite roafled, take it up, and lay it in the difh with the ixifide uppermoft; with a (harp knife life up the fkin, hack and cut the infide very fine, fhake a little pepper and ifalc over it, with two (balots, cover it with the ftin and feitd it to table. You may ad red wine or vinegar, jufl as you tike.

Sirloin of Beef en. Epigram.

ROAST a firloin of beef, take it ofFthe fpit, then rrffc the Ikin carefully ofF, and cut the lean part of the beef out but obferVB not to cut near the ends or lides; haOi the meat in the following manner: cut it in pieces about as big as a crown piecp, put half a pmt of gravy into a tofs-t)an, an omo& chopt

fine.







MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 55

nne two fpoonfuh of catchup, fome pepper and fair, fix fmall pickicd cucumbers cut in thin flices and the gravy that comes from the beef, a little batter rolled in flour, put the meat in )ind tofs it up for five minutes put it on the firloin, and then puc the kin over, and fend it to table. Garnilh with horfe-radi£b You may do the infide inftead of the outfide if you pleafe

To force thi Injide of a Rump of Beef

YQU may do it juft in the fame manner, only lift up the outfide (kin, take the middle of the meat, and do as before di- tt&ti i put it into the fame places aiid with fine ikeWers put i down dofe. ... ...

A roiled Rump of Besf

CUT the meat all o(F the bone whcte, flit the infide dowd frotn top to bottom', but npt through thfe fkin, fpread it opfen; take the fiefli di two foiis and beef-fiiet an equal quantity tnd as liiuch cold boiled ham, if yoti have it, a little peppery an ahchovy, a nutmeg grated, a little thymej a good deal of carfley', a few mu(Krooms, and chop them all together, beat them in a mortar, with a half-pint bafon fall of crumbs of bread .liiix all thefe together, with four yolks of eggs, lay it into the meat, cover it up, and roll it round, flick one fkewef in, and tie it With a pack-thread crofs and crofs to hold it together; take a pot or large fauce-pan that will jufl hold it, lay a layer of bacon and a layer of beef cut in thin fliccb, i pieC0 Qf carrot, fome whole pepper, macej fweet herbs, and a large bnioji i lay the rolled beef on it; juft put water enough to covet the top of the beef; cover it clofe, and let it ftew very fofily on aow fire for eight or ten hoiirsj but ndt too feft When you find the beef tender which you will know by. runhirig a ikewer into the meat, then take it up, cover it up hbt boil the gravy till it iS good, then flralh it ofi, and add fome nvufhrooms choiped, fothe truffles and morels cut fmall, two fpoonfuls of red or white wine, the yolks of t(o eggsj and a piece of butter rolled in flour; boil it together, fet the meat before the fire, bafte it With biittfer, and throw crumbs oF bread all over it: when the fauce is enough lay the meat into the difli, and pour the fauce oveir it. Take care the eggs do not c;urdle; or you may omit the eggs.

71? toil a Ruriip of Bief tU French fajhiom

TAJSCE a rump of beef boil it bajf an hour, takeit up, lay ii into a large deep pewter di(b or fiew-pai9c ct three or fouj

D 2 gafliei



jS tllE ART OF COOKERY

gzthts in it all along the fidev rub the gafhes with pepper ahd fait, and pour into the diih a pint of red 'wcsa much hot water, two or three large onions cut fmall, the hearts of eighl or ten fettuces cat fmaU, and a good piece, of butter rolled m a Iktie flour; lay the fleby part of the meat downwards, coiTer it clofe, let it flew two hours nd a half over a charcoal fire, or a very flow coal fire. Obferve that the butcher chops the bone fo clofe, that the meat may lie as flat as it can in the difli When it is enough, take the beef, lay it in the diih, and pour the fauce over it. .

Npte, when you do it in a pewter difk, it is beft done over a chaffingdifh of hot coals, wiih a bit or two of charcoal to keep it alive.

Beef Efiarlot.

TTAKE a brifcuit of beef, half a pound of coarle fugar, two punces of bay-faU, one ounce of faltpetre, a pound pf coenmon' fait; mix all together, and rub the beef; lay it in an earthen pan and turn it every day. It may lie a fortnight in the pickle then boil it, and ferve it up either with favoys cabbage, or greens, or peas-pudding.

Note, it eats much bner cold, cut into flices, and fent ta' table.

Beef a la Daub.

TAKE a rump and bone it, or a part of the leg-of-mutton-piece, or a piece of the buttock; cut fonie fat bacon as long as the beef is thick, and about a quarter of an inch fquare;' take eight cWes, four blades of mace, a little allfpice, and half a nutmeg beat very fine; chop a good handful of parfley Sne, fome fweet herbs of all forts chopped fine, and fome pepjper and fait j roll the bacon in theie, and then take a large: larding- pin, or a fmall btaded knife, and put the bacon througSk and through thie beef with the larding-pin or knife; when that is done, put ic in a ftew pan, with brown gravy enough to covr it- Chop three blades of garlic very fine, and put in fome frelh muihrooms or champignons, twiy large onions, and a carrot,: flew it gently for fix hoiirs; then take the meat out,' ilrain off the gravy, and fkim all the' fat off. Put your meat and gravy into the pan again; put a gill of white wine into the gravy, and if it wants feafoning, feafon with pepper and falt flew them gently for half an hour; add fome artichoke-bottoms, truffles and morels, oyfters, and a fpoonful of vinegar Put the meat in a foup-dilh, and the fauce over it; or you may put turnips cut lA round pieccsj and cacrots cut jouiid, fome

- - fmaH



• MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 37

fmall onronS) and thicken the fauce; then put the meat in, and &CW it gently for half an hour with a gill of white wine. 3ofne like favoys or cabbage ftewed and put iqto the fauce

TV maie Beef Alamade

' TAKE a fmall buttbcky or leg-of-mutton- piece o beef, or,

clod, or a piece of buttock of beef, alfo two dozen of cloves,

as much mace, and half an ounce of filUfpice beat fine; chop

a large handful of parfley, and all forts of fweet herbs fine (cut

fat bacon as for beef a la Daub, and put it into the fpice, &c

9nd into the beef the fame); put it into a pot, and cover it

with water; chop four large onions very fine, and fix cloves of

garlic, fix bay-leaves, and a handful of champignons, or fre(h

mufhrooms; put all into the pot with a pint of porter or ak,

and half a pint of red wine; pit in fome pepper and fait, fome

Cayenne pepper, .a fpoonful of vinegar, ftrcw three handf6ls of

bread rafpings, lifted fine, over all; cover the pot clofe, aind

ftcw it for fix hours, or according to the fize of the piece; if

a large piece eight hours, then take the beef out, and put it ia

a deep difii, and keep it hot over fome boiling water; ftrain

the gravy through a fieve, and pick out the champignons of

mu&rooms; (kirn all the fat ofF clean, put it into your po(!

again, and give it a boil up; if not feafoned enough, feafon it

to your liking; then put the gravy over your beef, and fend it

to table hot; or you may cut it in dices if you like it beft, or

pot it to get cold, and cut it in dices with the gravy over it


for whea the gravy is cold, it will be in a ftrong jelly.

Beef Alanade in Pieces,

YOU muft take a buttock' of beef, cut it into two-pound pieces, lard them with bacon, fry them brown, put them into t pot that will juft hold them, put in two quarts of broth or gravy, a few fweet herbs, an onion, fome mace, cloves, nut-. ™gc PPP It; when that is done, cover it clofe, and ftew it till it is-tender, fkim off all the fat, lay the meat in the difii, and ftrain the fauce over it. You may ferve it up hot ox cold.

Beef Olives,

TAKE a rump of beef, cut it into fteaks of half an inch thick, cut. them as fquare as you can, and about teil inches Jong, cut apiece of fat bacon as wide as the beef, and about three parts as long'put fome yolk of an egg on the beef, put the bacon on it, and the yolk of an egg on the bacon, and

. D 3 fome



38 THE ART OF COOKERY

ipmc good favory forcc-qieat on that, feme yolk of an egg oq the force-meat, then rol! them up and tie them round with ftring in two pUces; put fomc yoN( of an egg on them and fome crumbs of bread, theti fry them brown in a large pari of good beef-dripping; take them out and put them to drain, take foQie butter and put into a ftew-pan, mlt it, and put in fpoonful of flour, ftir it well till it is fmQoth $ then put a pint of good graty in, and a gill of wbit wine, put in the olives and flew them for an hour; add focne muihrooms, truffles and orels, force-meat balls and fweet breads cut in (XKiyW fquare pieces, fopie ox- palates; feafop with pepper and fait, and fqueeze the juice of half a lemon; tofs them up. Be careful %o fkim all the fat oiF, then pyt them in your diih Qarnifl with beet-root nd lemon. '



Fcil Olivet,

CUT theiiii out of a leg of veal, and do them tlie fame a tceef olives, with the fame fauc and garniQi.

Or thus: cut fome flices of a kg of vealy arbout three inches ong, and t broad, cut thn;) thin, fpread them pn thetable and hack them with the back of a knife; put fome yolk of egg over them, and fone favory force-meat on the egg as thick as the veal, then fome yolk of egg over it; roll them vp tight, and tie them with a firing; rub them all over with yplk of egg, and ilrew bread crumbs over them; ha,ve ready a pan of bbiiing I'at; fry them of a gold colour, put them befofe the fire to drain. (lave ready the following ragop: put about two ounces of butter fn your ftew-pan, and melt it, put a fpoonful of ilour, and ftir it about till it is fmall; put a pint of gravy, a glafs of white wiipe, fome pepper and fait, a little cloves aid tnce, a little ham or len bafon cut fine twp (hzlois cut fipe, and half a lemon, ftewthem geptly for teii mnutei, ftrain it through 9, ileve, fkim oft' the far, then put it into your pan agaip, add a fweetbrcad cut in pieces, artichoke-bottoms 9ut in pieces, fomq force-meat balls, a few trufHes and mojels, and muftrooms, fpoonful of catchup, give them a boil up; put your olives iix the did), and pour the ragoo over them. GarniQi "with lemonj

Beef ColUp.

TAKE fom rump ftcak$, or any tender piece, cut like Scotch collops, only larger, hack them a little with a knife nd flour then); put a IitcJe butter in a ftew-pan, arid melt it bfin put in your collops, and fry them quick for about two inutss; put in a pint of gravy, a little butter, rolled in flour;



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 39

afonwith pepper and fait; cut. four pickled cucumJSers in thin dices, half a walnut, and a few capers, a little onion ihred very fine; ftew them five ifiinutes, then put them into a hot difl, and end them to table. You may put half a gUfs'Of white wine into it.

TAKE rump (leaks, pepper and fait them, lay them in a SBew-pan, pour in haf a pint of water, a blade or two of mace, two or three cloves, a little bundle of fweet herbs, an ancho 'Vj a piece of butter rolled in flour, a glafs of white wine, and an onion; cover them clofe, and let them dew foftly till rhsf are tender; then take o.ut the fteaks, £our them, fry them in txttti butter, and pour away all the far, firain the fauce th6y were ftewed in, and pour into the pan; tofs it all up together till the fauce is quite hot and thick. If you add a quarter of a pint of oyfters, it will make it the better. Lay ffae fteaks into the di(h, and pour the fauce over them. Gar J)iih with any pickle you like.

0 fry Beef' Steaks.

TAKE Tum.p.ftajcs, pepper apd alt them, fry them in a little butter ver.y quick and brown take them out and put them into a di(b, pour the fat out of the frying pan, and then .take half a pint of hot gravy if no gravy, half a pint of hot water, and put into the. pan, and a liuie better roiled in flour, a little pepper and fait, and two or three (halots chopped fine boil them up in your pan for two minutes, then put it ov,er the ileaks and fend them 10 table.

A fecmd way to fry Btef -Steaks,

CUT thelean by itfelf, and beat them well with the back of a knife, fry them in yuft as much butter as will moifien the pan, pour out the gravy as it rpns out of the meat, turn them ' often, do them over- a gentle fire, then fry the fat by itfelf and lay.uppn the meat, and put, to the gravy a glafs of red winehalf an anchovy, a little nutmeg, a little betenpepper, and a ftalot cut fmall; give it two or three little boils, feafon it with fait to .your palate, pour it ovv the (leaks, and fend thpm to table.

A pretty Side-Dljh of Beef.

ROAST a tendor piece of bcef,,ky fat bacon all over it, and roll it in paper bafte k, and when it is roafted .cut about

D 4 £r



40 THE ART Of CQOKERY .

two pounds in thin flice$, lay then in a ftew-pah, and take ( large cucumber5, peel tKenon and chop them fmall, lay ovef tbcun a little pepper and fait, and Aew them iiT' butter for about ten minutes, then d;ain put the butter, and fluke fome flour over them; tofs them up, pour in half a pint qf grvy, let them ilew till they are thick, and dlfii them up.

To 4refe a Fillet of Beef. .

IT is the infide of a firloin. You muft carefully cut it atl out from the bone, grate fome nutmeg over it, a fer crumbs of bread, a little peppccr and fait,, a little lemon peel, a littl thyme, ome parfley flired fmall, and roll it up tight; tie it with a packthread, roaft it, put a quart of milk and a quaKei of a pound of butter into the dripping pan, and Jballe it; whea jt is enough take it up, untie it, leave a little ikewer in it to hold it together, have a little good gravy in the.diih, and fome fweet fauce in a cup. You may ba( it with red wine and butter, if you like it better j or it will do very well with bt tcr only.

Beef Steaks- rolled.

TAKE three or four beef-fteaks, flat them with a ckavcr and make a force-meat thus: take a pound of veal beat fine iii a mortar, the flefti of a large fowl cut fmall, half" a pound o( cold ham chopped fmall, the kidney.fat of a loin of veal chopped fmall, a fweetbread cut in little pieces, an ounce of truffles and morels firft ftewed and then cut fmall, fome parfley, the yolks of four eggs, a nutmeg grated, a very little thyme, little lemon-peel cut line, a little pepper and fait, and. half a pint of cream: mix all together, lay it on your fl:eaks, rolj them up firm, of a good flze, and put a litt4e fkewer into them, put them into the ftewpan, and fry them of a nice brown j then pour all the fat quite out, and put in a pint of good fried gravy (as in page 19.), put one fpoonful of catchup, two fpoonfuls of red wine, a few mufhrooms, and let them ftew for half an hour. Take up the fteaks, cut them in two, lay the cut fide uppcrmofl:, and pour the fauce over it, Garni(h with lemon.

Note, before you put the force-meat ihto the beef, you arc to ftir it all together over a flow fire for eight or ten minutes.

To fiew a Rump of Beef

HAVING boiled it till t is little mor? than half enough, take it up d peel off the ikin: take falt pepper, beaten

8 ' mace,



MADE PtAIN AlD EASY. 41

iPaace, grated nuCmeg, a baodfol 0f parfley, a little thysnc winter-favory, fwct marjoram, aU dhopped fine and mixily and ftuflF theoQ in great holes in the fat aid jean, the reft fpread over it, with the yolks of two eggs fave the gravy that rung out, put to it pint of claret, and put the meat in a deep pan pour, th6 liquor in, cover it cloie, and let it bake two houra then put it into the difh, ftrain the liquor through a fieve, and ikim Q the fat very clean, then pour it over the meal, an4 end it to tale. 1

Another way to Jltm a Rimp of Beef

YOU muft cut the meat ofF the bone, lay it in your ftew pan, cover it with half gravy and half water, put in a fpoonful of whole pepper, two onions, a bundle of fwect herbs,'foai9 fair, an a pint of red wine; cover it clofe, fet it over a ftov pr flow fire for four hours, ihaking it fometimes, and turning it four or five times
keep it ftirring till dinner is ready: take ten or twelve turnips, cut them into flices the broad way, then cut them into four, fjour them, and fry them brown ia beef dripping. Be fure to let your dripping boil before you put them in; then drain them well from the fat, lay the beef in your foup-dilh, toaft a little bread very nice and bfown, cut in three corner dice, lay them into the difli,.and the turnips like wife (kirn the fat off clean, ftrain in the gravy, and fend it to table. If you have the convenience of a ftove, put the difli over it for five or fix minuter; it gives the liquor a fine flavouff pf the turnips, makes the bread eat better, and is a great addio (ion. Seafon it vyith pepper and fait to your palate

Portugal Beef.

TAKE a rump of beef, cut it ofF the bone, cut it acroft, flour it,, fry the tbin part brown in butter, the thick end ftuff with fuet, boiled chefnuts,an anchovy, an onion, and a Ittth pepper. Stew it in a pan of ilrog broth, and when it is ten der, lay both the fried and ftewed togetfaier in your difli; cut the fried in two and lay on each fide of the flrewed, flrain thp gravy it was ftewed in, put to it fome pickled gerkins chopped and boiled chefnuts, thicken it with a piece of butter rolled iii fioqr, a fpoonful of browning, give it two or three boils up ieafon it with fait to your palate, and pour it over the beef parnifh with lemon.

To'JUw a Rump of Beefy or Brifcuit the French way.

TAKEarump of beef cut it from the bone; take half a y ' -pint



4c THE art;of cookery

4nt of white port, and half a pint of red, a h'ttle vinegar, iome cloves and mace, half a nutmeg beat £ne, fome parfley chopped, and aH forts of fweet herbs, a little pepper acfd falt tntx the herbs, fpice, and wine all together; lay your beef in an earthen-pan, put th mixture over it, dnd let it lay M flight, then take the beef, and put it into a deep ftewpan, with two quarts of good gravy, the wine, &c. an onion chopped ae, ibme carrot, and two or three bay- leaves; you may put in fome thick rafhers of bacon at the bottom of jrour pan; flewr t very gently for five hours, if twelve pounds j if eight or nine, four hours and keep the ilewpan clofe covered: thcR take the meat out and ftrain the liquor through a fieve, fkion all the fat off, put it into your fiewi- pan with fome truffles and tnorels, artichoke-bottoms blanched and cut in pieces; or fome carrots and turnips cut as for hanrico of mutton; or a few fii yoys tied up in quarters and ftewed tiH tender j boil it up, feaon it with a little Cayenne pepper and fair to your palate, theit jput the meat rn juft to make it hot: diih it up. Garnifli witb jffied fippits, or lemon and beet- root,

To Jieu) Beef'Gcbbets.

GET any piece of beef, except the leg, cut lit in piecet bout the bignefs of a pullet's egg, put them in a ftewpan, cover them with water, let them liew, ikim them clean, and wJien they have flewf d an hour, take mace, cloves, and whole fcepper tied in a muflia rag Joofe, fome celery cut fmall, put them into the pan with cfome fak,. turnips and carrots pared ajidcut in flices, a little parfley, a bundle of fweet hcths, ant large cruft of bread. You may put in an ounce of barley or lice, if you like it. Cover it clofe, and let it ftew till it is tender; takeout this herbs, fpices, and bread, and have ready fried a French roll cut in four, Di(h mc all together, and fend Z to table.

$ RoyaL

TAKE a firloin of beejf, or a large rump, bone it and be it very well, then lard rt with bacon, feafon it all over with fait, pepper, mace, cloves, and nutmeg, all beat fine, fome lemon-peel cut fmall, and fome fweet herbs; in the mean time make a ftrong broth of t;he bones.; take a piece of butter with a little flour, brown it, put in the beef keep it turning often 4ill it is brown, then ftrain the broth, put all together into a 4cot, put in a bay lef, afew truffles, and fome ox palates cut imall; coyer it clofe, and let it flew till it is tender; take out the beef, ikim off all xhe fat pour in a pint of darct, fome

ricd



MADE PLAIN AND EASY fj

Iried -oyRers an anvhovy, and fome gerkins fhred foaall $ boil pll together, pot in the beef to warm, thicken your fauce with f piece of butter rolled in flour, or mufliroom powder, or but
e'r rolled in flour. Lay your meat in the di(h, pour the fauce over it apd fei
d it to table, Thi9 may be ett either hot or cold.

j( Tongue and Vdder firceJ

FIRST parboil your tongue and udder, blanch t
)e tongue nd ftick it with cloves; as for the udder, you mud carefully raifeit, and fill it with force- mea; made with veal: firft wai4
he infide with the yolk of.an egg, then put in the forcemear tie the ends clofe and fpit them, roaft them, and hade theoi with butter; when enough, have good gravy in the di(b, an4 jfweet fauce in a ciip.

Note, for variety you may lard the udder

Xo frictifey Ntats Tingues brown.

TAKE neats .tongues, boil tnem tender, peel Aem, cut Aem into thin flices, and Uy them in freih bqtter; then pour put the buttefr, put jn as ipuch gravy as you fliall want for iauce, a bundle of fweet herbs an onion, fome pepper and fair, and a blade or two of mace, a glafs of white witie, fimmer all together half ap hour then take out your tongue, ftrain the gravy, put it with the tongue in the ftew-pan again, beat up the yolks of two egg?, a little graced nutmeg, a piece of butter b;g as a walnut, rolled in flour; (hake all together for four pr five minutes. Pifh it up and fend if to tabid.

Xo force a Tongug

BOIL it till it 1$ tender; let it ftand till it is cold, then cut hole at the root end of it, take out fome of the meat, chop it with as much beef fuet, a few pippins, fome pepper and fajit, a jiftle mace beat, fome nutmeg, a few fweet herbs, and the yolks of two egg; beat all together well in a marble mortar; ftuiF it, cover the end with a veal caul or buttered paper, roaft it
afte it with butter, and difli it up. Have for fauce good gravy, a little melted butter, the juipe of an orange or lemon, and fome grated nutmeg; boil it up, and pqur it into the dilh.

To Jlew Neats Tongues whole.

TAKE two tongues, let them ftcw in water juft to cover them for two hours, then peel them, put them in again with pint of ftrong gravy, half a pint of white wineji a bundle of



44 THE ART OF COOKERY

fweet herbs, a Kttk pepper and Adt, (bone mace, cloves 9it4 wole pepper tied in a muflin rag,s a fpoonfiji of capers cbop ped, turnips and carrots fliced, and a piece of butter rolled Itk flour; let all fteW together very foftly over a flow fire for tWQ hours, then take out the fpice and fweet herbs, and fend it to table. You may leave out the turnips and carrots, or boil them by themfelveB and lay them in a diOi, juft as you like,

7i ragoo Ox Palates.

TAKE four ox palates, and boil them very tender, clean them well, cut fome in fquare pieces, and fome long; take and make a rich cooley thus: put a piece of butter in your ftew-pan and melt it, put a large fpoonful of flour to it, ftir i( well (ill it is fmooth; then put a quart of good gravy to it, chop three flialots, and put in a gill of Lifbon, cut fome lean )iam very fine and put in, alfo half a lemon; boil them twenty minutes, then ftrain it through a fieve, put it into your pan, and the palates, with fome force-meat bails, truffles and mo rels, pickled or ffetti mufltrooms ftewed in gravy; feafoti with pepper and fait to your liking, and tofs them up five or fix mi PMtes, then difl them up. Garnifli with lemon or beet-root.

Ti fricafey Ox Ptdates

AFTER boiling your palates very tender (which you muft do by fetting them on in cold water, and letting them do foft ly), then blanch and fcrape them clean; take mace, nutmeg, cloves, and pepper beat fine rub them alt over with thofe, and with crumbs o(f bfead; have ready fome butter in a ftcw-pan, and when it is hot put in the palates; fry them brown on both fides, then pour out the fat, and put to them fome mutton or beef gravy, enough Cor fauce, an anchovy, a litt:e nutmeg, a little piece of butter rolled in flour, and the juice of a lemon t kt it finuner all together for a quarter of an hour; difh It up, and garniih with lemon.

To roaft Ox Palates.

Having boilcd your palates tender, blanch them, cut them into kes about two inches long, lard half with bacon, then have ready two or three pigeons, and two or three chickenpeepers, draw them, trufs them, and fill them with forcemeat; let half of them be nicely larded, fpit them on a bfrdfjpit thus: a bird, a palate, a fage leaf, and a piece of bacon; and fo on, a bird, a palate, a fage leaf, and a piece of bacom Tc cock'sccomb$ and lambsftones, parboiled and blanched,

lard



Made plain and easy.



45



lard then with 'ttle bits of bcon large ojfters parboiled, and

cacb one larded with one piece of bacon; put thefe on a (kcwer,

with a licftle piece of bacon and a fage leaf between them, tie

them on a fpit and roaft them, then beat up the yolks of three

eggs, fotne nutqneg, a little fait, and crumbs of bread: bafte

thecn with thefe all the time they are roafting, and have redy

cwo fweetbreads each cut in two, (bme artichoke- bottoms cut

rnto foir and fried, and then rub the difli with fhalots: lay

rice birds in the middle, piled upon one another, and lay the

ether things all feparate by themfelves round about in the di(h,'

Have ready for fauce a pfntof good ravy, a quarter of a pint

of red wine, an anchovy, the oyfter liquor, a piece of butter

rotted in Hour; boil all thefe together and pour into the diib,

with a little juice of lemon. Oamifl) your diih with lemon.

To dnfs a Leg if Mutton a la Royalt.

HAVING taken oiF all the fat, fkin, and (hank-bone, lard it with bacon, feafon it with pepper and fait, and a round piece of about three or four pounds of beef, or leg of veal, lard ir have ready fome bog's lard boiling, flour your meat, and give it a cdlour in the lard, then take the meat out and put it into a pot, with a bundle of fweet herbs, fome parfley, an onion ftuck with clovest two or three blades of mace, fome whole pepper, and three quarts of gravy j cover it clofe, and let it boU very foftly for two hours, meanwhile get ready a fwectbread fpitt, cut into four, and broiled, a few truffles and morels Hewed in a quarter ( a pint of ftrong gravy, a glafs of MtA wine, a few mufhrooms, two fpoonfuls of catchup, and feme afparagus-tops; boil all thefe together, then lay the mutton in the middle of the di(h, cut the beef or veal intoflices, make a rim round yourmutton with the flices, and pour the ragoo over it; when you have taken the meat out of the pot fkim all the fac off the gravy; ftrain it, and add as much to the other as wilt fill the di(h. Garniih with lemon.,

t •

A Leg of Mktton a la Haut GoAt.

LET it hang a fortnight in an airy place, then have ready fome cloves of garlic, and fhiff it all over, rub it with pepper and fait 5 roaft it, have ready fomfe good gravy and red-wine in the difl), and; fend it to table.

To roafl a Leg of Mutton with Oyjiers

Take a leg about two or three days killed, ftuff it all over Wth oyfters, ami roaft it. Gariiifh wittx horfe-radift.

To



-



4 THE ART OF COOKERY

To roaft a Lig of Mutton with Cockles.

STUFF It all over with cockles and roaft it. Garniih wlttt horfe-radiib,

A ShouMtr of Mutton en Epigram.'

ROAST it almoft enough, then very carefully take off the Ikin about the thjcknefs of a crawnpiece, and the ihank-bpne with it at the end; then feafon that fkin and ihank-bone with

Eepper and fait, a little lemon-petl cut finally and a few fweec erbs and crumbs of bread, then lay this on the gridiron, and, let it be oi a fine brown; in the mean time uke the reft of the meat and cut it like a hah about the bignefi of a (hilling; "fave the gravy and put to iy with a few fpoonfuls of ftrong gravy, half an onion cut fine, a little nutmeg, a little pepper and fait, a iittle bundle of fweet berbs fome gerkios cut very fmall, a few muftirooms, two or three truffles cut fmHll two fpoonfuls of win, either red or white, and fhrow a little flour over the meaj;: let all thefe ftew together very foftly for five or fix minutes, but be furp it does not boil; take out the fweet herbs, and put the haih iito the difti lay the broiled upon it and fend it to table.

A Harrico of Muttor.

TAKE a neck or loin of mutton, cut it into thick chops, flour them, and fry them brown in a little butter take tbem out, and lay them to drain on a fieve, then put them into a fifwpan, and cover them with gravy; put in a wliole onion,y and a turnip or two, and ftew them till tender then take out the chops, ftrain the liquor through a fieve, and fkim off all the fat; puc a little butter in the ftewpan, and melt it with t fpoo%iful of flour, ftir it well till it is fmootb then put the liquor in, and r it well all the time you are pouring it, or it will be in lumps; put in your chops and a glafs of Lin)on % have ready ibme carrot about three quarters of an inch long aid cut round with an apple-corer, fome turryps cot with a turnip-fcoop, a dozen fmall onions all blanched well; pufP them to your meat, and feafon with pepper and fait i flew them very gently for fifteen minutes, then take out' the chop with a fork, lay them in your di(h and. pour the ragoo over it Grnifli with bet-root.

TV Trmch a Hind Saddle of Mutton .,

IT is the two chumps of the loins Cut off the ruit, dnd

carefully



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



47



arefttflj lift tip the &in with a knife: begin at the broad eod but be fare you do not crack it norfake ft quite off; then take ioine flices of ham or bacon cboppe'd fine, a few trufflet, fooic young onions, fome parfley, a little thyme, fweet marjoramy. wiolr favory, a little lemonpeel, all chopped fine, a little mace and two or three ojoves beat "fine, half a nutmeg, and a. little pepper and fait; mix all together, and throw over the meat where you took off the fkin, then lay on the ikin again,, and faften it with two iioe (kcwers at each fide, and roll it ia well buttered paper. It will take two hours roailing: then, take off the paper, bade the meat, ftrew it all over with crumbi of bread, jand when it is of a fine brown take it up. For fauce take fix large ihalots, cut them very fine, put them itito a faucepan with two fpoonfuls of vinegar, and two of white wUie;, boil them for a minute or two, pour it into the difli, and gar nifli with faorferadifh.

I

Another French Way, called St. Menehout.

TAKE the hind-part of a chine of mutton, take off the fkin,' lard it with bacon, feafbn it with pepper, fait, mace, cloves beat, and nutmeg, fweet herbs, young onions, and parfley all chopped fine; take .a large oval of a large gravy-pao, lay layers of bacon, and then layers of beef all over the bottoms lay in. the mutton; then lay layers of bacon on the mutton and then a, layer of beef, put in a pint of wine, and as' much good gravy as will fiew it, put in a bay leaf, and two or thi'ee (halotSj coYZT it clofe, put fire over and under it, if you have a clofe pan, and let it ftand dewing for two hours; when done, take it out, firew frrymbs of bread all ovor it, and put it into the oven to brown, firain the gravy it was ftewed in, and boil t till there is juft enough for fauce; lay the mutton into a difl), pour the fauce in, and ferve it up. You muft brown it before a fire, if you have not an oven.

Cutlets a la Maintenon. A very good Dijh

TAKE a neck of mutton, cut it into chops, in every chcp muft be a long bone; take the fat off the bone, and fcrape it clean; have fome bread-crumbs, parfley, marjoram, thyme, vrinterfavory, and bafil, all chopped ffne grate fome nutmeg on it, fome pepper and fait; mix thefe all together, melt a little butter in a flew-pan, dip the chop in the butter, then roll them in theherb9, and put then in half iheets of butter • psper; leave the end of the bone bare, then broil them on •1 clear fire for twenty, minutes: fend theoi up in the paper.



4 THE kVLT Of CdOfCEfeV

i

With poverroy .fluice in a boat, madtf thu; chop f6br9vala(i fuhtj put thetn n half a gill of gravf aitttle pepper ahd (ak a a rpoonlu! of vinegar) boil them ap on minoce, then pttt it in your boat.

CtUT your rtiytt'on jn little bits as thin as you caic, ftrew a little flour over it. Have ready feme gravy (enough for faoce Wherein fweet herbs, ohion, pepper, and fait, have been boil;cd; ftrain it, put in your meat, viith a little piece of buttei' rblled in flour, and a little fait, a (Halot cut fine, a few capers and gerkins chopped fine: tofs all together for a minatd or two; have ready fortic bread tbafled and, cut into thin fippets, lay thism round' the difii, and pour in your hafh. Carnifh your dith with pickles and horfe-radifh.

Note, fome love a glafs of, red wine, or walnut pickle. You may put jufl what you will into a hafh. If the fippets are toafled it is better.,

' To drefs Pigs PettjToes.

PUT your petty- toes into a faucepan with half.a pint of water, a blade of mace, a little whole pepper, a bundle of fvfcet herbs, and an onion. Let them boil five minutes, then take out the liver, lights, and heart, mince them very fine, grate a little nutmeg over them, and (hake a little flour on them; let the feet do till they are tender, then take them out; and flrain the liquor, put all together with a little fait, and a piece of butter as big as a walnut, (bake the fauce-pan often let it fjmmer five or fix minutes, then cut fome toafted fippets and lay round the difh, lay the mince-meat and fauce in the ifiiddle, and the petty-toes fpiit round it. You may add the juice of half a lemon, or a very little vinegar.



Aficond way to roqfl a Leg of Mutton with Ojiiers.

STUFF a leg of mutton with mutton fuet, fair, pepper, nutmeg, and the yolks of eggs then roafl it, flick it all avf r with cloves, and when it is about half done cut ofF fome of the under-fid of the flefby end in Irttle bits, put thefe into a pipkin with, a pint of oyfters, liquor and all, a little fait and nace, and lialf a pint of hot water: flew them till half the liquor is wailed, then put in a piece of butter rolled in flour. fluke all together, and when the mutton is enough take it up % pour this fauce over it and fend it to tble,

. ' ' ' T9



To drefs a Lig of Mutton to mi like VenifcH.

Take a hm(icquarier of mutton, and cut the teg in thb' (hape of a haunch of vcnifo.n, fav the blood of the Iheep and fieep it for five or fix hours, then take it out and roll it in three br four.fheets of white paper Well buttered on the infide, tie it with a packthread, and roaft it, bafling it witb good beefr dripping or butter. It will take two hours at a good fire, for your mutton mufl be fat and thick. About five or £nt itiirfutet; before you take it up, take ofF the paper, bafie it with a piect of butter, and (hake a little flour ovei' it to make it haie a finp froth, and then have a iitrl good drawee gravy in a hafon,' and fveet fauce in another. Do not garnifh with any thing.

To drefs Mutton the Turkijh way.

FIRST cut your oat into thin flroes, then wafli' it m vU segar, and put it ilito sw pot or faucepan that ha$ a clofe coveir tt) it, put in fooie rice, whole pepper, and three or four whofe onions; let ali thefe flew together, flcimming it frequently i wfaen it is eoough take oiu the ohbns, and feafon it vriih fait toyoui p4lat8, lay the mutton in the4iih, aifd pour the lioe aod Uuor oyr it.

Not,the neck or leg ace the befl Joints to refs this way: put ia ioc a leg foiir quarts of water,' and a quarter of a pound pf rice; to a neck two quarts of Water, and two ounces of itce To every pound of meat allpw a quartet of an hour, being clofe covered. If you put in a blade, or two of mace,' lQda buivileof fweet herbs, it will be- a great additron. When it is juil enough put in a piece of butcer, and take care the rice do not burn to the pot. In a)l thefe thjngs you fhtould lay (kewers at the bottom of the pfot cb lay your meat on, that it may not flick.

A Skdukfip of Mutton with a recnofTwrmpU

TAIE a (hoalder of mutton, get the blade-bone take oot as neat as poflSble, and in trz pFace put! a ragoo, ont k%: tike one or tVo feet- breads, fbme cock'i-com&s, half' ah ounce of trufRes fome mufhrooms, a blade or two of mace, tf little pepper and fah j ftevV all thefe in' a qularter of pint of good gravy, and thicken it viith a piece of batter roiled in" flour, or yolks of eggs, which you pleafe: let it be Oold bttfore you put it in, and fill up the place whre yoti took the booeout juft in the form it was before, and few it up tight: take a large deep flew -pan, or one of the found deep coppei

E pantf



50 THE ART OF COOKERY

I

pans with two handles, lay at the bottom thin dices of bacon, then dices of veaj, a bundle of parfly, thyme, and fwect herbs, fome" whole pepper, a blade cO two of mace, three or four cloves, a large onion, and put in Juft thin gravy enough to cover the meat j cover it clofe, and let it ftew two hour?, then takceighi'or ten turnips, pare them, and cue them into what (hape you pleafe, put thcrp into boiling water, and let them, be juft enough; throw them into a fieve to. drain, over the hot water that they may keep warm then take up the mutton, drain it from the fat, lay it in a difh, and keep it hot covered; ftrain the gravy it was ftewed in, and take ofF all the fat, put in a little fait, a glafs of white-wine, two Tpoonfuls of catchup, and a pxce of butter rolled in flour, boil them together till there is juft enough, for. fauce; then put in the turnpis, give them a boil up, pour them over the meat, and fend it to table. You may fry the turnips of a light brown, and tofs them ''up" with the fauce but chat is According to youf palate.

Note, For a change yoti may Icvc out the turnips, and add a bunch of celery cur and waflied cleah, and ftewed in a very little water, tilfit is qui:e tender, and the water almoft boiled away. Pour the gravy, as .before dlrefted, intb it, and boi'l it up till the fauce is good: or you may leave both-thefe out, and add truffles, morels, freih and pickled mufliroofhs, and artichokebottomis, ...

N. B. A (houlder of veal without the knuckle, half roafted, very quick and brown, and then done like the mutton, eats well. Do not garnifh your mtitton, but garniih ybui veal with lemon.

Tajluff a Leg, or Shoulder of Mutton,

TAKE a little grated bread, fome beef-fuet, the yolks of hard eggs, three anchovies, a bit of onion, fome pepper and fait, a little thyme and winter favory, twelve oy iters, and fome. nutmeg grated; nriix all thefe together, fhred theip very fire, work them up with raw eggs like a pafte, ftufFyoui mutton under the ikin in the thickeiF place, or where you pleafe, and rOfift it: for fauce, take fome of the oyfter liquor, fome claret, one anchovy, a little nutmeg, a bit of on:on, and a few oyftcrs j itcw all thefe together, then take out your onion, IKiur fciucG under your mutton, and fend it vo table. GarniOi With harfe-raddifli

. Oxford



MADE PLAIN AND EASY;

Oxford John.

KEEP a leg of mutton till it is ftale, cut it into thin collops, and take out all the (inews and fat, feafou them with pepper and fait, a little beaten mace, and ftrew among them a little fhred parfly, thyme, and three or four fhalots; put about a quarter of a pound of butter in a (tewpan, and make it hot, put all your collops in, keep them ftirring with a wooden fpoon till they are three parts done, and then add a pint of gravy, a a little juice of lemon, and thicken it with butter rolled in flour; let rhem fimmer four or five minutes, and they wHl be enoflgh. Take care you do not let them boil, nor have theoi ready before you want them, for they will grow hard; fry feme bread fippets, and throw over and round them and fend tbeoi up hot.

Mutton Rump a la Bratji,

TAKE fix mutton rumps, and boil them for fifteen mihtites in water take them out, cut them in- to, and put them into a few-pan with' half a pint of good gravy, a gill of white wiaej an onion ftuck with doves, a Httk fait and Cayenne pepper cover them clofe and flew them till tender; take them •ttt and the onion, fkim o£F all the fat, thicken the grvy with a Itjtle butter rolled in fliaur, a fpoonful of browning, thd juice of half a lemon; bpil it up till it is fmooth, but not too thick; put in your rumps, give therh a tofs or two, difh them up hot, Garnifh with hbrre-raddilh and beet-root.

For variety you may leave the rumps whole, and lard fix kidneys on one fide, ind do them the fame as the rumps j only not boil them, and put the rump in the middle of the diihj and kidneys round them, with faUce bvef all. The ktd heys make a pretty fde-difh of themfelve.

' ' &kJeeprRump5 with Rice

TAKE fit riimps, put them into a fteW-panj with fom inutton gravy enough to fill it; ftew them about half an hour take them up arid Tet them flaiid to coor, then put into' the li quota qiiaf ter of a pound of rice, an onioii ftuck With tloves nd a blade or two of mace; let it boil till the rice is as thick a& a pudding, but take care it do riot flick to the bottom Which you mufl do by ftirring it often: in the mean time take
i clean ftew-pan, put a piece of butter iiito it; dip your rumps ill tfie volks of eggs beat, and then in crumbs of bread with 1

t h. t littli



it TllE ART OP COOKERY

little nutmeg, lemon-peel, and a very little tbynnc in it, fry them in the batter, of a fine brown, then take them outy lay theih in dilh to drain, pour out all the fat, and t6(s the fice hto that pan; ftir it all together for a minute or tio, thdt hy the rice into the difh, and the ratnps all round upon the rice; have ready four eggs boiled hard, cat them irrtd quarters lay them round the difli with fried parffey between Ihem, and lend it to table.

To make Lamb and RUe

TAKE a neck pr loin of lamb, half roaft ie take tC iip cut it into fteaks then take half a pound of rice boiIe4 tn a quart of water ten nainutes, put it into a. quart of good gravy )vitb two or three blades of mace, and a little nutmeg. .Do H orer a ftove or Jlow fire till the rice begins to be thick then take it oiF, flir in a pound of butter, and when thai is quite melted ftir in the yolks of fix eg
9, firft beat then take a di£h and butter it all Ove, take the ftetka and. put a little pepper and fait over them, dip them in a little iBeked butter lay theol into the difli, pour the gravy whitk cornea out of them over them, and thea the rice; beat the yolks of three eggs aik) pour all over fend k to the even, and bake it belter -thsui half an hour.

A forced Leg tf LaMr

TAKE z large leg of lamb, cut a long flit on the fcack ttAt

and take out the meat, but take grcat caie you do
i6t deface

the other fide; then chop the met freall with marrow, half a

pound of beef-fuet, fomeoyfters, an anchovy w?iiied, an onion

fofne fwcct herbs, a littJe lemon-peel, and fomebeaceic nnate and

nutmegs beat all thefe together in a mprtar, ftuffit up in the

(bape It was before, few it up, and rub it over witK the yolks

of eggs beaten, fpit it, flour ft alt over, lay it to the fire, and

bafte it with butter. An hour wli i'Offft ii You may bake it,

if you pleafe, but then you muft.bujtter the difh and lay the

butter over it t cut the loin into (!eaks, (feafon ihem "with ep-

er, fait, and nutmeg,, lemon-peel cut fine, aiid a ftvr fwect

herbs j fry them in frefh-butter. of a fine browri," then pour '

but all the butter, put n a quarter of a pint of white-wine,

Ihake it about, and put iii half a pint of flrong gravy, wnere-

in good fpice has been boiled, a quarter of a pint of tyyti

and the liquor, fome muflirooms, and a fpoonful of the pickle,


a piece of butter rolled in flour, and the yolk of an egg beat j

ftir all thefe together till thick, then lay yotif ieg of lamb in

the



. f AD5 PLAIN AND EASy. 53

the ilBii and the loin round it pour the fauce o?er it, and garnifli with lemon.

To fry a Loin fjf Lamh

CUT your bmh into chopts, rub it oyer 00 both fides with the olk of an egg, and fprinkle foorve bread crumbs, a littk parfley, thyme, eafjoram, and winter fayory cbopp '₯ fine, and a little lemon peel chopped fifce; fry it in butter of a nice light brown, fend it up in a di£b by iifelf. Garni£ ivit a good deal of fried parfley.

AnHhir Way of frying a Nick or Loin rfLamb

CUT it into thin fleaks, beat them with a roliiAg-pin, fry than in half aint of ale, feafon them with a, little fait, and cover them ciofe % when enough, take them out of tbe pan, lay them in a plate before tbe fire to keep hot, and pour all out of the pan into a bafon; then put in half a pint of whitewine, a kw capers, the yolks of two eggs bat, with a lUtle nutmeg and a little fait; add to this the liquor they were fried in, and keep ftirring tt one way all tbe time till it is thick, thea put in the lamb, kep ftaking tbe pan for a minute or two jay the fteaks into the difli, pour the fauce over tbem, and have fome parflep in a plate before tbe fire to crifp Ganifli yor difli with chat and lemon,

To make a Ragoo of Lmh

TAKE a fiDre-quarter of lamb, cut the knuckle-bone oif Jard it witii little thin hh% of bacon, flour it, Uy it of a fine brown, and then put it into an earthen-pot or flew-pan: put to ic a quart of broth or good gravy, a bundle of herbs, a little mace, IV19 or three cWes, and a little whole pepper; cover it clofe, and let it ftew pretty faft for blf an hour; pour the liquor all out, ftrain it, keep the lamb hot in the pot till the fauce is ready. Take half a pint of oyfters, flour them, fry them brownc drain out all the fat clean tht you fried them in, ikim all the fat oF the ravy, then pour it in to the oyilers, put in n anchovy,, and two fpocfnfuls of either red or whitewine boil all together, till there is juft enough for fauce, add fone frefli muflirpoms (if you can get them) and fome pickled ones, with fpoonful of the pickle, or the juice of half a lemon. Lay vour lamb in the dMb, and pour the fauce over it Garnifli witn lemon.

E 3 Lami



54 THE ART OFCGOKERY

Lamb Cutlets fricafeed.

TAIE a ceg oflmb cut it in thin cutlets acrofs the grain, put them in a ftew-pan; in the mean time make fome good broth with the bones and (hank, &c. enough to cover the collops, put it into the cover with a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion a little cloves and mace tied in a muflin rag, ftew them g&ntly for ten minutes; take out the coilops, flcim the fat oiF, Und take out the Cweet herbs and mace, thicken it with butter rolled in flour, feafon it with fait and a little Cayenne pepper put in a few mufhrooms, truffles, ahd morels clean wallhed fome force meat balls, three yolks of egg's beat up in half a pint of cream, fome nutmeg grated; keep ftirring it one way till it is thick a,nd fmooth; put in your collops, give them 4 tofs up, take them out with a fork and lay them in a dtih, pour the fauce over them. Garnifli with lemon and beet root.

l,amb Cf)ops larded,

CUT the beft end of a neck of lamb in chops, and lard one fide, feafon them with beaten cloves mace and nutmeg, a lit-

fle pepper and fait j put them into a fl:ew-pan, the larded fide uppernrioft; put in half a pint of gravyj a gill of white wine an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, ftew them gently till tender; take the chops out, fkim the fat clean oflF, and take out the onion and fweet hcfbs; thicken the gravy with a little butter rolled in flour, add a fpoonful of browniiig, . a fpQonful

of ketchup, and one of lemon-pickle. Boil it up till it is fmooth, putjn the chops larded fide down, ftew them up gently for a minute or tvo; take the chops out, and put the larded fide uppermoft in the difli, and the fauce over them, Garnifh with lemon and pickles of any fort; you may add truflies and morels and pickled mufhrooms in the fauce if you pleafe or you piay do the chops without larding.

Lamb Chops en Caforole.

' CUT a lojn of lamb in chops, put yolk of egg on both fides and ftrew bread crumbs over, with a littie cloves and mace, pepper and fait mixed; fry them of nice light brown, and put them rpund in a difh clofe as you can, and leave a hole in the jmiddle to put the following fauce in: all forts of fweet herbs and parfley chopt fine, ftewed a little in fome good thick gravy, arniih with fried parfley,



MADE PLAPN AND EASY. SS

To Jlew a hamVs or Calfs Head.

FIRST wa(h it, and pick it very clean, lay it in water for

an hour, take out the brains, and with a (harp penknife care,

fully take out the bones and the tongue, but be careful you

do not break the meat; then rake out the two eyes, and take

two pounds of veal and two pounds of beef fuet, a very little

thyme, a good piece of lemon- peel minced, a notmeg grated,

and two anchovies: chop all very well together, grace two

ftale rolis, and mix all together with the yolks of four eggs:

fave enough of this meat to make about twenty balls, take half

a pint of frefti mufhrooms clean peeled and wafhedythe yolks

of fix eggs chopped, "half a pint of oyfters clean waflied, or

))ickled cockles; mix all thefe together; but firft Hew your

oyfters, put the force meat into the head and clofe it, tije h

tight with pack-'thread and put it into a deep ftew-pan, and

put to it two quarts of g'avy, with a blade or two of mace.

Cover it clofe, and let it ftew two hours; in the mean time

beat up the brains with fome lemon peel cut fine, a little pardey

chopped, half a nutmeg grated, and the yolk of an egg; have

fome dripping boiling, fry half the brains in little cakes, and

fry the balls, keep them both hot by the fire; take half an

ounce of truffles and morels, then ftrain the gravy the head was

ftewed in, put the truffles and morels to it with the liquor, and

a few muftirooms; boil all toiether, then put in the reft of

the brains that are not fried, ftt w them togetner for a minute

or two, pour it over the head, and lay the fried brains and

balls round it. Garnifli witli lemon. You may fry about

twelve oyfters and put over.

To drefs Veal a la Bourgoife,

CUT pretty thick flices of veal, lard theip with bacon, and feafon them with pepper, fait, beaten ipace, cloves, nutmeg, and chopped parfley; then take the ftew-pan and cover the bottom with flicejs of fat bacon, lay the veal upon them, cver it, and fet it over a very flow fire for eight or ten minutes, juft to be hot and na more, then brifk up votr fire and. brown your veal on both fides, then (hake fome flour. overjt and brpvyn jt j pou-r in a quart of good broth or gravy, cover jt .clofe, and le it ftew gently till it is enough; when enpugh, take out the juices of bacon, and (kim' ail the, fat offclean, and beat I'p the iroJks of three eggs with fome of the gravy; mix ali lotther,

E 1 and

I



iJB THE ART OF COOKERY

and keep it (lirrittg one W4iy till it is fmooth and thick, then take it up, lay your meat in the diib, and pour the fauce over it. Qarnii)l with lemon.

I • •

J dlfguifed Leg of Veal and Bacop.

LARp your veal all over with flips of bacons ail a little lemon-peel, and boil it with a piece of bacon: when enougb
fake it up, cut the bacon into flices, and have ready (ome dried fage and pepper rubbed fipe; fub over the bacon. Jay the veal in the ifli and the bacon round it, i
rew it all over with fried parflcy, and have greep fauce in cups, made thus; take twQ bandfuls of forrel pound it in a mortar, and fqqeee out the Vttice, put it into a fauce-pan with fome melted butter, a little fugar, and the Juice of a lemon Qr you may make it thus; heac two hanfluls of forre) in a mortar, with two pippins quar ' tered fqueee the juice out, with the juice of a lemoi; or vi pegary and fweetep it with fugar.



loiti of Veal in Epigram.

ROAST a fine loin of veal as directed in the chapter for pafting; take it up and carefully take the fliti ofFthe back part without breaking; take and cut out all the lean meat, but fnind and leave the epds whole, that it will hold the following mince meats: mince all ihe meat very fine with the kidney part, put it in a little veal gravy, enough to moiften ft with the gravy that comes from the loin put in a little pepper and fait, ibmc lemonpeel hred fine, the yolks of three eggs, a fpoonful " of catchup, and thicjcen it with a little butter rolled in flour; give it a (hake or two over the fire and put it into the loin, and then pull the flcin over; if the flin (hould not quite cover it, give it a brown with a hot iron, or put it in an oven for fifteen minutes. Send it up hot, and garziifli with barberries and lemon.

i: • '

J PiJlam; of Vfol.

TAKE a netk or breaft of veal, half roaft it, then cut it Jnto fix pieces, feafon it with pepper, fait, and nutmeg: take a pound of rice, put to it a quart of broth,' fome mace, and a little fait, do it over a ftove or very flow fire till it is thick, but putter the bottom of the difli or pan you do it in: beat up the yolks of fix eggs and ftir into i% then take a little round deepi "• dift,



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. $7

dilh, batter it, ay kmt of the rice at the bottom, then lay tht vea4 on i round heap, and cover it all over with rice, wafli it over with the yolks of eggf, and bake it an hour and a half; then open the top and poor in a pint of rich good gravy. Gar nifli with a Seville orange cut in quarters, and (end it to table hot.

Bombarded Veah

YOU muft get a fillet of veal, cut out of it five lein piecee at thick as your hand, round them up a little, then lard them very thick on the round fide with little narrow thin pieces of bacon, and lard five ihecps tongues (being firft boiled and blaached), lard there here and there with ycty litde biu of konoopetl, and make a weil-feafoned force-meat of veal, ba OMi, ham, beef-fuet, and an anchovy bc.it well; make an other tender force- meat of veal, beef-fuct, muflirooms, fpiAacb, pirfley, thyme, fweetmarjoram winter-iavory, and green onions. Sea Ami with pepper, (alt, and mace; beat it well, make a round ball of the other force-meat and ftufF in the middle of this, roll it up in a veal caulc and bake it; what is left, tie up like a Bologna-faufage, and boil it, but firft rub the caitJ with the yoJk of an egg put the larded vea into a ficw-pan with fome -good gravy, and flew it gently till it is enough;
kim qS the fat, put in fome truffles and morels, and fome mufbrooms. Your forcemeat being baked enough, lay ia the middle, the veal round it, and the tongues fried, and laid between; the boiled cut into dices, and fried, and throw all over. . Pour on them the fauce. Yuu may add artichokebottoms, fweetbreads, and cocks-combs, if you pleafe. Qar nilh with lemout

Veal R9IU.

TAKE ten or twelve little thin flices of veal, lay on them f9me force-meat according to your fancy, roll them up, and tie them juft acrofs the middle with coarfe thread, put them on a bird fpi't, rub them over with the yolks of eggs, fl.mr them, and bafte them with butter. Half an hour will do them. Lay them into a diih, and have ready fome good gravy, with a few trufles and morels, and fome mulbrooms. Ga-nifli with lemon.

Olives of Veal the French way

TAKE two pounds of veal, fome marrow, two anchovies the yolks of two hard eggs, a few mulbrooms, and fome oyf

ters



58 THE ART OF COOKEp.V

4

ters, a little thyme, marjoram, parfley, fpinacb, lemon peeU fait, pepper, nutmeg and mace, finely beaten; take your veal caul, lay a layer of bacon and a lr of the ingredients, roll it in the veal caul, and either roaft it or bake it. An hour will do either. When enough, cut it into flices, lay it into your di(h, and pour good gravy over it. Garniih with lemon.

Scotch Colhps a la Franfoife

TAKE a leg of veal, cut it very thin, lard it with bacon then take half a pint of ale boiling, and pour ovcf it till the blood is out, and then pour the ale into a bafon; take a few fweet herbs chopped fmall, ftrew them over the veal and fry it in butter, flour it a little till enough, then pour it into a difh and pour the butter away, toaft little thin pieces of bacon and lay round, pour the ale into the flew- pan with two an chovies and a glafs of white-wine, then beat up the yolks of two eggs and ftir in, with a little nutmeg, fome pepper, and, a piece of butter; (bake all together till thick, and then pout 4c into the difli. Garnifh with lemon

To make a Savoury Dijh of Veal.

CUT large collops out of a leg of veal, fpread them abroad on a drefler, hack them with the back of a knife, and dip them in. the yolks of eggs; feafon them with cloves mace nutmeg and pepper, beat fine; make force-meat with fome of your veal, beef-fuet, oyfters chopped, fweet herbs ihred fine, and the aforefaid fpice; ftrew all thefe over your collops roll and tie them up, put them on (kewers, tie them to a fpit, and roaft them; to the reft of your force-meat add a raw egg or two, roll them in balls and fry them; put them in your difh with your meat when roafted, and make the fauce with ftrong broth, an anchovy, a ftialot, a little white-wine, and fome fpice. Let ic ftew, and thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flour; pour the fauce into the difli, lay the meat in, and gaxniih with lemon,

Italian Collops.

PREPARE a fillet of veal, cut into thin flices, cut off the flcin and fat, lard them with bacon, fry them brown, then takf them out, and lay them in a difh, pour out all the butter, take a quarter of a pound of butter and melt it in the pan, then Orew in a large fpoonful of flour; ftir it till it is brown, and pour in three pints of good gravy, a bundle of fvejtt herb, ' ',, an4



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



59



ind an onion, which you muft take out loon; let it boil a litde, then put in the coilops, let them ftew half a quarter of an hour, put in fome force-meat balls fried, and a few pickled mu(hrooms,c truffles and moaeh; ftir all together, for a minute or two till it is thick; and then di(h it up. Garnifli with lemon.

To do them Whiu.

AFTER you have cut your veal in thin flices, lard it wifh hacon; feafon it with cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper and fait, Ibme grated bread, and fweet herbs. Stew the knuckle in as little liquor as you can, a bunch of fweet herbs, fome whole pepper, a blade of mace, and four cloves; then take a pint of the broth, ftew the cutlets in it, and add to it fome mulhrooms, a piece of butter rolled in flour, and the yolks of two eggs and a gill of cream j ftir all together till it is thick, and,then difli it up, Garniih with lemon.

Veal Blanqueis.

ROAST a piece of fillet of veal, cut off the (kin and nervous parts, cut it into little thin bits, put fome butter into a ftewpan over the fire with fome chopped onions, fry them a little, theQ add a duft of flour, ftir it together, and put in fome good broth, or gravy, and a bundle of fweet herbs: feafon it with fpice, ipake it of a good tafte, and tlien put in your veal, the yoJks of two eggs beat up with cream and grated nutmeg, ibnie chopped parfley, a flialot, fome lemon -peel grated, and a little juice of lemon. Keep it ftirring one way; when enough, ifli it up, '

J Shoulder, of Veal a la Piedmontoife.

TAKE a flioulder of veal, cut off the flcin that it may hang atone end, then lard the meat with bacon and ham, and feafon it with pepper, fait, mace, fweet herbs, parfley, and le mon-peet; cove; it again with the (kin, fiew it with gravy, and when it is juft tender take it up; then take forrel,. fome lettuce chopped fmall, and ftew them in fome butter with parfley, onions, and muflirooms: the herbs being tender put to them fome of the liquor, fome fweet breads and fome bits, of ham. Let all ftew together a little while; then lift up the ikin, lay the ftewed herbovrr and under, cover it with the ikin again, wet it with melted butter, ftrew it over with .crumbs of bread, and fend it to the. oven to browns ftrve it

hot,'



6o THE ART OF COOKJBRV



kor, wkh (othe good gniry in the 6iA. TM FOftdi ftfcv if over iirich parmcfan betiore it gbes Co cbc •₯!•

Caf's Head Surprize.

TAKE a alP head with the fttn on, take a fliarp knift and raife off the (kin with ai much meat from the bone aa you C3n poffibly get, fo that it may appear like a whole head when fluffed, then make a foFce-meat in the following manner: take half a pound of. veal, a pound of beef-fuet, the crumb of a. two-penny loaf, half a pound of fat bacon, beat them well in a mortar, with fome fweet herbs and parfley flired fine, fome c1ove$, mace and nutmeg beat fine, fome fait and Cayenne pepper enough to feafon it, the yolks of four eggs heat up and mixt all together in a force-meat; ftuff the bead with it, and flcewer it tight at each end; then put it into a deep pot or pan, and put two quarts of water, half a pint of white-wine, a blade or two of mace, a bundle of fweet herbs, an anchovy, two fpoonfuls of walnut and muQuoom catchup, the fame quantity of lemon pickle, a little fait and pepper; lay a coarfe pafte over it to keep in the fteam, and put it for two hours 9nd a half in a (harp oven; when you take it out, lay the head in foup di(b, km off the fat from the gravy and ftraiq it thro' a fieve into a Aewpan, thicken it With better roiled in flour, and when it has boiled a few minuies put in the yolks of four eggs well been and minced wiih half a pint of cream; hyve ady boiled fome force-meat balls, half an ounce of truffles and morels, but don't pat them into the gravy pour the gravy pver the bead, afid garniib wiih force-meat ball$ truces, morels and mufhrooms.

Sweetbreads of Veal a la Dauphhe.

TAKE the largeft fweetbreads you can get, and lard them;

tcpen them in fuch a manner as yoa can ftufF in fofcemeat

three will make a Aiie difh: make your force-meat with a

Jarge fowl or young cock; ikin at, and pick off all the flefli;

take half a pound of fat and lean bacon, cut thefe ytvy fide

and beat them in a mortar; feafon it with an aiichcvy) fotne

iiutmeg, a little lemonpeel, a very little thyme, and fome

parfley: mix theie up with the yolks of two eggs, fill your

fweetbreads and faflen them with fine wooden iktwers; tajke

the (lew- pan, lay layers of bacon at the bottom of the pan,

feafon them with pepper, fait, mace, cloves, fweet herbs

and a large onion fliced i upon that Jay thin jQtctJ$ qf veal, and

then



MADE PLAIN AND EASY 6r

ftMfti Ity on your fweetbreads; corer it clofe, let it fttnd eighf 0r ten minutes over a flow fire, tnd then poiir m quart of bciilAg wmter or broth; cover it cfofe and let it ftew twa lottrs very foftly; then talee out the fwectbfeads, keep thenr hot ttniti the gravy, ikim all the fat off, boil it up till thete ts about half a pint, put in the fwcetbreads, and give them two or three minutes ftew in the gravy, then lay them in the diih, and pour the gravy over them. Garniib with lemon.

Another Way to dreft Sweethrgiids.

DO not put any wat or gravy into the ftew-pan but put the fame veal and bacon over the fweetbreads, and feafon a under direded cover them clofe, put fire over a$ well as under, and when they are enough, take out the fweetbreids put in a ladleful of gravy, boil it, and drain it, Ikim off all the fat, let it boil till it jellies then put in the fweetbreads tQ
glaae: lay eflence of ham in the diih, and lay the fweetbread: upon it$ or make a very rich gravy with muifarooms, truffles aad morels, a glafs of white- wine, and two fpoonfuls of catchup. Garnifli with cocks-combs forced, and Aewed 141 the gravy

Note, You may add to the firft, truffief fndreIs,.nuihrooms, cocks-combs, palates, artichoke bottoms, two fpoonfuls of white-wine, two of catchup, or juft as you pleafe.

N. B. There are many ways of dreffi(g fweetbreads: you may lard them with thin flips of bacon, and roaft them with what fauce you pleafe or you may marinate them, cut them into thin fliccs, flour theni and fry them. Serve ihem up with fried pariley, and either butter or gravy. Garnifh with lemon.

Stunitbnads sft Gorditutre

TAKE three fweetbreads ami parboil therti, takfe a (tewca and lay layers of bacon or fcam antf real, over that hy tb fweetbreads on wfth the upper fide downwards, put a layer of ' veal and bacon over them, a pint of veal broth, three or four bladcsoftttace, flew them gently three c)uarfers of an hour 1 take the fweetbreads out, ftrafn off the gravy through a fieva and &im off the fat; make an aumlet of yolks of eggs in the following manner: beat up four yolks of eggs, put two in a plate, and put them ever a ftew-pan of water boiling over the Kre, put another plateovr it, and it wrll foon be done; put a little rpinacb juie info fhe ottitr hfalf, and ferve it tlie iaine

cut



6% THE ART OP COOKERY

cut it out in fprigs or what form you pUafe, and (uit it over the fweetbreads in the difli, and keep.thn as hot as you cn $ put.fome butter rolled in flour to thicken the gravy, two yoljka of eggs beat up in a gill of cream; put it over (be fire ao4 keep ftirring it one way till it is thick and finooth $ pdt it uii der the fweetbread and fend theoa up. Garnifli with lemon and beet root. .

- Calfs Chitterlings or Andomlies.

TAKE feme of the Ivgeft calf's tuts, ckanfe them, cut them in pieces proportionable to the length of the puddings ' you deiign to make, and tie one endto thofe pieces; then take, fome bacon, with a calPs 'udder and chaldron blanched, and Cut into dice or fliees, put them ihto a ftewpan and feafon with fine fpice pounded, a bay leaf, fome fait, pepper and ihalot cut fmall, and about half a pint of, cream; tofs it up, take off the pan, and thicken your mixtui-e with four or five yolks of eggs and fbme crumbs of bread, then fill up your chitterlings with the ftuflSing; keep tt warm, tie the other ends with packthread blanch and boil them like hog's chit terlings, kt them grow cold in their own liquor before joi ferve them up; boil them over a moderate fire, and ferve them up pretty hot. Theft fort of andouilies, or puddings, muft be made in fummer, when hogs are fcldom killed.

To drefs Calfs Chitterlings curioujly.

CUT a calfs nut in dices of its length, and the thicknefs of a finger, together with fome bam, bacon, and the white of chicke()s, cut after the fame manner; put the whole into a ftew-pan, feafoned with fait, pepper, fweet herbs, ' and fpice c then take the gut's cleanfed, cut and divide them in parcels, and fill them with your fltces; then lay in the bottom of a kettle or pan fome flices of bacon;ind veal, feafon them with fome pepper, fait, a bay leaf, nd an onion, and lay fome ba con and veal over them then put in a pint of witiCfWinei and let it (lew foftly, clofe covered, withfue over.andjpnder it, i the. pot or pan will allow itj then broil the.puddings on a (beet of white paper, well buttered on the infide, i,

7i drejs a Ham a la Braife

CLEAR the knuckle, take pfF the fwerd, and lay it in wa ter to fre(hen; then tie it about with a firing; take dices of bacon and beef, beat and feafon them well witti fpice and

I fwei



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 63

fweet herbs; then lay them in the bottom of a kettle with onions, with parfnips, and carrots fliced, with fome elves and parfley; lay in your ham the fat fide uppermoft, and cover it with flices of beef, and over that with dices of bacon;, then lay on fome fliced roots and herbs, the fame as under it:,cdver it clofe, and flop it clofe with pafte; put fire both ovmand under it and let- it fiew with a very fldW Are twelve isours;. put it in a pan, drudge it well with grated bread, and brown it wjth a hot iron or put it in the oven, and hakc; k one hour: then fcrve it upon a clean napkin. Garniih with raw parfley. • '

Note, If you eat it hot,, make a ragoo thus: take a real fweetbread, fome livers of fowls, cocks-combs, mu(hioont$, and truffles; tois tbem up in a pint of good gravy, feafoned with fpice as you like it,, thicken it with a piece of buuer rolled ij flour, and a glafs of red wine; then brown your ham. as above, and let it Ibnd a quarter of an hour to drain the fat out; take the liquor it was fiewed in, flrain it, fkim all the fat off, put it to the gravy, and boil it up with a fpoonful of browning. It will do as well as the efience of ham. Sometimes you may ferve it up with a ragoo of crawfifb and fometimes with carp-fauce.

To roqft a Ham or Gammon.

TAKE off the fwerd, r what we call the ikin, or rind, apd lay it in lukewarm wafec for two or three hours; then lay jt iji a pan, pour upon it a quarit of canary, and let it fleep in itjojr ten or iwIve hours. When you have fpitted it, pijit fome c Iheets of.whit paper over the fat fide, pour the. canary in w()ifti it was foaked in the dripping-pan, and bade with it all the tiqip it is toafiing; when it is roafied enough, pull off the paper, and drudge.it well with crumbled bread and parfley, (bred fine; make the fire briflc, and brown it welL If you et it hot, garniih it with rafpings of bread; if cold, ferve it on a .cean napkin, and garriiih it with green parfley for a fecond courfe.

Or thus: Take off the flcin of the ham or gammon, when you have half boiled it, nd dredge it with oatmeal fifted very fine, bafte it with butter, then roafl it gently two hours; fllr up your fire and brown it quick; when I9 done difh it up, and pour broyirii gravy in the difl. Garnifh with bread rafpings. if hoti if cold garnifli with parfley,







64 THE AfiLt OF COOKEHt

To Jluff a Chine f Pork.

MAKE a fluffing of the fat leaf of pork, parfley, tbyme fagc eggs, crumbs of bread feafoa it with pepper, fatt, iba lot, and nuteneg and ftoff it thick j then roaft it gently and when it is about a quarter roafted cut the (fein in flips: and iliake your fauce with apples, lemon- peel, two or three cloves, and a blade of mace i fwecttn it with fugar, put fome butter in and have muftard in a cup.

Variout tFays of drejjing a Pig

tIRST fkin your jpig up to the ears whole, then make af good plumb-puddiitg better, with good beef fat, fruit, eggs,milk, and flour, fill thefkin, and few it up; it will IcK)k like a j)Tg; but you muft bake it, flour it very well, and rub it stU over With butter, and when it is near enqagh, draw it to tire oven's: rriouth, rub Xx, dry, and put it in again for a few minutes; lay h in the diib, and let the fauee be fnnat gravy and butter irr the difli: cut the other part of the pig into four quarters, roaft them as you do Iamb, throw mint and parfley on it as it roafts then lay them on watercrefles, and have mint- fauce in a bafon. Any one of thcfe quarters' will make a pretty fide diib: or take one quarter and roaft, cut the other in fieaks, and fry

- tfiem fine and brown.. Have tvit fpinach in the difli, ancf lay the roaft upon it, and the fnec in the middle. Garniftx with bard eggs and Sevrlfe oranges cut into quarters, and have ibme butter in a cop: or for change you my have good gravy in the difli, and garnifh with fried parfley and kmon; •or you may make a ragoo of fwectbreads articboke-lx)ttoms,' truffles, morels, and good gravy, aitd pour over them. Garnifli with lemon. Either of thcfe will do for a top difr of a rft courfc. You may fricafey it white for a fecond cefttrfe at top, or a fide-diflt. . •

Yofi may take a pig, flcin him and fill him wlth force-meat made thus: take two pounds of young pork, fat and all, two pounds of veal the fame fome ttfge, thyme, parfley, a little Icmon-pcel, pepper, fait, nuce clovcsj and a nutmeg: mix'

' thenfi, and beat them fine in a mortar, then fill the pig, and few it up. You may either roaft or bake it. Have noching birc good gravy in the diOi. Or yoa may cut it into flices,' an lay the head in the middle. Save the head whole with the flin on, and xoaft it by itfelf; when it is enough cut it in two nd lay it in your dilk: haVe ready fome good gravy and dried



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 65

fage rubbed in it, thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flour, take out the brains, beat them up with the gravy, and pour them into the difli.

Note, You may make a very good pie of it, as you may fee in the diredions for pies, which you may either make a bot torn or fide di(h. ' .

You muft obierve in your white fricafey that you take off the fat. Or you may make, a very good difli thus: take a qjuar ter of pig (kinned, cut it into chops, feafon them with fpice, and wa(h them with the yolks of eggs, butter the bottom of a di(h, lay thefe (leaks on the difli, and upon every (leak lay Ibme force-meat the thicknefs of half a crown, mstde thtis: take half a' pound of veal, and of fat pork the fame quatitity thop them very well together, and beat them in a mortar fine; add fonie fweet herbs and fage, a little lemoil-peel, nutmeg, pepper, and fait, and a little beaten mace; upon this lay a layer of bacon or ham, and thn a bay leaf; take a little fine fkewer, and ftick juft in, about two inches long, to hold them together, then pour a little melted butter over them, and fend theni to the oven to bake; when they are enough lay theni in your di(h, and pour good gravy over them with mu(hrooms, and garnifh with lemon.

A- Pig in Jdly.

Cut it into quarters, and lay it into your ftew-pan, put iit bne calPs foot and the pig's feet, a pint of Rheni(h wine, the juice of four lemons, and one quart 'of water, three or four blades of mace two or three cloves, fome fair, and a very iittlc piece df leition peel y ftove it, or do it over a flow iire tw6 hours; then take it up, lay the pig into the difh yoU intended for it, then ftrain the liquor, and when the jelly is cold, (kini b(F the fatj and leave the fettling at the bottom. Beat up the whites of fix eggs, and boil up with the jelly about Un minutes; dnd put it through a bag till it is clear then pour the jelly bver the pigi then ferve it up cold in the jelly.

Collared Pig.

KILL a fine young roafting pig, drefs ofFthe Hair and dra; it, and wafli it clean, rip it open from one end to the other, ind take oiit all the bones;, rub it all over with pepper and fait, a little cloves and mace beat fine, fix fage leaves and fweet herbs chopt fmall; roll up your pig tight, and bind it with a filler fill the pot you intend to boil it in with foft water,

. F a bunch



66 THE ART OF COOKERY

a bunch of fweet herbt, Yome pepper-corns, fooie cloves and mace, a handful of fait, and a pint of vinegar; when the It-quor boils put in your pig; boilnt till it is tender take it up and when it is almoft cold, bind it over again put it into an . earthen pan, and pour the liquor your pig. was boiled in over it, and always keep it covered when you want it; take it out, of the pan, untie the fillet as far as you want to cut it; then cut it in (lices and lay it in your diih. Garnifii with pariley

To drefs a Pig the French way.

SPIT yoyr pig, lay it down to the fire, let it roafl till it is thoroughly warm, then cut it ofF the. fpit, and divide it in twenty pieces. Set them to ftew in half a pint of white wine, and a pint of ftrong broth, feafoned with grated nutmeg, pepper two onions cut fma,)!, and fome ftripped thyme. Let it flew ag hour, then put to it half a pint of ftrong gravy, a piece of butter rolled in flour, fome anchovie, and a fpoonful of vinegar, or muQiroom pickle: when it is enough, lay it in your di(h,' and pour the gravy over it, then garnifh with orange and lemon.

To drefs a Pig an Pere Duillet.

CUT off the head, and divide it into quarters, lard then with bacon, feafon them well with mace, cloves pepper, nutmeg, and fait. Lay a layer of fat bacon at the boitjom of 9 kettle, lay the head in the middle, and the quartej. round thet put in a bay lef, an onion fliced, lemon, carrots, parf nips, pariley, find cives; cover it again with bon p4Jt in 9 quart ofsbrotb, ftew it over the fire for an hour, and theo tatc it up; put your pig into a ftew-pan or kettle;, pour in a bottle of white wine, cover it clofe, afid let it ftew for an hour very fofdy. If you would ierve it cold, let it ftand till it is cold then drain it well, and wipe it that it may look whitc ad lay it in a difti with the head in the middle, d the quarter round, then throw fome green parfley all over: or any one of the quarters is a pretty little difti, laid on water creftes. If you would have it hot, whilft your pig is flewing in the wine, take the firft grvy it was ftewed, and ftiajn it, fkim off iJl the fa% ' then take a fiveetbread cut into five or fix flices, fome trMes, niorels, and muftirooms; ftew all together till they are enough, thicken- it with the yoJks of two eggs, or a piece of butter rolled in flour, and when your pig is enough take jt out, and

'9 . . y



I



Made plain and easy.



67



ky it in your dtfli; put the wine it was ftewcd in to the ragoo, theo pour all over the pig, and garnilh with lemon.

A Ph Matelote.

GUT aiid fcajd .your pig, cut off the head and petty-toes,

then cut your pig io four quarters, put them with the head

and toes into cold water; cover the bottom of a ftewpan with

fliccs oi bacon, and place over them the faid quarters, with the

pettyctoc8 aiid the bead cut in two. Seafon the whole with

pepper, fait, thyme, hayleaf, an onion, and a bottle of white

wine; lay over more flices of bacon, put over it a quart of wa

ter, and let it boil. Take two large eels, (kin and gut them,

and cut them about five or fix inches long; when your pig is

half done, put in youreels then boil a dozen of large craw-

ii(h, cut off the claws, and take off the fhells of the tails; and

when your pig and eels are enough, lay firft your pig and th

petty-toes round it, but do not put- in the head (it will be a

pretty difh cold) then lay your eels and craw-fifh over them,

and take the liquor they were flewed in, fkim off all the fkt

then add to it half a pint of flrong gravy, thickened with a little

piece of butter rolled in flour, and a fpoonful of browning, and

pour over it then gamifh with craw-iifh and lemon. This

ill do for a firfl courfe, or reiliove. Fry the braixc8 and lay

round, and all over the difh. %

To drefi a Pig like a fat Lamb

TAE a fatptg, cut off his head) flit and trufs him up like X lamb; when he is flit through the middle and (kinned, parboil hinv a little then throw fpme parfley over him, roaft it and drudge it. Let your fauce be half a pound of butter and a pint of cream, ftirring all together till it is fmooth; then popr it over and fend it to table.

Barbicuei Pig.

HAVINij drefl a pig ten or twelve weeks old, as if yott intended to roaft it, make a force-meat in the follojving manlier: take the liver of the pig, two anchovies, and fix fage leaves chopped fmall; put them into a 'marlrie mortar, with the crumbs of a penny loaf, half a pint of Madeira wne, four ounces of butter, and hclf a tea-fpoonful of Cayenne 'pepper, beat them all together to a pafle, put it into your pig's, belly, and few it up; lay your pig down, at a good diftance, before a large brifk fire put inttc your dripping-pan two bottles of " F 2 red



' c



6S



THE ART OF COOKERY



red wine, and one of Madeira, bafte it with the wine all the time it is roafiing, and when it is half roafted, put two penny loaves under the pig; if there is not wine enough put in riore, and yhen the pig is hear done, take the loaves and fauce out of the pan, and put to the fauce half a lemon, a bundle of fweet herbs, an anchovy, chopped fmall, boil it five minutes and then draw your pig when it. has roafted four hours; put into the pig's cnouth an orange or lemon, and a loaf on each fidc; fkim off the fat, and ftrain your fauce through a fieve, and pour over the pig boiling hot; ferve it up garntflied with lemon and barberrieb; or you may bake it, only keep it bafting with wine.

To make a pretty Dijh ef a Breaft of Venifon,

TAKE half a (iound of butter, flour your vcnifon, and ffy it of a fine brown on both fides; then take it up and keep it hot covered in the difti: take, feme flour, and ftir it into the butttr till it is quite thick and brown (but take great care it do not burn), ftir in half a pound of lump-fugar beat fine and polir n as much red wine as will make it of the thicknefs of a ragoo; fquecze in the juice of a lemon,, give it a boil up, and pour it over the veniion. Do not garniih the difti, but fend it to table.

To boil a Haunch or Heck of Ventfon.

LAY it in fait for a week, then boij it in a doth well floured J for every pound of venifdn allow a quarter of an hour for the boiling. For fauce you muft boil fome cauliflowers, pulled into little fprigs, in milk and water, fome flne white cabbage fome turnips cut into dice, with fome beet- root cut into long narrow pieces, about an inch and a half long, and half an inch thick: lay a fprig of cauliflower, and fome of the turnips itiafhed with. fome cream and a little butter; let your cabbage be boiled, and then beat in a fauce-pan with a piece of butter and fait, lay that next the cauliflower, then the turnips, the.o. cabbage and io on till the difli is full; place the beet-rpot here and there, juft as you fancy; it loolfLS very pretty, and is a fine difh. Have a little melted bu'tter in a cup, if wanted •

Note, a leg of mutton cut venifon falhion, and dreflied the fame way, is a pretty difh; or a fine neck, with the fcrag cut ofl. This eats well boiled, or hafhed, with gravy and fweet fauce, the next day.

To



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



69



. To drefs POULTRY.

To roajl a Turkey. '

THE befi way to roaft a turkey is to loofen the flcin on the hreaft- of the turkey, and fill it with force-meat, made thus: take a quarter of pqund of beef-fuet, as many crumbs of bread, a little lemon -peel, an anchovy, fome nutmeg, pepper, pariley, and a little thyme. Chop and beat them all well together, mix them with the yolk of an egg, and flufF up the breaft j when you have .no fuct, butter wiIJ do: or you may make your force-meat thus; fpred bread and butter thin, and grate fome nutmeg over it; when you faae enough roll it up, and ftui£ the breaS of the turkey; then roaft it of a fine brown but be fure to pin fome white paper on the breaft till it is near enough You muft have good gravy in the difh, and breadfauce made thus: take a good piece of crumb, put it into a pint of water, with a blade or two of mace, two or three cloves, and fome whole pepper. Boil it up five or fix times, then witli a fpoon take out the fpice you had before put in, and then you n)u ft pour off the water (you may boil an onion in it if you pleafe); then beat up the bread with a good piece of butter and a little fait. Or onion-fauce, made thus: ' take fome onions, peel them, and cut them into thin flices, and boil them half an hour in milk and water; then drain the water from c them, and beat them up with a good piece of butter; fliake a' little flour in, and ftir it all together with a little cream, if you W it (or milk will do put the fauce into boats, and garJJifli with lemon., '

Another way to make fauce: take half a pint of oyfters, fttain the liquor, and put the oyfters with the -liquor into a fauee-pan, with a blade or two of mace; let them juft lump, then pour in a glafs of white wine, let it boil once, and thick en it with a piece of butter rolled in flour. Serve this up in a hafofl by itfelf, with good gravy in the di(h, for every body does not love oyfter-fauce. This makes a pretty fide-difh for fu per,, or a corner-difli of a table for dinger. If you chafe it in thedifli, add half a pint of gravy to it, and boil it up together. Thijs fauceis good either with boiled or roafied turkies or fpwls but you may leave the gravy out, adding as much but ter as will do for fauce, and garniChing with lemon.

Another bread-fauce. Take fome crumbs of bread, rubbed

through a fine cullender, put to it a pint of milk, a lUtle but

' 3 %



70 THE ART OF COOKERY-

ter, and fome fait, a few corns of white pepper, and an onion boil them for fifteen minutes, take out the onion and beat it up weii then tois it up, and put in your fauce-boats.

A White Sauce for Fowls or Chickenu

TAKE a little ftrong veal gravy, with a little white pep per, mace, and fait, boiled in it; have it clear from any flciii or fat; as much cream, with a little flour mixed in the cream, a little mountain wine to your liking; boil it up gently for five muntes, then flrain it over your chickens or fowls, or ia boats.

To make a mock Oyjier-faucs either for Turkies or Fowls hileef

FORCE the turkies or fowls as above, and make your fauce thus: take a quarter of a pint of water, an anchovy, blade or two of mace, a piece of lemon peel, and five or fix whole pepper-cors. Boil thefe together, then ftrain them
add as much butter with a little flour as will do for fauce; let it boil, and lay.faufages round the fowl or turkey. Garnifl with lemon.

To make Mujhroom- fauce for white Fowls of all Sorts.

TAKE a cjuart of frefli mufhrooms, well cleaned and wafh ed, cut thefn in two, put them in a ftew-pan, with a littl butter, a blade of mace, and a little fait; flew it gently for half an hour, then add a pint of cream and the yolks of tWQ eggs beat very well, and keep ftirring it til it boils up j then fqueeze half" a lemon, put it over your fowls, or turkies, or in bafons, or in a diib, with a piece of French bread firft buttered, then toafted brown, and ju& dip it in boiling waters put it in the difi), amd the mufhrooms over,

Mvjhroom'fauce for while Fowls boiled,

TAKE half a pint of cream, and a quarter of a potind of butter, ftir them together one way till it is thick; then add a fpoonful of mufliroom pickle, pickled mufhrooms, or frelh if you have them. Garhilh only with lemon.

To make Celery - fauce y either for rqafled or boiled Fowls Turkis

Partridges J or any other Game. . .

_

TAKE a large bunch of celery, waft and pare it very clean, 'Cut it into little thin bits, and boil it fofdy in a little watet till'

It



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



7



it is tender; then add a little boaten mace, fome nutmeg, pepper and fale, thickened with a good piece of butter rolled in flour; then boil it up, and pour in your difli.

You may make it with cream thus: boil your celery as above, and add fome mace, nutmeg, a piece of butter, as big a$ a walnut, rolled in flour, and half a pint of cream; boil them all together

To make brown CeUry-faucu

STEW the celery as above, then add mace, nutmeg, pepper, fait, a piece of butter rolled in flur, with a glafs of red wine, a fpoonful of catchup, and half a pint of good gravy; boil all thefe together, and pour into the di(h Garnilh with

le:Bon

7i Jlew a Turiey or Fowl in CeUry-fauce.

YOU muft judge according to the largenefs of your turkey or fowl, what celery or fauce you want. Take a large fowl, put it into a fauce-pan or pot, and put to it ope quart of good broth or gravy, a bunch of celery waflied clean and cut fmall, with fome mace, cloves, pepper, and all-fpice, tied loofe in a muilin rag put in an onion and a fprig of thyme, a little fait and Cayenne pepper; let thefe ftcw foftly till they are enough, then add a piece of butter rolled in flour take up your fowl, and pour the fauce over it. An hour will do a large fowl, or a fmall turkey $ but a very large turkey will take two hours to ci6 it foftly. if it is overdone or ctry, it is fpoiled; but you may be a judge of that, if you look at it now and then. Mind to take out the onion, thyme, and fpice, before you fend it to table.

Note, a neck of val done this way is very good, and will fake two hours doing.

To make 'gg-fquce prop&for roajied Chickens.

MELT your butter thick and fine, chop two or three hard-,, boiled eggs fine, put them into a bafon, pour the butter over them, and have good gravy in the difli.

Shalot'fauce for roajled Fowls

XAKE fix ihalots chopped fine, put them into a fauce-pan With a gill of gravy, a fpoonful of vinegar, fome pepper -and fait, -ftew them for a minute; then pour them into your difli, r put ic in fauce-boats.

' Fa Carrier



t I



THE ART OF COOKERY

Carrier Sauce.,

TAKE a Spaniih onion, and cut it in thin dices, put it into a deep plate, take half a pint of boiling water, with a fpoonful of vinegar, a little pjcpper and fait, and pour jt over the onion.

Sbalot fauce for a Scra of Mutton boiled.

TAKE two fpoonfuls of the liquor the mutton is boiled in, two fpoonfuls of vinegar, two or three fhalots cut fine, with a little fait; put it into a fauce pan, with a piece of butter as big as a walnut rolled in a little flour;.ftir it together, and give it a boil. For thofe, who love ftialot, it is the pitieft fauce that can be made to a fcrag of mutton.

To drefs Livers 'with Muflirootn- fauce.

TA(C£ fome pickled or frefh muOirooms cut fmall; both if you have them; and let the livers be bruifed fine, with a good deal of parfley chopped fmall, a fpoonful or two of catch up, a glafs of white wine, and as much good gravy, as will .aiake fauce enough; thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flour. This docs either for roafted or boiled.

A pretty little Sauce.

TAKE the liver of the fowl, bruife it with little of ther liquor, cut a little lc
;noncpeel fine, melt fome good butted, and mix the liver by degrees; give it a boil, and pour it into the di(b.

To maie Lemon-fauce for boiled Fowls.

TAKE a lemon and pare ofi' the rind, cut it into dices, and take the kernels out, cut it intofquare bits, blanch the li-. ver of the fowl, and chop it fine j mix the lemon and liver together in a boat, and pour fome hot melted butter on it, and Itir it up. Boiling of it will make it go xo oil.;

A German way of drejjing Fowls.

TAKE a turkey or fowl, fluff the breaft with virhzt forcemeat you like aind fill the body with roafied chefnuts peeled. Roafl it, and have fome more roafled chefiiuts peeled, put them n half a pint of good gravy, with a little piece ofbutter rolled in flour i boil tbefe together, with fome fmall turnips and fau.

fagcf



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 73

I _

fave cut in flices, and fried or boiled. Garnifl) with chdhuts. You may leave the turnips out. Note, You may drefs ducks the fame way.

To drejs a Turkey or Fowl to perfe£Jion.

BONE them and make a force-meat thus: take the flefli of a fowl, cut it fmalj, then take a pound of veal, beat it in a inortar, with half a pound of beef-fuet, as much crumbs of bread, fume muflirooms, truffles and -morels cut fmall, a ftw fweet herbs and pariley, with fome nutmeg, pepper, and fait, a little mace beaten, fome Jemon peel cut fine; mix all thefe together, with the yolks of two eggs, then fi!l your turkey and roaft it. This will do for a large turkey, and fo in proportion for a fowl. Let your fauce be good gravy, with muh looms, truffles,, and mv)rel$ in it r then garniih with lemon, M f or variety fake you may lard your fowl or turkey.

Tojiew a Turkey brown.

TAKE your turkey, after it is nicely picked and drawn, fill the (kin- of the breaft with force-meat, and put an anchovy, alhalot, and a little thyme in the belly, lard the breaft with bacon, then put a good piece of butter in the (lew-pan, flour thjB turkey, aiid fry it juft of a fine brown; then take it out, and put it into a deep flew- pan, or little pot, that will juft hold it, and piit in, as much gravy as will barely cover it, a glaif of 3vhite wine, fome whole pepper, mace, two.or three cloves and a little bundle of fwett herbs; cover it clofe, and ftew it for an hour, then take up the turkey, and keep it hot covered by the fire, and boil the fauce to about a pint, ftrain it off, add the yolks of two eggs, and a piece of butter rolled in flour J ftir it till it is thick, and then lay your turkey in the di(b, and pour your fauce over it. You may have ready fome little French loaves, about the bignefs of an egg, cut ofF the tops, and take out the crumb then fry them'of a fin brown, fill them with fiewed oyfters, lay them round the di(b, and garniih with lemon.

To Jim a Turkey brown the nice way.

BONE it, and fill it with a force-meat made thus: take the flefh of a fowl, half a pound of veal, and the flefli of two pigeons, with a well pickled or dry tongue, peel it, and chop it all together, fhen beat in a mortar, with the marrow of a beef

)cone, or a pound of the fat of a loin of vfeal: fcafoh it with

••'''

two



74



THE ART OF COOKERY



two Of three bUdes of mace, two or three doves, and half a nutmeg dried at a good diftance from the fire, and pounded with'a little pepper and fait: mix all thefe welf together, £U your turkey, fry them of a fine brown, and put it into a little pot that will jufl hold it i lay four or five fkewers at the bottom of the jot, to keep, the turkey from flicking; put in a quart of good beef and veal gravy, wherein was boiled fplce and fweet herbs, cover it clofe, and let it flew half an hour % then put in a glafsof white wine, one fpoonfui of catchup, a large fpoonful of pickled mufhrooms, and a few frelh ones, if you have them, a few truffles and morels, a piece of butter'as big as a walnut rolled in flour; cover rt clofe, and let it ftew . half atx hour longer; get the litde French rolls ready fried, take fome oyfters, and ftraln the liquor from them, then put the oyfters and liquor into a fauce-pan, with a blade of mac, a little white wine, and a piece of butter rolled in flour; Uc them ftew till it is thick, then fill the loaves, lay the turkey in the diih, and pour the fauce over it. If there is any fat on the gravy take it ofF, and lay the loaves on each fide of the turkey. Garhifh with lemon when you have no loaves, and take oyfter dipped in butter and fried.

Note, The fame will do for any white fowl

j Fo%ul a la Braife'.

TRUSS your fowl, with the leg turned into the belly, fea fon it both infide and out, with beaten mace, nutmeg, pepiper and fait, lay a layer of bacon at the bottoqn of a deep ftew-pan, then a layer of veal, and afterwards the fowl, then put in aii onion, two -or three cloves ftuck in a little bundle of fweet herbs, with a piece of carrot, then put at the top a layer of bacon, another of veal, and a thirJ of beef, cover it cloie, and let it flrand over the fire fortwo or three minutes, then pour in a pint of broth,- or hot water; cover it clofe, and let it flew an houi-j afterwards take up your fowl, flrain the fauce, and after you have fkimmed ofFthe tat, boil it down till it is of a glas, then put it over the fowl. You may add juft what you'pleafe to the fauce. A ragoo of fweet- breads, cock's- combs, truffles, and morels, or mufhrooms, with force-meat balls, look very ry pretty, or any of the fauces above.

To force a FowL

TAKE a good fowl, pick and draw it, flit the (kin down the back, and take the liefh from the bones j
mince it very

fmalL



• MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 75

finally and- mix it with one pound of beef- fuet Ihred, a pint of large oyfterft chopped, two anchovies, a (balot, a little grated bread, and fome fweet herbs; (bred all this very well, mix them together, and make it up with the yolks of eggs; then turn all thefe ingredients on the bones again, and drafw the &in over again; then few up the back, and either boil th€ fowl in a bladder an hour and a quarter, or roaft it i 'then flew fome more oyftets in gravy, bruife in a little of your force meat, mix it up with a litde frefli butter, and a yry little 0our; tbeo give it a boil, lay your fowl in the diih, and pouf the fauce oyer it, garnifhing witli lemon.

Tp roaft a Fowl with ChefnuU

FIRST take fome chefnuts, roaft them txy carefully, fo at Aot to burn them;,take off the Ikin and peel chem; take about a dozen of them cut fmall, and bruife them in a mortar par boil tfie liver of the fowl, bruife it, cut about a quarter of a ' pouad of hajh or bacon, and pound it; then mix them all tojgcther with a good deal of parfley chopped fmall, a little fwtct perbs, fome mace, pepper, fait, and nutmeg; mix thefe together and put into your fowl, and roaft it. The beft Way of doing it is to tie the neck, and hang it up by the legs to roaft with a ftring, and bafte it with butter. For fauce, take the reft of the chefnuts peeled and fkinned; put them into fome good gravy, with a little white wine, and thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flour; then tajce up your fowl, lay it in the difh, and pour in the fauce. Garnifh with lemon

Pullets a la Sainte Menehout.

AFTER having truiTed the legs in the body, flit them along the back, fpread them open on a table, take out the thighbones, and beat them with a rolling-pin; then feafon them with pepper, fait, mace, nutmegs and fweet herbs; after that take a pound and a half of veal, cut it into thin flices, and lay it in a ftew-pan, of a convenient fize, to ftew the pullets in: cover it, and fet it ovr a ftove or flow fire; and when it begins 0 cleave to the pan, ftir in a little flour, fliake the pan about till it be a little brown; then pouj in as much broth as wilt flew the fowls, ftir it together, put in a little whole pepper, an jonioo, and a little piece of bacon or bam; then lay in, your fowls, cover them clofe, and let them ftew half an hour j then take them out, lay them on the gridiron to brown on the in fide; then lay them before the Are to do on the outfide; ftrew

them



76 THE ART OF COOKERY

thjcm over with the yolk of an egg, fooie crumbs of bread, ancf bafte them with a little butter: let them be of a fine brown, and boil the gravy till there is about enough for fauce; ftrain it, put a few m.uflirooms in, and a little piece of butter rplled in flour; lay the pullets in the diih, and pour in the fauce. G.arnKh with lemon.

Note You may brown them in the oven, or fry theip, which you pleafe.

Chicken Surprize.

IF a fmall di(h, one large fowl will do; roaft it, and take the lean from the bone; cut it in thin flices, about an inch long, tofs it up with fix or feven ipoonfuls of cream, and a pieco of butter rolled in flour, as big as a walnut. Boil h up snd fet ft, to cool; then cut fix or feven thin flices of bacon round, place them in a petty-pah and- put fome force-meat on each fide; work them up in the form of a French roll, with a raw egg in your hand, leaving a hollow plaice inthe middle; put in your fowl, and cover them with fome of tjie me forcemeat, rubbing; them fmooth with your hand and a raw egg; make them of the height and bignefs of a French roll, and throw a little floe grated bread over them. Bake them three quarters, or an hour, in a gentle oven, or under a baking cover, till they come to a fine brown, and place them on your mazarine, that they may not touch one another but place them fo that they may not fall fiat in the baking; or you may form them on your table with a broad kitchen knife, and place them on the thin2 you intend to bake them on. You may put the leg of' a chicken into one of thje loaves you intend for the middle. Let your fauce be gravy, thickened with butter and a little juice of lemon. This is a pretty fide-difh for a firfl courfe, fummer or winter, if you can get them.

Mutton Chops in Difguifi.

TAKE as many mutton-chops as you want, rub nem with pepper, fait, nutmeg, and a little parfley; roll each chop in half a (heet of white paper, well buttered on the infide, and . rolled on each end clofe. Have fome hog's lard, or beef- drip- . ping, boiling in a ftew-pan j put in the fieak$, fry them of a,fine brown, lay them in your di(h, and gamifli with fried parfley j throw fome all over, have a little good gravy in a cup'5 but lake great care you do not break the paper, norhav?, any fat in the difii but let them be well drained.

Chickent



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. t

Chickens roafted with forameat and eucumiers

TAKE two chickens, drefs them very neady, break the breaft-bone; and make force-meat thus: take the flefli of a fowl, ahd of two pigeons, with fome flices of ham or bacon; cho
i them all well together, take the crumb of a penny-loaf foaked in milk and boiled, then fet to cool; when it is coo! mix it all together; feafon it with beaten mace, nutmeg, pepper, and a little fait, 9 very little thyme, fome parfley, and a little lemon-peel, with the yolks of two eggs j then fill your fowls, fpit them, and tie them at both . ends; after you have papered the breaft, take four cucumbers, cut them in two, and lay them in fait and water two or three hours before; then dry them, and fill them with fome of the force-meat (which you mufl takecare to fave), and tie them with a packthread; flour them, and fry them of a fine brown; when your chickens are enough, lay them in the di(h, and untie your cucumbers; but take care the meat do not come out ) then lay them round the chickens, with the flat fide downwards, and the narrow end upwards. You mufl have fome rich fried gravy, and pour in to the difh; then garnifh with lemon.

Note, One large fowl done this way, with the cucumbers laid round it, looks pretty, and is a very good difh.

Chickens a la Braife.

YOU muft take a couple of fine chickens, lard them, and ftzfon theni with pepper, felt, and mace; then lay a layer of veal in the bottom of a deep flew- pan, with a flice or two of bacon, an onion cut to pieces, a piece of carrot, and a layer of beef; then lay in the chickens with the breaft downward, and a bundle of fweet herbs; after that, a layer of beef, and put in a quart of bfoth or water; cover it clofe, let it ftew very foftly for an hour, after it begins to iimmer. In the mean time, get ready a ragoo thus: take a good veal fweetbread, or two, cut them fmall, fet them on the fire, with a very little broth or water, a few cock's-combs, truffles, and morels, cut fmall with an oxpalate, if you have it; flew them 11 together till they are enough; and when your, chickens are done, take them up, and keep them hot; then ftraip the liquor they, were ftewed in, fkim the fat off, and pour into your ragoo; add a glai of red. wine, a fpoonful of catchup, and a fe ftiufhrooms; then boil all together, with a few artichoke- bottoms cue in fouT) and afparagustops If your fauce is not

thick



tut AitT dP Cc)OItERY

thick enough, take a little pice of butter rolled in flour anct ihen enough, lajr your chickens in the difli, and pour the ra goo over thttn OarniQi with lemon.

Or you may make your fauCe thus: take the gravy the fowls were newed in, ftrain it, fkim oUt the fat; have ready half si pint of oyfters, with the liquor ftrained-; put them to your gravy, with a glafs'of white wine, a good piece of butter rolled in flour s then boil them all together and pour over your fowls. Garnifli with lemon.

To marinate PowU.

TAKE a fine large fowl or turkey, raife the &iii from tbcr breaft-bone with your finger; then take a veal fweetbrcia nd cut it fmall, a few oyfters, a few muflirooms, an anciovy fome pepper, a little nutmeg, fome lemon-peel, and a littW thyme chop all together- fmalj, and mix it with the yolk of an egg, fltuiF it in between the (kin and the fleih; bul tale grat care you do not break the (kin i and then ftuff what pyfters you pleafe intcthe body of the fowl You may lard the bieA of the fowl with bacon, if you chufe it. Paper the breiiifl; ao4 road it. Make good gravy, and garniih with kqioiu Yoil ipay add a itw muihrooms to the fauce

7i broil Chickens,

SLIT them down the back, and feafod them with peppef and fait; lay them on a very clear fire and at a great diftance. Iet the infide lie net the fire till it is above half done; then turn them, and take great care the jGiefhy fide do not burnj a
id Jet them be of a fine brown. Let your fauce be good gravy, with mufliroams, and garoifli with lemon and the livers broiled, the gizzards cut, flafhed, and broiled with pepper and fait.

Or this fauce: take a handful of fofrel dipped in boiling water, drain it, and have ready half a pint of good gravy, a ihalot (bred fmall, and fome pariley boiled very green; thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flour, and add a glafs of red wine; then lay your fprrel in heaps round the fowls, and pouf the fauce over them. Garnifh with lemon.

Note, You may make jufl: what fauce you fancy

Pulled Chickens.,

TAKE three chickens, boil them jufl fit for eating, but iKrt too much s when they are boiled enough, flay all the &in pff

y and



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 79

tnd take the white fle(h off the bones, pull it into pieces abovt as thick as a large quill, and half as long as your finger Have ready a quarter of a pintof good cream, and a piece of freih butter about as big as an egg; ftir them together till the butter is all melted, and then put in your chicken with the gravy that caoie from them; give them two or three tofles round on the fire, put them into a di(h, and fend them up hot.

Note, The legs, pinions, and rump muft be peppered and falted, done over with the yolk of an egg and bread crumbs, and broiled on a clear fire; put the white meat, with the rump, in the middle, and the legs and pinions round.

A prttty wayrfjlewing Chickens.

TAKIE two fine chickens, half boil them, then take thenj ipln a pewter, or filver di(h, if you have one cut up your fowls, and feparate alt the joint-bones one from another, and then take out the breaft-bones. If there is not liquor enough from the fowls, add a few fpoonfuls of the water cbey were boiled IP, put in a blade of mace, and a little (alt i cover it dofe with another difli; fet it over a ftove, or chafing-difh of coats; let it ftew till the chickens are enough, and then fend tlicm hot to the table in the fame difli they were fie wed in.

Note, This is a very pretty difli for any fick perfon, or for a lying-in lady. For change it is better than butter, and the faucc is very agreeable and pretty.

N. B. You may do rabbits, partridges, or moor-game this way. '

Chickens Chiringrate.

CUT off their feet, break the breaft-bone flat with a rolling-pin; but take care you do not break the (kin; flour them, fry them of a fine brown in butter, then drain all the fat out of the pan, but leaive the chickens in. Lay a pound of gravy beef, cut very thin, over your chickens, and a piece of veal cut very thin a little mace, two or three cloves, fome wholepepper, an onion, a little bundle of fweet herbs, and a piece of carrot, and then pour in a quart of boiling water; cover it elofe, let it dew for a quarter of an hour then take out the ctiickens and ksep them hot: let the gravy boil till it is quite rich and good; then ftrain it off and put it into your pan again, with two fpoonfuls of red wine and a few muflirooms; put ill your chickens to heat, then take them up, lay them into your difb, and pour your fauce over them. Garnifli with lemon and a few flices of cold ham broiled.

Note,



to THE ART OF COOKERY

Note, You may fill your chickens with force-meat, and hf them with bacon, and add truffles, morels and fWeetbreadsj cut fmall; but then it will be a very high difh..

Chickens toiled with Bacon and Celery

BOlL two chickens very white in a pot by themfelves, anq a piece of ham, or good thick bacon;.boil two bunches of cd lery tender; then cut them about two inches, long, all tt white part; put it into a fauce-pan with half a pint of preatn m piece of butter rolled in flour, and fome pepper and fait; fet it on the fire, and (hake it often: when it is thick and fine, lay your chickens in the diOi, and pour your fauce in the mid- die, that the celery may lie between the fowls; and garnifii the difh all roun,d with flices of ham or bacon.

Note, If you have cold ham in the houfe, .that, cut into Sices and broiled, does full as well, or better, to lay round the dilh.

Chickent with Tonues. A good Dijh fot a gtedi deal of CofHpdHym

TAKE fix fmall chickens, boiled Very white, fix hogs tongues boiled and peeled, a cauliflower boiled very white in milk and water whole, and a good deal of fpinach boiled green; then lay your cauliflower in the middle, the chickens clofe all round, and the tongues round them with the roots outward 4Dd the fpinach in little heaps between the tongues. Garnifh with little pieces of bacon toafted, and lay a little piece oh each of the tongues

Scotch Chickens.

, FIRST wafh your chickens, dry them in a clean cloth, and linge them; then cut them into quarters; put them into a flew- pan or (aucepan and juft cover them with water; put in a blade or two of mace, and a little bundle of parfley; cover them clofe, and let them flew half an hour; then chop half n handful of clean wafhed parfley, and thj-ow in, and have ready fix eggs, V whites and all, beat fine. Let your liquor boil up and pour the eggs all over them as it boils.; then fend all to.-c gether hot in a deep difh, but take out the bundle of parfley firft. You muft be fure to (kirn them welj before you put ia your mace, and the broth will be fine and clear.

Note, This is alfo a very pretty difh for fick people; but the Scotch gentlemen are very fond of it



MADE PLAIN AND ESY, 8t

To fiew Chickens the Dutch way

. TAKE two chickens, trufs them as for boiling; beat fine fix cloves, and four blades of mace, a handful of parfley hrcd jRoe, fome pepper nd fait; mix all togiether, and put into the jnfide of your chickens; finge them and flour them j piit them into a ftew-pan j clarify as much butter as will cover them; flew them gently one hour; put them into a china, bowl With the butter and fdnd them up hot

•: djew aickehs.

TAKl two chickens, cut them into quarters, wafli them clean, and then put them into a fauce-pan $ pOt tothem a quarter of a pint of water, half a pint of red wine fome mace, pepper, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, and a few rafpings; cover them clofe, let them ftew half an hour j then take apiece of butter about as big as an egg, rolled in floury put in, and cover it clofe for five or fix minutes; fliake the fauce-4)aii about, then take out the fweet herbs. and. onion. You itiay take the yolks of two eggs, beat and mixed with them if yott do not like it, leave them out; Garnifh With lemon

Ducks Alaniode.

TAKE two fine ducks, cut them into quarters, fry them In ibutter a little brown J then pour out all the fat and throw little flour over them, and half a pint of good gravy, a quarter of a pint of red wine, two flialots air anchovy, and a bun die of fweet herbs j cover them clofe, and let them flew a quarter of an hour; take out the herbs, fkim ofF the fat, and kt your fauce be as thick as cream fend it to table, and garniih with lemohi

'to drefi a TFild Dtick the hiji way.

. FIRST half roaft it, then lay it in a difli, carve it, but leave the joints" Hanging toeethcr; throw a little pepper and fait, and fqueeze the juice oT a lerhon over it; turh it on the bread, and prefs it hard With a plate, and add to its own gravy two or three fpoonfuls of good gravy j cover it clofe with another difh, ahd fet it dver (fove ten minutes; then fend it to table hot in the di(h it was done in, and garniih with lemon. You rriay add a little red Wirie, and a fhalot cut fmall, if you like it I but it is apt to make the duck at hard,unlefs you firft heat the wine, and pour it in juft as it is done

, O Jnotbet



8a tut ART OF COOKERY

Jamihir way to drefs a J'Tild Duck,

TAK£ a wild duck, pat fomc "pepper and fait in the rofide, akid half roaft it; have ready the following iauce: a gijl of good gravy, arid a gill of red wine; put it in 'a ftew-pan with three or four (halots cut fine; 'boil it up; then cut the duck in fmall pieces, knd put it in with a little Cayenne pep per and fait; be (Tar'efui to pat in 11 the gravy that comes om the duck; flmmer it for three minutes, and fqueeze in a Se ville orange; if no orange, a jemon; put it in the dilh, and garnifli with lenion.

Ji boil a Dud or a Rabbit with Onionr.

BOIL ycnir duck, or rabbit, in a good deal of watery fure to fkim your water; for there will always rife a fcum which, if it boils down, will difcolour your fowls, &c. They Will take about half an hour boiling. For fauce, your onions muft be peeled, and throw them into water as you peel them f then cut them into thin ilices, boil them in milk and water, and flcihi the liquor. Half an hour will boil them. Throw them into a clean fleve to drain; chop them and rub them through a cullender; put them into a fauce-pan, (hake in a l;tie flour; put to them two or three fpoonfuls of cream, a jgood piece of butter; ftew all together over the fire till they are thick and fine; lay the duck or rabbit in the difh, and pour the fauce aU over: if a rabbit, you muft pltick out the jaw-bones, and ftick one in each eye, the fmall end inWards.

Or you may make this fauce for change: take one large onion, cut it fmall, half a handful of parfley clean waihed and picked, chop it fmall, a lettuce cut fmall, a quarter of a pint of good gravy, a good piece of butter rolled in a little flour;, add a little juice of lemon a little pepper and fait;, let all flew together for half an hour; then add two fpoonfuls of red wine. This fauce is mod proper for a duck; lay your duck in ths difh, and pour your fauce over it.

To drefs a Duck with Green Peas.

PUT a deep ftew-pan over the fire, with a piece of frcft butter; finge your duck and flour it, turn it in the pan two or three minutes; then pour out all the fat, but let the duck

jremain in the pan; put to it a pint of good gravy, a pint of peas, two lettuces cut fmall, a fmall bundle of fwect herbs, a

clittle pepper and fait; cover them clofe, and let them flew for



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 83

hilt an hour; now and then give the pan a fliake 1 when thty iire juft done, gfate in a little nutmeg, and put in a very littte beaten mace, and thicken it either with a piece of butter rolled in flourj or the yolk of an egg beat up with two or three fpoon fttis of cream; fliake it all together for three or four minutes, take out the fweet herbs, lay the duck in the difli, and pour the fauoe over it Vou may garniih with boiled mint dioppcciy or let it alone

Ji Jres 4 Duct with Cucumpirsm

TAKE three or four cucumbers, pare them take out the feeds, cut them into little pieces, lay them in vinegar for two or three hours before, with two" large onions peeled and diced; then do your duck as above; then take the duck out' and put in the cucumbers and onions, firft drain them in a cloth let them be a little bfown; (hake a little flour over them. In the mean time let your duck be ftewing in the fauce-pan with a -pint of gravy j for a quarter of an hour then add to it the cucumbers X and onions, with pepper and fait to your palate, •a good piece of butter rolled in flour and two or three fpoonfuls of red wine; ihake all together, and let it ftew for eight jor ten aiinutes; then take up your duck, and pour the fauce over it.

Or you may roaft your duck, and make this (auce, and pour nver it i but then half a pint of gravy will be enough

Tc drefs a Duck a la Braifi

Take a duck, lard it with little pieces of bacon, feafon it infide and out with pepper and fait; lay a layer of bacon, cut thin,' in the bottom of a ftew-pan, and then a layer of lean .beef, cut thin 5 then lay your duck with fome carrot, an onion, a little bundle of fweet herbs, a blade or two of mace, and a thin kyer of beef aver the duck; cover it clofe, and it over a flow fire for eight or ten minutes; then take off the cover and ihake in a little.flour, give the pan a (hake, pour in a pint of fmail broth, or boiling water; give the pan a (hake or two, -cover it clofe again, and let it ftew half an hour; then take off the cover, take out the duck, and keep it hot; v let the fauce boil till there is about a quarter of a pint, or a little better; then ftrain it, and put it into the ftew-pan again, wirh a filafs of red wine; put in your duck, (hake the pan, and let it Sew fojir or five minutes
then lay your duck in the difb, and pour - the fauce over ic, and garni(h with lemon. If you love

G 2 your



84 THE ART OF COOKERY

I

your duck very high, you may fill it with the following irigr-

dients: take a veal fweetbread cut in eight or ten pieces, a few

truffles, feme oyfters, a few fweet herbs and parfley chopped

fine, a little pepper, fait, and beaten mace; fill your duck with

.the above ingredients, tie both ends tight, and drefs as above.

Or you may fill it with force-meat made thus: take a little

jciece of vel, take all the ikin and fat ofF, beat it in a mortar,

with as much fuer, and an equal quantity of crumbs of bread,

a few fweet herbs, fome parfley chopped, a little lemon- peel,

pepper, fait, beaten mace, and nutmeg, and mix it up with

the yolk of an egg.

You may (lew an ox's palate tender, and cut it into pieces with fome artichoke bottoms cut into four, and toflfed up in the fauCe. You may lard your duck, or let it alone juft as you pleafe: for my part I thnk it beft without.

To boil ducks the French way.

LET your ducks be larded, and half roafted then take them ofF the fpit, put them into a large earthen pipkin, with half a pint of red wine, and a pint of good gravy, fome chefnuts, firft roafted and peeled, half a pint of large oyfiers, the

vliquor ftrained, and the beards taken oiF, two or three little onions minced fmall, a very little ftripped thyme, mace, pep-

'per, and a little ginger beat fine; cover it cipfe, and let them ftew half an hour over a flow fire, and the cruft of a French roll grated when you put in your gravy and wine. When they are enough, take them up, and pour the fauce over them

To drefs a Goofe with Onions or Cabbage •

SALT the goofe for a week, then boil it. It will take an hour. You may either make onion-fauce, as we do for ducks, or cabbage boiled, chopped, and ftewed in butter, with a little pepper and fait; lay the goofe in the difb, and pour the fauoe overJt. It eats very good with either.

DireSiions for roajiing a Goofe. TAKE fome fage, wafh and pick it clean, and an onion; chop them very fine with fome pepper and fait, and put them into the belly; let your goofe be clean picked, and wiped dry with a dry cloth, infide and out; put it down to the fire, and roaft it brown: one hour will roaft a large goofe, three quarters of an hour, a fmall one. Serve it in your difli with fome brown gravyj apple-fauce in a boatjnd fome gravy in anoth.



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



Is



A Green Gooje,

m

NEVER put any thing but a little pepper and fair, unlefs defired; put gravy in the di(h, and green fauce in a boat, made thus: take half a pint of the juice of forrel; if no fqrrel, fpinach juice: have ready a cullis of veal broth, about half a pint, fome fugar, the juice of an orange or lemon; boil it up for five or fix minutes, then put your forrel juice in, and juft boil it up. Be careful to keep it ftirring all the time or it vill curdle then put it in your boat

To dry a Goofe.

GET a fat goofe, take a handful of common fait, a quarter of an ounce of falt-petre, a quarter of a pound of coarfe fugar; mix all together, and rub your goofe vry well; let it lie ia this pickle a fortnight, turning and rubbing it every day; then roll it in bran, and hang it up in a chimney where wood-fmoke is, for a week. If you have not that conveniency, fend it to the baker's; the finoke of the oven will dry it.: or you may hang it in your own chimney, not too near the fire, but make a fire under it, and lay horfe-dung and faw-duft on it, and that will fmother and finoke-dry it; when it is well dried keep it in a dry place; you may keep it two or three months, or more: when you boil it put in a good deal of water, and be fure to fkim it well.

Note, You may boil turnips, or cabbage, boiled and ftewed in butter, or onion- fauce.

To drefs a Goofe in ragoo.

m

FLAT the breaft down with a cleaver, then prefs it down with your hand, fkin it, dip it into fcalding water; let it be cold, lard it with bacon, feafon it well with pepper, fait, and a little beaten mace; then Hour it ail over, take a pound of good beef-fuet cut fmall, put it into a deep ftew-pan, let it be melted, then put in your goofe; let it be brown oh both fides; when it is brown put in a quart of boiling gravy, an onion o
two, a bundle of fweet herbs, a bay-leaf, fome whole pepper, and a few cloves; cover it clofe, and let it ftew foftly;ili it i tender. About an hour will do it, if fmall; if a large one, an hour and a half. In the mean time make a rac;oo: boil fome turnips almoft enough, fome carrots and onions quite, enough; cut your turnips and carrots the fame as for a harrico of mutton, put them into a fauce-pan with half a pint of

G 3 good



$6 THE ART OF COOKERY



good beef gravy, a little fiepper and fait, a piece of butter rolU cd in flouft and let this ftew all together a quarter of an hour Take the goofe and drain it well then lay it in the difii, and pour the ragoo over it.

Where the onion is dilliked, leave it out. Yoit may add cabbage boiled and chopped ftnall.

Take a large fine goofe, pick it clean, ikln it, bone it nicely, take the fat off; then take a dried tongue, boil it, anct peel it: take a fowl, and do it in the fame manner as the goofe; feafon it with pepper, fait, and beaten mace, roll it round the tongue; feafon the goofe with the fame $ put the tongue and fowl in the goofe; put it into a little pot that will juft hold it; put to it two quarts of beef gravy, a bundle of fweet btrbs and an onion; put fome dices of ham, or good baconj between the fowl and goofe; cover it clofe, and let it ftew an hoar over a good fire; when it begins to boil, let it do very foftly; then take up your goofe, and flim oS all the fat
ftrain it, put in a glafs-of red wine, two fpoonfuls of catchup, a veal fweetbread cut fmall, fome trufQes, morels, and mu£hrooms, a piece of butter rolled in flour, and fome pepper and fait, if wanted; put in the goofe again, cover it clofe, and let it ftew half an hour longer; then take it up and pour the ragoo oyer it. Garnifh with lemon.

Note, This is a very fine difli. You muft mind to fave the bones of the goofe and fowl, and put them into thgrav wheq It is firft fet on; and it wil be better if you roll fome beefr marrow between the tongqe and the fowl, and between the fowl and jgoofe, it will make them mellow and eat fine. Yoq may add fix or feven yolks of hard eggs whole in the difli they are a pretty addition. Take care to ikim oiFthe fat.

N. B. The beft method to bone a goofe or fowf of any fort

IB to begin at the breaft, and take all ofF the bones without

cutting the back; for when it is fowed up, and yoti come tq

ficw it, it generally burilrs in the back, and ipoifs tie ibape of it

Tq JiiW Giblets

LET them be nicely fcalded and picked, cut the pinion in two; cut the )sead, and the neck, and legs in two, and the gizzards in four; waih them very clean, put them into a ftew? pan or foup-pot
with (hfee pounds of (crag of veal, juft co?



MADE PLAIN AND EASY, 87

them hh water; let them boil up, take all the fcum clean ' ' oiF; then put three onions, two turnips, one carrot, a little thyme and parfley, ftew them till they are .tender, ilraui thpoi through a fieve, wafh the giblets clean with fome warm water out of the herbs, '&c.; then take piece of butter as big as a large walnut, put it in a ftewpan, melt it, and put in a large fpoonful of flour, keep it ftirring till it is fmooth; then put in your broth and giblets, ftew them for a quarter of an hour; ieafon with fait: or you may add a gill of Lifbon, and juf z before you ferve them up, chop a handful of green parfley andf put in; give them a boil up, and ferve em in 'a tureen or foup-difh. N. B. Three pair will make a handfome tureen fulK

To make GibUt$ a la TurtU.

•

LET three pair of giblets be done as before (well cleaned); put them into your ftew-pan, with four pounds of fcrag of teal, and two pounds of lean beef, covered with water; let them boil up, and flcim them very clean; theor put in fijc cloves, four blades of mace, eight corns of all-fpice, beat very fine, fome baiti, fweetmarjoram, winter favor y, and a little thyme chopped very fine, three onions, two turnips, and one carrot; ftew them till tender, then ftrain thepi through a fieve, and wafli them clean out of the herbs in fome warn water; then take a piece of butter, put it in your fiew-pan melt it, and put in as much flour as will thicken it, ftir it till tr is fmooth, then put your liquor in, and keep ftirring it aU tht time you pour it in, or elfe it will go into lumps, whicb if it happens, you muft ftrain it through a fieve; then putia a pint of Madeira wine, fope pepper and fait, and fqmq Cayenne pepper; ftew it for ten minutes, then put in your giblets, add the juice of a lemon, and ftew them fifteen mi nutes; then ferve them ti a tureen. You may put in fomQ egg-balls, made thus s boil fix eggs hafd, tske out the yolks, put them in a mortar, and beat them, throw in a fpoonful of Sour, and the yolk of a raw egg, beat them together till fmooth; then roll them in little balls, and fcald them in boiling water, and juft before you ferve the giblets up, pu.t them in,

N. B Never put your livers in at firft, but boil them in t faucepan of water by themfelves.

G 4 Ta



8 TIJE ART OF COOKERY

To roafl Pigeons

. FILL them with parfley, clean wafhed nd chopped, ardl feme pepper and falc rolled in bqtter; fill the bellies, . tie tle lieck eiid clofe, fo that nothing can ruic put; put a ikewer through the legs nd have little iron o purpofe, vyith fix books to jty and on each hook hang a pigeon faften ope end pf the ftriqg to the chinncy, and the other end tq the iroa (this is what we call the ppor man's fpit); flour them. baftQ them with butter, and turn them gently for fear of nitting the bars. They will roaft nicely, and be fulKof gravy. Take; care how you ta
x them off, not to Ipfe any of the liquor. You may melt a very little butter, and put into the dilh. Your pigpons ought to be quite frefh, and npt too much done. This is by much the heft way of doing them, for then they will fwim in thir pwti gravy, and a very littlq melted' butter will do.

N. B. You may fpit them oji a lon fmall fpit, only tie both ends clofe; and fend parfley and butter in one boat, and gravy in another.

' When you roafl: them on a fpit, all the gravy runs out; or if you fluff them and broil them whole, you cannot fave the gravy fo well; though they will be very good with parfley and butter in the di(b, or fplit and broiled, with pepper and flt.

• To boil Pigeom.

BOIL them by themfelves, for fifteen minutes; then boil a )iandfdme fquare piece of bacon and lay in the niddle; flew fome fpinach to lay round, and lay the pigeons on the fpinach. Garni(H your difli with parfley, laid in a plate before the fire to crifp. Or you may lay one pigeon in the middle, and the reft round, and the fpinach between each pigeon, and a flice of bacon on each pigeon. Garhi(h wiCh flices of bacon, and melted butter in a cup.

To h daub Pigeons

TAKE 9 large fauce-pan, lay a layer of bacon, then a

Jaycr of veal, a layer of coarfe b?ef, and another little layer

of veal, about a poui;d pf veal and a pound of beef cut very

fhin,' a'piece of carrot, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion,

iotti bjack and white pepper, a jblade or (wo of mafce, four oi

five cloves. Cover the fauce-pan clofe, fet it over a flow fire,

oiaw it till ic is brown, to make the gravy of a fine light

browns



MADE PI.AIN AND EASY. 89

brown; then put in a quart of boiling water a
id let it Rtw kill the gravy is quite rich and good then ftrain it off, and fkim ofFall the fat,
n the mean time fluff the bellies of the pigjeons with force-meat made thus: take a pound of veal, pound of beef-fuer, bat both in a mortar fine an equal quantity ofcrumbs of bread, fome pepper, fait, nutmeg, beaten mace, a little lemon-peel cut fmall, fome parfley cut fmall, and a very little thyme ftripped; mix all together with the yolks of two eggs; fill the pigeons, and flat the breaft down, flour. them and fry.thcem in frefli butter,, at little bown: then pour the fat clean out of the pan, and pt the gravy to the pi geons; cover them clofe, apd let them ftewa quarter of aa hour, or till ypu think they are quite enough then take them up,. lay tbem in a difli, and pour in your fance: on each pigeon lay a bay leaf, and on the leaf a flice of bacon. Yoi jnay gajpiih with a lemon notched, or let it alone.

Note, You may leave out the fluffing, they will be very fich and good without it and it is the befl way of drefljng theoi for a fine Qiade ifb.

Pigeons au Poir.

MAKE a good force-meat as above, cut off the feet quite, fluff them in the ihape of a pear, roll them in the yolk of ah egg, and then in crumbs of bread, ftick the leg at the top, and butter 9 di£h to lay tem in; then fend them to an oven to bake, but do not let them touch each other When they are enough, lay them in a diib, and pour in good gravy thickened lith the yolk pf an egg, or butter rolled in flour; do not pour

Jour gravy ovr the pigeons. You may garnifli with lemon, t is a pretty genteel di(h': or, for change, lay one pigeon in the middle, the refl ound, and ftewed fpinach between
poached eggs ori the fpinach, Garnifh with notched leinon and orange cut inp quarters, and have melted butter in
)oats.,

Or thus: bone your pigeors, and fluff them with forcemeat make them in the fliape of a pear, with one foot ftuck t the fmall end, to appear like the ftalk of a pear rub them oypr with the yolk of an egg, and flrew fome crumbs of bread on; fry them in a pan of good dripping a nice light brown; )ut them in a drainer to drain all the ifat off: then put them n a ftew-pan with a pint of gravy, a gill of white wine, an pnion ftuck with cloves; cover them clofe, and flew them for ia,lf p hour Ut them out, flcim off all the; fat, and take



f,



9 THE ART OF COOKERy

•

out the onion; put in Tome butter rolled in flour g fpoonful of catchup, the fame of browning, fome truffles and morels, pickled mufbrooms, two artichoke-bottoms cut in fix pieces each, a little fait and Cayenne pepper, the juice of half a lemon; ftew it five minutes, put in your pigeons, and make Ihem hot; put them in your dilh, and pour the' faucc over them. Garni(hwith fried force-meat balls, or with a lemon cut in quarters.

Pigeons Jived.

TAKE a fmall cabbage lettuce, juft cut out the heart, and make a force-meat as before, only chop the heart of the cabbage and mix with it: then fill up the place, and tie it acrofs with a packthread; fry it of a light brown in frefli butter, pour out all the fat, lay the pigeons round, flat them with your hand, feafon thenr a little with pepper, fait, and beaten mace (take great care not to put too mph fait), pour in half a pint of Rhenifli wine, cover it clofe, and let it ftew about five or fix minutes; then put in half a pint of good gravy, coyer them clofe, and let them ftew half an hour. Take a good piece of butter rolled in flour, (bake it in: when it is fine and thick rake it up, untie it, lay the lettuce in the middle, and the pigeons round; fqueeze in a little lemon-juice, and pour the fauce all over them. Stew a little lettuce, and cut it into pieces for garnifli, with pickled red cabbage.

Note, Or for change, you may ftufF your pigeons with the fame force-meat, and cut two cabbage- lettuces into quarters, and ftew it as above: fo lay the lettuce between each pigeon, and one in the middle, with the lettuce round it, and pour the fauce all over them.

Pigeons SurtouU

FORCE your pigeons as above, then lay a flice of bacon on the breaft, and a flice of veal beat with the back of a knife, and feafoned with mace, pepper, and fait, tie it on with a fmall packthread, or two little fine flcewers is belter j fpit them on a fine bird- fpit, roaft them and bafte with a piece of butter, then with the yolk of an egg, and then bafte them again with crumbs of bread, a tittle nutmeg and fweet herbs; when enough lay them in your difli, have good gravy ready, with trufljes, morals, and mulhrooms, to pour into your difh, Carnifti with lemon.

Pigeomt



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. i

Pigeons Cwnprtim

TAKE fix young pigeons and (kewer them at for bollmgi make a force-meat thus: grate the crumb of a penny loaf, half 9 pound of fat bacon, ihred fome fweet herbs and parfley fine fwo (halots, or a little onion, a little lemon- peel, a littlo grated nutmeg, feafun it with pepper and fait, and mix it up with the yolks of two liggs, put it into the craws and bellies, lard diem down the breaft, and fry them brown with a little butter; then put them in a ftewpan, with a pint of ftrong brown gravy, a gill of white wine; ftew them three quarters of an hour, thicken it with a little butter rolled in Dour, feafon with ialt and Cayenne pepper, put the pigeons in the di£h, and ftraia the gravy over them. Lay fome hoc force-meat balls roun4 fbem and fend them up hot;

A French Puptm rf Pigeons.

TAKE favoury force-meat rolled out like pafte, put it in butter-di(b, lay a layer of very thin bacon, fquab pigeons, diced fweetbread, afparagus-tops, muflirooms, cocks-combs, a palate boiled tender and cut into pieces, and the yolks of hard eggs make another force meat and lay over like a pye, bake it; and Hrhen enough turn it into a diOi, and pour gravy round it

Pigeons boiled with Rice.

TAKE fix pigeons, ftuflF their bellies with parfley, pepper, 9nd fait, rolled ih a very little piece of butter j put them into a quart of mutton broth, with a little beaten mace, a bundle of fw?e(erbs, and an onion; cover them dofe, and let them boil a full 'quarter of an hour; then take out the onion and fweeC herbs, and take a good piece of butter r6lled in flour, put it ii
and give it a (hake, feafon it with fait, if it wants it, then have ready half a pound of rice boiled tender in milk; when it begins to be thick (but take great care it does not burn), take th yolks of two or three eggs, beat up with two or three fpoon fills of cream, and a little nutmeg; ftir it together' till it is quite, thick; then take up the pigeons and lay them in a difli; pour the gravy to the rice, ftir all together and pour over the pigeons Qarniib with hard eggs cut into quarters.

Pigeons tranfmogrijied.

TAKE your pigeons, feafon them with pepper and fait, take large piece of blotter, male a puff-pafte, and roll each pigeon

in



91 THE ART OF COOKERY

in a piece of pafte; tie tcem in a cloth, fo that the pafte do not break; boil them in a good deal of water. They will lake n hour aqd a half boiling; untie them carefully that they do not break; lay them' in the difb, and you may pour a little good gravy in the difli. They will eat exceeding good and nice, gnd wUl yield faucc enough of a veYy agreeable relifli.

Pigeons in Fricando.

AFTER having trufled your pigeons with their legs in their bodies, divide them in two, and lard them with bacon; then lay them in a ftew-pan with the larded fide downwards, and two whole leeks cut fmall, two ladlefulsof mutton broth, or veal gravy J icover them clofe over-a very flow fire, and when they are enough make your fire very bri(k, to wafte away what liquor remains: when they are of a fine brown take them up, and pour out 9! the fat that is left in the pan; then pour in foipe veal gravy to lopferi what fticks to the pan, and a little pepper ftir it about for two or three minutes a
id pour, l( over the pigeons. This is a pretty little f
de-diib.

Ti roaft Pigeons with a Farce.

MAKE a farce with the livers minced fmall, as much ftvee fuet or marrow, grated bread, and hard egg, an equal quantity of each; feafon with beaten mace, nutmeg, a little pepper, fait, aqd fweet herbs; mix all thefe together with the yolk of an egg, then cut the (kin of your pigeon between the legs and the body, and very carefully with your finger raife the fkin from the flefh, but take care you do not break it: then force them with this farce between the ikin and flefh, then trufs the legs clofe to keep it in; fpit them and roaft them, drudge them with a little flour, and bafte them with a piece of butter; fave the gravy which runs from them, and mix it up with a little red wine, a little of the force-meat, and fome nutmeg. Let it boil, then thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flourj and the yolk of an egg beat up, and fome minced lemon; when enough lay the pigeons in the difli, and pour in (he fauce Garnifli with lemon.

Pigeons a la SouJfeL

TAKE four pigeons and bone them; make a force-meat as fo pigeons Compote, and fluff them, put them in a ftew-pan with a pint of veal g'avy, ftew them half an hour very gently (hen take them out; in the meantime make a yeal forcemeac

and



MADE PLAIN AND. EASY. 93

And wrap all round theno, riib it over witb.the yolk of an egg and fry them in good dri
og of a nice brown; take -the graVy they were ftewed id fkim off the fat) thicken it with 1 little butter rolled in Aour, the yolk of aa eggj and a gill of cream beat up feafon it ith pepper and fair, mix it all to gether, and keep it ftirring one way till it is fmooth; firain it into your difli, and pat the pigeons on. Gacnifh with plenty of fryed parflcy; you may leave out the egg and cream, and put in a fpoonful of browning, a little lemon. pickle and catch up if you like it beft. 1

Pigeons in Pimlico

TAKE theilivers, with fome fat and lean of ham or bacon; muQirooms, truffles, parfley, and fweet herbs; feafon with beaten mace, pepper, and fait; beat all this together, with two raw eggs, put it into the bellies, roll them all in athm fliceof veal, over that a thin flice of bacon; wrap them up in white paper, fpit them on a fmall fpit, and roaft them. In the mean time make for them a ragoo of truffles and mufbrooms chopped fmall with parfley cut fmall; put to it half a pint of good veal gravy, thicken with a piece of butter rolled in Aour. An hour will jdo your pigeons; bafte them, when enough lay them in your di(h, take off the paper, and pour, your fauce over them. Garnilh with patties, made thus: take veal and cold ham, beef-fuet, an- equal quantity fome- mufbrooms, fweet herbs, and fpice; chop them (mall, (%t them on the fire, and mbiften with milk or cream; then make a little puffpaAe, roll it, and make little, patties, about an inch deep, and two inches llong; fill them wiib the above ingredients, cover them clofe and bake them; lay-fix pf them round a difh This makes a fine diih for a fir ft courfe.,

- Tq jug Pigeons. .

PULL, crtcp, and draw pigeons, but do not waih them; fave the Hvers and put them in icalding water, and fet them on the fire for a minute or two: then take them out and mince them fmall, and. bruife them with the back of a fpoon; mix them with a little pepper, fait, grated nutmeg, and lemon-peel (bred very fine, chopped parfley, and .two yolks of eggs very hard; bruife them as 70a do the liver, and put as much fuet as liver, (haved exceeding fine, and as much grated bread; work thefe together with raw eggs, and roll, it in frefli butter; put a piece into the crops and betliesand few up the necks and vents; then dip fCRir pigeons in (irater, and feafon (faem with pqper acl4 fait at for a pie; put them in your jug, with a piece of oelery bundle of fwcet herbs, foiir cloves and three blades of ftiace ipeat fine, flop them clofe, ami fet them in a kettle of coM water; firft cover them clofe, and Uy a tile on the top of the jug, and het it boil three hours; then take them out of the

Jug, and lay them in a difli, take out the cekry and fweeC lerbs, put in a piece of butter rolled in flour, (bake ft about 4U1 it is thick, and pour it on your pigeons Garnilh witli lemon

To Jiew Pigeons.

SEASON your pigeons with pepper and fait, a few cloves and maccf and fame fweet herbs; wrap this feafoning up in a piece of butter, and put it in their bellies; then tie up the neck and vent, and half road them: put them. in a ftewpan, with a quart of good gravy, a little white-wine, a few pep jier-corns, three or four blades of mace, a bit of lemon, a bunch of fweet herbs, and a fmall onioh; flew tbein gemy till they are enough; then take the pigeons out, and ftram the liquor through a (ieve; ikim it, and thicken it in youir ilewpan, put in the pigeons with fome pickkd mufliroom and oyfters; ftew it five minutes, and put the pigeona an a jdHh, and the fauce over.

Tif drefs a Coifs Liver in a Cml.

TAKE ofF the under (kms, and (bred the liver very fmall. jhen take an ounce of trui&es and morels chopped fmall, wkh -parfley; roaft two or three onions, take off their oufermoft coats, pound fix cloves, and a dozen coriander-feeds, add theili to the onions, and pound them together in a marble mortar then take them out, and mix them with the liver, take a pirn of cream, half a pint of milk, and feven or eight new-laid eggs; beat them together, boil them, but do not let them curdle 'flired a pound of fuet as fmall as you can half melt it in a pan, and pour it into your egg and cream, then pour it tnCO - your liver, then mix all well together, feafon it with pepper fait, nutmeg, and a little thyme, and let it ftand till it iscoMis fpread a caul over the bottom and fidei of the ilcwpan, aifll put in your haflied liver and cream altogether fold it up iti the caul, in the fiiape of a calf's liver, then turn it vpfidodown carefully, lay it in a diih that will (tear the oven, and th it over with beaten egg, druge it with grated breads ami i bake it in an oven. Serire it up hot for a firft courfe.



MADE PLAIN AND EAY.

To tmJI a Coifs Livtr,

LARD it with 1cacOin, fpit it firft, and roaft it: ferve it irp • wrth godd gravy,

7i Yoaft Partridges.

LElr them be nicely roafted, buc not too imich; baflfc iKcfh enty 'Wih a Hide butter, and drudge with flour fprinklc a little fait on, and froth them nicely up; have good gravy in the difli, with bread-fauce in a boat, made thus; take about a handful or two of crumbs of bread, put in a pint of niilic or more, a fmall whole oliion,_a little whole white pepper, a little fait, and a bit of butter, boil it all well up; then take the onion out, and beat it Well with a fpeonj Cake poverroy-fauce in a boat, made thus: chop four flialots fine, a gill of good gravy, and a fpoonful of vinegar, a little pepper and fait; boil them up one minute, then put it in a boat.

7i iw7 Paririies,

BOIL them in a good deal of cyater, let them boll quick; fifteen minutes will be fufficient. For fauce take a quarter of a pint of cream, and a piece of frefli butter as big as a walnut; ftir it one way till it is melted, and pour it into the diib.

Or this fauce: take a bunch of celery clean wafhed, cot all ihe white very fmall, wafh it again very clean, put it into a 'iauce-pan with a blade of mace, a little beaten pepper, and a very little fait; put to it a pint of water, let it boil till the water is juft wafted away, then add a quarter of a pint of cream nd a piece of butter rolled in floor; ftir all together, and when it is thick and fine, pour it over the birds.

Or this fauce: take the livers and bruife them fine fomb parfley chopped fine, melt a little nice frefli butter, and thea add the livers and parfley to it, fqueeze in a little lemon, juft ive it a boil, and pour over your birds.

Or this fauce: take a quarter of pint of cream, the yolk of "an egg beat fine, a little grated nutmeg, a little beaten jnace, ft jciece of butter as big as a nutmeg, rolled in flour, and one fpoonful of white-wine; ftir all together one way, when fine and thick pour it over the birds. Ypu may add a few muflhrooms.

Or this fauce: take a few mufhrooms, frefli peeled, dnd Wafli them clean put them in a faucepaa with a little f4lt,

put



9 THE ART OF COOKERY

put them over a quick fire, let them boil up, then put in i quarter of a pint of cfeam and a little nutmeg; (hake them together with a very little piece of butter rolled in flour, give it two or three fhakes over the fire, three or four minutes will do; then pour it over the birds.

Or this fauce: boil half a
:ound of rice very tender in beef gravy; feafon it with pepper and faltj and pour over your birds Tbefe faupes do for boiled fowls; a quart of gravy will bc Enough, and let it boil till it is quite thick;

To drefs Partridges a la Brate, '

TAitE twobracp, trufsthe legs into the bod ies
lard theni feafon with beaten mace, pepper and fait; taice a iiewcpan Jay flices of bacon at the bottom, then flices of beef, and then ilices of vealj all cut thin, a piece of carrot, an onion cut fmall a bundle of fweet herbs, and fome whole pepper: lay the par tridges with the bread downward, lay feme thin flices of beef and veal ovet them and fome parfley (hred iine; cover them and let them ftew eight or ten minutes over a flow fire, then give your pan a fhakej and pour in a pint of boiling water; cover itclofe, and let it flew half an hour over a little quicker £re;' then, take out your birds, keep them hot, pour into th pan a pint of thin gravy, let them boil till there is about half 4 pint, then firain it off, and fkim off all the fat: in the meatt time, have a veal fweetbread cut fmall, trufiles, and m6cels', cocks-combs, and fowls livers flewed in a pint of good gravy half, an hour, fome artichoke-bottoms, and afparagus-tops; both blanched in warm water, and a few mufhrooms; theil add the other gravy to this, and put in your partridges to heat; if it is not thick enough, take a piece of butter rolled in flour and tofs up in it; if you will be at the expence, thicken it with veal and ham cullis, but it will be full as good without.

To, make Partridge Pams

TAKE two roafted partridges, and the flefb of a large fowl a little parboiled bacon, a little marrow or fweet-fuet chopped vey fine, a few mufhrooms and morels chopped fine, tmfHes, and artichoke-bottoms, feafon with beaten mace pepper, a little nutmeg, fait, fweet herbs chopped fine, and the crumb of a two-penny loaf fpaked in hot gravy; mix all well together with the yolks of two eggs, make your panes on paper, of a round figure, and the thicknefs of an eggc at a proper diflance one from another, dip the point of a knife in the yolk of 9ji 7 iSt



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 99

eggc in order to (hape them, bread them neatly, and bake them a quarter of an hour in a quick oven: obferve that the truAes and morels be boiled tender in the gravy you foak the bread in. Serve them up for a Gde-difli, or they will ferve to garni(h the above difli, which will be a very fine one for a firft coirrfe.

Note, When you have cold fowls in the houfe this makes a pretty addition in an entertainment

T$ r$qf Pheafants.

PICK and draw your pheafants, and finge them, lard one with bacon but not the other, fpit them, roaft them fine, and paper them all over the breaft; when they are juftdone, flour and bade them with a little nice butter, and let them have a fine white froth; then take them up, and pour good gravy ia the difh, and bread-fauce in boats or bafons.

Or you may put water- crefTes, with gravy in the difls, and hy the cre,fles under the pheafants.

Or you may make celery- fauce, ftewed tender, ftrained and mixed with cream, and poured into thedifii.

If you have but one pheafant, take a large fowl about the bignefs of a pheafant, pick it nicely with the head on, draw it and trufs it with the head turned as you do a pbeafant's, lard the fowf ail over the breaft and legs with bacon cut in little pieces: when roafted put them both in a difli, and no body wtU know it. They will take three-quarters of an hour doings as the fire muft not be too briflc. Put gravy in thcdiibc am garniAi with watercrefles.

A Jiewed Pheafant.

TAK£ your pheafant and ftew it in veal gravy, take artichokebottoms parboiled, fome chefnuts roafted and blanched: when your pheafant is enough (but it muft ftew till there it juft enough for fauce, then ikim it), put in the chefnuts and artichoke-bottoms, a little beaten mace, pepper and fait enough tofealbn it, and a glafs of white-wine; if you do not think it thick enough, thicken it with a little piece of butter rolled in jBour: fqueeze in a little lemon, pour the fauce over the phea fant, and have fome force-meat balls fried and put into the difli

Note, A good fowl will do full as well, trufled with the head on, like a pheafant. You may fry faufagcs inftead of lorce-meat balls.

H r



;98 THE ART OF COOKERY

To dres a Pbeafant a la Sraiji. LAY a layer of beef all over your pan, then a layer of veal, a little piece of bacon, a piece of carrot, an onion (luck with cloves, a blade or two of mace, a fpoonful of pepper black and white, and a bundle of fweet herbs; then lay in the pheafnt, lay a layer of veal, and then a layer oi beef to cover it, fet it bn the nre five or fix minutes, then pour in two quarts of boiling gravy: cover it clofe, and let it ftew very foFtly an hour and a half, then take oip your pheafant, keep it hot, and let the gravy boil till there is about a pint; then ftrain it off, and ))ut it in again, and put in a veal fweetbread, fir ft being ftewed Avitb the pheafant; then put in (bme truffles aiid moreS, fome livers of fowls, artichoke-bottoms, and afparagus tops, if you have them; let thefe fimmer in the gravy about five or fix niinutes, theti add two fpdonfuls of catchup, two of red-wine, and a tittle piece of butter rolled in flour, a fpoonful of brown lAg, (hake all together, put in your pheafant, let them ftew all together with a few muihtboms, about five or fix minuted hiore, then take up your pheafant and pour your ragoo all over, with a few force-meat balls. Oarnilh with lemoa You Inay lard it, if you chufe. .

T$ hoii tf Phiafimi.

TAKE a line f)heafatit, boil it in a good deal of water, keep yiur Water boiling % half an hour will do a fmall Me, and ttiret c)Uflrtfs of an hbiir a large one. Let your fauce be cekry AeVved ahd thickened with cream, attd a little piece of icutter rolled in flour; take up the pheafant, and pour Che fauce tdi over, Garnifh with lemon. Obferve to ftew your celery fo, that the liquor will not be all wafted awy before you put your cfeam in if it wants fait, put in Mne vo your patate.

To falmic n Snipe or fVoodcock

HALF roafttdem, akid cut them in quarters, put them itif ftewan with a little .gravy, two ftalots chcpt fine, a glafe of red wine, a liltk ialt and Cayenne fieper, the juie of 'hstf a etfnon; ftew them gently for ten minutes, and put tfaetn oft a toaft fetved the fatne as fot roafting, and fend them up hot. Garntfll vvkh kmcen.

Snipes in a &ourUcut% or Woodcocks.

• • •

TAKE, force-meat mide with veal, as ratich becWtidt

chopped and beat in a morter, with an equal quantity of

J crumbs



MADE PLAIN AN tASY.



99



trumbs of bread; mix in a little beaten mace, pepper and falt foxnt pai;fley, and a little fweet herbs, mix it with the yolk of n egg: .lay fome of this meat round the dKJj, (hen lay in the ifnipes, being firft drawn and half roaded. Take care of .the trail; chop it, and throw it all over the difli.

Take fome g'odgravy,,?iC€ording to, tbebignefs of your furtQut fotne truffles and morels, a few mu&rooms, a fwetbread, cut iiito pieces, and artichoke-bottoms, cut fmall let all ftew together, 'fhake them, and take the yolks of two or three eggs, iccording as you want them beat them up With a (poanfiil or two of white-wine, ftir alll together one way, when it is thic)c take it off, let it cool, and pour it into the furtout: have the yolks of a few hard eggs pdr in here and there; feafoh with beaten mace, pepper, and feltc to our tafte; cover it with the force-meat all over; rub he yolks of eggs all over to 'hdoitr it, then fend it io the ov'en. Half all hoUr does it, and hd it hot to table.

7i Ml Snipus 9ir WoodoKks.

BOIL them in goodftrongbroth, or beef gravy made thus: iake apounf of beef, cut.it into little pieces, put it into .two t)uarts of water, an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, a blade at two of jnaee, fix cloves, and fome whole pepper; coyer it dofe, let it boil till about half wafted, then drain it oiF, put the glravy into a lauce-pan, with fait enough to fealbn it; tak the Aiipes and gut them clean (but take care of the .guts), put them into the gravy, and let them boil, coyer them clofe,,and ten minutes will boil them. In the mean time, chop the guts and liver fmall, take a little of the gravy the fnipes are boiling in, and fteW the guts in, with a blade of mace. Take fome Crumbs of bread, and have them ready fried in a little frelh butter crifp, of a fine light brown. You muft take about as much bread as the infide of a ftale roll, and rub them fmall tnto a olefin clofth; when they are done, let them ftand ready in a plate before the fire.

When your fnipes are reidyj take about half a pint of the liquor they txt boiled in, and add to the guts two fpoonfuls oj red-wine', and a piece of butter as big as a walnut, rolled in a little flour; fet them on the fire, (hake your fauce pan ofica (but do not ftir it with a fpoon, till the butter is all melted, then j)ut in the crumbs, give your faucc-pan a (hake, take up your birds, lay them in the dilh, and pour this fjuce ovr them, Garnilh With lemon.

Ha Tit



100 THE ART OF COOK

To drefi Ortolans.

SPIT them fide-way;s, with a vine leaf between; bade them with butter, and have fried crumbs of bread round the difli. lreft quails the fame way.

To drift Ruffs arid Reifs.

THESE birds are found in Lincolnihire and the Ifle o Ely; the food (Proper for them is new milk boiled, and put over whitebread, with a little fine fugar and be careful to keep them in feparate cages: they feed very faft, and will die of their fat if not killed in time: trufs.them as you do a Wood cock but draw them, and cover them with vine leaves.

To drefs Larks. -

PUT them on a bird-fpit, tie them on another (Jt ' and roaft them twenty-five minutes with a gtle fire put them in a di£h with crumbs of bread fried brown, or you may put a toaft under with gravy and butter,- or gravy only.

To drefs Plovers

TO two plovers take two artichokebottoms boiled, lome chefnuts roafled and blanched, fome fkirrets boiled, cut all very ftnall, mix with it fome marrow or beeffuet, the yolks of two hard eggs, chop all together, feafon with pepper, fait, nutmeg, and a little fweet-hcrbs, fill the bodies of the plpvers lay them in a faucepan, put to them a pint of gravy, a glafs of white- wine, a blade or two of mace, fome roafted chefnut&of blanched, and artichoke-bottoms cut into quarters, two or three yolks of eggs, and a little juice of lemon; cover theoii clofe, and let them flew very foftly an hour. If you find the fauce is not thick enough, take a piece of butter rolled in flour and put into the fauce; (hake it round, and when it is thick take up your plovers, and pour the fauce over them. Garniih with roafted chefnuts. t

Ducks are very good done this way.

If they are well fed they need no butter, being fat enough of themfelves.

Or boil them in good cclery-faucc, either white or brown, juft as you like.

The fame way you may drefs wigeons. c

N. B, The heft way to drefs plovers, is to roaft them the, fame as woodcocks, with a toaft under them, and gravy and butter. "

7c



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. lot

TV drifs Larks Pear Fafinon.

YOy muft trufs the larks clofe, and cut offthelegs, feafoA them with fait, pepper, cloves, and mace; make a forcemeat thus: take a vesU fweet-bread, as much beef-fuet, a few morela and muQirooms, chop all fine together fomc crumbs of bread and a few fweet-herbs, a little lemon-peel cut fmal), niix all together with the yolk of an egg, wrap up the larks in force meat, and (hape them like a pear, ftick one leg in the top like the ftalk of a pear, rub them over with the yolk of an egg and crumbs of bread, bake them in a gentle oven, ferve theoi without fauce; orc they make a good garniih to a very fine

You may ufe veal, if yoii have not a fweet-bread.

Jugged Hare.

..CU'El,it into little pieces, lard them here and there with little, flips of bacon, feafon them with Cayenne pepper and fait, jcut them into an earthen jyg, with a blade or two of mace an onioa ftuck with cloves, and a jbundle o fweet-hrbs; cover" the jug or jar you do it in fo clofe that nothing can get in, then fet it in a pot of boiling water, and three hours will do it; then turn it out into the diih, and tke out the onion and fweetAierbs, and fend it to uble hot. If you do not like it laided leave it out

FlorenOne Hare.

LET your hare be full grown, and let it hang four or five days before you cafe it; leave the ears on and take out all the bones, except the bead, which muft be left whole; lay the hare on the drefTer, and put in the foJloying fxire-meat take the crumbs of a penny loaf, the liver bred iine haf a pound of fat bacon fcraped, a glafs of red-wine, fome fweet-herbs chopped fine, feafon with pepper, fait, and pitipeg, an an chovte chopt fine, the yolks of two eggs, nix II together, and put into your hare's belly, roll it up tp th bead, flcewer it with the head and ears leaning back, and tie it with packthread aa you would a collar of veal, wrap it in a cloth, and boil it one hour and a half in a ftew-pan' covered clofe, with two quarts of water; as foon as the liquor is reduced to a quart, add a pint of red- wine, afpoonfulof lemon pickle, one of catchup, and one of browning; then takeout your hare, and Pf w the gravy till it is reduced to a pint, thicken it with but

H 3 tcr



lot THE ART OP COOKERY

ter rolled in flour; put the hare in the difh, and poi
r tle fauf; over it; pull the jaw-bones out, and put them in the eyes s put fome force-meal halls and tniBlts round tt, and gsurnim wili water-creflTes.

To fcare a Han.

' LARD a hare and put a pudding ip the belly; put it intc) a pot or filh-lcettle, then put to it two quarts of. ffrongrdrawn gravy, one of red- wine, a whole lemon cut, afaggot of fwcct herbs, nutm'eg, pepper, a little fait, and fix cloves; cbVerij;. clofe, and ftew it over a flow fire, till it is three parts donet then take it up, put it into a dilb, and ftrew it over with criimbg of bread, fweet- herbs chopped' fine, fome lemoh-peel grated and half a nutmeg; fet it before the fire, and bafte it till it is of a fine light browjn. In the mean time take the fat off your gravy, and thicken it with the yolk of an egg; take fix eggs boiled hard and chopped fmall, fome pickled cucumbers cut very thin; mfx thefe with the faure, ahd pour it into the di(h.

A ffllet of mutton or neck of venifon may be done the' fame way,

' Note, You may do rabbits the fame way, buti muflibc VeaJ gravjr, and white-wine; adding muflirooms foi cucumbers;

To Ji&uc a Hme

CtJT It intd pteccsiandptJt it into a ftew-pan, Mfith a Dlic or two of mace, fome whole pepper blaclf a'nd white, atl onion ftuck with cloves,, a biinJIe of fweet-herbs, and a nut meg cut to pfeces, and cover it with water; cover the ftevpan clofe, let it ftew till the hare is tender, but not too mucfh done: then take it u and with' a fork take out the hare intq a clean pan, ffrain the fa uce through a coarfe fiiv,' empty at! out of the pan, put in the hare again with the fauce, 'take a piece of butter as bfg as a" Wahiit rolled in flour, and put in Wy likewife one fpoonful of cchiTp, and agi'H of red- wine; ftcvi

ijiJTf'z'ti together (with a ftw ffefli rfiui&r0oml5, or pickled ones, if

• fciiyoti have any), tili it is thick and fmooth; then difliMt up, iand ferjd it to table. Yo tay cut a hare in tw6, and ftew thi.

iL& ' fore-quarters thuTS, and roaft the Wnd-quartefs with a pudding

n the belly. ' '=

BONE the hare, and' talae out atl the finews; cut one haK in thin flices, and the other hadf in prieces an inch HHck, flour ibea% atEd" &yf them ivk a: little freifa buttea: as coHops, quick.



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. loj

and have ready foiQe gravy made good with Ike bones of the hafe and beef, put a pint of it into the pan tp the hare, fome mnftard, and a little elder vinegar; cover it clofe, and let it do foftly till it is as thick as cream, then di(h it up, with the' bead is the middle.

Portugutfe Rabhitu

I HAVE, in the beginning of n book, given direfiions for bmled and roafled. Get fome rabbits, truis them chicken fafliion, the he muft be cut off, and the rabbit turned with tfaebaek upwards, and two df the % flripped to the clawend, and fo trufled with two fkewers. Lard them, and roaft them with what fauce you pleale. If you want chickens, and they are to appear as fuch, they muft be drefled in this manner: iissA ehem up hot with gravy in the dilb,. and garnifli with lemon and beet-rdot.

Rabbits Surprifi.

&OAS.T two halfgrown rabbits, cut off the beads clofe to.

tke fiiQtilders and the tirft joints then take off all the lean

meat from the back-bones, cut it teaJl, and tofs it up with fix

or feven oonfuls of cream and milk, and apiece of butter aa

big as a walout rolled in flour, a Iktle nutmeg and a litdefalt

fliake all together till it is as thick as good cream, and fet it to

cool then make a force-meat, with a poujd of veaJ, a pound

of fuet, as much crumbs of bread, two anchovies, a little

pieceof lemon-peel cut line, a little (pfig of thyme, and alittle

nutmeg grated; let the veal and fuet be chopped very fine and .

beift in a mortar, then mix it all together with the yolks of two

raw eggs; place i all round the rabbits, leaving a long trough .

in the -back-bone o(n, that you think will hold the meat you

cut out with the fauces pour it in and cover it with the force

meat, fmooth it all over with your hand as well as you can

with a raw egg, fquare at both ends, throw on a little grated

breads and butter a mazarine, or pan, and take them from

the drefTer where you formed them, and place them on it very

carefully. Bke them three quarters of an hour till they ae

of a fine brown colour. Let your fauce be gravy thickened

with butter and the juice of a lemon; lay them into the driby

Sod pour in the fauce. Garnifli with orange, cut into quar-

s and ferve it up for a firft courfe.



0+ TtfE ART OF COOKERY

To drefs Rabbits in Cajferole.

DIVIDE the rabbits into quarters. You may lard themc let them alone, juft as you pleafe, hake fome flour over them, and fry them wijth lard or butter, then put them into an earthea pipkin, with a quart of good broth, a glafs of white-wine, a little pepper and fair, if wanted, a bunch of fweetherbs, and a piece of butter as big as a walnut, rolled in flour; cover them clofe, and let them ftew half an hour,, then dilh tbem up, and pour the fauce over them. Garnifh with Seville orange, cut into thin flices and notched the peel that ia .€u
out lay prettily between the flice$.

V Mutton Kebobbed.

TAICE a loin of mutton, and joint it between every bone t c ( feafon it with pepper and fait moderately grate a fmall nutmeg, all over, dip them in the yolks of three eggs, and have ready crumbs of bread and fweet herbs, dip them in, and clap them tbgether in the fame fhape again, and put it on a fmall fpit y, roaft them before a quick fire, fet a difh under, and bafte it with a little piece of butter, and then keep bafting with what comes from it, and throw fome crumbs of bread and Tweetherbs all over hem as it is roafting; when it is enough, take it up, lay it in the difh, and have ready half a pint of good gravy, and what comes from it-: take two fpoonfuls of catch up, and mix a tea-fpb6nful of flour with it and put to the gravy, flir it together and give it a boil, and pour over the mutton, . 5 . . u:

Note, You mufl obicrvc to take off all the fat of the infide, and the fkin of the top of the meat, and fqme of the fat, if there be too much. When you put in what comes from youf meat intQ the gravy, obferve to pour out all the fat. • . '

A Neck of Muttony called The ' Hajly Dijh. ',

TAKE a large pewter or filver (lifh, made like a deep foupdffh, with an edge about an inch deep en the infide,, on which the lid fixes (with an handle at top), fa faft that you may lift it up full by that handle without falling. This difh is Called a necromancer. Take a neck of mutton aboiit fix pounds, take off the fkin, cut it into chops, cot too thick, flice a French roll thin, peel and flice a very large oniony pare and flice threp Of four turnips, lay a row of mutton in the difli, on that a roW ef roU
then a row of turnips and then onions, a little falr

• ' '••. ...'.,. then



.- - 1



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 105

then the meat, and To on; put in a little bundk of fweet-berbs, and two or three blades of mace; have a' tea-kettle of water • boiling, fill the dift, and cover it clpfe, hang thedifh on the back of two chairs by the; rim, have readj three iheets of brown paper, tear each (beet into five pieces, and draw them through, your hand, light One piece and hold it under the botton of the difli, moving the paper about, as faft as the paper burns; light another till all is burnt, and yOur meat will be enough. Fifteen minutes juft does it. Send it to table hot in the difli.

Note, This difli was firft contrived by Mr. Rich, and it much admired by the iiobility

7a make a Currey the Indian Way.

TAKE two fmall chickens, flcin the and cut them as for a fricafey, wafli them clean, anfi ftew them in about a quart or water, for about five minutes, then ftrain off the liquor and put the chickens in a clean difli; take three large onions, chop them finally and fry them in about two ounces of butter, then put in the chickens, and fry them together till they are brown, take a quarter of an ounce of turmerick, a large fpoonfulof ginger and beaten pepper together, and a little fait to your palate; ftrew allthefe ingredients over the chickens whilft frying, then pour in the liquor, and let it ftew about half an hour then put in a quarter of a pint of cream, and thox jatce of two lemons, and ferve it up. The ginger, pepper, and tgrinerick, muft be beat very fine

7i hoil Rid.

PUT two quarts'of water to a pint of rice, let it boil till. ytcu think it is done enough, then throw in a fpoonful of fait, and turn it out into a cullender; then let it ftand about five idinues before the fire to dry, and ferve it up in a difli by itfftff. Difli it up and fend it to table, the rice in a difli by itfelfL

To maii a Pelkw the Indian Way.

TAKE three pounds of rice, pick and waffli it very clean, put it into a cullender, and let it drain vtry dry; take three quarters of a pound of butter, and put it into a pan over a very flow fire till it melts, then put in the rice and cover it over very ciofe, that it may keep all the fteam in; add to it a little fait, fotne whole pepper, half a dozen blades of mace, and- a few ciovesi You muft put in a little water to keep it from burning, tlM fiir it up very often and let it flew till the rice is foft. ' '.; - Boil



i9 THE ART OF COOKBRV

Bait ti fbiRIly itda fine pifc of bacon, of about twopvmif vmigkt as eoenitKini out the bacon iii two pttcet, ky it ttt the difli with the fowls, cover it orer with tbe rict, and gariiNb ir with about Jialf a dozen htfd cggt, and a dozen of- onions fried whole aifd rery brown. Nc)te, Tbi is the true Indian way of dreflng theiSf

4nthi(r Wia to msie a PelUw

TAKE a kg of Veal abodt twelve or fourteen pounds weiglit 011 old cock tinned, choc both to pieces, put it into a pot with five or fix blades of mace, fome whole w4kitep!epper$ acid ffaiee gallons of water, half a pound of bacon, two onions, and fix cloves; cover it clofe, and when k boils, let it do very foftly till the meat is god. for nothing, and abe two-thirds wafted, then ftrain it the rieif day put this fovpineo a faucepan with a-poulid of rice, fet. it over a very flow fire, take great care it do not burn when the rice is very thick and dry, turt) ie into a difli. GartiMh with hard eggs cut in two and hat foafted fowla in anotfaet difii.

' Note, Yoit arc to cfcrvc, if jrour rice fimmeiis too faft, it will burn Wen: it coities; to be thicks k muft be tery thick aiid dry,, and the rice not boiled to a mummy.

2i make Effince cf Ham

, TAKE a hiffliy and cut off ail the fat, cut tbe lean in thin pieces, and lay them in the bottom of your ftew-pan v P over them fix onions fliced, two carrots, and one parfnip, two or three leeks, afew frcfli muftirooms, a little parfley and fwcet herbs, four or five (kaloli and fome cloves and mace;, pet a little water at the bottom, fet it on a gentle ftove till it beg io to ftiek then put in H gallon of veal broth to a ham of four-r tciB povd (more or lefs hroth, according to tbe fie of the ham) I l0t t fiew very gently for one %our % then ftiain it (M% and put it away for ufe.

RULES to be obfcrved in all MADE-DISHES.

FIRST, that the ilew-pans or fauee-pans, and covers, he very clean, free from fand, and well tinned 5 and rfiat all the white imeea have a Kttk tartnefs, and he very fmooth and of fine thieknefe, and all the time any whrise fance is over the. fire, keep ftirring it one way

And aa to brown fauce, take great care no fat fwims at the top) but that ic.be ail ioioath alike, and about ae tUckasgood

fTcaip



MADE PLMN AND EASV; i

cfjeiiD, andiKK to tafte of ootf thtn more thari aincflHer. As Wpppey: aiui fait, feaJbn to your'palatb, bne do not pot toir IBUch' of cither, for tkat will tdoe sfPWBjr the fine fltvouf of jevirjr tiling As to moft madeccd(iAe9 fotumzf put in wftialr you think proper toenlargjc it, arnyake it good a niiflirtcdinr pickled, dried, frefli, or powdered; truffles, morels, cockscombs ftewed, ox-pdhteot jivfoimH bits artichoke- bottoms, either pickled, frflh boiled or dried one foftcoed iir warai water,, each cut in four pieces, afparagiistpps, the yolks of hard eggs, force-meat balls, Scc, The bed things to give, fauce tartriefs, are mufliroompickfe, white- walnut pickle, eldci vinegar, or lemon-juice.,., .



i fc.i .1 . I, ',• .fm I iMttlM



CHAP. III.



Read this CHAPTER,. and you will ftnd how expenfive a

FRENCH Cook's Saace is.

WrHEN they arc newly picked and, dfawh, fingc them: you muft mince their livers with a bit ofbuccer, fome . fcraped bacon, green truffles, if you lcave any, parffey chimbo, fait, pepper, fweet herbs, and all-fpice. The whole being mrnced together, put it into the infidfe of your partrid ges, th6n flop both ends of them, after which give them a fry. m ihh lew-pan; that being done, fpit them, and wrap them up in flices of bacon and paper; then take a ftiew-pan, and. biving put in an onion cut into flrces, a carrot cut into.little bits, with a little wl, give them a few tofles over the fire; then nioifteii them with gravy, cullis, and a little eilence of ham. Put therein half a lemon cut in flices, four cloves of garlic, a little fweet baiil, thyme, a bay-leaf, a little parfley, chimbol, two glafles of white wine, and four of the carcailes of the pArtrtdges; let thetu be pounded, an% put them in this fiuce. When the fat of your cuftis is taken away, be careful to make ir reitfliing; and after your pounded livers are put into your CQliis, you muft ftrain them through a (ieve. Your partridges t)eing done, take them oiF; as alfo take off the bacon smd,

paper, and lay thesi in your diih with your fauce over them. •.-••?•• Xhia



pr T KE A R T O F COOKERY

This difli I do riot recommend; for I think it an odd juoibte of ctafli; by that time .the cullis, the efleiuse of ham, and all ather ingredients are- reckoned, the partridges will come to a fitie penny. But fach receipts as this are what you have in moft books of cookery yet printed. •

• •, ...

r, To. mate EJeme.of Ham.

TAKE the fat ofFa Weftp'halia ham, cut the lean in fllccs, beat them well, and lay tHem in the bottom of a flewpan tMth fliccs of carrots, prfnip?, andonions; cover your pan, ahd fet it pvcr a gentle fire. Let them ftcw till ihcy begin to ftick, then fprinkle on a little flour and turn them; then moiften with broth and veal gravy; feafon with three or four nuiihrDomd, . 99 manyirufflq? a whole_ leek, fome bafil,.par. fley, and half a dozen cloves; or inftead of the leek, you may put a clove of garlic. Put in foine crufts of bread, and let them fimmer over thecfire for three Quarters of an hour. Strain it, and fet it by for ufe.

•' - A Cullis for all Sorts of Ragoo.

HAVING cut three pounds of lean veal, and half a pound of ham into flipes, lay it iato the boftom of a ftewpan; put iit carrots and parfnips, a9d an onion fliced; coyer it, and fet it a-fewing over a ftove: when it hs a good colour and begins to ftick, put to it a little melted butter, and fhake in a little flour, keep it moving a little while till the flour is fried: hen. nioiiien it with gravy nd broth, of each a like quantity; then put in (bme parfley and bafil, a whole leek, a bay-leaf, fome inuflirooms and trufies minced fmall, three or four cloves, and the cruft of two French rolls: fet all thefe fimmer together for three quarters of ai hour; then take out the flices of veal, flrain it, and Iceep it for all forts of ragbos. Now compute the expence,' and fee if this dilh cannot be drefled full as well vithout tliis expence, f -

A Cullhfor all Soru of Butchers McaU

YQU muft take meat according to your company; if ten or twelve, you cannot take lefs than a leg of veal and a ham, with all the fat, fkin, and outfide cut ofF. Cut the leg of veal in pieces, about the bignefs of your fift; place them in your ftewpan, and then the flices of ham, two carrats, an onion cut in two, cover it clofe Ift it flew fofcly at flrfl, and as it begins



MADE PLAIN Alflc. E.ASY.



109



to be brown, take biF tbe cover and turn it, tp colour it on all fides the fame; but take care not' to burn tbe meat. When It has a pretty brown colour, moiften your cuUis with broth marie of bf, or other meat; feafon your cullis with a little .fweec bafi, fome- cloves, with fome garlic; pare a lemon, cut it in ilices, and put it into your cullis, with fome muflirooms, c Put into a flew-pan a good Iimp of butter, and fet' it over a flow fire; put into it two or three handfuls of flour,, ftir it with a wooden ladle, and let it take a colour; if your cullis be pretty brown, you muft put in fome flour. Your flour being orown with your cullis, pour it very Ibftly into your cullis, kfping it fiirring with a wooden ladle; then let your cullis flew fqftly, and &im off all he fat, put in two glas of champaign, or other white wine; hot take care to keep your cullis very thin, fa that y6a may take the fat well oflT, and clarify it. To ca lify it, you muft put it in a flove that draws well, and cover it cloie, and let it boil without uncovering, till it boils over; then uacover it, and take off the fat that is round the ftew-pan, then wipe' it off the cover alfo, and cover it again. When yoor cullis is done, take out the meat, and flrain your cullis through a filk flrainer. This cullis is for all forts of ragpos, fowls, pie$9 and terrines.

Cullis tbe Italian TVay.

PUT into a ftew-pan half a ladleful of cullis, as much effence of ham, half a ladleful of gravy, as much of broth, three or four onions cut into flices, four or five cloves of garlic, a Jittle beaten coriander- feed, with a lemon pared and cut into flices, a little fweet bafil, muflirooms, and good oil; put all over the fire, lei it flew a quarter of an hour, take the fat well QfF; let it be of a good tafte, and you may ufe it with all forts of meat and fifli, particularly with glazed fifli. This faucc will do for two chickens, fix pigeons, quails, or ducklins, and all forts of tame and wild fowl. Now this Italian or French fauce, is faucy.

Cullis of Craw Fijb

YOU muft get the middling fort of craw-fifli, put.them ovar the fire, feafoned with fait, pepper, and onion cut in flices $ being done take then out, pick them, and keep the tails after they are fcalded, pound the reft together in a mortar; the more they are pounded, the finer your cullis will be. Take a bit of vea), the bignefs of your fift, with a fmall bit of ham an onioa



-



ii6 . fTiH.t AJLT 0:F ACOOKEiRY

.cut iatoibiir, piit it-jii to Aioat; gently: if.tt fticksbui Awiry Jittkto tbcvpflOi owdef it aJittlc Mihiflen it with.heotb fiut id it feme cloik CwtA bstfil in btanobet, foait jrmfii- roomS) tith lemah patodtaod CAit.in flices: being .dooeffntf ithefiitMcilj(itf',cJ8tkbeofa,gcxcd tafle; Uien.taiee,ott3uiurieat mithjL flckomer, and odn txc tbickeh it a JitIe with oSence .cof..han: then put in jrour cra-fifiij; and Acaiii it ofiw Bcig ikaioed, keep dt ibr a firft oourfe of . crawnfiflx.







TARE a pitce of veal, cut ft ifitoftbaH'brts, wich:ferAe

thin tlices of bam, and two onions cut into four pieces;; 'inoifl:-

en 'k with broth, fearfened with mufiirooms, a buneh fK par

tflty, gecn onions, tbre cloved j and fe Itt it 'flew' flefnfg

ilewed, take .put 1 your meat and roots wilh a ficiitinkr i

in a few crambs;pf bread, and let it Kow foftly; take. the

white of a fol, orimo chickens, and pound it m anotarj

cbei
ig wtU poanded, mkx it in your eallis, but it rfiUft Aot

b!pi1, and your .cuUi3 muft be veryHbite; but if it id(iot wbifed

enough, you rnqft potMid two dozen of fwaet altnondS'Maiieh

cd, and put into your cuUis: then boil a glafs of mi, and

put it into your cullis: let it be of a goodtafle, and drain it

eiF; then put it in a.faiall kettle, and Jkeep it warm. Yoii

may ufe it for white loaves, white cruft of bread', and bifcuits,

&iUOifira Brace cf Partridgs PhntsiOr any.tlmgyu pfeff.

ROAST a partridge, pound it well in a mortar, with the j;cinions of four turktes, wih a quart of 'ftrong gravy, nd At Ij vers cf the partridges, and fome truffles, and let it Wmer till it he pretty thick $ let it -fiand in a difli for a while, -then put two glaiTes of Biirgundy into a flew-pan, with two er three flices of onions, a clove or two of garlic, and the above fauces l.et it fimmer a few minutes, then prefs it through a hair bag into a ftewpan, add the efTence of ham, let it boil fo fome time, feafon it with good fpice and .pepper, Jay yourpar' tridges, &c in the difii, and pour your fauce in.

They will ufe as many fine Ingredients to ftew a pigeon or fowl, as will make a very fine difii, which is equal to 'bojUng a leg of mutton in champaign.

Ic would be oeedlefs to name any more, though you -hav much more expenfive fauce than this; however, I think bene i enough to fhew the folly of thefe fine 'French cooks. In thei own country, they will fnakea grand entertainfflwt with (he



MADE PLAIN AND EASy. m

expence of one of thefe difhes; but here they want the little petty profit; and by this fort of' legerdemain, fome fine eftatcs tee juggled intp Fjriinee.







C H A P. IV.



To make a Number of pretty little Diflies, •ftt for aSupper, or Side-did, and little Corner-difhes, for a jgreat Table i andjhe reft you have in the Chapter for Lent.

• Hffg Ears f€ed,

TAKE four hojgs.ears, and half boil them, or ta
ce them foufed; make a force-meat thus; take half a pound of beef-fuet as much crumbs of bread, n anchovy, fomefage'; boll and chop very fine a little parfley; mix all together with the yolk of an egg, a little pepper flit your ears very carefully to make a place for your fluffing; fill them, Bopr them, and fry them in frefh butter till they are of a fine brown; theh pour out all the fat clean, and put to them half a pint of gravy a a& of white wine, three tea-fpoonfuls of muftard, a pjece of butter as big as' a nutmeg rolled in flour, a little pepper, a fmall onion whole; cover them clofe, and let them Aew foftly for half an hour, fiuking ysvr pan nidw and then. When th are .enough, lay them in your difli and pour your fauce over thenc, but firft take out the onion. This makes a very pretty difli; but if yu would make a fine large dib, take the feet, and cut all the meat in fmall thin pieces, and flew with the ears. Seafon with fait to your palate.

To fm-ci C$cis Ccmis.

PARBOIL your cocks combs, then open them with a point of a knife at the great end: take the white of a fowl, as much bacon and beef marrow, cut thefe fmall, and beat them fine in a marble mortar; feafon them with fait, pepper, and grated nutmeg, and mix it with an egg; fill the cockscombs, and flew them in a little ftrong gravy foftly for half an hour; then flice in fomefrelh rajufliroonis and a few pickled oncsj then beat up the yolk of an egg in a little gravy, flirring it. SeaTon with fait. When they are enough, -ditfh them up in little

tdiflies or plates.

TV







ti THE ART OF COOKERY

To pnferve Cocks-Combsm

LET them be well cleaned, then put them into a pot, witJi fome melted bacon, and bdil them a little; about half an hour after add a little bay fait, fome pepper, a little vinegar, a lemon fliced, and an onion ftuck with cloves. When the bacon begins to flick to the pot, take them up, put them into the pan you would keep iic, lay a clean linen cloth over them, and pour Bielted butter clarified over them, to keep them clofe from the air. Thefd make a pretty plate at a fuppen

To prtferve or pickle Pigs Feet and Ears,

TAKE your feet and ears fingle, and wa(h them well, fplit the feet in twp, put a'bayleaf between every foot, put in al moft as much water as will cover them. When they are well fieamedf add to them cloves, mace, whole pepper, and ginger, corianderfeed and fait, according to your di fere tion; put t them a bottle or two of Rhenifli wine, according to the quan. tity you do, half a fco bay-leaves, and a bunch of fweet hei;bs. Let them boil foftly till they are very tender, then take them out of the. liquor, lay them in an earthen pot, then flrain the liquor over them; when they are cold, cover thqm down clofe and keep them for ufe.

You (bould let them Hand' to be cold fkim off all the fat, .and then put In the wine and fpice.

Pigs Feet and Ears another Way.

TAKE two pigs ears foufed, cut them into l6ng (Ilpa about three inches, and about as thick as a goofe quill put them in a flew pan with a pint of good gravy, and half, an onion cut very fine, flew them till they are tender; then add a little butter rolled in flour, a fpoonful of muftard, fome pepper and fait, a little elder vinegar; tofs them up and put them in a difli: have the feet cut in two, and put a bay-leaf between; tie them up, and boil them very tender in water and a little vinegar, with an onion or two, rub them over with the yolk of an egg, and fprinkle bread-crumbs on thetn, broil or fry them, and put them round the ears.

To pickle Ox-Palates.

TAKE your palates, wafli them well with fait and water, and put them in a pipkin with water and fome fait; and when they are ready to boil, fkim them well, and put to them pepper,

cloves.



MAfiE lLAiN ANb EAit I13

cloves, and mace, as much ai wiH give them a quick tafte Wha they are boiled tender (which will require four or five hours), peel them' and cut them into fmall pieces, and let them coq J then, make the pickle of white- wine and vinegar, an equal quantity; boil the pickle, and put in the fpices that were boiled in the palates; when both the pickle and palates ate coId
lay your palates in si jar, and pUt to them a few bay-leaves, and a little frefli fpice: pour the pickle over them, cover them clofe, tnd keep them fdr ufe.

Of thefe you may at any time make a pretty little difli eitheif tvith brown faucepr white; or butter and muftard and a fpoon- ful of white- wine I or they are ready to put in made di(bea.

To Jkw Cucumber t.

TAtCE file cucumbers, pare tfaem and cut thetii la tWOt length ways take out the feeds take a dozen fmall roundbcadf:d onions peeled n put fome butter in a ftewpan, melt it, put in your ooions and fry them brown; then put a fpoonfal of flour in ftir it till it is fmooth, put in three quarters ef a pint of brown gravy, and ftir it all the time; then put in your cucumbers, with a glaft of Li(bo, ilew them till they are tender; feafon with pepper and fait, and a little Cayenne;)epper to you liking: obferve to ikim it well, becaufe the butter wilt rife to the top. Send them to table in a diilr, ot under your meat.

29 ragoo Cucumbers

TAIE two cucumbers, two onions, ' ilice them, and fry tbem in a little buttei:, then drain them in a fieve, put them in to a faucc'pan, add fix fpoonfuls of gravy two of white wine a blade of mace; let them ftew five or ux minutes: then take a piece of butter as big as a walnut rolled in flour, a little faJt and Cayenne pepper (hsdce them together, and when it is, thick difh them up.

A Pricafey of Kidney Beans.

TAKE a 4iiart of the feed, when dry, foak them all night in river-water, then boil them on a flow fire till quite tender; take a quarter of a peck of onions, (lice them thin, fry them in butter till brown; then take them out of the hu&er, and put em in a qurt of ftrong-drawn gravy. Boil them till you, may maih them fine,, then put in yoiir beans, and give them, a bpil 01 two. Seafon with pepper, fait, and nutmeg.

I T



114 THE ART OF COOKERY

To drefs Windfor-Btans.

TAKE the feed, boil them till they are tender; then blanpk tliem, and fry them in clarified butter. Melt butter, with a drop of vinegar, and pour oyer them. Stow them with fait, pepper, and nutmeg.

' Or yoii may eat them with butter, fack, fugar, and a little powder of cinnamon.

To make Jumballs.

TAKE a pound of fine flour and a pound of fine powder- fu gar, make them into a light pafte, with whites of eggs beat fine: the)i add half a pint of cream, half a pound of fre(h butter melted, and a pound of blanched almonds well beat. Knead them altogether thoroughly with a little rofe-water, and cut out your jumballs in what figures you fancj; and either bake them in a gentle oven, or fry them in frefli butter, and they make a pretty fide or corner,difli. You may melt a little butter with a fpoonful of fack, and throw fine fugar all over the diOi., If you make them in pretty figures, they make a fine little di(h.

To make a Ragoo of Onions

TKE a pint of little young onions, peel them, and take four large ones, peel them, and put them very fmall put a quarter of a pound of good butter into a ftew-pan, when it is' melted and done making a noife, throw in your onions, and fry them till they begin to look a little brown: then ihake ia a little flour, nd fhake them round till they are thick; throw in a little fait, a little beaten pepper, a quarter of a pint of good jgravy, and a tea-fpooniful of mufiard. Stir all together, and when it is well-tafted and of a good thicknefs, pour it into your diib, and garnifh it with fried crumbs of bread. They make a pretty little difli, and are very good. You may ftew rafpings in the room of flour, if you pleafe,

J Ragoo of Oyjiers.

OPEN twenty large oyfters, take them out of their liquor, fave the liquor, and dip the oyfters in a batter made thus: take two eggs, beat them well, a little lemon-peel grated, a little nutmeg grated, a blade of mace pounded fine, a little parfley chopped fine; beat all together with a little flour, have ready fome butter or dripping in a ftew-pan; when it boils, dip in your oyfters one by one, into the batter, and fry them of a fine

brown 5



MADE PLAIN AND EASV. iij

Vfown then with ah cgg-flicc take them out, and lay them in a difh before the fire. Pour the fat out of the' pan, aiid (hake a little flour over the bottom of the pan, then rub a little piece of butter, as big as a fmall walnut, all over with' your knife, whilft it is over the fire; then p6ur in three fpoonfuls of the oyfter-liquor drained, one-fpoonful of wbitewine, and a quarter of a pint of gravy; grate a little nutmeg, ftir all together, throw in the oyfters, give, the pan a tofs round, and when the fauce is of a good thicknefs, pour all into the difh
and garnifli with rafpings,

A Ragoo of Afparaguu

SCRAPE a hundred of grafs very clean, and throw it into cold water. When you have fcraped all, cut as far as is good and green, about an inch long, and take two heads of endive clean wafhed and picked, cut it very fmall, a young lettuce, clean waflied and cut fmall, a large onion, peeled and cut fmall puc a quarter of a pound of butter into a ftew-pan, when it is melted throw in the above things: tofs them about, and Uy theni ten minutes; then feafon them with a little pepper and fait, Ihake in a little flour, tofs them about, then pour in half a pint of gravy. Let them ftew till the fauce is very thick and good; then pour all into your difh. Save a few of the little tops of the grafs to garni(h the difh.

N. B. Yoii muft not fry the afparagus: boil it in a little water, and put them in your ragoo, and then they will look green, '

A Rqgw of Livers

TAKE as many livers as you would have for your diflt. A turkey's liver and hx fowls livers will make a pretty difli. Pick the galls from them, and throw them into cold water; take the . fix livers, put them inafauce-pan with a quarter of a pint of gra vy, afpoonful of mu(hroom$, either pickled or frefb, a fpoonful of catchup, a little piece of butter as big as a nutmeg, rolled in flour; feafon them with pepper and fait to your palate. Let them ftew foftly ten minutes; in the mean while butter one fide of a piece of writing paper, and wrap the turkey's Kver on it, and broil it nicely, lay it in the middle, and the ftewed livers round. Pour the fauce all over, and garnifh with lemon'

iTo ragoo Caulijlofvers TAKE a large cauliflower, wafli it very clean, and ptcl it In- pieces, as for pickling; make a nice brown cuUia, and

I 2 ftew



,1(4 TRE ART OF QOKfRV

iW them tiU tejidei;, fcafon with pepper aad felt, put tkeei nKc your difli vitb the iiauee over; boU a f(pw fprigs of the uliflower in water, to garnifii with.

Si€wed Pfofo, and Lettuci

Take quart of greets pafe, two Urge cabbage- ktuccsy cut fmall aeroCsy andiwaihed very clean; put tbem iaa ftewc?pan with a quart of gravy, and ftew them till tender put ii ipme hikttec rolled in &ciix, fisalbn witk pepper and £ih r when of a proper thicknefs difli them up.

N. B. Some like them thickened with the yolks of four tggs. Others like an onion chopped very fine and ftewed with tbem wiCb two or three raihers of lean ham.

Anothr TVay ia ftew Ptas

TAitE a pint of peas, put them in a ftew- pan with handful of chopped parJtey; jufl cover them with waller, flew ihem till tender; thert beat up. the yol-ks of two eggSy put ia fome double-refined fugai to fweeten them, put in the egg 2nd tofs them itp; then put them in yoar di&.

c Qds-fiunds broiled ioith Grenjy,

SCALD them in hot water, and rub them with fak well blanch them, that id, take ofF the blacked dirty (kitif then fet theia on in cold water, and let them fimmer till they begin to be ten dex take them out and ftour them, and brioit them on tbe.grid'iron. In the mean time take a little good gravy, a little Ikniftard a little bit of butter rolled in flour, give it a boil, feafon it with pepper and fait. Lay the founds in your difh and pour youif iauce over them

• • -

A forced Cahhage.

TAKE a fine white-heart cabbage, about as big asaqurteif; of a peck, lay it in water two or three hours, then half boil It fet it in a cullender to drain,, then very carefully cut out the heart, but take great care not to break off any of the putfide leaves, fill it with force-meat onade thus: tal a pound oJF vealy half a pound of bacon, fat and lean together, cqt them fmally and beat them fine in a mortar, with four eggs boiled hard iSeafon it witli pepper and fait, a little beaten mace, a very little lemon-peel cut fine, fome pariiey chopped fine,, a very little thyme, and two anchovies: when they are beat fine, take iifit, crumb of ftae roU, fome mufhroojs, if you have them

•itb



MAt)E PLAIN AND EASY. 117

ettfer pickled or freOi, and the heart of the cabbage you cQt oat chopped fine. Mix all together with the yolk of an egg, en fill the hollow part of the cabbage, and tie it with a packthread; then lay fome fltces of bacon to the bbttom of a ftew pan or fauce-pan, and on that a pound of coarfe tean beef, cut thin; put in the cabbage, covet it clofe, and let it ftew oyer a flow fire, till the bacon begins to ftick to the pan, fake in a little flour, then pour in a quart of brbth, an onion ftuck with cloves, two blades of mace, fome whole pepper, a little bundle of fweet herbs; cover it clofe, and let it ftew very foftly an Hour and a half, put in glafs of red-wine, give it a boil, then take it up, lay it in the di(h, and ftraih the gravy and pour over: untie it flrft. This is a fine (ide-difh, and the next day makes a fine hafli, with a vealfteak nicely broil ed and laid on it.

' Sfnved fieJ Cabhage.

, TAKE a red cabbage, lay it in cold water an hour, then cut it into thin ilices ack-ofs, and cut it into little pieces. Put it into a ftew pan, with a pound of faufagesi a pint of gravy, a little bit of ham or lean bacon r cover it clofe, and let it ftew half an hour then take the pan ofF the fire, and fkim ofF the fat, (hake in a little floiir, ahd fet it on again. Let it ftew two or three minutes, then lay the faufages in your difh and pour the reft all over. You mayy before you take it up, put in half a fpoonful of vinegar.

Savoys forced and JleODtd.

TAKE two favoys, fill one with force-meat, aqd tlc other without. Stew them with gravy; feafon them with pepper and fait, and when they are near enough, take a piece of butc ter, as big as a large walnut, rolled in flour, and put in. Let them ftew till they are enough, and the fauce thick; then lay them in your difh, and pour the fauce ovef them. Thefe things are beft done on a ftove.

To force Cucumheru

TAKE three large cucumbers, fcoop out the pith, fill then with fried oyfters, feafoped with pepper and fait; put on the piece again you cut ofF, few it with a coarfe thready and frjr them in the butter the oyfters are fried in: then pour out the Butter, and fliake in a little flour, pour in half a pint of gravy, ihake it round and piit in the cucumbers. Seafon it with ' r I 3 . 3 little



n8 THE ART QF COOKERY

a little pepper mnd fltj let tbcm ftew foftly till they re tender, then lay them in a plate, and pour the gravy over them: or you ipay foice them with any fort of force-meat you fancy 'nd fry them in hog's lard, and then ftew them in gravy zai red-wipe

Fried Saufages

TAKE half 9 pound of faufages, and fix apples, llice fouf about as thick as a crown, cut the other two in quarters, fry them with the faufages of a fine light brown, lay the faufages in the middle of the difh, and the apples round. Qarnifb with the quarteied apples.

$ tewed cabbage and faufages fried is a good difh,

CoUops and Eggs,

CUT either bacon, hung beef, or hung itiutton In tp thirl flices; broil them nicely, lay them in a di(h before the fire, have ready a ftew- pan of water, boiling, break as many eggs as you have collops, break them one by one ip a cup, and pour them into the ffew-pan. When the whites of the eggs begin to harden, and all look of a clear white, take them up one by one in an egg-flice, and lay them on the collops.

To drefi cold Fowl or Pigeon

CUT them in four quarters, beat up an egg or two, according to what you drefs, grate a little nutmeg in, a Ifttie falt fome parfley chopped, a. few crumbs of bread, beat them well toge- ther, dip them in this batter, and have ready fome dripping hot in a ftew- pan, in which fry them of a fine light brown: have ready a little good gravy, thickened with a little flour, mixed ' with a fpoonful of catchup; lay the fry in the difli, and pour the fauce over. Garnifh with lemon, and a few muflirooms, if you have any, A cold rabbit eats well done thus.

To mince VeaU

CUT your veal as fine as poffible, but do not chop it: grate little nutmeg over it, fhred a little lemon-peel very fine, throw a very little fait on it, drudge a little flour over it. To a large plate of veal, take four or five fpoonfuls of water, lt it boil, then put in the veal, with a piece of butter as big as an egg, ftir it well together; when it is all thorough hot, it is enough. Have ready a very thin piece of bread toafted brown, cut it into three- corner fippets, lay it round the plate, and pour in the

vea).



MADE PLAIN AND EASV. 119

aL Juft before you pouj: it in, fqueeze iti half a lemon, or half fpoonful of vinegar Garni(h with lemon. You may put gravy in the room of water, ifyou love it flrong but it is better without

To fry cold VeaL

CUT it in pieces about as thick as half a crown, and as long as you pleafe, dip them in the yolk of an egg, and then in crumbs of bread, with a few (weet herbs, and flired lemon-peel in it; grate a little nutmeg over them, and fry them in frcfli butter. The butter muft be hot, juft enough to fry them in: in the mean time, make a little gravy of the bone of the veal; when the meat is fried take it out with a fork, and lay it in a difh before the (ire, then (bake a little flour into the pan, and ftir it round; then put in a lictle gravy, fqueeze in a little lemon, and pour it over the veaU Garnifli with lemon

To iofs up cold Veal White.

CUT the veal into little thin bits, put milk enough to it for faace, grate in a little nutmeg, a very little fait, a little piece of butter rolled in flour: to half a pint of milk, the yolks of two eggs well beat, a fpoonful of mu(h room- pickle, ftir all together till it is thick; thn pour it into your di(b, and garnilh with lemon.

Cold fowl (kinned, and done this way, eats well; or the beft end of a cold breaft of veal; firft fry it, drain it from the fat; then pour this fauce to it .

To hajh Cold Mutton.

CUT your mutton with a very (harp knife in very little bitsc as thin as poffible; then boil the bones with an onion, a little fweet herbs, a blade of mace, a very little whole pepper, a little fait, a piece of cruft toaft(d very crifp: let it boil till there is juft enough for fauce, ftrain it, and put it into a fauce-pan, with a piece of butter rolled in flour; put in the meat, when it is very hot it is enough. Seafon with pepper and fait. Hkve ready feme thin bread toafted brown, cut three- corner- ways, lay them round the di(h, and pour in the ha(h. As to walnutpickle, and all forts of pickles, you muft put in according to your fancy Garni(h with pickles. Some love a fmall onion peeled, and cut very fmall, and done in the ha(h. Or you (pay life made gravy if you have not time to boil the bones.

I 4 n



il



t%9



THE ART OF COOKERY



T9 imjh MuiUn Uki Ffnffm.

CUT it very thin as above; boil the bones as above; ftraifi the liquor, where there is juft enough for the balh, co a quarter of a pJnt of gravy put a large fpoonful of red wine, an onion peeled and chopped fine
a verv little lemon- peel (bred fine, a piece of butter as big as a rmall walnut rolled in flour; put it jntoa fauce-pan with the meat, Ihake it all together, and wheo It is thoroughly hot, pour it into your dih Hadi beef the Ame way. '

Ta mate C$lkps of Cold Betf

IF you have any cold inYide of a firloin of beef, take ofF all the fat, cut It very thin in little bits, cut an onion very fmallK boil as t)iuch Water or gravy as you thin will do for fauce feafon it with a little pepper and fait, and a buhdle of Tweet herbs. Let the water boil, then put in the meat, with a good piece of butter rolled in flour, ihake it round, and ftir it. When the fauce is thick and the meat done, take out the fweet herbs, and pour it into your diih. They do better than freih meat

To make a Florentine of Veah

TAKE two kidneys of veal, fat and all, and mince them very fine, then chop a few herbs and put to it, and add a feW currants: feafon it with cloves, mace, nutmeg, and a little fait, four or five yolks of eggs chopped fine, and fome crumbs of bread, a pippin or two chopped, fottie candied emonpeel cut fmall, a little fack, and orange- flower-water. Lay a (beet of puiF-pafte at the bottom of your difli, and put in the ingredi-c ents, and cover it with another (heet of ptifF-pafte. Bake iti ilack oven fprape fugar on the top, and ferve it up hot

Salmagundy,

TAICE two pickled herrings and bone them, a handful of parfley, four esgs boiled hard, the white of 0ne roafted chicken orc fowl; chop all very fine feparately, that is the yolks of eggs by themfelves, and the whites the fame; fcrape fome lean boiled ham very fine, hung beef or Putch beef fcraped. Turn a fmall China bafon o.r deep faucer, into your difli; make fome butter into the ibape of a pine apple, or any other Ihape you pleafe, and fet it on the top of the bafon, or faueer; lay round your bafon a ring of Ihred parfley, then whiter of

eggs



MADE PLAIK AND EASY. nt

eggs, then ham, then chitken ten bfcef, thn yolks of tggs, thea herrings, till you have covered the bafon, and ured all your ingredients. Garhifll the difli With whole capers, and pickles of any fort you choofe chopt fine; or you my leavt out the butter, and put the ingredients on, and put a flowet of any fort at the top, or a fprig of myrtle.,

jtMther Way

MINCE veal or fowl very fmall, a pickled herring boned and picked fmall, cucumber minced fmall, apples minced fmall, an onion peeled and minced fmall, fome pickled redcabbage chopped fmall, cold pork minced fmall, or cold duck or pigeons minced fmall, boiled parfley chopped fine, celery cut fmall, the yolks of hard eggs chopped fmall, and the whites chopped fmall, and either lay all the ingredients by themfelvea feparate on faucers or In heaps in a dih. Difli them out with what pickles you have, and fliced kmon nicely cut; and if you can get nailertium-fiowers, lay them round it. This i$ a fine middle di(h forTupper; but you may always naatop falmagundy of fuch things as you have, According to yout fiQcy.' The other forts you have in the Chapter of Fafts.

7s make litth Paftieu

TAKE the kidney of a loin of veal cut very fine, with al much of the fat, the yolks of tWo hard eggs, feafoned with 1 little falt and half a fmall nutmeg. Mix them well together then roll it well in a pufF pafte cruft; make three of it, and fry them nicely in hog's-lard or butter.

They make a pretty little di(h for change. You may put in fome carrots, and a little fugar and fpice, with the juice of In orange, and fometimes apples, firft boiled and fweetcined
widi a little juice of lemon, or any fruit you pleafe.

Petit Tafttesfvr gamijhing Difies.

MAKE a fhort cruft, roll it thick, make them about ds big as the bowl of a fpooti, and about an inch deep: take a piece pf veal, enough to fill the patty, as much bacon and beef-fuet, fhred thtfm all very fine, feafon them viith pepper and fait, and a little fweet herbs put them into a little fteW-pan, keep turning them about, with a few nnufhrooms chopped fmall, for eight or ten minutes; tften fill youf petty-patties, and cover fhem with fome cruft. Colour theih with the yolk of aii egg,' M bake tbera Somotimes fill them with oyftcrs for fift) etf

the



J22 THE. ART OF COOKERY



i '



the melts of the fifh pounded, and feafoned with pepper and fait fil) them with lohfters, or what you fancy. They make a fine garnifhing, and give a difh a fine look: if for a calPs head, the brains feafoned is mod proper,"and fome with oyftcr.



CHAP. V.

TO DRESS FISH.

AS to boiled fifli of all forts, you have full directions in the Lent chapter. But here we can fry fiih much better, be caufe we have beef-dripping, or hog's lard.

Obferve alw2
vs in the frying of any fort of fifli; firft, that you dry your filn very well in a clean cloth, then do your fifli in this manner: beat up the yolks of two or three eggs, ac cordiDg to your quantity of fiih; take a fmall paftry-brufb, and put the egg on, (hake fome crumbs of bread and flour mixt over the fi(h, and then fry it. Let your ftew-pan you fry them in be very nice and clean, and put in as much beef dripping, or hogVlard, as will almoft cover yourfilh; and be fure it boils before you put in your fifli. Let it fry quick, and let it be of a fine light brown, but not too dark a colour. Have your fifli- flice ready, and if there is occafion turn iti when it is enough, take it up, and lay a coarfe cloth on a difli, op which lay your fifli, to drain all the greafe from it; if yoti fry parfley, do it quick, and take great care to whip it out of the pan as foon as it is crifp, or it will lofe its fine colour Take great care that your dripping be very nice and clean. You have diredions in the eleventh chapter, how to make it fit for ufe, and have it always in readinefs.

Some love, fifl in batter; then you muft beat an egg fine, and dip your fifli in juft as you are going to put it in the pan; or as good a batter as any, is a little ale and flour beat up, juft as you e ready for it, and dip the fifli, to fry it,

Lobjier Sauce.

TAKE a fine hen lobfter, take out all the fpawn and bruife it in a mprtar very fine, with a little bfitter i take all

3 tbo



UaDE plain and easy. 123

the meat out of the claws and tail, and cut it in fmall fquare pieces; put the fpawn and meat in a ftew-pan with a fpoonfu of anchovy-Ijquor, and onefpoonful of catchup,,a blade of mace, a piece of a fttck of horfe-raddiih, half a lemon, a gill of gravy, a little butter rolled in flour, juft enough to thicken it put in half fi pound of butter nicely melted, boil it gently up for fix or feven minutes; take out the horferaddih, mace, Lod lemon, and fqueeze the juice of the lemon into thefauce juft fimmer it up, and then put it in your boats.

Shrimp Sauce.

TAKE half a pint of (hrimps, walh them very clean, put them in a ftew-pan with a fpoonful of fifli-)ear, or anchovy liquor, a pound of butter melted thick, boil it up for five minutes, and fqueeze in half a lemon; tofs it up, and then put it in your cups or boats

To mah Oyjier-Sauce for Fijh.

TAKE a pint of large oyfters, fcald them, and then ftratn them through a fieve, wa(h the oyfters very clean in cold wa ter, and take the beards off; put them in a ftewpan, poor the liquor over them, but be careful to pour the liquor gently oat of the vefiel you have ftrained it into, and you will leave all the fediment at the bottom, which you muft be careful not to put into your ftewpan; then add a large (jpoonful of anchovy liquor, two blades of mace, half a lemon, fome butter rolled in flour enough to' thicken it then put in half a pound of butter, boil it up till the butfer is melted; then take out the mace and lemon, fqueeze the lemon juice into the faucesgive it a boil up, ftir it a)l the time, and then put it into your boats or bafons.

N.' 3. You may put ii a fpoonful of catchup, or a fpooqful of mountain-wine.

To make Antbovy'SauSn

TAKE a pint of gravy, put in an anchotry, take a quarter of a pound of buttei; rolled in a little flour, and ftir all together till it boils. You may add a little juice of a lemon, catchup,Dcd-wine, and walnutliquor, fuft as you pleafe

Plain butter melted thick, with a fpoonful of walnut pickle, or catchup, is good fauce, or anchpvy: in ihort you may put as many things as y6u fancy into fauce. AH other ftuce for i&i you have in the Lent chapter, .

7i



S4 THE ART OF COOKERY

TV itrfs tf BrtiCi of Carp.

TAKE piece 6f butter and put into a ftewpan, melt It and Ut in ft large fpbonful of flour, keep it ftirring till it is ImoOth; Ithen put in a pint of gravy, and a pint of red-port oir tlaret, t little horfe-raddifli fcraped, eight cloves, four blades bf mace, and a dozen corns of all-cfpice, tie them in a little linen rag, a bundle of fweet-herbs, half a lemon three anchovies, a little onion chopped very fine; feafon With pepptr fait, and Cayenne pepper,, to your liking; ftew it for half an hour, then ftrain it through a fieve into the pan you intend to put your fi(h in let your carp be well cleaned and fcaled, then put the fifli in with the fauce, and ftew them very gently for kalf an hour ( then turn them, and ftew them fifteen minutes longer, put in ialoilg with your fi(h fome truffles ahd morels fcalded, fome pickled muflirooms, an artichoke-bottom, and about a dozen large oyfters, fqueeze the juice of half a lemon in, ftew it five minutes; then put your carp in your diih, and pour all the fauce over Gamifli with fried fippets, and thq roe of the fiih, done thus: beat the roe up wdl with the yolks of two eggs, a little flour, a little lemon-peel chopped fine, ibme pepper fait, and a little anchovy- liquor; have ready a pan of beef dripping boiling, drop the roe in, to be about as big as a crowhpiecej fry it of a light brown, and put it KNind the 'dih, with fome oyfters fried in batter and fome . fcraped lorfe-raddiih.

N. B. Stick your fried fippets in the fifl).

You may fry the carp firft, if you pleafe-, but the abptre il.;he moft modern way i

Or, if you are in a great hurfy, while the fattce is making ypu may boil the fi(h with fpriAg- water, half a pint of vinegar, a little horfe-radd lib, and bay-leaf; put your (ifli in c the difli, and pour the fauce over.

dnfs Carp au Blue,

TAKE A brace of carp alive, and gut them, but not wa(h nor fcale them; tie theoi to a fifli-drainer, and put them intb a fifli kettle and pour boiling vinegar over till they are blue, or you may hold them down in a fifh-kettle with two forks, and anor perfon pour the vinegar oyer them: put in a iiart of boiling water, a handful of fait, fome horferaddcih cut in fliCes; boil them gently twenty minutes: put a filfa-plate in the difl), a napkin over that and fend thctn up hot Garnifli . " with







MAtcE PLAIN A)fO £A$Y.' us

Witb horfe-raddifii. Boil half a pint of crcam aud fweetcR it with fine fugar for fauce in a boat or bafon



I . 1 ' I 11 H I '



CHAP. VI. 0 SOUPS AND BROTHSc

To make Jhrong Broth for Soup or Gravy.

YAlKE a ihin of beef, a knuckle of veal, and a (erag of J iputton, put them in five gallons of water then let it boil up, fkim it clean, and feafon it with fix large onions four good teeks, four heads of celery, two carrots, two turnips 1 bundle of fweet-herb$, fix cloves, a don corns of all-fpice and fome fait; fkinn it very clean, and let it ftew gently for fia( hours; then ftrain it oflT, and put it by for ufe

When you want very ftrong gravy take a. flice of bacon lay it in a ftew-pan take a pound of beef, cut it thin, lay it on the bacon, flice a good piece of carrot in, an onion fliced a good Cruft of bread, a few fweet-herbs, a little mace, cloves nutmeg, and whole pepper, an ancHovy; cover it, and fet k on a flow fire five or fix minutes, and pour in a quart of the above gravy; cover it clofe, and let it boif foftly till half is wa&ed. This will be a rich, high brown fituce for fi(h, fiowl orragoo.

Gravy for White Sauce

TAKE a pound of any part of the veal, cuiit it into fmll tcieces, boil it in a quart of water, with an oion, a blsde o£ mace, two cloves, and a few whole peppercorns. Boil it till it is as rich as you would have it.

Gravy for Turkey j Fowl or Ragoo,

TAKE a pound of lean beef, cut and hack it well, then flour it well, put a piece of butter as big asa hen's egg in a ftew-pan; when it is melted, put in your beef, fry it gi) all fides a little brown, then pour in three pints of boiling water, and a bundle of fweet-herbs, two or three blades of mce., threci or four cloves, twelve whole pepper- corns, a I;ttle bit Qt cr lot) a little piece of cruft of bread toafted . btown c cover it

clofe.



n6 THE ART OF COOKERY

clofe, and let it boil till there is about a pint or lefs; then feafon it with fait, and ftrain it oflF.

Gravy for a Fowly when you have no Meat nor Gravy ready.

TAKE the neck, liver, and gizzard, boil them in half a pint of water, with a little piece of bread toafted brown, a little prpper and fait, and a little bit of thyme. Let them boil till there is about a quarter of a pint; then pour in half a glafs of red-wine, boil it and ftrain it, then brulfe the liver well in and ftrain it again; thicken it with a little piece of butter roiU ed in flour, and'it will be very good.

An ox's kidney makes good gravy, cut all to pieces, and . boiled with fpice, &c. as, in the foregoing receipts.

You have a receipt in the beginning of the book, in the preface for gravies.

Vermicelli Soup

TAKE three quarts of the broth, and one of the gravy mixed together, a quarter of a pound of vermiceli blanched in two quarts of water; put it into the foup, boil it up for ten minutes, and feafon with fait, if it wants any put it in your tureen, with a cruft of a French roll baked.

Macaroni Soup.

TAKE three quarts of the ftrong broth, and one of the gravy mixed together; take half a pound of fmall pipe-maca roni, and boil it in three quarts of water, with a little butter in it, till it is tender; then ftrain it through a iieve, cut it in pieces of abouttwo inches long, put it in your foup, and boil it up for ten minutes, and then fend it to table in a tureenc With the cruft of a French roll toafted.

Soup CreJJii.

TAKE a pound of lean ham, and cut it into fmall bits, and put at the bottom of a ftew-pan, then cut a French roll and put over the ham; take two dozen heads of celery cut fmall, fix onions, two turnips, one carrot, cut and waQied very clean, fix cloves, four blades of mace, two handfuls of water-crefles: put them all into the ftew-pan, with a pint of good broth j cover them clofe, and fweat it gently for twenty, minutes, then fill It upiwith veal broth, and ftew it four hours . rub it through a fine fievc, or cloth, put it in your pan again;

feafoa



MADE. PLAIN AND EAST 127

feafon it with fait and a little Cayenne pepper; give it a fimmer up, and fend it to table hoc with fome French roll toafied hard in it. Boil a handful of creiles till tender, in water, and put in over the bread.

3d make Mutton or Veal Gravy.

CUT and hack your veal well, fet it on the fire with water, ftreet- herbs, mace, and pepper. Let it boil till it is as good as you would have it, then ftrain it oiF. Your fine cooks always, if they can, chop a partridge or two, and put into gravies.

TV mke ajirong Fijb-gravy.

TAKE two or three eels, or any fifh you have, Ikin or fcale them, gut them and wafh them from grit, cut them into little pieces, put them into a faucecpan, cover them with water, a little cruft of bread toafted brown, a blade of two of mace, and fome whole pepper, a few fweet-herbs, and a very little bit of lempn-peel. Let it boil till it is rich and good, then have ready a piece of butter, according to your gravy; if a pint, as big as a walnut. Melt it in the fauce-pan, then (hake in a little flour, and tofs it about till it is brown, and then ftrain in the gravy to it. Let it boil a few minutes, and it will be good.

To make Plum -Porridge for Chrtjlmas.

TAKE a leg and (bin of beef, put them into eight gallons of water, and boil them till they are very tender, and when the broth is ftrong .ftrain it out: wipe the pot and put in the broth again; then fllce fix penny loaves thin, cut off the top and bottom, put fome of the liquor to it, cover it up and let it ftand a quarter of an hour, boil it and ftrain it, and then put it into your pot. Let it boil a quarter of an hour, then put in five pounds of currants, clean wafiied and picked; let them boil a little, and put in five pounds of raifms of the fun, ftoned, and two pounds of prunes, and let them boil till they fwell; then put in three quarters of an ounce of mace, half an ounce of cloves, two nutmegs, all of them beat fine, and mix it with a little liquor cold, and put them in a very little while, and take ofF the pot; then put in three pounds of fugar, a little fait, a quart of fack, a quart of claret, and the juice of two or three lemons. You may thicken with fago inftead of bread, if you pleafe; pour them into earthen pans, and keep them for ufe.



ttt THE ART Olf COOtERT



To mate Jirmg Broth to ietp fir life.

TAltE part of a leg of beef and the fcrag-end of a neck o mutton, break the bones in pieces, and piit to it as much watef as will cover it, tA A Uttle fait and whf n it boils, (kirn it clean, and put into it a whole onion ftuck with cloves, a bunch of fweet-herbs, fotne pepper, and a nutmeg quartered. Let thefe boil till the meat is boiled in pieces, and the ftrengtU boiled out of it ftrain it out and keep it for ufe

A CrctW'fijh Soup.

TAKE a galloQ of W4ter, and fet it a-boiltng put in it a bunch of fweet-herb?, three or four blades of mace, an onioa ftuck with cloves, pepper, and fait i then have about two hundred craw-filb, fave about twenty, then pick the reft froili thd ihens, fave the tails whole; beat the body and (hells in a mortar with a pint of peas, green or dry, firft boUed tender in fair water; put your boiling water to it, and ftrain it boiling hot through a cloth till you have all thgoodnefs out of it: ftt It over a flow fire or ftew-hole, have ready a French roll cut venr thin, and let it be very dry, put it to your foiip, let it ftew till half is wafted) then put a piece of butter as big as an egg into a fauce-pan, let it fimnier tllL k badooe oiaking a noife (bake

. in tw.o tea-fpoonfuls of flour, ftirring it about, and an oniofl; put in the tails of the fifli, give them a (hake round, put tp them a pint of good gravy, let it boil four or five minutes foftly, take out the onion, and put to it a pint of the foup ftir it well together, bruife the livefpawn of a heii lobfter, and put it all together, and let it fimmer very foftly a quarter of an hour J fry a French roll very nice and brown and the twenty

, crav(-fi(h; pour your foup into the difh, and lay the roll in the middle and the craw-fi(h round the difti.

Fine cooks boil a brace of carp and tench and may be a lobfter or two, and many more rich things, to make a craw-fiih foup but the above is full as good and wants no addition.

To make Soup-Santea or Oravy-Soup,

TAKE fix good rafhers of lean ham, put it in the bottom

of a ftew-pan; then put over it three pounds of lean becf nd

V over the beef three pounds of lean veal, fix onions cut in OAH

two carrots, and two turnips fliced, two heads of celery, .nd

a bundle of fweet-herbs, fix cloves, and two blades V

put a little water at the bottom, draw it very gently vA it % dicks,



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 129

fticks, then put in a gallon of boiling water; let it ftew for two hours, feafon with fait, and ftrain it offj then have ready a carrot cut in fmall flices of two inches long, and about as thick as a goofc quill, a turnip, two heads of leeks, two, heads of celery, two heads of endive cut acrofs, two cabbagelettuces cut acrofs, a verry little forrel and chervill 5 put thcoi in a ftew-pan, and fweat them for fifteen minutes gently; then put them in your foup, boil it up gently for ten minutes; . put it in your tureen wUb a cruft of French roll,

N. B. You may boil the herbs in two quarts of water for ten minutes, if you like them beft fo; your foup will be the clcaVer, or you may take one quart of the broth, page 1 25, and one of the fowling- gravy, and boil the herbs that arc cut fine in it for a quacter of an hour.

jf Green Peas-S$up.

TAKE a knuckle of tcM, and one pound of leafl ham, cut tfaem in thin flices, lay the ham at the bottom of a foup-pot, the veal upon the ham; then cut fix onions in flices and puc on, two or three turnips, two carrots, three heads of celery cut fmall, a little thyme, four cloves, and four blades of " niacc; put a little water at the bottom, cover the pot clofe, and draw it gentlyc but do not let it flick; then put in fl; quarts of boiling water. Jet it ftew. gently for four hour, and Ikim it well; take two quarts of green-peas, and ftew them in fome of the broth till tender; then firain them ofF, and put them in a marble mortar, and beat them fine, put the liquor in, and mix them up (if you have no mortar, you muft bruife them in the beft manner you can); take a tammy, or a fine cloth, and rub them through till you have rubbed, all . the pulp out, and then put ypur foup in a clean pot, with half a pint, of fpinach juice, and boil it up for fifteen minutes; feafon with fait and a little pepper: if your foup is not thick enough, take the crumb of a r rench roll, and boil it in a little of the foup, beat it in the mortar, and rub it through your tammy or cloth; then put it in your foup, and boil it up; then put It in your tureen, with dice of bread toafted very hard

Another Way to make Green PeasSoup

TAKE a gallon of water, make it boil; rheo put in fix onions, four turnips, two carrots, and two heads of celery cue in flices, four cloves four blades of AiftCe, four cabbage let

K, ' tuces



ijo THE ART OF COOKERY

tuces cut fmall, ftew them for an hour i then ftrain it off and put in two quarts of old green-peas, and boil them in the liquor till tender; then beat or bruiYe them, and mixthiifi up with the broth, and rub them through a tammy or ctoth, and put it in a clean pot, with half a pint of fpinach juice, and boil it up fifteen minutes, feafonwith pepper and lalt to your liking; then put your foup in your tureen, with fmall dices of bread toaftcd very hard.

jf Peas- Soup for JVlnter.

TAKE about four pounds of lean beef, cut it in fmaU pieces, about a pound of lean bacon, of pickled pork, fet it on the fire with two gallons of water, let it bail, and fkim it well; then put in fix onions, two' turnips, one carrot, and four heads of celery cut fmll, and put in a quart of fplit-peas, boil it gently for three hours; then ftrain them through a iieve, and rub the peas well through; then put your foup rn a clean pot, and put in fome dried mint rubbed very fine to powder, cut the white of four heads of celery, and two turnips in dices, and boil them in a quart of water for fifteen minutes; then ftrain them off, and put them in your foup, take about a dozen of fmall rafhers of bacon fried, and put them into your foup, feafon with pepper and fait to your Jik ing, boil it up for fifteen minutes; then put it in your tureen) with dices of bread fried very crifp

Another Way to make it.

WHEN you boil a leg of pork, or a good piece of beef, favc the liquor. When it is cold take ofF the fat j th'e next day boil a leg of mutton, fave the liquor, and when it is cold take off the fat, fet it on the fire, with two quarts of peas. Let them boil tilL they are tender, then put in the pork or beef liquor, with the ingredients as above, and let it boil till it is as thick as you would have it, allowing for the boiling again; then ftrain it off, and add the ingredients as above. You may make your foup of veal or mutton gravy if you pleafe, that is according to your fancy.

jf Chenut- Soup.

TAKE half a hundred of chefnuts, pick them, put them in an earthen pan, and fet thetn in the oven half an hour, or roaft them gently over a flow fire, but take care thty do notc burn I then peel them, nd fet them to itew in a quart of good

beef.



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 131

hecf, veal, or mutton broth, till they are quite tender. In the mean time, take a piece or flice of ham, or bacon, a pound of veal, a pigeon beat to pieces, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, a little pepper and mace, and a piece of carrot; hy the bacon at the bottom of a (lew-pan, and lay the meat and in gredients at top. Set it over a flow fire till it begins to fticic to the pan, then put in a cruft of bread, and pour in two quarts of broth. Let it boil foftly till one-third is waflrd; then ftrain it ofF, and add to it the chefnuts. Seafoii it with fait, and let it boil till it is well tafted, ftew two pigeons in it, and fry a French roll crifp; lay the roll in the middle of the di(h, and the pigeons on each fide j pour in the fou
c, and fend it away hot.

Hon Soap.

TAKE and cut a large hare into pieces, and put it intb aft earthen mug, with three blades of mace, two large onions, t little fait, a red-herring, half a dozen large morels, a pint of red wine, and three quarts of water; bake it three hours in t quick oven, and then ftrain it into a ftew-pan; have ready boiled four ounces of French barley, and put in; juft fcald the liver and rub it through a fieve with a wooden fpooni put it into the foup, fet it over the fire, and keep it ftihing, but it muil not. boil. Send it up with crifp bread in it.

Scup i la Riim.

Take a pound of lean ham and cut it fmall, and put it at the bottom of a foup-pot; cut a knuckle of veal into pieces and put in, and an old fowl cut in pieces; put three blades 6f mace, four onions, fix heads of celery, two turnips, one carrot, a bundle of fweet herbs wa(hed clean; put in half a pint of water, and cover it clofe, and fweat it gently for half an hour, but be careful it don't burn, for that will fpoil it; then pour in boiling water enough to cover it, and let it fiew till all the goodnefs is out, then firain it into a clean pan, and let it ftand half an hour to fettle, then ikim it well, and pour it ofF the fettlings into a clean pan; boil half a pint of cream, and pour upon the crumbs of a halfpenny roll, and let it foke well. Take half a pound of almonds, blanch them, and beat them in a marble mortar as fine as you can, putting now and then a little cream to keep them from oiling; take the yolks of fix hard eggs, and the roland cream, and put to the almonds, and beat them up togethf r in your broth 1 rub

K a it



13a THE ART. OF 60OKERY

k through A fine hir (ievc or cloth till all the goodnefs is rubbed through, and put it in a ftew-pan i keep ftirrfng it till it boils, nd (kim oflF the froth as it rifts. Seafon with fait, and thei
pour it into your tureen, with three flices of French roll crifpt before the fire.

7i make MuttanBrotb.

TAKE a neck'oF mutton about fix pounds, cut it In two, boil the fcrag in a gallon of water, fkim it well, then put in a little bundle of fWeet herbs, an onion, and a good cruft of bread. Let it boil an hour, then put in the other part of the mutton, a turnip or two, fome dried marigolds, a fw cives chopped fine, & little parfley chopped fmall; then put ihefe in, about a quarter of an hour before your broth is enough. Seafon it wifh ui or you ma put in a quarter of a pound of barley or rice at firft Some love it thickened with oatmeal, and fome with bre; and fome love it feafoned with mace, inuead of fweet herbs and onion. All this is fancy, and dfiFerent palates. If you boil turnips for fauce, do not boil all in the pot, it makes the broth too ftrong of them, but boil them in a fauce-pan.

Beef' Broth.

TAKE .a lcJg of beef, crack the bone in two or three parts, wa(h it. clean, put it into a pot with a gallon of water, (kina it well, then put in two or three blades of mace, a little bundle of parfley, and a good cruft of bread. Let it boil till the beef js Quite tender, and the fine'ws. Toaft fome bread and cut it ill dice, and put it, in your tureen j lay in the meat, and pour the foup m.

To make Scotch Barky-Broth,

TAKE a leg of beef, chop it all to pieces, boil it In three gallons of water with a piece of carrot and a cruft of bread, till it is half boiled,away; then ftrain it off, and put it into the pot again with half a pound of barley, four or five heads of celery' tvafhed dean and cut fmall, a large onion, a bundle of fwfeet herbs, a little parfley chopped fmaJl, and a few marigolds. Let this boil an hour. Take a cock, or a large fowl, clean picked and wafhed, and put into the pot; boil it till the broth is quite goodc, then feafon with fait, and fend it to table, with the fowl in the middle. Thi broth is very good without the fowl. Take out the onion and fwect herbs before you fend it to tabic.

Some make this broth With a Iheep's head inftcad of a leg of beef, and it is .verygood c but you muft chop the head all to ' T . pieccsv



• t



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 133

pieces The thick flank (about fix pounds to fix quarts of water) makes good broth; then put the barley in with the meat, firft Ikim it well, boil it an houi?' very foftly, then put in the above ingredients, with turnips and carrots clean fcraped and pared, and cut in little pieces. Boil all together foft y, till the broth is very good; then feafon it with fait, aad fend it to table, with the beef in the middle, turnips and car rots rounds and pour the broth over all.

To make liodge Podge.

TAKE a piece of beef, fat and lean together, about a pound of veal, a pound of fcrag of mutton, cut all into little pieces, fet it on the fire, with two quarts of water, an ounce of )carley, an onion, a little bundle of fweet herbs, three or four heads of celery walhed clean and cut fmall, a little mace, two or three cloves, fome whole pepper, tied all in a mddin rag,' and put to the meat three turnips pared and cut in two, a large carrot fcraped clean and cut in fix pieces, a little lettuce cut fmall, put all in the pot and cover it clofe. Let it (lew very foftly over a flow fire five or fix,hours; take out the fpice, fweet herbs, and onion, and pour all into a foup-di(h, and fend it to table; firft feafon it with fait. Half a pint of green peas, when it is the feafon for them, is very good. If you let this boil fad, it will wafle too much; therefore you cannot do it too flow, if it does but fimmer. All other flrews you have in the foregoing chapter; and foups in the chapter of Lent.

Hodge-Podge of Mutton

TAKE a neck of mutton of about fix. pounds, cut about two pounds of the bed end whole, cut the reft into chops, put them into a fi;ew-pan or little pot; put in two large onions whole, two heads of celery, four turnips whole, a carrot cut in pieces, a fmall favoy or cabbage, alc wafhed clean; ftew it gently till you have drawn all the gravy out, but be fure it don't burn; put in about three quarts of boiling ater, and let it ftew gently for three hours; put in a fpoonful of browning, and feafon it with fait; fkioi oiF all the fav clegn. Put your meat in a foup-dilh, and put the herbs over, and pour the foup over all. Garnifti with toafted fippets; You puoniy the beft end, and leave out the chops.

Partridge Soup,

Take two large old partridges, (kin them, and cut them into pieces, with three or four flices of ham, a little celery,

K 3 and



134 THE ART OF COOKERY

and three large onions cut.in ilices; fry them them in butter till they are brown; be Aire not to burn them; then put them to three quarts of boiling water, with a few pepper corns, and a little fait; ftew it very gently for two hours, then ftrain it, and put fome ftewed celery and fried bread. Serve it up hot in a tureen.

To make PortahU Souf.

TAKE two legs of beef, of about fifty pounds weight, take off alLthe (kin and fat as well as you can, then take all the meat and '£new8 clean from the bones, which meat put into a large pot and put to it eight or nine gallons of foft water; firft make ic boil, then put in twelve anchovies, an ounce of mac6, a quar ter of an ounce of cloves, an ounce of whole pepper jblack and ' white together fix large onions peeled and cut in two, a little bundle of chyme, fweet marjoram, and winter- favory, the dry hard cruftof a two -penny loaf, ftir it all together and cover ic clofe, lay a. weight on the cover to keep it clofe down, and let it boil foftly for eight or nine hours, then uncover it, and ftir it together; cover it clofe again, and let.it boil till it is a verj rich good jelly, which you will know by taking a little out now and then, and letting it cool. When you think it is a . thick jelly, take it off, ftrain jt through a coarfe hair bag, and pref it hard; then ftrain it through a hair fieve into a large earthen pan; when it is quite cold, take ofF the fcum and fat and take the fine jelly clear from the- fettlings at bottom, and then put the jelly into a large deep well tinned ftew-pan. Set it over a ftove with a flow fire, keep ftirring it often, and take great care ft neither fticks to the pan or burns. When you iind the jelly very ftifF and thick, as it will be In lumps about the pan, take it out, and put it into large deep china-cups or well-glazed earthen-ware. Fill the pan two-thirds full of water, and when the water boils, fet it in your cups. Be fure no water gets into the cups, and keep the water boiling foftly all the time till you find the jelly is like a fiifFglue; take out the cups, anJ when they are cool, turn out the glue inta a coarfe new flannel. Let it lay eight or nine hours, keeping it in a dry warm place, turning every twd hours; and then put it into the fun till it is quite hard and dry. Put it into tin boxes, with a piece of writing paper between each piece, and keep them in a dry place.

• "hen you ufe it, pour boiling water, on it, and ftir it 11 the time till it is melted. Seafon with fait to your palate A piece as big as a large walnut will make a pint of water very

rich I



JAADE PLAIN AND EASY 13$

rich; but as to thit you are to make it as good as you pleafe; if for foup, fry a French roll and lay it in the middle of the di(h, and when the glue is difTolved in the water, give it a boil, and pour it into a difli. If you chufe it for change, you may boil either rice or barley, vermicelli, celery cut fmail, or truffles or morels; but let them be very tenderly boiled in the water before you ftir in the glue, and then give it a boil all together. You may, when you would have it very fine, add force- nat balls, cocks-combs, or a palate boiled very tender,' and cut into little .bits; but it will be very rich and good, without any of thefe ingredients.

If for gravy, pour the boiling water on to what quantity you tkink proper; and when it is diflblved, add what ingredients you pleafe, as in other fauces. This is only in the room of a rich good gravy. You may make your fauce either weak or ftrong, by adding more or lefs; or you may make it of.veal, or of mutton the fame way.

RULES to be obferved in making SOUPS or BROTHS.

FIRST take great care the pots or fauce- pans and covers be very clean atid free from all greafe and fand, and that (hey be well tinned, for fear of giving the broths and foups any brafiy tafte. If you have time to ftew as foftly as you cian, it will both have a firmer flavour, and the meat will be tenderer. But thenobferve, when you make foups or broths for prefent ufe, if it is to be dorfe foftly, do not put much more water than you intend to have fOup or broth; and if you have the convenience of an earthen pan or pipkin, fet it on wood embers till it boils, then fkim it, and put in your feafoning; cover . it clofc, and fet it on embers, fo that it may do very foftly for fome time, and both the meat and broths will be delicious. You muft obferve in all broths and foups that one thing does not tafte more than another; but thai the tafte be equal, and it has a fine agreeable relifli, according to what you defign ic for; and you muft be fure, that all the greens and herbs you . put in be cleaned, waihed, and picked.



K 4 C H A P. '



f2,. THE ART OF COOKfiRTf



CHAP. VII. OF PUDDINGS.

jtn Oat 'Pudding to hah,

OF oats decorticated take two pounds,, and new- milk enough to drowrt it, eight ounces of raifins of the fun ftoned afi equal quantity of currants neatly picked, a pound of fwreec fuct finely (hred, fix new laid eggs well beat: feafon with nutmeg, beaten ginger, and fait; mix it all well together; it will make a better pudding than rice.

To make a Calfs Foot- Pudding.

' TAKE of calves feet one pound minced very fine, the fat and the brown to be taken out, a pound and an half of fuet, pick off all thefkitl and fiired it fmall, fix eggs, but half the whites, beat them well, the crumb of a halfpenny roll grated a pound of currants clean picked and wafhed, and rubbed in a Hoth; milk, as much a will moiften it with the eggs, a handful of flour, a little fait, nutmeg, and fugar, to feafon it to your tafte. Boil it nine hours with your meat; when it is done, lay it in your difli, and pour melted buttet over i. It is very good wiih white-wine and fugar in the butter.

To make a Pith-Pudding.

TAKE a quantity of the pith of an ox, and let it lie all night in water to foak out the blood; the next morning ftrip it but of thefkin, and beat it with the back of a fpoon in orangewater till it is as fine as pap; then take three pints of thick cream, and boil in it two or three blades of mace, a nutmeg ' quartered, a ftick of cinnamon; then take half a pound of the beft Jordan almonds, blanched in told water, then, beat themi with a little of the cream, and as it dries put in more cream; and when they are all beaten, ftrain the cream from them to the pith; then take the yolks of ten eggs, the white of but two, beat them very well, and p':t them to the ingredients: take a fpoonful of grated bread, or Naples bifcuit, mingle all thefe togcther with half a pound of fine fugar, and the marrow of four large bones, and a little fait 3 fill them in a fmall ox or hog's

' . guts



MADfi PLAIN AND EASY. ijy

guts, or bake in a dilb, with a pff-paftc under it, aikl rotto4

the edges.

Td mate a Marrow-Pudding.

TAtCE a ()uarc of cream or milk, and a quarter of a pound

of Naples bifcuit, put them on the fire in a ftew-pan, and

boil them up; then take the yolks of eight eggs, the whites of

four beat up very fine, a little moid fugar, fome marrow chop

ped; mix all well together, and put them on the fire keep it

Sirring til! it is thick, then take it off the fire and keepftirring

it till it is cold; when it is almoft cold, put in a fmall glafsof

Wandy, one of fack, and a fpoonful of orange flower water;

then have ready your difh rimmed with puff pafte, put your

fluff in, fprinkle (bme currants that have been well wafbed ia

cold water, and rubbed clean in a cloth, fome marrow cut in

flices, and fome candied lemon, orange, and citron, cut ia

ihfeds, and fend it to the oven; three quarters of an hour

will bake it: fend it up. hot.

A boiled Suet- Puddings

TAKE a quart of milk, four fpoonfuls of flour, a pound of fuet fhred fmall, four eggs, one fpoonful of beaten ginger a tea-fpoonful of fait; mix the eggs and flour with a pint of thejnilk very thick, and with the feafoning mix in the refl of the milk and fuet. Let your batter be pretty thick, and boil it two hours.

jfboiled Plum- Puddings

TAKE a pound of fuet cut in little pieces, not too fine, pound of currants, and a pound of raifins flowed, eight eggs half the whhes, half a nutmeg grated, qnd a tea-fpoonfulof beaten ginger, a pound of flour, a pint of milk; beat the egg itrft, then half the milk, beat them together, and by degree fitr in the flour, then the fuet, fpice, and fruit, and a much milk a9 will mix it well together very thick. Boil i five bourse

A Hunting Pudding.

TAKE ten eggs, the whites of fix and all the yolka beat them up well with half a pint of cream, fix fpoonfuls of fiour, one pound of bef fuet chopped fmall, a pound of currants well wafhed and picked, a pound of jarrraifmsfloned 2ind chop t fmall, two ounces of candied ci iron, orange, and lmon Ihred fine, put two ounces of fine fugar, a fpoonful of

rofc-



138 THE ART OF COOKERY

rofe- water, and a glaft of brandy, half a nutmeg grated; mix all well together, tie it up in a cloth, and boil it four hours
be fure to put it in when the water boils, and kept it .boiling all the time 5 turn it out into a diih, and garnifli with powder fugar

A Yorijhtre Pudding

TAKE a quart of milk, and five eggs, beat them up well together, and mix them with flour till it is of a good pancake batter, and very fmooth 5 put in a little fait, fomc grated iutmeg and ginger; butter a dripping or frying pan, and put it under a piece of beef, mutton or a loin of veal, that is roafting, and then put in your batter, and when the top-fide is brown, cut it in fquare pieces, and turn it, and then let the iinder-fidc be brown j then put it in a hot diih as clean of fat as you can and fend it to table hot.

Vermicelli Pudding.

TAKE a quarter of a pound of vermicelli, and boil it in a pint of milk till it is tender, with a ftick of cinnamon, then tskke out the cinnamon, and put in half a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of butter melted, a quarter of a pound of fugar, with the yolks of four eggs well beat; put it in a di(h with, or without pafte round the rim, and bake it three-quarters of an hour 5 or if yoa like it for variety, you may add half a pound of currants clean wafhedand picked, or a handful of marrow chopped fine, or both.

A Steak -Pudding.

MAKE a good cruft, with fuet flired fine with flour, ajid mix it up .with cold water. Seafon it with a little fait, and, make a pretty ftiff cruft, about two pounds of fuet to a quarter of a peck of flour. Let your fteaks be either beef or mutton, well feafoncd with pepper and fait, make it up as you do an apple-pudding, tie it in a cloth, and put it into the water boil ing. If it be a large pudding, it will take five hours; if a fmall one, three hours. This is the beft cruft for an applepudding. Pigeons eat well this way.

Suet- Dumplings. TAKE a pint of milk, four eggs, a pound of fuet, and a pound of currants, two tca-fpoonfuls of laltj tbre pf gipger i

firft



I



Made plain and easy. 13

firft take half the milk, and mix it like a thick batter then put the eggs, and the fait and ginger, then the reft of the milk by degrees, with the fueC and currants, and iSour, Co make it like a light pafte. When the water boils, make them in rolls as big as a large turkey's egg, with a little flour; then flat them, and throw them into boiling water. Move them foftly, that they do not ftick together; keep the water boiling all the time and half an hour will boil them.

jfn Oxford-Pudding.

A quarter of a pound of bifcuit grated, a quarter of a pound of currants clean waflied and picked, a quarter of a pound of fuetfhred fmall, half a large fpoonful of powder-fugar, a very little fait, and fome grated nutmeg; mix all well together, tbeo take two yolks of eggs, and make it up in balls as big as a turkey's egg. Fry them in fre(h butter of a fine light browns for fauce have melted butter and fugar, with a little fack or white- wine. You muft mind to keep the pan ihaking about, that they may be all of a fine light brown.

All other puddings you have in the Lent chapter.

RU LE S to be obferved in making P U D D I N G S, &c,

IN boiled puddings, take great care the bag or cloth be verjr clean, not foapy, but dipped in hot water, and well floured.. If a bread pudding, tie it loofe; if a batcer-pudding, tie it clofe; and be fure the water boils when you put the pudding in, and you fbould move the puddings in the pot now and then, for fear they ftick When you make a batter pudding, firft mix the flour well with a little imilk, then put in the ingredients by degrees, and it will be fmooth and not have lumps; but for a plain batters-pudding, the beft way is to ftrain it through' acoarfe hair fieve, that it may neither have lumps, nor the treadles of the eggs: and for all other puddings, ftrain the eggs when they are beat. If you boil them in wooden bow(ls, or china'difhes, butter the infide before you put in your batter; and for all baked puddings, btUter the pan or di(h before the pudding is put in.



CHAP



140 THE ART OF COOKERY



CHAP. VIII. OF PIES

t J

To mah a very fine fweet Lamb or Veal Pie

SEASON your lamb with fait, pepper, cloves, mace, and nutmeg, all beat fine, to your palate. Cut your Iamb or veal into little pieces; make a good pufF-pafte cruft, lay it into your difh, then lay in your meat, ftrew on it fome ftoned ratfins and currarrts clean wa(hed, and fome fugar: then lay on it fome force-meat balls made fweet, and in the fummer fome artichoke- bottoms boiled, and fcalded grapes in the winter. Boil Spaniih potatoes cut in pieces, candied citron, candied orange, and lemon- peel, and three or four blades of mace; put butter on the top, clofe up your pie, and bake it. Have ready againft it comes out of the oven, a caudle made thus: take a pint of white-wine, and mix in the yolks of three eggs, ftir it well together over the fire one way all the time, till it is thick: then take it oiF, ftir in fugar enough to fweten k, and fqueeze in the juice of a lemon; pour it hot into jour pie, and clofe it up again. Send it hot to table.

J favoury Veal Pie,

TAKE a breaft of veal, cut it into pieces, feafon it with pepper and' fait, lay it all into your cruft, boil fix or eight eggs hard, take only the yolks, put them into the pie' here and there, fill your difh almoft full of water, put on the lid, and bake it well, or you may put fome force-meat balls in.

To make a favoury Lamb or Veal Pie.

MAKE a good puiF-pafte cruft, cut your meat into pieces,

feafon it to your palate with pepper, fair, mace, cloves, and

nutmeg finely beat; lay it into your cruft with a fcwlamb-

flones and fweetbreads feafoned as your meat, alfo.foroeoyfters

and force- meat balls, hard yolks of eggs, and the tops of afpa-

gus two inches long, firft boiled green; put butter all over the

pie, put on the lid, and fet it in a quick oven an hour and a

half, and then have ready the liquor, made thus: take a pint

gravy,'the oyfter liquor, a gill of red-wine, and a little grated

nutmeg; mix all together with the yolks of two or three eggs beat



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. M

beaf, and keep it ftirring one way all the time. When it boils pour it into your pie; put on the lid again. Send it hot t6 table. You muft make liquor according to your pie.

7i make a Calfs-Faot Pie.

FIRST fet your calf's feet on in a fauce-pan, in three quarts

of water, with thre.e or four bladfs of mace; let them boti

foftly till there is about a pint and a half, then take out your

feet, ftrain the liquor, and makea good cruft; cover your

dtfh, then pick off the flefli from the bones, lay half in the diih,

ftrew half a pound of currts clean wafhed and picked over,

and. half a pound of raidns noned; lay on' the reft of the meat

then fkim the liquor, fweeten it to the palate, and put in half -

a pint of white-wine; pour it into the dHh, put on .your lid,

and Jcake it an hour and a half. '

To make an Olive- Pie

MAKE your cruft ready, then take the thin collops of the kft end of a leg of veal, as many as you think will fill your pie; hack them with the back of a knife, and feafon them with fait, pepper, cloves, and mace: wa(h over your collops with a bunch tcf feathers dipped in eggs, and have in readinefs a good handw fill of fweet herbs flired fmall. The herbs muft be thyme, parlley and fpinacb, the yolks of eight hard eggs minced, and a few byfters parboiled and chopped, fome beef-fuet ihred very fine; mix thefe together, and ftrew them over your coloj)5, then fprinkle a little orange-flower water over them, roll the collops up very clofe, and lay them in your pie, ftrewing the feafoning ovier what is left, put butter on the top, and dole your pre. When it comes out of the oven, have ready fome gravy hcrt, with one anchovy difiblved in the gravy; pour it in boiling 4iot. You may put in artichoke-bottoms and chefsuts, if you pleafe. You may leave out the orangefIower water, if you do not like it.

To feafon an Egg- Pie.

BOIL twelve eggs hard, and Ihrcd them with one pound of beef-fuet, or marrow ihred fine. Seafon them with a little cinnamon and nutmeg heat fine, one pound of currants clean wa(hed and picked, two or three fpoonfuls of cream, and a little fack and rofewater mixed all together, and fill the pie. When it is baked, ftir in half a pound of frcfh butter and the jnitc of a lemcn.

r



14 THE ART OF COOKERY

. To make a MuitmPu

TAKE a loin of mutton, take off the fkin apd fat of the lit fide, cut it into ftealcs, feafon it well with pepper and fait to your palate. Lay it into your cruft, iill it, pour in as much water as wilj almoft iitl the didi then put on the cruft, and bake it well.

A Beef' Steak Pie.

TAKE fine rump (leaks, beat them with a rolling pin, then feafon them with pepper and fait, according' to your palate Make a good ctuil, lay in your fteaks, fill your difh, then pour in at much water as will half fill the diib. Put on the Ciuft and bake it well.

A Ham-Pie.

TAKf fomecold boiled ham, and flice it about half an inch thick, make a good cruft, and thick, over the dilh, and lay a layer of ham, (hake a little ' pepper over it, then take a large young fowl clean picked, gutted, wa(hed, and iinged; put a little pepper and fait in the belly, and rub a very little ialt on the outfide; lay the fowl on the ham, boil fome eggs hard, put in the yolks, and cover all with ham,( then (hake fome pepper on the ham, and put on the topcrufl:. Bake it well, have ready when it comes out of the oven fome very rich beef- gravy, enough to fill the pie; lay on thecruft again and fend it to table hot. If you put two large fowls in, they will make a fine pie; but that is according to your company, more or lefs. The larger the pie, the finer the meat eats The cruft muft be the fame you make for a venifon-pafty. You (hould pour a little (Irong gravy into the pie when yoii make it juft to bake the meat, and then fill it yp when ft comes out of the oven. Boil fome truffles and morels and put into the pie, which is a great addition, and fome fre(ii mufhrooms, or died ones.

To make a Pigeon-Pie

MAKE a pufF-pafie cruft, cover your di(h, let your pigeons be very nicely picked and cleaned, feafon them with pepper and fait, and put a good piece of fine frefh butter, with pepper and fait in their bellies; lay them in your pan, the necks,, gizzards, livers, pinions, and hearts, lay between, with the yolk of a hard egg and beef-fieak in the middle ) put as much wa- 4 tcr



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. ij

ter as will a) mod fitl thedifli lay on the top cruft and bate it weJK Tnis is the beil way to make a pigeon- pie; but the French fill inc pigtons wicb a very high force meat, and lay force-meat baiis round ciie infide, with afparagus-tops, arti dioke-botto rs, muflu'ccrus, iiuffle, and morels, and feafon high; but that is cCvirJmg to di6Ferem palates.

Ho malt aGibktPie.

TAKE two pair of giblets nicely cleaned, put all but the livers into a faace-pan; with two quarts of water, twenty corns of whole . pepper, three blades of mace, a bundle of fweet faerbs, and a large onion; cover them clofe, and let them flew very foftly till they are quite tender, then have a good cruft ready, cover jour di(h, lay a fine rump fteak at the bot torn, feafoned with pepper and fait; then lay in your giblets with the livers, and ftrain the liquor they were ftewed in. afon it with .fait, and pour into your pie; put On the lid and bake it an hour and a half.

To make a Duck Pie,

MAKE a puiF-pafte cruft, take two ducks, fcald them and make them very clean, . cut off the feet, the pinions, the neck, and head, all clean picked and fcalded, with the gizzards, livers and heartr; pick out all the fat of the infide, lay a cruft all over the difh, feafon the ducks with pepper and fait, infide and out, lay them in your difli, and the giblets at each end feafoned; put in as much water as will almoft fill the pie, lay on the cruft, and bake it, but not too much.

To make a Chicken-Pie,

MAKE a pufF'pafte cruft, take two chickens, cut them to pieces, feafon them with pepper and fait, a little beaten mace lay a force-meat made thus round the fide of the difli: take half a pound of veal, half a pound of fuet, beat them quite fine in a marble mortar, with as many crumbs of bread; feafon it with a very little pepper and fait, an anchovy with the liquor, cut the anchovy to pieces, a little lemon-peel cut very fine and ftired fmall, a very little thyme, mix all together with the yolk of an egg; make fome into round balls, about twelve, the reft lay round the difli. Lay in one chicken over the bot torn of the difli, take two fweetbreads, cut them into five or fix pieces, lay them all over, feafon them with pepper and fait, ftrew over them half an ounce of truffles and morels,

two





t44 THE ARt'OF COOKERY

to or three artichce-bottotns cut to pieces, a few cocir combty if yoa have them, a palate boiled tender and cut W pieces $ then lay on the other part of the chicken, put half a pittt of water in, and cover the pie; bake it well, and when t comes out of the oven, fill it with good gravy, lay it oa the cruft and fend it to table

Ta mah a Chefiire PoriPie.

TAKE a loin of pork, (kin it, cut it into fteaks, fearon it with fait, nutmeg, and pepper; make a good cruft, lay a layer of pork, then a large layer of pippins pared and eored, a litde fugar, enough to fweeten the pie, then another .laryer of pork; put in half a pint of whitewine, lay fome butter on the top, and clofe your pie. If your pie be Wge, it will take a pint of whitec-wine r •

Ttf maki a DtmnJUrt &jptabPii

MAKE a good cruft, cover the dift all over, put at thic bottom a layer of fllced pippins, then a byer of muttonfteaks cut from the loin, well feafoned with pepper and fait, then another layer .of pippins; peel fofne bnions ftnd Hice them thiii, lay a layer all over the apples, then a layer of mutton, then pippins and onions, pour in r pint of water; (b ciofe

your pie and bake it.

•

7i mah an OxChuk-Pie.

tIRST bke your ox-cheek as at other times, but not tod much, put it in the oven over night, and then it will be ready the next day; make a fine puff-paifte cruA, and let your fide and top cruft be thick; let your difh be deep to hold a good djeal of gravy, cover your difh with cruft, then cut oflT all the flelh, kernels, and fat of the head, c with the palate cyt ih pieces cat the meat into little pieces as you do for a ha(h, lay in the meat, take ah ounce of truffles and morels and 'throw them vet the meat, the yolks of fix eggs boiled hard, a giH of pickled muihrooms, or frefli ones are better, if you have them 5 put in a good many force- meat balls, a few artichoke bottoms And afparagus tops, if you have any. Seafen your pie with pepper and fait to your palate, and fill the pie Hvith the gravy it was baked in. If the head be rightly feafoned wden it corner out of the oven, it will want very little more; put on the lid, and bake it. When the cruft is done, your pic will be enough.

7i



Made pLAik Ab'EAsir, 145

4

T(9 make a Sbripjhire-Pte.

FIRST make a good pufiFpafte bruft, then cut tvtro rabbitft to pieces, witk two pounds of fat pork cut into little pieces; feafon both with .pepper and fait to your liking,, then covet your difli with cruft, and lay iti your rabbit. Mix the pork with them, take the livers of the rabbits parboil tbenfc9 and beat them in a mcH-tar, with as much fat bacon; a little fweet herbs, aod fome oyfters, if you have them. Seafon with pep per, (jilt, and 'nutmeg; mix it up with the yolk of an egg, and make it into balls. Lay them here and there in your pie fome artichoke- bottoms cut iic dice, and cocks-combs; if you have them; grate a fmall nutmeg over the mfcat, thexi pour in half a pint of red-winey and half a pint of water. Clofe your pie, and bake it ah hour and a half lii a quick dven but not too fierce an oven.

To make a Yorhjhiri Chrijimas-Pie.

FIRST make a good ftanding cruft, let the wall ind bottorrt be very thick; bone a turkey, agoofe, A fowl, a partridge, and a pigeon Seafon them all very well, take half an ounce of maccj half an ounce of nutmegs, a quarter of ah ounce of cloves, and half an ounce of black-peppef, all beat fine together, two large fpoonfuls of fait, and then mi them toge- thcr. Open the. fowls all down the back, and bone them; firft the pigeon, then the partridge j cover them; then the fowl therf the gpofe, and then the turkey which muft be large; feafon them all well firft, and lay them in the cruft, fo as it, will look only like a whole turkey; then have a hare ready cafedj and wiped With a clean cloth. Cut it to pirce, that is, joint it; feafon it, and lay it as clofe as you can oh one fide 5 on the other fide woodcocks, inaor game, and what fort of wild-fowl you can get, Seafon them well, and lay therti clofe 9 put at leaft four pounds of butter into the pie, then lay on your lid, which muft be a yery thick one, and let it be Well bakedi It inuft have a very hot oven, and Will rake at leaft four hours. . 'iMiis cruft will take a bufliel of flour;, In this chapter you ili fee how to make it. Thefe pies are ofcen fcnt to Londoa iti a box, as prefents tbeVefore the walls mUft be well built.

To make a Gooe-PhJ

HALF a peck of flour will make the walls of a goofe-ple, Aiadeas Ia the receipts for Cruft. Raife yoiir cruft juft big

!• enough



146 THE ART OF COOKERr

. enough to hold a large goore; firft have a pickled dried tongoe . boiled tender enough to peel, cut off the root, bone a goofe titd a large fowl; take half a quarter of an ounce of mace beat fine, a large teafpoonful of beaten pepper, three teafpoorifuls of fait; mix all together, feafon jour fowl and goofe with It, then lay the fowl in the goofe, and tongue in the fowl, and the goofe in the fame form as if whole. Put half a pound of buuer on the top, and lay on the lid. This lie is delicious, either hot or cold, and will keqc a great while. A (lice of this pie eut down acrofs makes a pretty Utde fidedlh for f upper.

To make a Vemfin-Paflj.

TAKE a neck and bread of venifon, bone it, feafon it With pper and fait according to your palate. Cut thebreafrin two or three pieces but do not cut the fat off the neck if you can help it Lay in the breaft and neck-end firft, and the beft end of the neck on chc top, that the fat may be whole; make a good rich puff-pafte cruft, and rim your dilh, then lay in your venifon, put in half a pound of butter, about a quarter of a pint of water, then put a very thick pafte over, and orlia ihent it in any form you pleafe with leaves, &c. cut in pafte, and let it be baked three hours in a very quick oven, rut a iheet of buttered paper over it to keep it from fcorching. f the mean time fet on the bones of the venifon in two quarts of ater, with two or three blades of mace, an onion, a little piece of cruft baked crifpahd brown, a little whole pepper; cover it clofe, and let it boil foftly over a flow fire tiU above half is wafted, then ftrain it off. When the pafty comes out 6f the oven, lift up the lid, and pour in the gravy.

When your venifon is not fat enough, take the fat of a loin - mutton, fteeped in a little rape-vinegar and red- wine twenfyfour hours, then lay it on ihe top of the venifon, and cl(e your pafty. It is a wrong notion of fome people to think venifon cannot be baked enough, and will firft bake it in a falfe cruft, arid then bake it in the pafty j by this time the fine ftavour of the venifon is gone. No; if you want it to be very fender, wafh it in warm milk and water, dry it in clean cloths till it is very dry, then rub it all oVer with vinegar, and hang it in the air. Keep it as long as you think proper, it will keep thus a fortnight good; but be fure there be no moiftneis about its if there is, you muft dry it well and throw ginger otx it,

aJad it will keep a long time. When you ufe it juft dip it in

lukewarm



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 147

Wtewsrnl ater, tnd Jhry k. Bake it in a quick even 3 if (t is a large ptfty it will take three burs; tfaea your veniibii wiii be tender, and have all the fine flavour. The flioulder mafcea a pretty pafty, booed and made aa above with the mutton fot.

A lorn of mutton makes a fine pafty: take a large fat loin of mutton, let it bang four or five,days, then bone it, lesviicg the qneat a$ whole as you can: lay the meat twenty- four hours ill half a pint of red- wine and half a pint of rape vinegar; Chen take it out of the pickle, and order it as you do a pafty and boil the bones in the fame manner, to £11 die pafty, when it comes out of the oven.

To make a Calfs-head'Pii,

CLEANSE your head very well, and boil it till it is tender 1 then carefully take off the ileih as whole. as you can, take ouc the eyes, and flice the tongue; make a good puffpafte cruft, cover the dffa; lay on your meat, throw over it the tongue, lay the eyes cut in two, at each corner. Seafon it with a very little pepper and fait,, pouc in half a pint of the liquor it was boiled in, lay a thin top-cruft on, and bake it an hour in a quick oven In the mean time ioil the bones of the head in two quarts of liquO, with two or three blades of mace, half a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper, a large onion, and a bun die of fweet herbs. Let it boil till there is about a pint, then ftrain it off, and add two fpoonfuls of catchup, three of red wioe, a piece of butter as big as a walnut rolled in flour, half an ounceof truflls and morels. Seafon with falc to your palate. Boil it, and have half the braiqs boiled with fome fage; beat them, and twelve leaver of fage chopped fine; ftir all togthcr, and give it a boil; take the other part of the brains, and beat them with fome of the fage chopped fine, a little lemon-peel m'mced fine, and half a fmall nutmeg gritted. Qeat it up with an egg, and fry it in little cakes of a fine light brown j boil fix eggs hard, take only the yolks; when your pie comes out of the oven take off the lid, lay the eggs and cakes over it, and pour the favce all over. Send it to table hot without the lid. This is a fine di(h; you may put in it as many fine things as you jpSeafe, but it wants no more addition.

To makt a Tori

FIRST mtrke a fine puff-pafte, cover yojtr difl with tbjs

cruft, make a good fprccoineat thus; take a pound of ved

L 2 and



3

i



J4 THE ART OF COOKERY

and a pound of beef-fuet, cut them fmall, and beat them fine in a movrar. Seafon tt with a fmall nutmeg grated a Httle kmon-pee (bred fine, a few fweet herbs, not too much, a little pepper and fait juft enough to feafon it, the crumb of a penny loaf rubbed fine; mix it up with the yolic of an egg niake one-third into balls, and the refl lay round the (ides of the di(h. Get two fine large veal fweetbreads, cut each into four pieces two pair of lamb-itone?, each cut in two; twelve cockscombs, half an ounce of truffles find morels, four artichoke bottoms, cut each into four pieces, a few afparagus-tops, feme fi-eib mufhrooms, and fomc pickled; put all together in your djfh.

Lay firft your fweetbreads, then the artichoke-bottoms, then the cocks-combs, then the trufHes and morels, then the afpara gus, then the mufhrooms, and then the force-meat ballsrSeafon the fweetbread$ with pepper and fait; fill your pie with water, and pt on the crufl. Bake it two hours.

As to the fruit and Afh pies, you have them in the chapter for Lent.

7i mate Mince- Pies the hejt Way.

TAKE three pounds of fuet (hred very fine, and chopped as fmall as poflible; two pounds of raifins floned aivd chopped as fine as poffible; two pounds of currants nicely picked, wafhed rubbed, and dried at the fire; half a hundred of fine pippins, pared, cored, and chopped fmall; half a pound of fine fugar pounded fine; a quarter of an ounce of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, two large nutmegs, all beat fine; put all together into a great pan, and mix it well together with half a pint of brandy, and half a pint of fack; put it down clofe in a ftone pot, and it will keep good four months. When you make your jnes, take a little dlfb, fometblng bigger than a ibup pkte, ky a very tbin cruft all over ity lay a tbiic layer of meat, and then a tbi layer of citron cut very thin, then a layer of mince-meat, and a layer of orange-peel cut thin, over that a little meat, fqAieae half the uice of a fine Seville orange or lemon, lay on your cruft, and bake it nicely. Thefe pie cat finely coM. If you make them in little patties, mix your meat and fweet- meats accordingly. If you chufe meat in your pies, parboil' i neats' tongue, peel it, and chop the meat as fine as pofiible, and mix with the reft; or two pounds of the infide of a firloin of beef boiled. But you muft double the .uantity of fruit when you ufe meat.'



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



49



Tort di Moy.

Make puflT-pafte, and layTound your diA, then a layered bifcuit, and a layer of butter and marrow, lind then a layer of all forts of fvireet meate, or as many as you have, and fo do till your difli is full j then boil a quart of cream, and thicken it with four eggs, and a fpoonful of orange-flower water 6weeten it with fugar to your palate, and pour over the reft. Half an hour will bake it.

To mah Orange or Lemcn Tarts.

TAKE fix large lemons, and rub them very weH with faff,' and put them in water for two days, with a handful of fait in it; then change them into frefli water every day (without fait), for a fortnight, then boil them for two or three hours till they are tender, then cut them into half-quarters, and then cut them three-corner way, as thin as you can: take (ix pippens pared, cored, and quartered, and a pint of fair water. Let them boil till the pippins break; put the liquor to your orange or lemon, and lalf the pulp of the pippins well broken and a pound of fugar. Boil thele together a quarter of an hour, then put it in 9 gallipot, and fqueeze an orange in it: if it be a lemon tart, fqueeze a lemon i two fpoonfuls is enough for a tart. Your patty pans muft be fmall and (hallow. Put fine pufF-pafte, and very thin; a little while will bake it. Juft as your tarta are going into the oven, with a feather or bruih do them pver with melted butter, and then fift double-refined fuear over them and this is a pretty iceing on them.

To mah different Sorts of Tarts.

IF you bake in tin paxties; butter them, and you muft put a little cruft all over, becaufe of the taking them out; if in China, xcr glafs, nocrufl but the top oie. Lay fine fugar at the bottom, then your plums, cherries, or any other fort of fruit, and fugar at top; then put on your lid, and bake them io a flack oven. Mincepies muft be baked in tin patties becaufe taking them out, and puff-pafte is beft for them. For fweet tarts the beaten cruft is beft; but as you fancy. You have the receipt for the cruft in this chapter. Apple, pear apricot, &c. make thus: apples and pears, pare them, cut. them into quarters, and core them; cut the quarters acrofs gain, fet them on in a fauce-pan with juft as much water as yill barely coyer them, let them fimner on a flow fire juft till

- 3 the



ISO THE ART OF COOKERY

the fruit is tender; put a good piece of lemon-peel in the water with the fruit, then have your patties ready. Lay fine fugar at bottom, then your fruit, and a little fugar at top $ that you mitft put in at your difcretioa. Pour over each tart a tea ipoonful of leoson juice, and three tea-fpoofifmI of the liquor they were boiled in; pu( on your lid, and bake them in a flack oven. Apricots do the fame way, only do not uie IaaoA. As to preferved tarts, only lay in your piefiirved fruit, and put a very thin cruft at top, and let them be baked as little ai poffible; but if you would make them very nice, have a arge patty, the fize you would have your tart Make your fugar cruft, roll it as thick aa a halfpenny; then butter yaur patties and cover it. Shape your upper cruft on a hollow thing oft purpofe, the fize of your patty, and mark it with a tiurhihg iron for that purpofe, in what (hape you pleafe, to be hdlow and open to fee the fruit through; then bake your croft in a very flack oven, not to difcolbur it, but to have it erifp. When the cruft is cold, very carefully take it out, and fill it with what fruit you pleafe, lay on the lid, and it is dbne therefore if the tart is not eat, your fweet-iheat is nqt the . worfe, and it looks genteel

Tajlef&r Tarts.

ONE pound of flour, three quarters of a pound ef buttery mix lip together, iand beat Well with a rolling- pin

Jnothir Pafte for Tarts

HALF a pound of butter, half a pound of flotsf;, and half a pound of fugar; mix it well together, and beat it with a rolling-pin well, then roll it out thin.

Puff-Pafie.

TAKE a quarter of a peck of flour, ru
c in a pound of butter very fine, make it up in a light pafte with cold water, juft ftiff enough to work it up; then roll it oiit about as thick, as a crown- piece, put a layer W butter all over, fprinkle on a little flour, double irup) and roll it out again; double it, ancl roll it three times; then it is fit fbr all forts of pies and tarts that require a puiF-pafte.

A- good Cruft for great Pies. TO a peck of flour add the yolks of three eggs then boij fomc watcr and put in half a pound of fried fuet, and a pound



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 154

and half of butter. Skim off the butter and fuet, and aa, much of the liquor as will make it a light good cruft: work it up well, and roll it out. .

Ajlandtng Cruft for great PJes,

TAKE a peck of flour, and fix pounds of butter, boik in a gallon of water; (kim it off into the flour, and as little of the liquor as you can; work it well up into a pafte, then pull it into pieces till it is cold; then ipake it )up in what form you will have it. This is fit for the walls of a goofe pie.

A cold Cruft •

TO three pounds of flour, rub in a pound %ni half of but ter, break in two eggs, and make it up with" cold water

A dripping Cruft.

TAKE pound and half of beef-dripping, boil it in water, flrain it, then let it ftand to be cold, and take off the hard fat: fcrape it, boil it fo four or five times j then work it well up into three pounds of flour, as fine as you can, and makp it up itito pafie with cold water. It makes a very fine crufl.

A Cruft fir CuJIards.

TAKE half a pound of flour, fix ounces of butter, thf yolks of two eggs, three fpoonfuls of cream j mi:i them togcr ther, and let chem ftand a quarter of an hour, tbn work it lip arid down, and roll it very thin.

Pafte fir crackling Cruft

BLANCH four handfuls of almonds, and thrpir them intq Water, then dry them in a cloth, and pound them in a mortar Very fine, with a little orange- flower-water, and the white of a:i cggi When they arc welt pounded, pafs them through a coarfe hair-fieve, to clear them from all the lumps gr clods; then fpread it on a di(h till it is very pliable; let it ftand fcfr a whilc then roll out a piece for the undcr-cruft, and dry it in the oveat on the pie-pan, while other paftry works are making as knots, C:yph?r8, Ho. for gamilhing your pics.



h CHAP.



7Hj; AiT 07 C00K8RV



G H A P, VI. c

ypr l-rE.NT, or ' Faft-Dinncr; a Number of gO(cd. Diftes. hich you aiaj dake ufe of fpr a Table at any pther Time



jf Pias Soup

BOIL a qurt of fplit-pcas in a gallon of water; when they are quite foft put in half a. red herring, or two ancho- ities, a good deal of whole pepper, bklc and white, two or three bJae of mace, four or iive cves, a bundle of fwet lierbs, a large onion, and the green tops of a buncK of celery, a good bundle of dried. mint; CQVQr (h'cim clofe, and let them boil foftl) till ther is about two quarts; then ftrainit off, and have ready the white part of tjie celery wafted clean, and ca( jfmall, and ftewed tender' in quart of water, fome fpinach picked and waihed clean, put to 'tle celcfy; let them flew till the water is quite wafted, and put it to your foup, • ' ''"

Take a French roll, take out the crumb, fry the cruft bfowiV in a little freO) butte.rj take fome fpinach, ftew it in a little butter, after it is boiled, and fill the roll j take the crum), put it in pieces, beat it in a mortar with a raw egg, a little fpinach and a little forrel, a little beaten mace, a little nutmeg, and ari dinchovy; then mix it up with your hand, and roll them into ' balls with a little flour, and cut fome bread into dice, and Uj them crifp; pour your loup into yoMr diAi. put in the balls and bread,' and the roll in the middle. Garnim yoqr diih.with fpiiiach. if it wants fait, ypu u(l featon it %o yourakite:

rut) in fome dried mint.

' ',

- A Green Pefas-Soup.

TAKE a quart of old green peas, and boil them till they are quite tender as pap, in a quart of water j then ftrain theni through a fieve, and boil a quart of young peas in that water. In the mean time put the old peas into a fieve, pour half a pound of melted butter over them, and ftrain them through the fieve with the back of a fpoon, till you have got all the pulp. When the young eas are boiled enough, add the pulp and butter to the young peas and liquor; ftir them together till they are fmooth, ' a(id fafqn with pepper and fait. Yoii

;' ma




MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 153.

may fry a French roll, and let it fwim in the dilh If you like jr boil a bundle of mint in the pea3.

Amthir Green PeaS'Soup,

TAKE a quart of green peas, boil them in i gallon of wa ter with a bundle of mint, and a kw fweet herbs, mace cloves, and whole pepper, till they are tender; then ftrain them, .liquor and all, through a coarfe ileve, till the pulp is grained. . Put this liquor into a fuce-pan; put to it four heads of celery clean wa(hed and cut fmall, a handful of fpinach clean waihed and cut fmalU a lettuce cutfoiall, a fine Itek cut fmall a quart of green peas, a little falc; cover them, and let them l)oil very fofcly till there is anout two quarts, and that the celery is tender. Then fend it to table,

Jufl before you fend up your foup, put in half a pint of fpipach'juice into it but don't let it boil after.

Sffup' Meagre,

TAKE half a pound of butter, pur it into a deep ftew-pan, fbake it about, and let it itand till it has done making a noiiej then haye ready fix middling onions peeled and cut imali, throw them iUt and (bake them about. Take a bunch of celery clean ldfhed and picked, cut it in pieces half as long as your finger large handful ot fpinach, clean waihed and picked, a good lettuce clean wafhed, if you have it, and cut fmall, a little bundle of parfley chopped fine; Oiake al this well together in the pan for a quarter of an hour, then ihake in a little flour, fiir all together, and pour into the flew pan two quarts of boiling water. Take a handful of dry hard cruil, ihiow in a tea-fpoonful of beaten pepper, three blades of mace beat fine, ftirall together, and let it boil foftly for half an hour 5 t len take it o the fire, and beat up the yolks of two eggs, and Air in, and one fpponful of vinegar; pour it into the foup-didi, nd fend it to table. If you have any green peas, boil half 4 pint in the foup for change.

To make an Onion Soup

TAKE half a pound of butter, put it into a fiew-pan on the fire, let it all melt, and boil it rill it has done making any poile; then have ready ten or a dozen middling onions peeled nd cut fma)l, throw them into the butter, and let them fry a quarter of an hour; then (hake in a little flour, and ftir them, found Ibake your pan and let them do a few minutes longer

then



c54 THE ART OF COOKERY

tliCR pbur m a quart or three pints' of boiling water, ftir than round; take a good piece of upper cruft, the ftaleft bread yea have, about as big as the top of a penny loaf cut finally and throw it in. Seafon with fait to your palate. Let it boil tea Biinutea, ftirrtng it often; then take itf off the fire, an4 have yeady the yolks of two eggs beat fine, with half a fpoonful f vinegar; mix forae of the foup with them, then fttr it into our foup, and mix it well, and poar it iiUq your difli. Tlus is a delicious difli

To maid am EiUZoup.

TAKE eels according to the quantity of foup you would make. A pound of eels will make a pint of good foup: fb ro every pound.of eels put a quart of water, a cruft of bread, two or three blades of mace, a little whole pepper, an onion, and a bundle of fweet herbs; cover thetn clofe, and let tbem borl till half the liquor is wafted; then ftrain it, and toaft fome bread, cut it fmall, lay the bread into the diih, and pour in your foup If you have a ftew-hole, fet the difh over it for a minute, and fend it to table. IF you find your foup not rich enough, you muft let it boil till it is as ftrong as you would have it. You may make this foup as rich and good as if it was meat. You mcy add a piece of carrot to brown it

To make a Craw-Fijh Soup

TAKE a carp, a large eel, half a thornback, cleanfe and wafh them clean, put them into a fauce-pan, or little pot, put to them a gallon of water, the crufl of a penny loaf; flcim th6m well, fcafon it with mace, cloves, whole pepper, black and white, an onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, fome parfley, a piece of ginger, Jet them bpil by themfelves clofe covered; then take the tails of half a hundred craw-fifh, pick out the bag, and all the woolly parts that are about them, put tbem into a fmce-pan, with two quarts of water, a little fait, a bu.ndle of fweet herbs; let them flew foftly, and when they are ready to boil, take out the tais, and beat all the other part of the craw-fi(h with the fhelis, and boil in the liquor the tails you took out, with a blade of mace, till it comes to about a pint, flrain it through a clean fieve, and add it to the fi(h a boiliHi. Let all boil foftly, till there is about three quarts; then ftrain it off through a coarfe fieve, put it inip your pot again, and if it wants faFt you muft put fome in, and the tails of the craw-fi(b; beat the live fpawn of a hen lobfter very fine I and



MADS PLAIN AND EASV: 15$

9,ni put in, to gife h t colour: fako a FfMch rdl and fry it crifp, and add to it Let tbem ftew all logotllc for a quarter of ao hour. You may ftew 9 carp with then; pour your foup into your dilb, the roll fwinmtng in the middle.

When you have a carp, there fliould be a roll on each fidew Garntfl) the difli with crawfifli. If your craw-fi(b will not lie on the fidea of your di(h, make a Httie pafte, and lay round 0ie rim, and lay the fifli on that all round the di(h.

Take care that your foup be well feafoned, but not too high.

f

m

To make a Ml Soup.

GET a hundred of muiTel?, wa(h them very clean, put them into a ftew-pan, cover them clofe. Let them ftew till they open, then pick them out of the fliells, flrain the liquor through a fine lawn fieve to your mufiels, and pick the heard or crab out, if any. •

Take a dozen craw-fifli, beat them to maih, with a dozen of almonds blanched and beat fine $ then take a fmall parfnip 9iid a carrot fcraped, and cut in thin flices, fry them brown frith a little buteer then take two pounds of any freih fifh, und boil in a gallon of water, with a bundle of fweet herbs, a brge onbn ftuck wkh cloves, whole pepper, black and white little parSey, a Jittle piece of horfe-raddifli, and fait the ByflEel-liquor, the craw-fiih, and almonds. Let them boil till haif is wafted, then ftrain them through a iieve, put the foup into a faucepan; put in twenty of the muflels, a few mufh rooms, and truffles cut fmall, and a leti waihed aoa cut very fmall: take two French rolls, take out the crumb, fry it brown, cut it into little pieces, put it into the foup; let it boil all together for' a quarter of an hour, with the fried carrot and parfinp. lathe mean while take the cruft of the rolls fried crifp; tke half a hundred oif the muflfels, a quarter of a pound of butrer, a fpoonful of water, (hake in a little flour, fet theai on the fixe, keeping the faucepan (haking all the time till the butter is melted. Seafon it wth pepper and falc, beat the yolks of three eggs, put them in, ftir them all the time f cr fear of curdItDg, grate a little tiutmeg; when it is thick and fine, iiil tne rolls, pour your foup into the difh put in the rolls, and lay the reft of the muilels round the nm of the diih.

Ti maii a Scate or Thornback Soup,

TAKE two poinds of fcate or tbornback, Ikin it and boil it Wfix quarts of water. When it is enough, take it up, pick



156 THE ART OF COOKERY

off the flefh and lay it by; put in the bones again, and about two pounds of any frelh fifli, a very little piece of lemon-peel a bundle of fweet herbs, whole pepper, two or three blades of mace, a little piece of horfe-raddifli, the cruft of a penny loaf, a little, parfley; cover it clofe, and let it boil till thece is about two quarts; then ftrain it off, and add an ounce of vermicelli, fet it on the fire, and let it boil foftly. In the mean time take a French roll, cut a little hole in the top, takeout tfie crumb, fry the cruft brown in butter; take the ileih off the fifli you laid by, cut.it into little pieces, put it into a faucepan, with two or three fpoonfuls of the foup; (hake in a little flour, put in a piece of butter, a little pepper and fait; (hake them together in the fauce-pan over the fire till it is quite thick, then fill the roll with it; pour your foup into your di(h, let the iqll (wia n the middle, and fend it to table

To maks an oyJier-Smp

YOUR (lock muft be made of any fort of fi(h the place affords; let there be about two quarts, take a pint of oyfters, beard them, put them into a fauce-pan, (bain the liquor, let them ftew two or three miputes in their own liquor; then take the hard parts of the oyfters, and beat them in a' mortar with the yolks of four hard eggs; mix them with fome of the foup, put them with the other part of the oyfters and liquor intq a faucepan, a little nutmeg, pepper, and fait; ftir them well together, and let it boil a quarter of an hour. Di(h it up
and, fend it to v table.

To njkaU on MtttQnd Soup

TAKE a quart of almonds, blanch them, and beat them in a marble mortar, with the yolks of twelve hard eggs, till they are a fine pafte; mix them by degrees with two quarts of new milk, a quart of cream, a quarter of a pound of double jcefincd fugar, beat fine; ftir all Well together. Yhen it is Vcll mixed, fet it over a flow fire, and keep it (lirring quick all the vvhile, till you find it is thick enough; then pour ic into your diih, and fend it to table. If you be not very areful, it will curdle.

To make a Rice Soup

TAKE two quarts of water, a pound of rice, a little cianamon j cover it clofe, and let it fimmer very foftly till the



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 157

tiee is quite tender: take out the cinnamon, then fweeten it to your palate, grate half a nutmeg, and let it ftand till it is cold; then beat up the yolks of three eggs, with half a pint of white wine, mix them very well, then ftii; them into the rice, fet them on a flow fire, and keep ftirring all the time for fear of curdling. When it is of a good thickneb, and boils, take it up. Keep ftirring it till you put it into your di(h.

To make a. BarleySoup.

TAKE a gallon of water, half a pound of barley, a blade or two of mace, a large cruft of bread, a little lemon-peel. Lee it boil till it.comes to two quarts; then add half a, pint of white wine, and fweeten to your palate

To make a Tumip'Soup .

TAKE a gallon of water, and a bunch pf turnips, pare them fave three or four out, put the reft into the water, with half an ounce of whole pepper, an onioA ftuck with cloves, blade of mace half a nutmeg bruifed, a little bundle of fwee( herbs, and a large crift of bread. Let thefe boil an hour pretty faft, then ftrain it, through a fieve, fqueezing the turnips through; wafh and cut a bunch of celery very fmall, fee it on in the liquor on the fire cover it clofe, and let it ftew. Iq the mean time cut the turnips you faved into dice, and two or three fmall carrots clean fcraped, and cut in little pieces: put half thefe turnips and carrots into the pot with the celery, and the other half fry brown in frefii butter. You muft flour them firft, and two or three onions peeled, cut in thin flrces, and fried brown; then put them all into the foup, with an oliQce of vermicelli. Let your foup boil foftly till the celery is quite tender, and your foup good. Seafoh it with fait to your palate

To make an Egg-Soup.



BEAT the yolks of two eggs in your di(h, with a piece of butter as big. as a heh's egg; take a tea-kettle of boiling water in one hand, and a fpoon in the other, pour in about a qusrrc by degrees, then keep ftirring it all the time well till the egg are well mixed, and the butter melted; then pour it into a fauce-pan, and keep ftirring it all the time till it begins to dimmer. Take it OfF the fire, and pour it between two veilels, out of one into another, tilf it is quite fmooth, and has a great

froth.



is8 THE ART OF COOKERY

froth. Set it on the fire agtm keep ftirrtng it till it is quite hot $ tbeii pour it into the foup-difli, and Tend it to table hot

7i maki PeaS'-Porridgt.

TAKE a quart of green peas, put to them a quart of water, a bundle of dried mint, and a little fait. Liet them boil till the peas are quite ten; then put in fome beaten pepper, a piece of butter as big as a walnut, rolled in flour, ftir it all together, and let it boil a few miniiteff; then add two quarts of milk, iet it boil a quarter of an hour, take out the mint, and fenre it n

ta make a fflnU-Pot.

TAKE two quarts of new milk, eight eggs, and half the whites, beat up with a Irtde rofewater, a nutmeg, a quarter of a pound of fugar; cut a penny-loaf in very thin flicesi and pour your milk and eggs over Put a little bit of fweet butter on the top. Bake it in a flow oveq half an hour.

. Sri maki a Ria Wbiu-Pot.

BOIL a pound of rice in two quarts of new milk, till it is tendet and thick; beat it in a mortar with a quarter of a poaad of fweet almonds Uaached; then boil two quarts of creaai, with a few crumbs of white-bread, and two or three blades of mace. Mix it ail with eight eggs, a little rofe-water, and .fweeten to your tafte. Cut fome candied orange and citron peels thi&9 and lay it in. It muft be put into a flow oven.

To make Rke-MU.

TAKE half a pound of rice, boil it in a quart of water, with a little cinnamon Let it boil till the water is all wafted; take great care it does not bum i then add three pints of milk, and the yolk of an egg beat up. Keep it ftirring, and when it boils take it up. Sweeten to your palate.

To make an OrangeFooU

TAKE the juice of fix oranges, and fix eggs wdfl beaten pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of fugar, a little cinnamon and nutmeg. Mix all together, and keep ftrrritig over a flow fire till it is thick; rhen put in a little piece of bttc keep ftfrimg till cold and diih it up.

ft



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 159



TomakiaWeJiminJi€r'F$ol.

TAK£ a penny loaf, cut it Into thin flices, wet them with iktk, lay them th the bottom of a difli': take a quart of cream, beat up fix eggs, two fpoonfuls of rofe-water, a blade of mace, and fome grated nutmeg. Sweeten to your tafte. Put all this into a fauce-pan, and keep ftirring all the time over a flow fire, for fear of curdling. When it begins to be thick, pour it ihto the diih over the bread. Let it ftand tift it is cold, and ferve it up.

Tq malu a GoofeherrjFodiL

Take two quarts of goofeberries, fet them on the fire in about a quart of water. When they begin to fimmer, turn yellow, and begin to plump, throw them into a cullender to drain the water out; then with the back of a fpoon carefully fquee the pulp, throw the fieve into a difli, make them pretty fweet, and let them ftand till they are cold. In the mean time take two quarts of new milk, and the yolks of four eggs beat up with a little grated nutmeg; ftir it foftly over a flow fire; when it begins to fimmer take it oiF, and by degrees ftir it into the goofeberries. Let it ftartd till it ii cold, and fervc it up. If you make it with cream, you need not put any eggs in; and if it is not thick enough, it is only boiling more goofe berries. But that you muft do as you think proper.

7i rAah Firmity.

TAKE a quart of readyboiled wheat, two quarts 6f ipilk, a quarter of a pound of currants clean picked and wafbed: flir thefe together and boil them; beat up the yolks, of three or four eggs, a little nutmeg, with two or three fpoonfuls of milk, and add to the wheat; flir them together for a few minutes. Then (Weeten to your palate, and fend it to ta1)le.

7o make PhtmiPvrriige nr Barley GrutU

TAKE a gallon of water, half a pound of barley, a quarter of a pound of raifins clean waflied, a quarter of a pound of currants clean waflied and picked. Boil thefe till above half the water is wafted, with two or three blades of mace. Then iWeecen it to your palate, and add half a pint of white wine.





i6o THE ART OF COOkERY

To make Buitered-tVheat.

iPUT youf wheat into a fauce-pan; when it is hot, ftir ia a good piece of butter, a little grated nutmeg, and fweeten it to your palate.,

To make Plum- Gruel.

TAKE two quarts of water, two large fpoonfuls of oatmeal, Sir it together, a blade or two of mace, a little piece of lemonpeel; boil it for 'five or fix minutes (take care it do not boil over), then ftrain it off, and put it into the fauce-pan again, with half a pouhd of currants clean waflied and picked. Let them boil about ten minutes, add a glafs of White wine, a little grated nutmeg, and fweeten to your palate.

To make a Flour Hqfty- Pudding.

TAKE a quart of milk, and four bay- leaves; fet it on the fire to boil, beat up the yolks of two eggs, and ftir ia a little fait. Take two or three fpoonfuls of milk, and beat up with your eggs, and ftir in your milk; then, with a wooden fpoon in one hand, and the flour in the other, ftir it in till it is of a

good tbicknefs, but not too thick. Let it boil, and keep it ifrisig, then pour it into a difti, and ftick pieces of butter here ' and there. You may omit the egg if you do not lik'e it; but it is a great addition to the pudding; and a little piece'of butter ftirred in the milk makes it tat ftiort and fine. Take out the bay- leaves before you put in the flour.

To make an Oatmeal Hajiy-Pudding.

Take a quart of water, fet it on to boil, put in a piece of butter and fome fait; when it boils, ftir in the oatmeal as you do the flour, till it is of a good thicknefs. L(ft it boil a few" minutes, pour it in your diOi, and ftick pieces of butter in it; or eat with wine and fugar, or ale and fugar, or cram, dr nevjr milk. This is heft made wuh Scotch oatmeal.

To make an excellent Sack' PoJfeU '

BEAT fifteen eggs, whites and jolks very wcll and ftraiii them; then put three quarters of a pound of whit fugar into, a pint of canary, and mix it with your eggs in a bdfon; ftt it over a chafing- di(h of coals, and keep continually ftirring it till it is fcalding hot. In the mean time grat fome nutmeg



MADE PLAIN AlJlD EASY. i6f

sn a quart of milk and boil it; then pour it into your eggs and wine, they being fcalding hot.- Hold your hand yery high as you pour it, and fomebody ftirring it all the time you arc pouring in the milk: then take it o(F the chafingdi&9 fet it before the fire half an hour, and ferve it up

To make another Sack-PoJfeU

TAKE a quart of nevir milk, four Naples bifcuits, crumble them, and when the milk boils throw them in. Juft give it one boil, take it off, grate in fome nutmeg, and fweeteh to your palate: then pour in half a pint of fack, ftirring it all the time, and ferve it up. You may crumble white bread in fiead of bifcuit

Or mae it Horn.

BOIL a quart of cream, or new milk, with the yolks of to eggs: firft take a French roll, and cut it as thin as poffibly you can in little pieces; lay it in the difii you intend for the poflet.. When the milk boils (which you muft keep ftirring all the time, pour it over the bread, and ftir it together; cover it clofe, then take a pint of canary, a quarter of a pound of fugar, and grate in fome nutmeg. When it boils, pour ic into the milk, ftirring it all the time, and ferve it up.

7i make a fine Hajly' Pudding

BREAK an egg into fine flour, and with your hand work upas much as you can into as fiiff pafte as is polTible thpn mince it as fmall as herbs to the pot, as fmail as if it were to be fifted; then fet a quart of milk a-boiling, and put it in the .pafte fo cut: put in a little fait, a little beaten cinnahion and fugar, a piece of butter as big as a walnut, and Sirring all oxle way. When it is as thick as you would have it, fiir in fuch another piece of butter, then pour it into your difh, and ftick pieces of butter here and there. Send it to table hot.

To make Hafly Fritters.

TAKE a ftew-pan, put in fome butter, and let it be hot In the mean time take half a pint of all-ale not bitter, and ftir in fome flour by degrees in a little of the ale; put in a few cur rants or chopped apples beat them up'quick, and drop a large fpoonful at a time all over the pan. Take care they do not ftick together, turn them with an cgg-flice, and wheq. they.

M arc



r



i62 THE ART OF COOKEJtV

are of a fine trown, Uy t
iem in a di(b, and throw foaie.fug8 oyer thcija. Garniih wkb ofange cut into quarters.

4V make fine Frittefu

DRY feme of tlic fineft four well before tle fire: mijt M with a quart of new milk, jlot too thick, fix or eight eggs, X little nutmeg, a little mace, a little fak, artd a quarter of a pint of fack or a)e, or a glafs of brandy. . Beat them well togetherthen make them ptetty fbick with ppins, and fry theth dry.

T0 maie Jfple- Fritters y

BEAT the yolks of eight eggs, the whites of four, well tO" ' gether, and ftrain them into a pan; then take a uart of cream, make it as hot as you can bear your finger in it;c then put to it a quarter of a pint of fack, three qiarters of a pint of ale, and make a poflet of it. When it is cool, put it to your eggs beating it well together; then put in nutmeg, ginger, falt and flour, to your liking. Your batter fhould be pretty thick then put in pippins fltced or fcraped, and fry tUedci ia a g0Qc deal of butter quick

To mah'Curd'Fritteru

w

HAVING a handful of curds and a handftit of flour, and" ten eggs well beaten and firatned, fome fugar, cloves, macer and nutmeg beat, a little faffron; ftir all well together, and' hy them quick, and of a fine light brown.

Ta make Fritters' Royal

TAKE a quart of new milk, put it into a itillet or fiiuccpan, and as the milk boils up, pour in a pint of fack. Let it boil up, then take it off, and let it ftand five or fix minutes; then fkim off all the curd, and put it into a bafon; beat it up well with fix eggs, feafon it with mitmeg; then bieat it with whiik, add flour to make jt as thick as batter ufually is, put iil fome fine fugar and fry them quicks

To maie Siirret-Friiteru

TAKE a pint of pulp of fkirret, and a fpoonful of flbuf,c the yolks of four eggs, fugar and fpicc make into a thicjk batter, and fry them quick

t - . 5V





MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 163

7i mJti HOnU'Frttten.

HAVING fomc rice, wafli it in five or fix fercral waters; nd dry it f ery Weil before the fire: tlien beat it in a mortar )fttj fine, and Tift it through a Uwn fieve, that it may be very line. You muft have at leaft an ounce of it, then put it into afancepan, juft wet it with milk, and when it is well incorporated with it, add to h another pint of milk; fet the whce 07er il jlove, of a very flow fire, and take care to keep it airways nrdvmg; put in a little fugar, and fome candied lemon peel grated, keep it over the fire till it is almoft come to the tbicknefs of a fine pafte, flour a peal, pour it on it, and fpread it abroad with a rolling-pin When it is quite cold cut itjn- to little morfels, taking care they ftick iot one to the other $ flour your hands, and roll up your fritters handfomcly, and fry them When you ferve them up, pour a little orangeflower-water over them, and fugar. Thefe make a pretty fidcr diih or are very pretty to garnilh a fine difh with



y



7i make Syringed- Fritter s.

TAKE about a pint of water, and a bit of butter the bigneft of an egg, with fome lemon peel, green if you can get it, rafped preferved lemon-peel, and crifped orangeflowers put atl together in a ftewpan over the fire, and when boiling throw in fome fine flour; keep it ftirring; put in by degrees more flour till your batter be thick ehough, take it oflF'the fire; then take . an ounce of fwect almonds, four bitter ones, pound them in a mortar, ftir in two Naples bifcuits crumbled, two eggs beat; fiir all together and more eggs till your batter be thin enough to be fyringed. Fill your, fyringe, your batter being hot, fyringe your fritters in it, to make it of a true lover's-knot, and being well coloured ferve them up for a fide-di(h

At another time, you may rub a (heet of paper with butter, over which you may fyringe your fritters, and make them in what fliape you pleafe Your butter being hot, turn the paper upfide down over it, and your fritters will eafily drop off. When fried ftrew them with fugar, and glaze them

To make Vine- Leaf Fritter Sm

Take fome of the fmalleft vine-leaves you can et, and 'having cut off the great ftalks, put them in a difh with fome French brandy, green lemon rafped, and fomq Gigar take a

M z . good



i66 THE ART OF COOKERY

and half a nutmeg grated, half a pound of melted butter almof cold; mingle all well together, and butter the pan fpr the firfl pancake; let them run as thin as poflxble; when they are ju( coloured they re enough; and fo do With all the fine pancakes.

To mate Rice Pancaies,

TAKE a quart of cream, and tiiree fpoonfuls of flour of rice;.fet it oh a flow fire, and keep it ftirring till it i thick as pap. Stir in half a pound of butter, a nutmeg grated; then pour it out into an earthen pan, and when it is cold, ftir in three or four fpoonfuls of flour, a little fait, fome fugar nine eggs well beaten; mix all well together, .and fry them nkely. When you have no cream, ufe new milk, and one ipopnful more of the flour of rice.

- s.

To make a Pupton of Apples

PARE fome apples, take out the cores, and put them into a Iktilet: to a quart- miigful heaped, put in a quarter of a pound of fugar, and two fpoonfuls of water. Do them ovr a flow' fire, keep them ftirring; add a little cinnatiron. When it is quite thick, and like a marmalade, let it ftand till cool; beat up the yolks of fouror five eggs; and ftir in a handful of grated bread, and a quarter of a pound of freflli butter; then form t into what (h ape you plefe, and bake it in a flow oven, an4 then turn it upfide down on a platej for a fecond courfe.

To make Black- Cap $•

CUT twelve large apples in halves, and take out the cores, place them on a thin patty-pan, or mazarine, as clofe toge" ther as they can lie, with the flat fide downards; fqueeze a • lemon in two fpoonfuls of orange- flower water, and pour over them; (hred fome lemonpeel fine, and throw over them, and grate fine fugar all over. Set them in a quick oven, and half aohour will do them. When you fend them to table,, throw" fine fugar all over the difli. . "

To bake Apples whole

-,, .,

PUT your apples into an earthen pan, with a kw cloves, a little lemoivpeel, fome coarfe fugar, a glafs of red wine; put them into a quick oveoc and they will take a(i hour baking.

7i



MADE PLAIN ANDEASY. 167

t

To Jiew Pears:

PARE fix pears, and either quarter them or do them whole; lAey make a pretty difli with one whole, the reft cut in quarters, and the cores taken out. Lay them in a deep earthen pot, with a few cloves, a piece of lemon-peei, a gill of red wine, and a quarter of a pound of fine fugar. If the pears are very large, they will take half a pound of fugar, and half a pint of red wine; cover them clofe with brown paper, and bake them till they are enough.

Serve them hot or cold, jufl as you like them, and they will be very good with water in the place of wine

To Jlew Pears in a Sauce-pan.

PUT them into a fauce-pan, with the ingredients as before; cover them, and do them over a flow fire. When they are,enough take them off; add a pennyworth of cochineal bruifed;rery fine.

To Jlew Pears purple.

PARE four pears, cut them into quarters, core them, put them into a ftew-pan, with a quarter of a pint of water, a iquarter of a pound of fugar; coyer them with a pewter plate, then cover the pan with the lid, and do them over a flow fire. Look at them often, for fear of melting the plate; when they are enough, and the liquor look of a fine purple, take them off, and lay them in your difh with the liquor; when cold, ferve them up for a fide-difii at a fcjcond courfe, or juft as you pieafe.

Tj Jiw Pippins whole,

TAKE twelve golden pippins, pare them, put the parings nto a fauce pan with water enough to cover them, a blade of mate, two or three cloves, a piece of lemon- peel. Let them fimmer till there is juft enough to ftew the pippins in, then ftrain it, and put it into the fauce-pan again, with (tigar enough to malce it like a fyrup; then put them in a preferving? pan, or clean ftew-pan, or large fauce-pan, and pour the fyrup over them. Let there be enough to flew them in; when iy are enough, which you will know by the pippins beipg fofr. take them up, lay them in a little difh with the fyrup f vyhea old ferve them up or hot, if you chijife it.

M 4 A pretty



i68 THE ART OF COOKERY

, A pretty Made-Difn.

TAKE half a pound of almonds banched and beat fme with a little rofe or orange flower, water; then take a quart of fweet thick cream, and boil it with a piece of cinnamon and mace; ftveecen it with fugar to your .palate, and mix it with your almonds: ftir it well together, and ftrain it through a fieve. Let your cream cool, and thicken it with the yolks of fix eggs; then garnifh a deep di(h, and lay pafte at the bojttom then put in ihred artichoke-bottoms, being iirft boiled, upoa that a little melted butter, (hred citron, and candied orange; fo do till your difli is near full, then pour in your cream, and bake it without a lid. When it is baked, fcrapc fugar over ir and ferve it up hot. Half an hour wiU bake it.

To make Kickjhaws,

MAKE pufflpafie, roll it thin, and if you have any moulds, work it upon them, make them up with preferved pippins. You may fill feme with goofeberries, fome with rafberries, or what you pleafc; then clofc them up, and either bake or fry them J throw grated fugar over them, and ferve (hem up.

Plain Perduy or Cream Toafs.

. HAVING two French rolls, cut them into flkes as thick as your finger, crumb and cruft together. Lay them on a dihc put to them a pint of cream and half a pint of milk; ftrew them over with beaten cinnamon and fugar; turn them fre'quently till they are tender, but take care not to break ihem: then take them from the cream with the flice, break four or five eggs, turn your flices of bread inthe g% and fry them, in clauStd bulter. Make them of a good brown colour but not blacky fcrape a little fugar over them. They may bq ferved for a fccond Courfe diih, but are fitteft for fupper.

Salmagundy for a Middle- Dijh at Supper.

IN the top plate in the middle, which fliould fiand higher than the reft-, take a fine pickled herring, bone it, take off the heacl, and mince the reft fine. In the other plates round, put the followin; things: in one, pare a cucumber, 'and cut it very thin 5 in another, apples pared and cut fmall; in another, an onion peeled and cut fmali j in another, two hard eggs chopped fmali, the whites in one, and the yolks in another j pick-

led



1



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



169



Jed girkins in another cut fmall; in another celery cut fmall; in another pickled red cabbage chopped fine; take fome wa tercrefies clean waflied and pickedy ftick them all about and between every plate or faucer, and throw naftertium flowers about the creiles. You muft have oil and vinegar, and lemoni to eat with it. If it is prettily fet out, it will make a pretty figure in the middle of the table, or you may lay them in heaps inadiih. If you have not all thefe ingredients, fet out your plates or faucers with juft what you fancy, and in the room of a pickled herring you may mince anchoyies.

Ta 7nah a Tanfiy.

TAKE ten eggs, break them into a pan, put to them a litr tie fait, beat them very well; then put to them eight ounces of loaf-fugar beat fine, and a pint of the juice of fpinach, and alittle juice of tanfey. Mix them well together and ftrain it idto a quart of cream; then grate in eight ounces of Naples bjfcuit or white bread, a nutmeg grated, a quarter of a pound of Jordan almonds, beat in a mortar, with a little'juice of tanjey to your tafte: mix thefe all together, put it into a ftewpan, with a piebe of butter as large as a pippin. Set it over a iloffr charcoal-fire, keep it ftirring till it is hardened very well; then butter a difh very well, put in your tanfey, bake it, and wlien it is enough turn it out on a pieplate fqueeze the juice of an orange over it, and throw fugar all over. Garnifh with orange cut into quarters, and fweet meats cut into long bitS
and lay all over its fide.

Another Way.

TAKE a pint of cream, and half a pint of blanched almonds beat fine with rofe and orange -flower water, ftir them together over a flow fire; when it boils take it ofl, and let it ftand till cold; then beat in ten eggs, grate in a fmall nutmeg, four Naples bifcuits, a little grated bread; fweeten to your tafte; and if you think it is too thick, put in fome more cream, the juice of fpinach to make it green; flir it well together, and cither fry it or bake it. If you fry it, do one fide firft, and then with a dilh turn the other.

7i make a Hedge-Hog.

TAKE two pounds of fweet almonds blanched, beat them ell in a mortar,, with a little canary and orange-flower water,



IO THE ART OF COOKERY

tsr to keep tbeoi from oilH% Mke them into & fluff pafli Aen beat in the yolks of twelve eggs, leave dut five of the whitef, put to it a pint of citam, fweeten it with fugar, put in half a pound of fweet butter melted fet it on a furnace or ilow fire and keep continually fiirring till it ia ftiff enough to be made into the form of a hedge-hog, then ftick it full of blanched almonds flit, and ftuck up like the briftles of a hedgehog, then put it into a diih. Take a pint of cream, and the yolks of four eggs beat up, and mix with the cream: fweetea to your palate, and keep them ftlrring over a flow fire all the jtime till it is hot, then pour it into your difli round the hedgehog; let it ftand till it is cold, and ferve it up.

Or you may make a fine hartihorn-jelly, and pour into the difli, which will look very pretty, sou may eat wine and fugar with it, or eat it without.

Or cold cream fweetened, with a glafs of white wine in ft, and the juice of a Seville orange, and pour it into the diih. It will be pretty for change.

This is a pretty fide-difb at a fecond courfe, or in the middle for fupper, or in a grand defert. Plump two currants for the eyes

Or fnah it thus for Change:

TAKE two pounds of fweet almonds blanched, twelve bitter ones, beat them in a marble mortar well together, with canary and orange- 0ower water, two fpoonfuls of the tinAure offardn, two ipoonfuls of thejuice of forrel, beat, them into a fine pafte, put in half a pound of melted butter, mix it up well, a little nutmeg and beaten mace, an ounce of citron, an ounce of orange-peel, both cut fine, mix them in the yolks of twelve eggs, aqd half the whites beat up and mixed in half pint of cream, half a pint of double-refined fugar and work it up all together. If it is not fljff enough to make up into the form you would have it, you muft have a mould for it; butter it well, then put in your ingredients, and bake it. The mould muft be made in fuch a manner, as to have the head peeping out; when it comes out of the ovn', have ready fpme almonds blanched and flit, aid boiled up in fugar till brown Stick it all over with the almonds; and for fauce, have red wine an(( fugar made hot, and the juice of an orange, end it hot to; table for a firft courfe.

You mayleave out the faffron and Acfrel, 9nd make it up like chickens, or any other (bape you pleafe, or alter th fauce to

your



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.' . 171

• jFOur fancy. Butter Aigar, and white wine is a pretty failnr for either baked or boiled and you may make the fauce of what colour you pleafe; or put it into a mould, with half a jcound of currants added to it; and boil it for a pudding. You inay ufe cochineal in the room of faiFron

The following liquor you may make to mix with your fauces: beat an ounce of cochineal very fine, put in a pint of water in a fkillet, and a quarter of an ounce of roch-alum: tKciI it till the goodnefs is out, ftrain it into a phial, with an ounce of fine fugar, and it will keep fix months.

To maki pritty Ahmud Pud£ngs.

TAfCE a pound and a half of blanched almonds, beat them fine with a little rofe water, a pound of grated bread, a pound and a quarter of fine fugar, a quarter of an ouhce of cinnamon, and a large nutmeg beat fine, half a pound of melted butter tnrxed with the yolks of eggs, and four whites beat fine, a pint of fack, a pint and a half of cream, fome rofe or orange-flower Water; boil the cream, and tie a little bag of fafiron, and dip in the cream to colour it. Fir ft beat your eggs very well, and inix with yqur batter $ beat it up, then the fpice, then the alinonds, then the rofe water and wine by degrees, beating it all ti)e time, then the fugar, and then the cream by degrees, keeping it flitring, and a quarter of a pound of vermicelli. Stir all together, have fome hog's guts nice and clean, fifl them 6xAj half full, and as you put in the ingredients, here and there put in a bit of citron; tie both ends of the gut tight, and boil them about a quarter of an hour. You may add currants for Change. '

, 7ij make fried Toafts.

TAKE a penny loaf, cut it into fliccs a quarter of an inch thick round ways, toaft them, and then take a pint of cream and three eggs, half a pint of fack, fome nutmeg, and fweeten it to your tafte fieep the toafts in it for three or four hours then have ready fome butter hot in a pan, put in the toafts and fry them brown, lay them in a difb, melt a little butter, and then mix what isleft; if noni put in fome wine and fugar and pour over them. They make a pretty plate or fide-difli for f upper.

TJIew a Brace of Carp.

SCRAP them very clean then gut tbem wafh them and " c.th€



IO THE ART OF COOKERY

tsr to keep them from oiling Mke them into a .fluff paftc Aen beat in the yolks of twelve eggs, leave but five of the whitef, put to it a pint of citam, fweeten it with fugar, put in half a pound of fweet butter melted fet it on a furnace or ilow fire and keep continually fiirring till it is ftiff enough to be made into the form of a hedge-hog, then ftick it full of blanched almonds flit, and ftuck up like the briftles of a hedgehog, then put it into a diih. Take a pint of cream, and the yolks of four eggs beat up, and mix with the cream: fweeten to your palate, and keep them ftirring over a flew fire all the time till it is hot, then pour it into your difli round the hedge hog; let it ftand till it is cold, and fere it up.

Or you may make a fine hartihorn-jelly, and pour io
o the difli, which will look very pretty. Vou may eat, wine and fugar with it, or eat it without.

Or cold cream fweetened, with a glafs of white wine in it, and the juice of a Seville orange, and pour it into the diih. It will be pretty for change.

This is a pretty fide-dim at a fecond courfe, or in the midr die for fupper, or in a grand defert. Plump two currants for thjC eyes.

Or maki it thus for Change:

TAKE two pounds of fweet almonds blanched, twelve bit ter ones, beat them in a marble mortar well together, witti canary and orange-0ower water, two fpoonfuls of the tinAure of fardn, two fpoonfuls of the juice of forrel, beat them into a fine pafte, put in half a pound of melted butter, mix it up well, a little nuf meg and beaten mace, an ounce of citron, an ounce of orange- peel, both cut fine, mix them in the yolks of twelve eggs, aijid half the whites beat up and mixed in half s
pint of cream, half a pint of doublerefined fugar and work it up all together. If it is not fljff enough to make up into the form you would have it, you muft have a mould for it; butter it well, then put in your ingredients and bake it. The mould muft be made in fuch a manner, as to have the head peeping out; when it comes out of the ovn', have ready fpme almonds blanched and flit, aid boiled up in fugar till brown. Stjcjc it all over with the almonds; and for fauce, have red wine anc fugar made hot, and the juice of an orange, end it hot t% table for a firft courfe.

You mayleave out the faffron and ibfrfel, and make it up like chickens, or any other (bape you pleafe or alter the fauce to

youc



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.' 171

•jour fancy. Butter Aigar, and white wine is a pretty fallen for either baked or boi and you may make tise fauce of what colour you pleafe $ or put it into a mould, with half a i)ound of currants added to it; and boil it for a pudding. You inay ufe cochineal in the room of faiFron.

The following liquor you may make to mix with your fauces: beat an ounce of cochineal very fine, put in a pint of water in a fkillet, and a quarter of an ounce of rochalum: boil it till the goodnefs is out, ftrain it into a phial, with an ounce of fine fugar, and it will keep fix months.

i

To maki pretty Jlmond PudJings

TA
CE a pound and a half of blanched almonds, beat them fine with a little rofe water, a pound of grated bread, a pound and a quarter of fine fugar, a quarter of an ouhce of cinnamon, and a large nutmeg beat fine, half a pound of melted butter inbred with the yolks of eggs, and four whites beat fine, a pint of fack, a pint and a half of cream, fome rofe or orangeflower water; boil the cream, and tie a little bag of fafiron, and dip in the cream o colour it. Firft beat your eggs very well, and mix with your batter; beat it up, then the fpice, then the alinonds, then the rofe water and wine by degrees, beating it all the time, then the fugar, and then the cream by degrees, keepiiig it ftitring, and a quarter of a pound of vermicelli. Stir all together, have fome hog's guts nice and clean, fin them 6n1y half full, and as you put in the ingredients, here and there put in a bit of citron; tie both ends of the gut tight, and boil them about a quarter of an hour. You may add currants for Change. ' -, .

. T9 make fried Toqls.

TAKE a penny- loaf, cut it into fliccs a quarter of an inch thick round ways, toaft them, and then take a pint of cream and three eggs, half a pint of fack, fome nutmeg, and fweettn it to your tafte fieep the toafts in it for three or four hours, then have ready fome butter hot in a pan, put in the toafts and fry them brown, lay them in a difb, melt a little butter, and then mix what islefr; ifnone put in fome wine and fugar, and pour over them.' They make a pretty plate or fide-difli forfupper.

i

TJlew a Brace of Carp,

SCRAPE them very clean, then gut them, wafh them and

-the



.172 THE ART OF COOKERY

t

I

the roes in a pint of good ftale beer, to prdervB all the bldoj, and boil the carp, with a little fait in the water. .

In the mean time drain the beer, and put it into a fauce-pan, with a pint of red wine, two or three bladea of mace, fome whole pepper blaclc and white an onion ftuck with cloves, half a nutmeg bruifed, a bundle of fweet herbs, a piece of le mon-peel as big as a fixpence, an anchovy, a little piece of horfe-raddifli. Let thcfe boil together foftly far a quarter of an hour, covered clofe; then ilrain it, and add .to it half the hard roe beat to pieces, two or. three fpoonfuls. of catchup, a quarter of a pound of frefli butter, and a fpoonful of mufiiroompickle let it boil,' and keep flirring it till the fauce is thick and eQugb. If it wants any fait, you muft put fome in: then take the reft of the roe, and beat it up with the yolk of an egg, fome nutmeg, and a little lemon-peel cut fmall; fry them in fre& butter in little cakes, and fome pieces of bread cut three corner- ways and fried brown. When the carp are enough take them up, pour your fauce over them, lay the cakes round the difli, with horfe-raddifli fcraped fine, and fried parfley, TJie rc
l lay on the carp, and flick the bread about them, and lay roujid them, then
Iiced lemon notched, and lay round the diOi, and two or three pieces on the carp. Send cbem tp .table hot.,

If you would have your famce white,, put in good fifli-brolh inftead of beer, and, white wine in the room of red wine. Make your broth with any fort of frefii fiCh you have, and fe fon it as you do gravy.

To fry Carp.

FIRST fcale and gut them, waft them clean, lay them in a cloth, to dry, then flour them, and fry them of a fine light brown. Fry fome toaft cut three-corner ways, and the roes; ivhn your fifli is done, lay them on a coarfe cJoth to drain. Let your fauce be butter and anchovy, with the jtiice of lemon. ' Lay your carp in the dift, the roes on ach fide, and garnift with the; fried toaft and lemon.

To bake a Carp,

SCALE, waft, and clean a brace of carp very well; take an earthen pan deep enough to lie cleverly in, butter the pan a little, lay in your carp; feafon vjrith mace, cloves, nutmeg, nd black aiid white pepper, a bundle of fweet herb.s gn onion,



MADE PLAIN AND EASY ifj

•

and anchovy; pour in a bottle of white wine, cover it clofe, and Jet them bake an hour in a hot oven, if large; if fmall, 9, lefs time will do them. When they are enough, carefully take them up and lay them in a difli; fet it over hot water to keep it hot, and cover it clofe, then pour all the liquor they were baked in into a fauce-pan j let it boil a minute or two, then ftrain if, and add half a pound of butter rolled in flour. Let it boil keep ftirring it, fqueeze in the juice of half a lemon, and put in what fait you want; pour the fauce over the fifh, lay the roes round, and garnifli with lemon. Obferve to ifkim all the fat ofF the liquor.

To fry Tench

SLIME your tenches, flit the fkin along the backs, and with the point of your knife raife it up from the bone, then cut the fkin acrofs at the head and tail, then ftrip it ofl, and take out the bone; then take another tench, or a carp, and mince the flefli fmall with mufhrooms, cives, and parfley. Seafon them with fait, pepper, beaten mace, nutmeg, and a few favoury herbs minced fmall. Mingle all thefe well together; then pound them in a mortar, with crumbs of bread, as much as two eggs, foaked in cream, the yolks of three or four eggs, and apiece of Gutter.. When thefe have been well pounded, fiufF the tenches with this fauce: take clarified butter, put it into a pan, fet it over the fire, and when it is hot flour your tenches, and put them into the pan one by one, and fry them brown then take them up, lay them in a coarfe cloth before the fire to keep hot. In the mean time pour all the greafe and fat out of the pan, put in a quarter of a pound of butter, fhake fome flour all over the pan, keep flirring with a fpoon till the butter is a little brown; then pour in half a pint of white wine, Ait it together, pour in half a pint of boiling water, an onion fluck with cloves, a bundle of fweet. herbs, and two blades of mace. Cover them clofe, and let them ftew as foftly as you can for a quarter of an hour; then ftrain off the liquor, put it into the pan again, add two fpoonfuls of catchup, have ready' an ounce of truffles or morels boiled in half a pint of water tender, pour in truflies, water and all, into the pan, a few muih' rooms, and either half a pint of oyfters clean wafhed in their own liquor, and the liquor and all put into the pan, or fome craw-fifli; but then you muft put in the tails, and, after clean picking thqm, boil them in half a pint of water, then ilrain the

7 ' liquor.



176 THE ART OP COOKEkY

the fire to boil three or four minutes, then drain it, and ($ut tcf it 8 gill of red wine, two fpoonfuls of catchup, a pint of' flirimps, half a pint of oyfters or muflels, liquor and all, but firft'ftrainit; a fpoonful of mufhroom- pickle, a quarter of a pound of butter rolled in iiour ftir it all together till it is thick and boils; then pour it into the difh, have ready fome toaft cut threecorner ways, and fried crifp. Stick pieces about the bead and mouth, and lay the reft round the head. Garniih with lemon notched, fcraped horfe-raddifh, and parfley crifped in a plate before the fire. Lay one flice of lemon on the head and ferve it up hot.

•

7i broil Shrimps Cod Salmoiii Whitingy or Haddock.

FLOUB: it, and have a quick clear fire, fct your gridiron high, broil it of a fine brown, lay it in your dih, and for fauce have good melted butter. Take a lobfter, bruife the fpawn ia the butter, cut the meat fmall, put all together into the melted butter, make it hot and pour it into your diib, or into bafoos. Garniih with horfe-raddifli and lemon.

Or Ojier Sauce made thus,

TAKE half a pint of oyfters, and fimmer them till they are plump, ftrain the liquor from them through a fleve, wa(h the oyfters very clean, and beard them; put them in a ftewpan, and pour the liquor over thiem, but mind you do not pour the fedimentwith the liquor; then add a blade of mace, a quarter of a lemon, a fpoonful of anchovy-liquor, and a little bit of horfe-raddi(b, a little butter rolled in flour, half a pound of butter nicely melted, boil it up gently for ten minutes then take out the horfe-taddiil, the mace and lemon, fqueeze the juice of the lemon into the faucec tofs it up a little then put it into your boats or bafons, -

Mufiel-fauce made thus is very good, only you muft pyt them into a ftew-pan, and cover them clofe firft open, and fearch that there be no crabs under the tongue.

Or a.fpoonful of walnut-pickle in the butter makes the fauce good, or a fpoonful of either fort of catchup, or horfe-raddifli fauce.

Melt your butter, fcrape a good deal of horferaddifh fine, put it into the melted butter, grate half a nutmeg, beat up the • yolk of an egg with one fpoonful of cream, pour it into the .butter, keep it ftirring till it boils then pour it dire£lly into your bafon.



MAIc£ PLAIK AND EASY. 177

79 drrfs link Fijb.

AS to all (brts of littlv fiih
fuch as rmelts, roacby &e. thejr 0iould be fried dry and of a fine brown aad notbiag but plain buer. Garnitb witb lemon

And witb all boikd-EOi, you (hould put a good deal of fait and horfe-raddiOi in the water, qjccept mackerel, with wUeb yat fait and aunr, parfley and fennel, wbicb you muft cbop to put into cbe Imtter; aad fome love fcaldcd goofcberriev witb (bem. And be fure to boil your fi(h well f but take ipreat cfc Ibej do not break.

To br$il MackereU

CLEAN cbeo iplrt tbem down the back, feafon them with pper and fak, fine miot, parfley, and fennel chopped very fiac and flonr diem; broil them of a fine light brown, put them on a di(b and flrainer. Garniih witb parfley; let your futce ha fennel and butter in a boat.

7i hrnl Weavtrs.

GUT them, and wafh them clean, dry them in a clean cloth' flour, then broil them, and have melted butter til a cup. They tfe&ie ft(b, and cut ae firm as a foal but you miift rake care not to bttjtt yourfelf with the two (harp bones in the bead

Xo hoil a Turbfft.,

LAY.it in a good deal of fait and water an hour or two and if it is not quite Tweet, (hift your water five or fix times
firft put a good deal of fait in the mouth andlelly.

In the mean time fet on your fi(h- kettle with clean fpringWater and fait, a little vinegar, and a piece of horfe-raddife. When the water boils, lay the turbot on a fifh- plate, put it in-? to the kettle, let it be weil boiled, but take great care it is not too much done J when enough take ofi. the filh-kcttle, kt it before the fire, then carefully lift up the fifh plate, and fet it acrofs the kettle to drain: in the mean time melt a good deal of freti butter, and bruife in either the fpawn of one or two lobAcrs, and the meat cut fmall,. with a fpoonful of anchovy Jiquor; then give it a boilj and pour it into bafons. This is the bcft fauce; but you may make what you pleafe. Lay the fiih in the diih. Garniih wih fcraped horfe raddi(h and lemon.

N T,



lyS' i'HE ART 6 'CdOiCERY

Tq Bah a Tttrbot.

TAltE a difli the fize of your turbot, rob butter ja!! oV6r i • thick, throw a little fait, a Httle beaten pepper, and half a lar . nutmeg, fome parfley minced fine&nd thro all over pour in a pint of white wine, cut ofFthie head and tail, lay the turbot in, the difli, pour another pint of white wine all over, grate Hoc other half of the nutmejg oVer It, and a little peppef,fome fait and chopped parfley. Lay a piece of butter here and there' afl over, and throw a Mttle fiour a) over,' and thei a good many crumbs of bread. Bake it, and be fure that it is of a fine brown; then lay it in your dih,. ftir the fauce in your difli all together, pour it into a fauce pan, fiiake in a little flour, let it boil, then ftir in a piece of butter and two fpoonfulis of catchup, let it boil and pour it into bafohs. Qarnilh your difli widi lemon; and you may add what you fancy tb (he fauce, as fbrimpa, anchovies, mufltrooms, &c; If a fmall turbot, half the wine will do. It eats finely thus. Lay it in a dlft, flcim oflall the fat, and pour the reft over it. Let it (land till cold and it is good with vinegar, and a fine diib to fet out a cokt table.

7i drtfi a Jowl of PickUd, Salinon

tjAY it in frefli water all night, then ta'y it in a fidt-pUte put it into a large ftew pan feaion it with a little Whole pep per, a blade or two of mace tied in a coarfe muflin-rag, a whole onion, a nutmeg bruifed, a bundle of fweet herbs and parfley a little lemon- peel, put to it three large fpoonfuls of vinegar, a pint of white wine, and a quaiter of a p&und of frefli butter,1'olled in flour; cover it clofe, and let it fimmer over a flow fire for a quarter of an hour, then Carefully tatce up your faloson and lay it in your diflb; fet it over hot water and eoVer it. la the mean time let yoir fauce boil till it is thick and good. Take out the fpice, onion, and fweet herbs, and pour it over the fifh. Garniih with lemon.

To. broil Salmon.

CUT frefli falmon into thick pieces, flour them and broil them, lay them in your difli, and have plaia inelted butter in ja cup, or anchovy and butter.

Baked Salmon.

TAKE a little piece cut into flices about an inch thick, butter



i



I



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 179

i

ffr the di(h that you wouM ferve it to table on, lay, the flices,ih the di(b, take ofF the fkin, make a forceineat thus: take the defli of an ee, the flefh of a (Ulmon, an equal quantity, beat in a mortar, feafon it with beaten pepper, falt nutmegs two or three cloves, fome parfley, a few mufhrooms, a piece of butter, and ten or a dozen coriander- feeds beat fine. Beat all together, boil the crumb of a halfpenny-roll in milk, beat up four eggs. Air it together till it is thick, let it cool and mix it well together with the reft i then mix all together with four raW' ggs; on every (lice lay this force-meat all over, pour a very little melted butter over them, and a few crumbs of bread, lay a cruft round the edge of thedi(h, and ftick oyfters round upon it. Bake it in an oven, and when it is of a very fine brown ferve it up; pour a little plain butter (with a little red wine in it) into the di(b, and the juice of a lemon: or you nlay bake it in any difli, and when it is enough lay the flices into another di(h. Pour the butter and vine into the difli it was baked in, give it a bpil and pour it into the diCh. Garnifli with lemon. This is a fine difh. Squeeze the juice of a lemon in.

To brcil Mackeril whole.

CUT off their beads, gut them, wafh them clean, puU oot the roe at the neck-end, boil it in a little water, then bruife it with a fpoon, beat up (he yolk of an egg, with a little nutmegs ' a little lemon-peel cut fine, a little thyme, fome parfley boiled and chopped fine, a little pepper and fair, a few crumbs of bread: mix all well together, and fill .the mackerel flour ic well, and broil it nicely. Let your fauce be plain butter, with a little catchup or walnut pickle.

Mackertl a la Maitre tTHoteUe

TAKE three mackerel, and wipe them very dry with a clean . cloth, cut them down the back from head to tail, but not open them; flour them artd broil them nicely; chop a handful of parfley, and a handful of green onions very fine, mix them up with butter and pepper, and fait. Put your mackerel in the di(h, and put the parfley, &c. into the cut in the bick, and put them before the fire till the butter is melted. - Squeeze the juice of two lemons over them, and fend them up hot.



Na



iSo THE ART OF COOK'ERY

71 broil Hirrlngs.

SCALE them, gut them cut off their beads, wafh them clean, dry them in a cloth, flour them and broil them. Lar the fifli in the di(h, in a boat, plain melted butter and muftard.

To fry Herrings

CLEAN them as above, fry them in butter; have ready a
;ood.raaoy onions peeled and cut thin; fry them of a light brown with the herrings; lay the herrings in your di(b, and the onions round, butter and muftard in a cup. Y(m muft do them with a quick fire.

' i'

To maki ffaterSotif. '?

TAKE fome of the fmalleft plaice or flounders yoij can get,, wafb them clean, cut the fins clofe, put them into a ftewpan, with juft water enough to boil thtm a little ialt, and a bunch of parfley; when they are enough fend them to table in a foup-difl), with the licjuor to keep theaa hot Have parfiey and butter in a cup.

To Jim Eilu

SJIN, gut, and waihthem very clean in fix or eight waters, o wa(b away all the land; then cut them in pieces, about as lone as your finger, put uft water enough for faace, put in a fmail onion ftuck with cloves, a little bundle of fweel herbs, a blade or two of mace, and fome whole pepper in a thin muflin-rag. Cover it clofe, and let them ftew vtry (bftly.

Look at them now and then, put in a little piece of butter rolled in flour, and a little chopped parfley When you find they are quite tender and well done, take out the onion, fpice, and fweet herbs Put in fait enough to feafon it. Then di(b them up with the fauce.

Tojlew Eels with Broth.

CLEANSE your eels as above, put them into a faute-pan with a blade or two of mace and a cruft of bread. Put juft water enough to cover them clofe and let them ftew very fofty; when they are enough, difli them up with the broth, and have a little plain melted butter and parfley in a cup to eat tbf eels with, 't'he broth will be very good, atnd it is fit for weakly and confumptive coaflitutiona



F



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. i8i

To dreft a Pike.

$CALE and gut your pike, and walh it vry clean, tlieii make a fluffing in the following manner: take the crumb of a penny loaf foked in cream, a quarter of a pound of butter an anchovie chopped fine, a handful of parfley, and a little fweet herbs chopped fine 9 the liver or roe of the fi(h bruifed, a little lemon peel chopped fine, a little grated nutmeg, fome pepper and fait, the yolks of two eggs; mix all together, an(
put it in the llly of your fifli; few it up, and then make it in the form of n S. Rub the yolk of an egg over; grate fome nutnaeg on it, and ftrew fome crumbs of bread on it -put fome butter here and there on U Put it on an irorl plate, and bakeit, or roaft it before the fire in a tin oven; for fauce good an Chovies and butter, and plain melted butter. Garnifh with horfe-raddi(b and barberries, or you may boil it without th€ Cuffing %

To broil Haddocks -when they are in high Seafm.

SCALE them, gut and wa(h them clean; do not rip open their bellies, but take the guts out with the gills; dry them iti a clean cloth very well: if there be any roe or liver, take it out, but put it in again; flour them well, and have a clear good fire. Let your gridiron be hot and clean, lay them on, turn them quick two or three times for fear of fticking; then let one fide be enough, and turn the other fide. When that is done, lay them in a dilli, and have plain butter in a cup, or anchovy and butter. "

They eat finely faked a day or two before you drefs them, and bung up to dry, or boiled with egg- fauce. Newcafile is a famous place for faked haddocks. They come in barrels, and keep a great while. Or you may make a fluffing the fame 9S for the pike, and broil them.

To broil Cod'Sounds.

YOy muft firft lay them in hot water a few minutes.; take liem out and rub ibem well with fait, to take off the ikin and

ilack dirt, then they will look white, then put them in water, nd give them a boil. Take theii out and flour theru well, pepper aad fait them, and broil them. When they are enough h them in your di£h, and pour melted butter and muflard into IhiecLiih firosl tbcn wbole.

N 3 7i



i8 THE ARTxOF CQQICERV

To fricafey Cod Sounds

CLEAN them very well, as above, then cut them into Hftle pretty pieces, boil them tender in milk and water, then throw them into a cullender to drain, pour them into a clean faucepan, feafon them with a little'beateh mace and grated nutmeg, and a very little fait; pour to them juft cream enough for fauce and a good piece of butter rolled in fidur, keep (baking your faucepan round all the time, till it is thick enough hen difli it up, and garniih with lemon



7 drefs Salmon au Couri'Bomlhn.

AFTER having wafted and made your falmop very clean (core the fide pretty deep, that it may take the feaibriing; take Z quarter of an ouice of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, a nutmeg, dry them and beat them fine, a quarter of an ounce of black- pepper beat fine, and an oiince of fait. Lay the falmoa in a napkin, feafon it well with this fpice, cut fome lemonpeel fine, aifd parfley, throw all ever, and in the notches put about a pound of frefh butter rolled in Hour, roll it up tight in' the napkin,, and bind it about with packthread; Put it in a fifh- kettle, juft big enough to hold it, pour in a quart of white-' wine, a quart of vinegar, and a niuch water as will jufl boil it.;

Set it over a quick fire, cover it clofe; when it is enough, which you muft judge by the bignefs of your falmon, fet it over' a ftove to fi'ew till you are ready. Then have a clean napkin folded in the. difh it is to lay in, turn it out of the napkin it was boiled in, on the other napkin. Garni(h the difh with ar good deal of parfley crifped before the fire.

For fauce have nothing but plain butter in a cup, or horfe raddiib and vinegar. Serve it up for a firft courfe '

To drefs Salmon a la Braife,

TAKE a fine large piece of falmon, or a large falmon-trout 5 inake a pudding thus; take a large eel, make it clean, fli( it open, take out the bone, and take all the meat clean from' the bone, chop it fine, with two anchovies, a little lemon peel cut fine,' a little pepper, and a grated nutmeg with parfley chopped, and a very little bit of thyme, a few crumbs of bread, the yolk of an hard egg choppedf fine; roll it up- in a piece of butter, and put it into the belly ofthe fiih, few it up, lay it in an oval flew-pan of liltle kettle that wiU juft bold it take

I t half



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. iS

half a pound of frei butter put.iUntp a fauce-pan, when it i$ melted fliake in a handful of flour, ftir it till it is a little brown, then poiur to it a pint of fifh -broth, fiir it together, pour it to the fi(k, whh a hottle of whitewine,' Seafon it with fait to your palace put fome mace, cloves, and wbole-pepper into a coarfe qnufi'in rag, tie it, put to the fiQx an onion, and a little bundle of weet herbs. Cover it .clofe, and let it ftew. very fofxJy jpver a flow fire, put in fome frefli muflirooms, or pickied ones cut fmall, an ounce of truffles and morels cut fmall; let them all ftew together; when it is enough, take up your falmon carefully,- lay it in your difh, and pour the fauce all over. Garnifli with fcrapd horferaddifb and lemon noichpiy ferve it up hot. This is a $ne difh.for.a fiift fouxfe.

Salmon in Cafes

CUT yOur falmon into little pieces, fuch as will lay rolled in half- fheets of paper Seafoi it with pbpper, falt and nut meg; butter the inside of the paper weli fold the paper fo as nothing can come out, then lay them on a tinpate to be baked, pour a little melted butter oyer the' papers, and then crumbs of bread all over them. Do not let your oven be too hot, for feat pf burning the paper. A tin oven before the 'fire dc?es beft. When you think they are enough, ferve them up juft as they are. There will be fauce enough in the papers; or put the alffion in buttered papers only, and broil them.

'To drefs Flat Fijh.

IN dreffing all forts of flat-fifb, take great care in the boiling of them; be fure to have them enough, but do not tt. them bo Woke; mind to put a good deai of fait in, and horfc-raddifli in the water, let yourfiQi be well drained, and mind to cut the fins off. 'When iou U them, let them be well drained in a cloth, and floured, and fry them of a fine light brown, either in oil or butter. If xhexe be any ater in your diih with the boiled fib, take it out with a fpunge. As to your fried fiil), coarfe cloth i& the heft thing to drain it on.

a

To dnfs Sali'FiJ.

OLD ling, which is the beft fort of falt-filh, lay in water fRtvz hours, then lay it twelve dours on a boardi, and then fwelve more 'in water. When you boil it, put it into the water cold; if it is good, it will take about fifteen ininutes boiling . jfoftly. Boil parihips vdty tender; fcrape them, and put them '"• ' N 4 ioto



lUiL









it4 THE ART OF COOKERY



intq 91 fauce-pan, put to them feme millet ftir them till chiclr then ftir in a good piece of butter, and a little fait; iivhen tfiey are enough lay them in a plate, the fllh by itffelf dry, nd butter and hard eggg chopped in a bafon.

As to watercod, that need only be boiled and well fktmmed

Scotch haddocks you mull lay in water all night You may

boil or broil them. If you broil, you muft fplit them in two.

You may garniib your dUhes with bard eggs and parfoips,

aind potoes.

THE heft of this fort of fi(h are taken in the river Severn; and, when they re in feafon, the && mongers and others in London have them from Gloucefter. But if you are where ey are tp be had frefli, you may drefs them as you pleafe.

To fry Lampnys

BLEEP them and fave the blood, then wafh them in hot water to take ofF the flime, and ctit them to pieces. Fry them in a little freih butter not quite enough, pour out the fat put m a little white- wine, give the pan a make round, ftafon it with whole pepper, nutmeg, fait, fweet herbs ind a bay-leaf, put irx 9 few capers, a good piece of butter rolled up in flour, and the blood; give the pan a (hake round often, and cover them clofe. When you think they are enough take them .out, ftratn the fauce, then give them a boil quick, fqueeze in a little lemon and pour over the fifli. Garnim with lemonc and drefs them juft what way you fancy.

To pitcbcock Et!s.

TAKE a large eel, and fcour it well with fait to clean oflF all the flime; then flit ii down the back, take out the bone,' and cut it in three or four pieces; take the yolk of an egg and put over the infide, fprinkle crumbs of bread, with fome fweet herbs and parfley chopped very fine, a little nutmeg grated, and fome pepper and fait, mixed all together; then . put it on a gridiron over a clear fire, broil it of a fine light, brown, di(b it up, and garnifh with raw parfley and horfe raddiih; or put a boiled eel in the middle, and the pitch cocked round. Garni(h as above with anchovy- fauce and parfley and butter in a Ifott



r



i



MADE PLAIN AND EASYw



h



MAKE tfaem very dean, cut them ifito pttt% Ibfon ttiem with pepper and fait, ftoitr thenfi and ffy thefM In butted Let your fattce be plain butiM melted. With th jwteC fcmon. Be fttre they be well drained from tb6 fat before you by them in the diih.

To broil Eels.

TAKE a large eel, fkin it and make it clean. .Open the beUy, cut it in four pieces; take the tail dnd, flrip oS ihe lefli, beat ft in a mortar, feafon it with a little beaten roace, ai Uttk grated nvtmeg, pepper and fait, a little parfley and thyme a ihde km'on-peef, an equal .quantity of crumbs of breads roil it in a litde piece of butte; then mix it again with tho yc4k cf an egg, roll it p again, and fill the three pieces of bdty with it. Cut the (Idn of the eel wrap the pieces tn and few op the flan. Broil them well, have butter and an anchery for iauce, with the juice of Ijcmon. Or you may twa tbtoi round, and nni a (kewer through them, and broil thent nhole

To farce Eels whh WhiU Sauce.

SKIN and cln your eels well, pick ofF alh the fle£h cleaa from the bone, which you muft leave whole to the head. . Take the flelb, cut it (mall and beat it in a iportar; then take hal the quantity of crumbs of bread, beat it with the fifh, feafon it with nutmeg and beaten pepper, an anchovy, a good deal o parfley chopped fine, a few truffles boiled tehder in a very little water, chop them fine, put tticm into the mortar with the li- quor and a few mufbrooms: beat it well together, mix in a little cream, then take it out and mix it well together in your hand, lay it round the bone in the fliape of the eel, lay it on a buttered pan, drudge it welt with fine crunks of bread, find bake it. Wben it is done, lay it carefully in your dift; hav ready half a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of frefli but ter, ftir it one way till it is thick pour it over your cels and garnifli with lemoh

To drefs Eels with Brown Sauce

SKIN and clean a large eel very well, cut it in pieces, ptit it into a fauce-pan or ftew-pan, put to it a quarter of a pint of

water, a bundle of fwcct lierbs an onioo fomc whole pepper, a

blade



Ofk THE A
11? OF COOKERY

blade of mace, and a little fait. Cover it clofe, and when -it begins to fimmer, put in a gili of red v(rine, a fpoonful of muihrooin- pickle, a piece of butter, as big as a walnut rolled in flour: cover it dofe, apd let jt w till it is enough, which you will koQW by jthe eel Mng very tender. Take up your eeL y it in a difli, firain your fauce, give ita )coiil fiuick, and pour it over your fifl). You muft make fauce according t the largenefs of your eel more or lefs. Garniih with lemon.

To roaji a Pw tf frifb Sturgfop.

GET a piece of frefli fturgeon, of about eight or ten poufuf,' ct it lay in water'and faltfix or eight hours, with its fcales on ithen faften it 'on the fpit, and baAe it well with butjter for i quarter of an: hour, then with a little flour, grate a numjeg all over it, a little mace and pepper beaten fine, and fait thrown over it, asd a few fweet herbs dried and powdered fine, and iben crumbs of bread; then keep bailing a little, apd .drudg4 ing with crumbs of bread, and with what fal)s from it til it it enough. In the mean time prepare thi fauce: take' a pin% of water, inanchovy, a little piece of lemon- jpeel, an onion, bundle of fweet herbs, mace, cloves, whole pepper black an4 white, a little piece of borfe-raddifh: cover (fclofe, let rt boil a quarter of aii npur, then ftrain it, put it into the fauce-pah again, pour in a irtit of white wine about a dozen oyfters and the liquor, two fpoonfuls df catchup, two of walrtut-pickle,' the infide 6f a crab brdift fine, 6V lobfter, ftiritiips, or prawn,a good piece of butter rolled in flour, Wfpooriful of mufhroomi'' pickle, or juide of lemon. Boil it alltogcther; vyrhch your 6(h is ejiough, lay it in your difli and pour the fauce over it Garniih with fried toafls and lemon. " ' . c .

To roaf a Fillet or Collar of Sturgeon •

; TAKE a piece of frefli' fturgeon, fcalc.it, gut it, take out the bones, and cut it in. lengths abopt ftven or eight inches; then provide fome (brimps and oy(
ers chopped fmall,' an equal quantity of crumbs of brea, and little iemonpeel grated fome nutmeg, a little beaten mace, a little pepper and chopr ped parfley, a few fweet herbs, an anchovy, mix it together; when it is done, butter one fide of ydur fifli, and (Irew fome of your mixture upon it; then begjn to roll it p as clofe as
cpflible, and when th% firfi piece is rolled up, roll upon thac another, prepared in the fame manner, and bind it round wltl

a narrow



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 187

p airrow fillet, leaving ts much of the fi(b apparent as ina
r be; but you muft mind that the roll is not above fpur inches and a half thick, or clfc one part will be d6ne before the infide is warm; therefore we often parboil the infide roll before we roll it. When ' it is enough, lay it in your diih, and prepare ice as above Garnifli with lemon.

To boil Sturgeon

CLEAN your fturgeon, and prepare as much liquor as will juft boil it. To two quarts of water, a pint of vinegar, a ftick of hbrfe-raddifh, two or three bits of lemon-peel, fome whole pepper, a bay-leaf, add a fmall handful of fait. Boi your fiih in ibis, and ferve it wfth the following fauce: melt a pound of butter, diilblve an anchovy in it, put in a blade or two of mice, bruife the body of a crab in the butter, a few ihrimps or craw-fiih, a little catchup, a little lemon-juice; give it a boil, drain your fiih well, and lay it in 'your diih. Garniih with fried oyfters, fiiced lemon, and fcraped horfe-raddiihs
cour your fauce into boats or bafons. So you may fry it, ra.. goo it, or bake it.

To crimp Cod the Dutch TVaj. .

TAKE a gallon of pump-water and a pound of fait, mix them well together; take your cod whilft alive, and cut it in ilices of one inch and a half thick, thrbw it into the fait and water for half an hour; then take it out aq dry it well with a clean cloth, flour it and broil it: or have a ftew-pan with' fome pump-water and fait boiling, put in your fi(b, and boil it quick for five, minutes; fend oyfter- fauce, anchovy fauce, Arimp-fauce, or what fauce you pleafc. Garniih with horferaddifli and green parfley.

To Crimp Scate

CUT it into long flips crofs-ways, about an inch broad, and put it into fpring water and fait, as above; then have fpring-wter and fait boiling, put it in, and boil itiifceea mi nutes. Shrimp fauce, or what fauce you like.

To fricafey Scale or Thornhack white.

CUT the meat clean from the bone, fins, &c. and make it very clean. Cut it into little pieces, about an inch broad, and two inches long lay it in your ftew-pan. To a pound of the

flcfli



I



rJ THE ART OF COOKERY

IMh Mt ft qtmrter of a pint of vater, i little beaten ft)dce, and raitd'nitneg, a little bundle of ftreet herbs, and a little fait; ' lotr it and kt it boil fifteen mintites. Take one the fweet iNrrbi, tot iri a quarter df a pint of gdod eream, a piece of batter as big as ai walftut rolled in fldur, a glafs of wtiite wine, keep fhaking the pan all the while one way till it is tbiek and fmooth; then difix it up, and garni(h with lemon.



• TortcaJiy.U brown.

TAKE your fifli as above, flour it, and fry it of a fine brown, in freih butter; then take it op, lay it before the fire to keep warm, potir the fat out of the pan, fliake in a little flour, and mrith a fpooa flir tA a piece of butter as big as an egg; fltr it rouad tiU it t well mixed in the pan, then pour in a quarter of a pint of water ftir it round, fliake in a very little eatcn pepper a little beaten mace; put in an onion, and a little bundle of fweet herbs, an anchovy, &ake it round and let it boil; then poor in a qusirter of a pint of fed wine, a fpoonful of ca-tcbvrp, a litliejvice of lemon, (lir it all together, and let it boil. When it is enough, take out the. fweet herbs and onion, and put in the fi(h to heat. Then di(h it up, and gar tkifh with lemon. .

Ta fficafey Seals tohHi.

SKIN, wa(h, and cut your foals very clean, cut oflF their Heds, dry them in a cloth, then with your knife very carefully cut the flefh from the bones and fins on both fides. Cut the ftelb long-ways, and then acro&, fo tbat each foal will be in eight pieces: take the heads snd bones, then pot them into a fauce-pan with a pint of water, a bundle of fweet herbs, an onion, a Tittle whole pepper, two or three blades of mace, a little fait, a very little piece of lemon- peel, ind a Uttle cruft of bread. Cover it clofe, let it boil till half is wafted, then ftrain it through a fine fieve, put it into a ftewpaii, put in the (bala and half a pint of White wine, a little parfley chopped fine, a ttvi muftrooms cut fmall, a piece of butter as big as a hen's egg rolled in flour, grate in a little nutmeg, fet all together on the fire, but keep fliaking the pan all the while till the fiih is enough. Then difli it up, and garnifli with lemon.

To fricafiy Soals brawn,

CLEANSE and cut your fozls, boil the watfer as In the foregoing receipt, flour your fift, ancf fry Acm in flrelb butter o

a fine



MADE PLAIN ANP EASY 499

a fine light brown. Take the fleih ccf a fwiall fpal boat it

a oDortar, with a piece pf bread &s big as an hen's egg fQaked.in

creaiB, the yolks of two hard gs, and a little mdted butteri a

little bit of thyme, a Httle parfley, an anchovy, (pafoa it with

nutmeg, mix all tctber with the yolk of a raw egg aod vitiith

a little flour, roll it up into little balls and fry them, bMt not

top much Then lay youi fi(h and balls before the fire, pour

out all the fat of the pan, pour in the liquor which is boiled

with the fpice and herbs, fiir it round in the pan, then put in

balf a pint of red wine, a few truffles and morels, a few mulb-

roomSf a fpoonful of catchup, and the juice of half a fmali le-

wfkon. Stir in all together and let it boil, then ftir in a piece of

butter rolled in flour ftir it round, when your fauce is of a

fine'thicknefs put in your fi(h and balls, and when it is hot

diih it up, put in the balls, and pour your fau.ce pver ir

Garniih with lemon. In the fame manner drefs a fmU tun-

bat. Or any flat fifh.

To boil Soals.

TAKE a pair of foals, make them clean, lay them in vini?-' gar, fait and water two hours; then dry them in a cloth, put them into a ftew-pan, pt to them a pint of white wine, a bun die of fweet herbs, an oniop ftupk with fix cbves, fome wboje pepper, and a little fait; cover them, nd let them boil. When they are enough, uke them up, lay them m your diO?t firaio the liquor, and thicken it i
p with butter and flour Pour the fauce over, and garnifh with fcraped borfec-raddi and leaKcn. In this manner drefs a little turbot. It is a genteel di(h for fupper. You may add prawis, or 4u:inipS
or mufcles to the fauce,

Jnother W ' M Soak

TAKE three quarts of fpring- water, and a bandul q( MU let it boil; then put in your foals, boil thm gently fir minutes; then difli them up in a cleaosapkiO) with aftQhpyyfauce, or l)
rimp-f;iiice, ii
boats.

To naha Collar of Fifi in Ragoo to look lifi a le of TW

colarf4.

TAKE a large eel, fkin it, wafli it clean, and fJarboi it pick'off the fleih, and. beat it in a mortar; feafonJt with beateii maoe, nutAcgy pepper, ialt, afcw.fweahcibs, paifleyc, andia



i90 HE ART OP COOKERY

little lemon-peel chopped rmall; beat all well together with m equal quantity of crumbs of bread; mix it well together, then take a turbot, foals, fcate, or thornback, or any flat fifh that will roll cleverly. Lay the flat fifli on the drelTe, take away all the bones and fins, and cover your fifli with the farce; thea roll it up as tight as you can, and open the fkin of your ee), and bind the collar with it nicely, fo that it may be flat top and bottom, to ftand well in the difli; then butter an earthen difli, and fet it in upright; flour it all over, and (lick a piece of butter on the top and round the edges, fo that it may run . down on the fifh; and let it be well baked, but take great care it is not broke. Let there be a quarter of a pint of water in the difh.

In the mean time take the water the eel was boiled in, andl A the bones of the fi(h. Set them on to boil, feafon them with mace, cloves, black and white pepper, fweet herbs, an onion. Cover it clofe, and let it boil till there is about a quar ter of a pint; then (train it, add to it a few truffles and morels, a few muihrooms, two fpoonfuls of catchup, a gill of red wine a piece of butter as big as a large walnut rolled in flcmr. Stir ' all together, feafon with fait to your palate: ifave fome of the farce you make of the eel, and mix with the yolk of an egg, and roll them up in little balls with flour, and fry them of a light brown. When your fiflx is enough, lay it in your di(b, ikim all the fat ofithe pan, and pour the gravy to youi fauce. Let it all boil together till it is thick; then pour it over the roll, and put in your balls. Garnifli with lemon.

This does beft in a tin oven before the fire, becaufe then yott can bafte it as you pleafe. This is a fine bottom diib.

. To butter Crabs or Loblers.

TAKE two crabs or lobfters, being boiled, and cold, take all the meat out of the fliells and bodies, mince it fmallj and put it all tojgether into a fauce- pan i add to it a glafs of white wine, two fpoonfuls of vinegar, a nutmeg grated, then let it .boil up till it is thorough hot. Then have ready half a pound of frefli butter, melted with an anchovy, and the yolks of two eggs beat up 'and mixed With the butter; then mix crabs and butter all together, ihaking the fauce-pan conftantly round till it is c)uitehot. Theii have ready the great hell, either of a crab or lobfter j lay it in the middle of your di(h, pour fome into the (hell, and the reft' in little faucers round the helt„

fticking



kADE ILAJN AND EASY. igt

kicking thrcecorncT toafts bilWcen the faucert, avd round the ibell. This is a fine fide-difli at a fecond courfe.

To htttter Lobfters another Way.

• ' ?

PARBOIL your lobfters, then break the ihellspicj; out alf the meat, cut it fmalU take the meat out of the body, mix it fine with a fpoon in a little white wine; for example, a fmali lobfter, one fpoonful of wine; put it into .a fauce-pan with the meat of the lobfter, four fpoonfuls of white wine, a blade of inace, a little beaten pepper and fait. Let it (lew all together a few minutes, then Air in a piece of butter, (hake your faucepan round till your butter is melted, put in a fpoonful of vine- gar, and ftrew in as many crumbs of bread as will make it thick enough. When it is hot, pour it into your plate, and garniih with the chine of a lobfter cut in four, peppered, fait ed, and broiled. This makes a pretty plate, or a fine difl), with two or three lobfters. You may add one tea-fpoonful of fine fugar to your fauce.

7i roaji Lohftert.

BOIL your lobfters, then lay them before the fire, and bafte them with butter, till they have a fine froth. Difli them up with plain melted butter in a cup. This is as good a way to the full as roafting them, and not half the trouble.

To male a fine Dijb of Lobjiers.

TAKE three lobfters, boil the largeft as above, and froth it before the fire. Take the other two boiled, and butter them as in the foregoing receipt. Take the two body (hells, heat them hot, and fill them with the buttered meat. Lay the large lobfter in the middle, and the two (hells on each fide; and tha two great claws of the middle lobfter at each end; and the four pieces of chines of the two lobfters broiled, and laid on each end. This, if nicely done, makes a pretty difh.

To drefs a Crab.

HAVING taken out the meat, and cleanfed it from the (kiflt put it into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of white wine, a little nutmeg, pepper, and fait over a flow fire. Throw in a few crumbs of bread, beat up one yolk of an egg with one fpoonful of vinegar, throw it in, then (hake the faucepan round a minute, and ferve it up on a plate.

T$



.;m THE ART OF COOKERY

'T ftfuc Prawnfy Shrimpy ar- CrawPiJi

PICK out the tails, lay them by, about two quarts; take the bodies, give them a bmifc auid put them into a pint of white wine, with a bUde of mace; let them ftew a quarticr of an hour, ftir them together, and ftrain them; then wafli ojiit the faucC'opan, put to it the ftrained liquor and tails: grate a fmali nutmeg in, add a little fait, and a quarter of a pound of butter rolled in tour: ftake it all together cut a pretty thin foaft round a quartera loaf, toaft it brown en both fides, cut it into fix pieces, lay it clofe together in the bottom of your diib, and pour your iUh and fiiuqe over it. Send ft to table hot. If it be craw-fifh or prawQSy garoifh your difli with fome of the biggeft claws laid thick round. Water will do in the room, of

wine, only add a fpoooful of vinegar

?

PUT your oyfters into fcollop-ihells for that purpofe. Set them on your gridiron over a good clear fire, let them flew till you think your oyflers are enough, then have ready feme crumbs of bread rubbed in a clean napkin, fill your Ihells, and fet them before a good fire, and bade them well with butter. XiCt them be of a fine brown, keeping them turning, to be brown all over alike; but a tin oven does them beft beore the fire. They eat much the befl done tbie way, though moft people ftew the oyfters firft in a fauce pan with a blade of mace, thickened with a piece of buUer, and fill the (hells, and then cover them with crumbs, and brown them with a hot iron; but the bread bat not the fine tafte of the former.

7a ft€Vc Mifcks.

WASH them very ckan from the faiid in two or three wa ters, put them into a ftew-pan, cover them c!lofe, and let them flew tin ail the (hells are qccned; then take them out one by one, pick them out of the (hells, and look under the tongue to fee if there be a crab; if there is, you muft throw away the mufcle; fome will only pick out the crab, and eat the mufde. When you have picked them ail clean, put them into a fauce pan: to a quart of mufcles put half a pint of the liquor flraia • •d thMcugh a fieve, put in a blade or two of mace, a piece of butter as big as a large- walnut rolled in flour; let them flew: iMift fome bead brown, and lay them round the di(h, cut three coraer-wayti pour in the mufcles, and (end them to table hot.

Amtbff



MADEPLAIN AND EASV.



93



. Jnoibir, ffff.ip kfv Mucles.

CLEAN' and ftcw yotif muftles as in the foregoing receipt, rmy to a quart of mtifcks puttn pint of liquor, and a quar ter of a pond of butter roIl(f in a very little flour. When tbey are enough, have fome crumbs of breid ready, and cover the bottom of your di(h thick, grate half a nutmeg over them, and pour theinufcles and fauc ail over the crumbs, and fend hem to tabte;- " '

t

A third Way to drefs MufcUt.

STEW them as above, and lay them inyour dUh v ftrevir yout crunibs of bread thick all over them, tHen fet tVem before a gobd fire, tumrng the difli round and round, that they tnay be brown all alike. Keep bafting them with butter, that the crumbs may be ctifp and it will make a pretty fide-diih. You may do cockles the fame way.

To Jlew Scollops,

BOIL them very well in fait and water, take them out and fiew them in a little of the liquor, a little white wine, a little vinegar, two or three blades of mace, two or three cloves, a piece of butter rolled in flour, and the juice of a Seville orange. Stew them well, and dlQi them up.



c . '



To ragoo Oyfiers,

TAKE a tqaart of the largeft oyfters yoti can get, open them, f!ijthe4tqttor aa4 ftfain it thrtcugh a fine fieve; wafh yotir (Qif fters lift yarm water. Makife a batter thus: take two yolks ef gg$,: Hat them Welt, gmtt In half a nutieg, cut a little lemon-pbel fmaH, a good detfl of parfley, a' fpooftful of the juice .of fjpijiach, two fpooAfiris tcf ereaiti r thilk, beat it up ith flour vto a thick batter; have ready fome buttei' in- a ftew-pai), dip your oyflers one by one into the halter, and have ready crumbs of bread, then rdll them in it, and fry them quick and brown; fome with the- crumbs of bread, and fc9me without. Take tbein Oilt of the pan, dknd fet them before thtt fire; then havereiy qiiaet of chefhuts ihellcd and' fkikmed, fry them in Che butter; when they are enough tskethem up, pour the .fat out of the pan, Aakr a Iktleflcrufall'over the pan, nixl rub a pece of butter as big aka hen's egg all over the pan with your fpoon, till it is melted and thick; then pt in the oyfter

O liquor



194 THE ART OF COOKERY

liquor tbree or four blades of mace, ftir it round, put in a feW piflacbionuts flielled, let them boil, then put in the chefnuts, and half a,pint of white wine, have ready the yolfcs of twa eggs beat up with four fpoonfuU of cream; fiir all well together. When it is thick and £ne, lay the oyfters in the di&, and pour the ragoo over them Garnilh with chefnuts and lemon.

You may ragoo mufcles the fame way. You may leave out the piftachionuts, if you do not like them but they give the fauce a fine flavour. '

To ragoo Endive

TAKE fome fine white endive, three heads, lay them in fait and w&ter two or three hours ', take a hundred of afparagus, cut off the green heads, chop the reft fmall, as far as is tender; lay it in fait and water; take a bunch of celery, wa(h it and fcrape it clean, cut it in pieces about three inches long, put it into a fauce- pan, with a pint of water, three or four blades of mace fome whole pepper tied in a rag, let it ftew till it is quite ten der; then put in the afparagus, (hake the fauce-pan, let it fimtner till the grafs is enoughs Take the endive out of the water drain it, leave one large head whole, the other leaf by leaf, put it into a ftew-pan, put to it a pint of white wine; cover the pan clofe. Jet it boil till the endive is juft enough, then put in a quarter of a pound of butter rolled in flour, cover it clofe, (baking the pan. When the endive is enough, take it up, lay the .whole head in the middle, and with a fpoon take out the celery and grafs and lay round, the other part of the endive over that; then pour the liquor out of the fauce-pan into the ftew-pan, ftir ic together, feafon it with fait, and have ready the voUs of two eggs, beat up with a quarter of a pint of cream, and half a nutmeg grated in. Mix this with the fauce, keep it flirring all one way till it is thick; then pour it over your ragoo, and fend it to table hot.

To ragoo Fnnch Beam,

TAKE a few beans, boil them tender f then take yout ftew-

pan, pttt4fira pteeof butter, whei it is melted Ihake in ibme

flour, and peel a large onion, cflice it, and fry it brown in that

butter; then put in the beans, (hake in a little pepper and a

little fait, grate a little nutmeg in, have ready the yolk of an

egg and ibme cream ftir tbem all together for a minute or two

.and diih them up.,

To



MADE-PLAIN AN'D EASY. 195

To mah good Brown Gravy.

TAKE half a pmt of fmall beer, or afe that is not bif ter, and half a pint of water an onion cut fmallj a little bit of lemonpeel cut fmall, three cloves, a blade of mace, fome whole pepper, a fpoonful of muChroom-pickle, a fpoonful of walnutpickle, a fpoonful of catchup, and an anchovy; firft put a piece of buttfer into a fauce-pan, as big as a hen's eggj when it is melted feake in a little flour, and let it be a little brown; then by degrees ftir in the above ingredients, and let it boil a quarter of an hour, then ftraia it, and it is fit for fifli or roots.

To frkafey Slirreii.

WASrt the roots very well, and boil them till they are tender; then the (kin of the roots muft be taken off, cut in (lices, and have ready a little cream, a piece of butter rolled in flour the yolk of an egg beat, a little nutmeg grated, two or thjee, fpoonfuls of white wine, a very little fait, and ftir all together. Your roots being in the difh, pour the fauce ovef them. It is a pretty fidc-difli. So likcwifc you may drefs root of falfify and fcorzoara.

Cbardoons fried and huttered.

YOU muft cut them abou fix inches long, and firing them j then boil them till tender; take them out, have fome butter mdted in your ftew-pan, flour them, and fry them brown i fend them in a difli with melted butter in a cup. Or you may tie them up in bundles, and boil them like afparagus put a toaft under them, and pour a little melted butter over them; or cut them into dice, and boil them like peas: tofs them up in butter and fend them up hot. •

Chardoons a la Fromagn

AFl'Ek they are ftringed, cut them an inch long, ftew them in a little red wine till they ate tender; feafon with pepper and fait, and thicken it with a piece of butter rolled in flour; then ipour them into your difh, fqueeze the juice of orange over it, then fcrape Parmefan or Chefhire cheefe all over them; then brown it with a Cheefe-iron, and felrve it up quick and hot.

O 2 To



196,TH£ ART OF COOKERY -

Tf maii a Scotch RaUit.

TOAST a piece of bread ipery njceiy on both fides, butte it, cut a flice of cheefe about as big as the bread toaft it oft both fidcsj and lay it on the bread.

To mate a Wikb Rabbit.

TOAST the bread on both fides, then toaft the cheefe ott one fide, lay it on the toaft, and with a hot iron brown thr other fide. You may rub it over with muftard.



To make an Englijh Rabbit,

TOAST a flice of bread brown on both fide, then -lay it in a plate before the fire, pour a glafs of red wine over it, and let it foak the wine up; then cut fome cheefe very thin, and lay it very thick over the bread, and put it in a tin oven before thd fire, and it Will be toafted and browned prefently. Servd it away hot.

Or Af it thus.

TOAST the bread, and foak it in the winej fct it before the fire, cut your cheefe in very thin dices, rub butter over the bottom of a plate, hy the chede on, pour in two or three fpoonfuls of white wine, cover it with another plate, fet it over a. chafing- difii of hot coals for two or three minutes; then ftir it till it is done and well mixed. You may ftir in a little muftard; when it is enough lay it on the breads uft brown it"' with a hot OioveL Serve it away hot.,

Sorrel with Eggs,

FIRST your forrel muft be quite boiled and well frained, then poach three eggs 6% and three hard, butter your forrel well; fry fome three cornered toafts brown, lay the. forrel in the ciiih, lay the fott eggs on it, and the hard between; fticfc the toaft in and about ic. Garnifh with quartered orange.

A Fricajty of Artkhoks -Bottoms.

TAKE them either dried or pickled j if dried, you muft lay them in w::rm v;atcr fofr three or four hours, (hiftin2 the water two or three times; then have ready a little cream, and a piece of ficili butter itirred together oue way over the fire till it is-

8 melted c



MADE PLAIN AND gASY. 197

mAted; then put ia Che artichokes, and when they are hot idiBi them up.

V T'yb' 'Artichokes.

FIRST blahch theih in water, then flour theio, fry them iii frefii butter. Jay them in your difh, and pour melted butter over them. Or you may put a little red wine into the butteCt und feafon with nutmeg, pepper, and fait.

A White Fricafey of Mujhrooms

TAIE quart of freih mufhrooms, make them very clean, cut the largeft ones in two; put them in a ftew-pan with four fpoonfuls of water, a blade of mace, a piece of lemon peel; cover your pan clofe, and ftew them gently for half an hour % beat' up the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of cream, and a little nutmeg grated in it, take out the mace and lemon peel; put in the eggs and cream, keep it ftirpng one wray all the time till it is (hick, feafon with fait to your palate; fcjuees&e a little lemon-juice in, butter the cruft of a French roll, and toaft it brown; put it in your difli aiiid tlie rnuih rooms over.

. N. B. Be careful not to fqueeze the lemon juice in till they are finiihed, and ready to put in your difh; then fqeeze if in, and fiir them about for a minute,, then put them in your di(h.

' To make Buttered Loaves,

BEAT up the yolks of twelve eggs, with half the whites, and a quarter of a pint of yeail, drain them into a difh; feafon with fait and beaten ginger, then make it into a high pafte with flour, lay it in a warm cloth for a quarter of an hour; then make it up into little loaves, and bake them or boil them with butter, and put in a glafs of white wine. Sweeten well with fugar, lay the loaves in the di(h, pour the fauce om them, and throw fugar over the difh.

Broccoli and Egs

BOIL your broccoli tender, faving a large bunch for the middle, and fix or eight little thick fprigs to ftick round. Take a toaft half an inch thi(5k, toaft it brown, as big as you would have it for your difli or butterplate; butter fome eggs thus: J:ake fix eggs, more or lefs as you have occafion, beat them well put them into a fauce-pan with a good piece of butter, a

O I little







198 THE ART OF COOKERY

little fait, keqc beating tbem with a fpoon till they are thick enough, then pour them on the toaft: fet the biggeft bunch,of broccoli in the middle, ai:4 the other little pieces round and about and garniih the difli with little fprigs of broccoli, Thisi is a pretty fule'diih, or a corner-plate.

4fporagu% and Eggs.

TOAST a bit of bread as big as you have occafion for, butter it, and lay it in your difli $ butter fome eggs as above, and lay over it. In the mean time boil fome grafs tender cut it fmall, cand lay it over the eggs This makes a pretty fi(ediih fpr fecQnd courfe, or a porner-plate.

Broccoli in Sallad

BROCCOLI IS a pretty difh, by way of fallad in the mid die of a table. Boil it like afparagus (in the beginning of thebook you have an account how to clean it; lay it in your diib, beat up with ofl and vinegar, and a little fait, Garni with naftertium-buds.

Or boil it, and have plain butter in a cup. Or farce French rolls with it, and buttered eggs together, for change. Or farce your rolls with mufcles done the faoip Way as oyfterS
only no wine.

To mah Potatoe Cakes

TAKE potatoes, boil them, peel them, beat them in a morcr tar, mix them with the yolks of eggs, a little fack, fugar, s
little beaten mace, a little nutmeg, a little cream, or meltecj butter, work it up into a pafle; then make ic into cakes, or juft what ihapes you' pleafe with moulds,, fry them brown in freih butter, lay them in plates or dilbes nlt butter wit fack and fugar, and pour over them.

, jf Pudding tnade thus;

. MIX if 3s before, make it up in the fhape of a puddingy arid bke it pour butter, fack, nd fugar over it.

To make Potatoes like a Collar of Veal or Muttor

MAKE the ingredients as before; make it up in the (hapc pf a collar of veal, and with fome of it make round balls. Bake It with the bIIs fet the foliar in 'the middle, lay the

' bai



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 199

balls round. Let your (auce be half a pint of red wine, fugar enough to fweeten it, the yolks of two eggs, beat up a little nutmeg, ftir all thefe together for fear of curdling; when it is thick enough, pour it over the collar. This is a pretty diih for a firft or fecoad courfe.

To broil Poiatots.

FIRST boll them, peel them, cut them in two, broil them till they are brown on both Gdes; then lay then in the plate or diih, and pour melted butter over them.

To Jry Potatoes.

CUT them into thin flices, as big as a crown piece, fry them brown, lay them in the plate or di(h, pour melted butter, and fack and fugar over them. Thefe are a pretty cornerplate.

Majhtd Potatoes.

BOIL your potatoes, peel them, and put them into a faucepan, ma0i them well; to two pounds of potatoes put a pint of milk, a little fait; ftir them wel
together, take care they do not flick to the bottom; hen take a quarter of a pound qF but fer, ftir it iq, and ferve it up.

To grill Shrimps,

SEASON them with fait and pepper, (bred parfley, butter, ia fcollop-fhells well; add fome grated bread, and let them ftew for half an hour. Brown them with a hot iron, and ferve them up.

Buttered Shrimps

STEW two quarts of flirimps in a pint of white wine, with, nutmeg; beat up eight eggs. With a little white wine and half a pound of butter, (baking the fauce-pan one way all the time' over the (ire till they are thick enough. Lay toafted (ippets round a di(b, and pour them over it; (o ferve them up.

To drefs Spinach.

PICK and wa(h your fpinach well, put it into a faucepan, with a little fait. Cover it clofe, and let it ftew till it is ju(l tender; then throw it into a (ieve, drain all the liquor our,

0.4 and



20O THB ART OF COOKERY

Mid chop it.finalU 4s much.4 the quantity of a French mll' add kaU a pint of croam- lo it, fpafon with fait, peppec, and. grated Dutmeg pot in a quarter of a pound of buusr, and fer it a-ftewing over the fire a quartcrof an hour, ftirring it often. Cut a French roll iixto long pieces, about as thick as your fia ger,'fry them, poach fix eggs, lay them round on the fpinach, fticic the pieces of roU in and'alout the eggs. Serve it up either for a fupper, or a fide-difli at a fecgnd courfe.

Stewed Spinach and Eggs,

PICK and wa(h your fpinach very clean, put it into a faucepan, with a little fait; cover itclofe, (bake the pan often. When it is juft tender, and whilft it is greei throw it intq a fieve to drain, lay it into your dlQi In the mean time have a. ftew-pan of water boiling, break as many eggs into cups as you would poach. When the water boils put in the eggs, have an egg-flice ready to take them out with, lay them on the fpinach, and garniih the diib with orange cut iilto quarters, with raeIt-c cd butter in a cup,

7i boil Spinach when you have not Room on the Fire to do it By

itelf.

HAVE a tin-box, or any other thing that (huts very clofe, put in your fpinach, cover it fo clofe as no water can get in, and put it into water, or a pot of liquor, or any thing you are boiling. It will take about an hour, if the pot or copper boils. In the fame manner you may boil peas without water.

Afparagus forced in French Rolls.

TAKE three French rolls, take out all the crumb, by firft cutting a piece of the topcfuft off; but be careful that the cruil fits again the fame place. Fry the rolls brown in frfh butter; then take a pint of cream, the yolk of fix eggs beat fine, a little fait and nutmeg, ftir them well together over a fljw fire till it begins to be thick. Have ready a hundred of fmall grafs boiled; then fave tops enough to flick the rolls with, the refl cut fmall and put into the cream, fill the loaves with them. Before you fry the rolls, make holes thick in the topcrufl, ai4d flick the grafs in; then lay on the piece of cruft, and flick the grafs in, that it may look as if it were growing. It makes a pretty fiderdifh at a fecond courfe,

7i



MAPI PLAIN AND EASY. ton

. To mU Pjfttr Lo4tVfs ...

FRY the French rolls as above, take half a pint 6f oyftcrs ftew them iit their own liqucfr, then take out the oyftcrs with a fork, ftrain- the Ktjuor to them, put them into a fauce-pan again, with a glafs of white wine, a little beaten mace, a little grateci nutmeg, a quarter of a found of butter rolled in flour; (hake them well together, then put them into the rolls; and thfe make a pretty fide-di(h for a firft coarfe. You may rub in the crumbs of two rolls, and toft up with the oyftcrs'.

Tojitv Parnips.

BOIL them tender, fcrape th(;m from the duft, cut them into flices, put,them into a fauce-pan, with cream enough; for fauce, a piece of butter rolled in flour, a Httle fait, and Ihake the fiKc-pan onen. When the cream boils, pour them into a plate for a corner-difli or a fidecdi(h at fupper.

Tp majh Parfnip.

BOIL them',tcnder, fcrape them clean, then fcrape all the Toft into a fauce-pan, put ds much milk or cream as will dew them. Keep them ftirring, and when quite thick, ftir in a good piece of butter, and fend them to table.

To Jlew Cucumbers.

PARE twelve cucumbers, and fllce them as thick as a half, crown, lay them in a coarfe cloth to drain, and when they are dry, flour them and fry them brown in frefh butter; then take them out with an egg- fllce, lay them in a platje before the fire, and have ready one cucumber whole, cut a long piece out of the fide, and fcoop out all the pulp have ready fried onions peeled and fliced, and fried brown with the fliced cucumber. Fill the whole cucumber with the fried onion, feafon with pepper and ftlt; put on the iiece you cut out, and tie it round with a packthread. Fry it brown, firft flouring it, then take it out of the pan and keep it hot; keep the pan on the fire, and with one hand put in a little flour, while with the other you ftir it. When it is thick, put in two or three fpoohfu Is of water, and half a pintof white or red wine, two fpobnfuls of qatchup, ftir it together, put in three blades of mace, four cloves, half a nutmeg, a iirtie pepper and fait, all beat fine together ftir it into ' ' . the











202 THE ART OF COOKERY

Che fauce-pan, then throw iii your cucumbers, give them % tofs or two, then lay the wholei cucumbers in the middle, the reft round, pour the fauce all over untie the cucumbers before you lay it into the diCh. Garni£h the diOi with, fried onions, and fend it to table hot. This is a pretty fiderdtih at a firft courfc.

To ragoo French Beans.

TAKE a quarter of a peck of French beans, firing theoo, do not fplit them, cut them in three acroft, lay them in fait and water, then take them out and dry them in a coarfe cloth; fry them brown, then pour out all the far, put in a quarter of a pint of hot water, ftir it into the pan by degrees, let it boU i then take a quarter of a pound of fre(h butter rolled in a very little flour, two fpoonfuls of catchup, one fpoonfui of mufh room-pickle, and four of white wine, aonipn ftuck with fix cloves, two or three blades of mace beat, naif a nutmeg grated, a little pepper and fait; ftir it all together for a few minutes, then throw in the beans; (hake the pan for a minute or two, take out the onion, and pour them into your difh This is a pretty fide-difli, and you may garniih with vhat you fancy, either pickled French beans, muihrooms, famphire, or any thing elfe,

A Ragoo of BeanSy with a Force

R AGOO them as above; take two large carrots, fcrape and boil them tender, then mafh them in a pan, feafon with pepper and fait, mix them with a little piece of butter and the yolks' of two raw eggs. Make it into what fbape you pleafe, and baking it a quarter of an hour in a quick oven will do, but a tin oven is the heft; lay it in the middle of the difti, and th ra- goo round. Serve it up hot for a firft courfe.

OSr this Way J Beans ragooed with Cabbage

TAKE a nice little cabbage, about as big as a pint bafon when the outfide leaves, top and fialks are cut ofl, half boil it, cut a hole in the middle pretty big, take what you cut out and chop it very fine, with a few of the beans boiled, a carrot boiU ed and malhed, and a cturnip boiled; mafh all together, put them into a faucepan, feafon them with pepper, alt, and nutmeg, a good piece of butter, ftew them a few minutes over the fire, fiirring the pan often. In the mean time put the cabbage

ito



MADft PLAIN AND EASY. 203

into a faucepaii, but take great care it does not fall to pieces; put to it four fpoonfuls of water, two of wine, and one of catchup; have a fpoonful of mufhroom-pickle, a piece of butter rolled in a little flour, a very little pepper: cover it clofe, and let it ftew foftly till it is tender i then take it up carefully and lay it in the middle of the diih, pour your maihed roots in the middle to fill it up high, and your ragoo round it. You may add the liquor the cabbage was fiewed in, and (wi it to table hot. This will do for a, top bottom, middle, or fidedifli. When beans are not be had, you may cut carrots and turnips into little flices, and fry them; the carrots ia little round flices, the turnips in pieces about two inches long, and 9S thick as one's finger, and tofs them up in the ragoo

Bians raifoed with Parnips

TAKE two large carrnips, fcrape them clean, and boil them in water. When tender take tben up, fcrape all the foft into a &uce-pan, add to them foiir fpoonfuls of crem, a piece of butter as big as an hen's egg, chop them in a faucepan well; and when they are quite thick, heap them up in the middle of the diih nd the ragoo round.

Beans ragooedwitb Potatoes •

BOIL two pounds of potatoes Toft, then peel them, put them into a fauce-pan, put to them half a pint of milk, fiir them about, and a little fait; then ftir in a quarter of a pound of butter, keep fiirring all the time till it is fo thick that you cannot ftir the fpoon in it hardly for ftifFnefs, then put it into a halfpenny Welch djib, firft buttering the diih. Heap them as high as they will lie, flour them, pour a little melted butter over It, and then a few crumbs of bead. Set it into a tin oven before the fire; and when brown, lay it in the middle of the difh (take great care you do not mafh it), pour your fagoo ro;n4 itc ai)d fefid it to tble hot,

Tq ragQo CeUrj.

WASH and make a bunch of celery very dean, cut it in pieces, about two inches long, put it into a ftewpan with juft ?s much water as will cover it, ti three or four blades of mace, two or three cloves, about twenty corns of whole pepper in a niuilin rag loofe, put it into the ftew-pan, a little onion, a little bundle of fweet herbs coyer it clpfe aqd let it
lew foftly till

tender;



204 THE'AT OF COOKERY'

tender; then take out the fpice, onion, and fnret herbs, pvt in half anounee of truffles and morels, two fpoonfuls of catchup, a gin of red wine, a piece of butter as big as an egg rolled in flour, fixfarthrng French rolls, feafon with fait to your palate, ftir it all together, cover it clofe, and let it ftew till the fauce is thick and good. Take care that the roll do not break, ihake your pan often; when it is enough di(h it up, and garniih with lemon. The yolks of fix hard eggs, or more, put ki with the rolls, will make it a fine diih. This for a firft courfe

If )pou'wottld have it white, put in white wine inftcad. of ltd, and fome cream for a fecond courle.

To ragoo Mujhrooms

PEEL and fcrape the flaps, put a quart into a fauce-pan, a very little fait, fet them on a quick fire, let them boil up, then take them ofF, put to them a gill of red wine, a quarter of a pound of butter rolled in a little flour, a little nutmeg, a little beaten mace, kt it on the fire, flir it now and then; when it IS thick and fine, have ready the yolks of fix eggs hot, and boiled in a bladder hard, lay it in the middle of your diih, and pour the ragoo over it. Garnifh with broiled mufhrooms,

J pretty Dijb of Eggs. .

BOIL fix eggs hard, peel them, and cut them into thic flices, put a quarter of a pound of butter into the flew-pan, then put in your eggs and fry them quick. Half a quarter of an hour will do them. You mufl be very careful not to break them; throw over them pepper, fait, and nutmeg, lay theni in your difh before the fire, pour out all the fat, ftake ip a little flour, and have ready two fhalots cut fmall; throw them into the pan, pour in a quarter of a pint of white wine, .a ittc juice of lemon, and a little piece of butter rolled in flour. Stir all together till it is thick; if you have not fauce enough, put in a little more wine, toaft fome thin flices of bread cut three corner ways, and hy round yr.difli, pour the fauce all over, and fend it to table hot. You may put fwcet oil on the toafl. if it be agreeable

Eggs a la Tripe.

BOIL your eggs hard, take off the fhells and cut them longways in four quarters, put a little butter'into a fiew-pan, let it

melt,



MADE. PLAIN AND EASY. aos

melt, fliake in a little fiour ftir it with a fpOon then put itk your eggs,. throw.aJictle.gra nutsaeg all over a little fait, m good deal.of flired paritej; ihake your pan round, pour in a Uttle cream, toTs thepan round carefully, that you dd not break the eggs. When your fauce is thick. and fine, take up your eggs, pour the fauce all over them, and garni& with le mon.

jt Fricafey of £ggs,

BOIL eight eggs hard, take ofF the (belli, cut them into quarters, have ready half a pint of cream, and a quarter of a pound of frefb butter ( ftir it together over the fire till it is thick and fmooth, lay the eggs in the diib, and pour the fauce all over Garniib with the hard yolks of three eggs cut in two, and lay round the edge of the diib. c

J Ragoo of Eggs.

BOIL twelve eggs hard, take oflF the fbells, and with a little knife very carefully cut the white acrofs long- ways, fc that the white may be in two halves, and the yolks whole. Be careful neither to break the whites nor yoiks, take a quarter of a pint of pickled mulhrooms chopped very fine, half an ounce of truffles and morels, boikd in three or four fpoonfuls of water, fave the water, and. chop the truffles and morels very fmall, bail a little parQey,,chop it fine, mix them together with the truffle water you faved, gratp a little nutmeg in a little beaten mace, put it into a fauce-pan with three fpoonfuls of water, a gill of red wine, one'fpoonfulof catchup,, a piece of butter as big as a large walnut rollefl in flour, ftir all together, and let it boil. In the mean time get ready your eggs, lay the yolks and whites in order in your di&, the hollow parts of the whites uppernioft, that they may be 'filled J take fome ' crumbs of bread, and fry them brjown and crifp; as you do for larks, with which fill up the whites oi. the eggs as high as they will lie, then pour in youi: fauce all oer, and garnifh with firied crumbs of bread This is a very genteel pretty difb, if it be well done.

7S broil Eggs.

CUT a toafl round a quartern loaf, brown it, lay it on your dtfii, buttec it, and very caVefuQy break fix or eight eggs on the toafts and take a red-hat flovd, and hold over cfrem.

When







ao6 THE ART OF COOKERY

W hen thejr are done, fqueeee a Sevilk orange oei theni, grate a little putmeg over it, and ferve it up for a fideplace. Or yoa may poach your eggs, and lay them on a toafl
or toaft your bread crifp, and pour a littk boiling water over it $ fea&mwith a little fait, and then lay your poached eggs on iu

To drefi Eggs with Bread.

TAItE a penny loaf, foak it in a quart of hot milk twcr hours, or till the bread is foft, fhe drain it through a coarfe iieve, put to it two fpoonfuls of orange flour water, or rofe Water; fwecten it, grate in a little nutmeg, take a Httle difli butter the bottom of it, break in as many eggs as will cover the bottom of the di(fa, pour in the bread and milk, fet it in a tinovea before the fire, and half an t)our will bake it) it will do on a chafing- difh of coals. Cover it clofe before the fire or bake it in a flow oven.

To farce Eggs.

GET two cabbage-lettuces, fcald them, with a few mufh- rooms, parfley, forrel, and chervil; then chop, them very fmall, with the yolks of hard eggs, feafoned with fait and nutmeg; then ftew them in butter; and when they are enough, put in a little creiam, then pour them into the bottom of a di(h Take the whites, atnd thop them Very fine with parfley, nut meg, and fait. Lay this round the brim of the di(h, and ruii a red-hot fire (hovel over it to brown it4

Eggs with Lettuce

SCALD Tome cabbage lettuce in fair winter, fqueeze tbeni well, then flice them, and tofs them up in a faucepaa with a piece of butter; feafon them with pepper, fait, and a little nutmeg. Let them flew half an hour, chop them well to gether; when they are enough, 1 them in your di(b, fry ibme eggs nicely in butter and lay on them. Garoiih with Seville orange;

To fry Eggs as round as Balb.

m

HAVING a deep frying-pan, and three pints of clarified butter, heat it as hot ai for fritters, and ilir it with a flick, till it runs round like a whirlpool; then break an egg into the middk, and turn it round with your ftidc till it be as bard aa

a poached



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 207

•m po&cbed egg; the whtriing round of the butter will make it as round as a Mi, then take it op with a flice, and put it in a difli before the fire: they will keep hot half an hour and yet be ibft; fo you may do as many as you pleafe. You may ferve thefe with what you pleafe, nothing better than ftewed fpinach, and garnifh with orange.

To mah an Egg as hig as twaity:

PART the yolks from the whites, ftrain them both feparate through. a fieve, tie the yOlks up in a bladder in the form of a ball. Boil them hard then put this ball into another bladder, and the whiter round.it; tie it up oval fjfbion, and boil it. Thefe are ufed for grand fallads. This is very pretty for a ragoo, boil fi?e or ux yolks together, and lay in the middle of the ragoo of eggs; and fo you may make them of any fize you pleafe.

Ti mate a grand Dtjh of Eggs.

YOy muft break as many eggs as the volks will fill a pint bafon, the whites by themfelves, tie the yolks by themfelves in a bladder round, boil them hard: then have a wooden bowl that will hold a quart, made like two butter difhes, but in the fhape of an egg, with a hole through one at the top. You are to obferve, when you boil the yolks, to run a packthread through, and leave a quarter of a yard hanging out. When the yolk is boiled hard, put itint6 the bowl-difli but be careful to hang it fo as to be in the middle. The firing being drawn through the hole, then clap the two bowls together, and tie them tight, and with a funnel pour in the whites through the hole; then ftop the hole cjofe and boif it hard. It will take an hour. When it is boiled enough carefully open it, and cut the ftring clofe. In the mean time take twenty eggs, beat them well,, the yolks by themfelves, and the whites by themfelves; divide the whites into two, and boil them in bladders the fhape of. an egg. When they are boiled hard, cut one in two long- ways, and one crofs- ways, and with a fine fharp knife cut out fome of the white in the middle; lay the great egg in the middle, the two long halves on each fide wi the hollow part uppermoft, and the two round flat between. Take an ounce of tru£fles and morels, cut them very fmall, boiltheni in half a pint of water all they are tender, then take a pint of frefh mufhrooms clean picked, wafhed, and chopped fmall, and

9 put



%G9 THE A&T OF COOlfRY

put into the Oruffles and morels, htt tfaem boU add a lUttci fait, a liittl, beaten autmeg, a little beaten ma a gill of pick led flokv&rootns chopped fine. Boil fix teen of the yoljcs bard jn a bladder, then chop them and mix tbet witb the other ixii- • gredients; thicken it with a lump of butter- foiled In floAir, fliaking your fauce-pan round ill hot s(nd thick, then iilLthie round with this, turn them down again, and fill the two long ones; what remains, fave to put kito the fauce-pan. Take a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of l)utter,, the other fouC yolks beat fine, a gill of tvhilc wine, a gill of pickled muili- rooms, a tittle beaten mace,, and a little nutmeg putc all into the fauce-pan to the ojther ingredients, and ftir all well.together one way till it is thick and fine;, pouf it over all and garnifll with notched lemon

This is a gtand difh at a fecond courTe. JCir yoii may mix it upiieith red wine and butter, and it will db for a firfl courfe.

4

To maii a pritty dljb f Jfhites afMggS'

. TAKE the whites of twelve eggs, beat them, up fsfithfoui fpoonfuls of rofe water, a little grated lemonpeei, a little nu&meg, and fweeten with fugar; mix them well, c4coil them in four bladders, tie them inthe fhiape of an egg, and boil them hard. They will take half an hour. Lay them in your difh 5 when cold, mix half a pint of thick cream, a gill of fack, and half the juice of a Seville orange, Mi all tQgether, fweeten with fine fugar, and pour over the egos. Serve it up for a fide-diih at fupper, or whei you pleafe.-

- • •

To drefs Bans in Ragoo.

YOU muft boil your beans fo that the ikins will flip oflf" Take about a quart, feafon them with pepper, fait, and nutmeg, then flour them; have ready feme butter in' a ftew-pan, throw in your beans, fry them of a fine brown, then drain them from the fat, and Jay them in your difh. Have ready a quarter of a pound of butter melted, and half a pint of blanched beans boiled, and beat in a mortar, with a very little pepper, fait, and nutmeg; then by degrees mix them in the butterj and pour over the other beans. Garnifh with a boiled and fried bean, and To on till you fill the rim of your difh. They are very good without frying, and only plain melted butter over them.



HADE PLAIN AND EASY. 309

An Amulet of Beanu

BLANCH your beanS) and fry them ia Aireet cutter, with A little parfley, pour out the butter, and pour in fome creamLet it fiotmer, (haking your pan feafoQ with pepper, fait, and nutmegs thicJIcen with three or four yolks of eggs, have ready, a pint of cream, thijclned with the yolks of four eggs, ieafoh with a little falt pour it in your difli, and lay your beans on the amulet, and ferve it up hot,

Tbc &me. way you may drefs mu&rpoms, truffles, green peas, aiparagtts, and artichoktbotoms, fpinach, forrel, &c; all being rft cut into fmall pieces, or fhred fine.

To ptaii a Bean Tanfey. .

. TAKE two quarts of beans, blanch and beat them very fine 10 a niortar; ieafon With pepper, talt, and mjice; then put in the yoflts of fix gs, and a quarter of a pound of butter, a pint of cream, half a pint of fack, and fweeten lxc your palate. Soak four Naples bi&uits in half a pint of milk, mix them with the otbef ingredients, half a pint of the juice of fpinach, with two or three fprigs of tanfey beat with it. Butter a pan, and bake it, then turn it on a di(h, and ftick citron and orange-peel candied, cut fmall, and jftuck about it. GarniQi With Seville orange.

' To make a Water Tanfey.

TAKE twelve eggs, beat them very well, half a manchet grated, and fifted through a cullender, or half a penny roll, half a pint of fair water; colour it with the juice of fpinach, and one fmall iprig of tanfey beat together (eafon it with fu-gar to your palate, a little fait, a fmall ilutmeg grated, two or three fpoonfuls of rofe water, put it into a (killer, ftir it all one way, and let it tjiicken liie a hafiypudding then bake it; or you may butter a ftew-pan and put it into. Butter a difli, and lay over it. When one fide is enough, turn it with the di(h, and flip the other fide into the pan. When thaf is done, fet it into a maflereeU) throw fugar all over aud gariiifh with orange.

Peas Franfotfe.

TAKE a quart of ihelled peas, cut a large Spaniifli onion, ti two middling ones fmall, and to cabbage or oilefia lettuces ciU linaUput tnm into a iauce-pan with half a pint of water

P feafen



2fo THE Art OP COOKERY

feafon them with a little fait, a little beaten pepper,. and a little beaten mace and nutmeg. Cover them clofe, and let them ftewr a quarter of an hour, then put in a quarter of a pound oic fre(h butter rolled in a little flour, a fpoonful of catchup, a Kttte piece of burnt butter as big as a nutmeg; cover them clofe, and let it fimmer foftly an hour often fhaking the pan When it i enough, fcrve it up for a fide-di(h.

For an alteration, you may ftew the ingredients as above: then take a fmall cabbage lettuce, and half boil it; then dram it, cut the ftalks flat at the bottom, fo that it will ftand iiraa in the difl), and with a knife very carefully cut out the middle leaving the outGde leaves whole. Put what you cut out into a fauce-pao, chop it, and put a piece of butter, a little pep per, fait, and nutmeg, the yolk of a hard egg chopped, a few crumbs of bread, mix all together, and when it is hot fill Your cabbage; put fome butter into a ftew-pan, tie your cabbage and fry it till you think it is enough; then take it up, untie it, and firft pour thelngredients of peas into your difiiy fet the forced cabbage in the middle, and have ready four artichokebottoms fried, and cut in two, and laid round the difh. This will do for a topdih.

Green Peas with Cream

TAKE a quart of fine green peas, put them into a ftew pan with a piece of butter as big as an egg, rolled in a little flour, feafon them with a little fait and nutmeg, a bit of (ugar as big as a nutmeg, a little bundle of fweet herbs, fome parfley chopped fine, a quarter of a pint of boiling water. Cover them clofe, and let 'them ftew very foftly half an hour, then pour in a quarter of a pint of good cream. Give it one boil, and ferve it up for a fide-plate.

A Farce-meagre Cabbage.

TAKE a white-heart cabbage, as btg as the bottom of a plate, let it boil five minutes in water, then drain it, cut the ftalk flat to fiand in the difh, then carefully open the leaves, and take out the infide, leaving the outfide leaves whole. Chop what you take out very fine, take theflefli of two or three floun ders or plaife, clean from the bone; chop it with the' cabbage, the yolks and whites of four hard eggs, a handful of pickled parfley, beat all together in a mortar, with a quarter of a pound of melted buttec; mix it up with the yolk of an egg, and a few crumbs of bread, fill the cabbage, and tie it together, put it into 7 a deep



MAbE Ph-Ml ANi) EASY. r

((ftep ftew-pan, or fauce-pan, put to it half a pint of water, a

ijuarter of a pound of Gutter rolled in a little flour, the yolks of

four bard eggs, ap onion fiuck with fix cloves, whole pepper

and mace tied in a rtiudin ragj half n ounce of truffles and

Itiorels, a fpoonful . of catchup,' a few pickled mufhrootns;

cover it ciofe, and let it fioimer an hour. If you find it is not

enough you muft d6 it longer. When it is done, lay it ia

your dtib, untie it, and pour the fauce ovei it

. . ' . ' . .

To farce Cucumbers.

TAKE fix large cUcumbet"s, cut a piece off the top, and firdop out ail the pulp; take a large white cabbage boiled tender, take onfy the heart, chop it fine, cut a large oniony fine fhrcd fome pariley and pickled mufhrooms fmall two hard eggs chop-, ped very fine, feafon it With pepper, fait, and nutmeg; ftufF your cucumbers fuflj and pat on the pieces, tie them with a packthread, and fry them in butter of a light brown,' Have the fdioWiAg fkuQt ready: take a quarter of a pint of red wine, a quarter of a pint of boiling water, a fmaJI onion chopped fine, a little pepper and fair, a piece of butter as big as a walnut, rolled in flour. When the cucumbers are enough lay them ih your diiii, pour the fat out of the pan, and pour in this faupej let it boil, and have ready the yolks of two eggs beat fine mixed with two or three fpoonfuls of the fauce, then turn them intp the pan, let them boil, keeping it ftirring all the time, untie the firing:, and pour the fauce over. Serre it up for a fide iHbi. (MrnUh with the tops.

Tojflew Cucumbers,

TAKE fix large cucumbers, flice them; take fix large oniohs peer and cut them in thin flices, fry them both brown then drain them and pout out the fat, put them into the pan again with three fpoonfuls of hot water, a quarter of a pound of butter rolled in floury and a. tea fpofnful of muflard; frafon with pepper and fait, and let them dew a quarter of an hour foftly, fhakk ing the pan often. When they are enough difh them up.

Fried Celery

TAfeE fix oi eight headis of celery cut ofTthe grech tops', and take ofF the outfide flalks, wafh them clean and pafe the iroots clean; then have ready half a pint of white wine, the yolks of three eggs beat fine arid a little fait and nutmeg; mix •U well together with flour into ji, bat teri dip every heftd into

P a the



ai2 THE ART OF COOKERY

the batter and fry fhein in butter When enough, Uy thtm in your diih, and pour melted butler over cheow

CUry with Crtam

WASH and clean fix or eight heada of celeryuC them about three inches lone, boil then tender, pour away all the water, and take the yolks of four egg3 beat fine, half a pint of creaoit a little fait and nutmeg, pour 4t over, keeping the pan ibaJwg all the while. When it begins to be thick, £i2i it up.

Caulifiowirs riid

' TAKE two fine cauliflowers, boil them In milk and water,, thqi leave one whole, and pull the other to pieces take halif a pound of butter,, with two fpooofuls of water a Jijtde du
t of flour,, and melt the butter in a fiew-pan; then put in the whole cauliflower cut in two, and the other pulled to pieces and fry it till it is of a very light bvown Seafon it with pegr per and fak. When it is enough,, lay the two halvea in thp middle, and pour the reft all over.

To mah an Oatmeal Puddings

TAKE a pint' of fine oatmeal, boil it in three pinl of WiW milk, ftirring it till it is as thick as a haftypudding take it off, and Air in half a pound of frefli butter, a little beaten mace and nutmeg, and a gill of fack'; then beat up eight eggs, half the whites, ftir all well together, lay pufF-pafie all ovof the difli, pour in the pudding, and bake it half an hour. Or you may boil it vith a few currants

To maki a PotaUo-Puddhg

TAKE a quart of potatoes, boil theu) fofc, peel them, an maih them with the back of a fpoon, and rub them through a fieve, to have them fine and fmooth;. take half a- pound of ittOeif butter melted) half a pound of fine fugar, beat them well getbcv till they are very fmooth, beat fix eggs, whites and all, ftir them in, and a glafs of fac;k or brandy; You" mayt add half a pound of currants, boil it half an hour, melt butter wiih a glafs of white wine; fweeten with fugar, and pour over it. You may bake it in a difli, with puff-pe all round diihat the bottom

To make c fecmd PotatotPuddipg

BtOIl' two jpouads pf potatoes, d beat them la a mortar

finej



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 113

I

Hue, best ! haff a pound of melted butter, boil it half an hdur, pour meked butter over it, with a glafs of white wine, or the juice of a Seritte orange, aii4 throw fugar all over the pudding d dUh.

To mah a third Sort of Poiatoi'Pud£ng.

TAKE two pounds of white potatpes, boil thei foft, peel .imd beat them in a mortar, or ftrain them through a fievp till tbcY are quite fine; then mix in half a pound pf frefh butter melted, then beat up the yollcs of eight eggs and three whites, £tr them in, and half a pound of white fugariinely pounded, balf a pint of faek, ftir it well together, grate ia half a large Butm and ftir in half a pint of cream, make a puffpafte, and lay all oiver your difh and round the edges; pour in the pudding, and bake it of a fine light brown.

For change, put in half a pound of currants; or you may Arew over the top half an ounce of citron and orange-peel cut Ihin, before jrou put it into the oven

To majti an Orang€Pud£ng.

TAIE the yolks of fixteen eggs, beat them well, with half a pound of melted butter, grate in the rind of two fine Seville joranges, beat in half a pound of fine fugar, two fpoonfuls of 4crange-flower water, two of rofe-water, a gill of fack, half a pint of cream, two Naples bifcuics, or the crumb of a halfpenny foU foaked in the cream, and mix all well together. Make a thin puff-pafte, and lay all over the difh and round the rim, pour in the pudding and bake it It will take about as long jbaking as a cuftard, " '

Tp maie a fecmi Sort of (f range- Pudding,

YOU muft take fifteen yolks of eggs, beat them fine, mix' jtbcm with half a pound of freih butter melted, and half a pound of white fugar half a pint of cream, a little rofe-waccr, and a little nutmeg. Cut the peel of a fine large Seville orange To thin as none of the white appears, beat it fine in a mortar till jt is like a pafte, and by degrees mix in the above ingredients j together; then lay a puff pafte all over the difh, pour in the Ingredients and bake it.

To mate a third Orqngi-Pudding

TAKE two large Seville orangey and grate o(F the rind as far as ihcy ate ytllow j then put your oranges in fair water,

P 3 and



I



c



il4 THE ART OF COOKERY

and let them boil till they are tender. Shift the water tbre or four times to take out the bttternefs; when they are tender, cut them open and take away the (eds and ftriogs, and beat the other prc in a mortar, with half a pound of fugar, till it is a pafte; then put to it the yolks of fix eggs, three or four fpoonfuls of thick cream, half a Naples biicuit grated; mix thefe together, and melt a pound of frefli butter very thick and ftir it well in. When it is cold, put a little thin puff pafte about th bottom and rim of your difli; pour in the in gredients, nd bake it about three quarters of an hour,

7i make a fourth OrangiPudding.

TAKE the outfide rind of three Seville oranges, boil them in feveral waters till they are tender, then pound them in a piortar, with three quarters of a pound of fugar; then blanch lialf a pound of fweet almonds, beat them very fine wjth rofe water to keep them from oiling, then beat fixteen eggs, but fix whites, a pound of frefli butter, and beat all thefe together till jt is lighf and hollow; then lay a thin pufF-pafie all over a di(b •and put in th ingredients. Bake it with your tarts.

To make a Lemetf-Pudding.

TAKE three lemons, and cut the rind off very thin, boil
hem in three feparate waters till very tender, 0en pound them. ytry fine in a mortar; have ready a quarter of a pound of Naples bifcuit, boiled up in a quart of milk or cream; mix them and tbe !lempic r
nd with it; beat up twelve yolks and fix whites of eggs very fine, melt a quarter of a pound of frefk butter, hajf a pound of fine fugar, a little orange-flower water I mix all well together put it over the flove, and keep it 4tirring till it is thick, fqueeze the juice of half a lemon in; put pufF-pafle round the rim of your difli, put the pudding fluff in, cut fome candied fweet meats and put over; bke ic
hree quarters o an hour, and fend it up hot.

Another Wny to make a Lemon-Pudding.

'AKE three lemons and grate the rinds off, beat up felye yolks and fix whites of eggs, put in half a pint of cream, half a pound of fine fugar, a little orange- flower -water, a quarter pf a pound of butter melced; mix all well together, fqueeze in the juice of two lemons; put it over the ftove, and keep flirrlng it till it is thick; put a puff-pafle found the rim of the difb, put in your pudding ftuff with



MADE PLAIN AND EASY 215

me candied fvreet meats cut finall over it, and bake it three quarters of an hour.

To mah an Almmd-Fudding.

BLANCH half a pound of Aveet almonds, and four bitter . fiTit& In warm water, tale them and pound them in a marble mortar, with two fpoonfuls of orange-flowerwater, and two qf rofe-water, a gill of fack; mix in four grated Naples bifcuits, three quarters of a pound of melted butter beat eight eggs, and mix thm with a quart of cream boiled, grate in half a nutmeg and a quarter of a pound of fugar; mix all well together, make a thin puiF-paAe, and lay all over the di(h Pour in the ingredients, and bake it.

Tq toil an Almond'Puddsng.

BEAT a pound of fweet almonds as fmall as poffible, with thred fpoonfuls of rofe-water, and a gill of fack or white wine, and mix in half a pound of frefli butter melted, with five yolks of eggs and two whites, a quart of cream, a quarter of a pound of fugar, half a nutmeg grated, one fpoonful of flour, and three fpoonfuls of crumbs of white bread i mix all well together, and bolt it It will take half an hour boiling.

79 mah a SagoPudding.

LET half a pound of fago be wifhed well in three or four hot waters, then put to it a quart of new milk, and let it boil together till it is thick
ftir it carefully (for it is apt to burn), put a (lick of cinnamon when you fet It on the fire: when it is boied take it outj before you pour it out, flir in half a pound of frefb butter, then pour it into a pan, and beat up nine eggs, with ve of the whites, and four fpoonfuls of fack; ftir all together, and fveten to your tafle. Put in a quarter of a pound of currants clean walhed and rubbed, and juft plumped in two iboonfuls of fack and two of rofe- water: mix all well, together, ttjr it well over a flow fire till it is thick, lay a pufFpafle over . a diih. Pour in the ingredients, ajd bake it.

To make a MilUuPudding.

YOU mufl get half a pound of millet-feed, and after it is ivaihed and picked clean, put to it half a pound of fugar, z Vhole nutmeg grated, and three quarts of milk When you

P 4, have







2x6 THE ART OF CQOKERY

have mixed! all well together, brealc in half a pound of freft: . butter, and butter your di(h Pour it in, and lake it'

To mate a CdrrHPudding

YOU muft take a raw carrot, fcrape it very clean and gratft it: take half a pound of the grated carrot, arid a pound of grated bread, be:it up eight eggs, leave out half thwhitea and mix the eggs wirh half a pint of cream; then ftir in th bread and carrot, half a pound of frefh butter pnelted, half a( pint of fack, and three fpoonfuls of orangc-flowcr-watcr, a nut meg grated, iSweeten to your palate. Mix all well together and ir it is not thm enough, ftir in a little new milk or creanEi. Let it be of a moderate thicknefs, lay a puff-pafte all over the di(h, and pour in the ingredients. Bake it; it will take aa hour's baking. Or you may boil it, but then you muft mel butter, and put in white- wine and fugar.

to c A fecmd Carrat'Pudding.

GET two penny loaves, pare off the cruft, foak them in Cuarc of boiling milk, let it ftand till it is cold, tbn grate iii two or three large carrots, then put in eight eggs well beat, and three quarters of a pound of frefii butter melted, grate ii a little nutmeg, and fweeten to yOur tafte. Cover your d(h With pufF-paAc, pour in the ingredients, aad bake it an hour. -

To make d CowJHf'FucUUng.

HAVING got the flowers of a peck of cowflips, cut thcni and pound them fmall, with half a pound of Taples bifcuit$ grated, and thre pints of cream Boil them a little; theh take them ofF the fire and beat Up fixteen eggs, with a little cream and rbfe water. Sweeten to your palate. Mix it all Well together, butter a difh, and pour it in. Bake it, and when it is enough, throw fine fugar oVer and ftrve it up. 0(f you may make half tbb quantity.

Note, nevir milk will- do in all thefe puddings, when ybil have ho cream. '

To maki a ince Jpricot. or Wiiu-Pior Plum-Pudding.

SCALD your qumccs very tender, pare them very" thin, fcrape off the foft; mix it with fugar very fweet, put ill a ittle ginger and a littte cinnamon. To a pint of cream you muft put three or four yolks of eggs, and ftir it into your quinces till they ve of a good thicknefs. It muft be pretty thick,



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. Uf

$o you may io apricots or whilcpear plums. - Boiter joor di(h, poiif it to and bake U;

To mate a PiorlBarUyPudSng.

.GET pound of pearl-barley, wa(h it clean, pat (o it thr iuarts of new milk, and half a pound of double-refined fugaic a nutmeg grated i then put it into a deep pan, and bake it wita brown bread. Take it outt of the oven, beat up fix eggs; Aix iail well together, butter a diib pour it in, bake it again an hour, and it wilt be excellent.

To mah a Fnncb'Barbj'ud&tgi

PUT to a quart of cream fix eggs well beaten, half thc whitcsf, fwecteii to yt)ur palate, a litdc orange- flower- water, or ro(b-water and a pound of melted butter; then put in fix landfuis of French barley, that has been boi)ed tender in milk, Sutfer a dilh, and piit it in. It will take as long baking as a Tenifonpafty.

To mah un AppUPudding.

TAKE twelve large pippins, pare them, and take out the cores, put'them into a fauce-pan, with four or five fpoonfuls of water. Boil them till they are foft and (hiek; then beat them well, ftir in a pound of loaf fugar, the juice of three Ie mons, the peel of two lemons, cut thin and bat fine in a morbr, the yolks of eight eggs beat; mix all well together, bake it in a flack oven; when it is near done, throw over a little ine fugar. You ma bake it in apufF-pafte, as you do the pther puddingy.

To mah an JtaUan Pudding.

TAE a pint of cream, and fltce in fome French rolls, aa mucK as you think will make it thick enough, beat ten eggs ne, grate a nutmeg, butter the bottom of the difb, flic:e twelve (Pippins into it, 'throw fome orange-peel and fugar over, and half a pint of red wine; then pour your cream, bread, and eggs oyer it; firft lay a puff-pafte at the bottom of the di(h and round the edges, and bake it half an hour.

To mah a Rice-Pudding.

TA
CE a quarter of a pound of rice, put it into a fiiuce-pan, with a c
uart of new milk, a ftick of cinnamon, ftir it often, to keep



•



4i8 THE ART OP CO.OKlRRy

kosp itfron fticking to tht fauce-pftn. Whes it. has thick, pour it into a pan, ftir in a. quarter of a poqid of frcth butter, and fugar to your palate -, grate in half a nutmeg, add three or four fpoonfuls of rofe- water, and ftir all well together j when it is cold, beat up eight ggs, with half the whites, beat it all well together, butter a difti, pour it in and bake it You may lay a pu-pafte firft all over the difb For cbang put in a few currants and fweet oieats, if you chufe it

V A fecond Rid Pudding,

GET half a pound of rice put to it three quarts of milk, ftir in half a pound of fugar, grate a fmall nutmeg in, and break in half a pound of fre(b bMtter butter a difti, and pour it in and bake it. You may add a quarter of a pound of currants jfor change. If you boil the rice and milk, and then ftir in the ' filgar, you may bake it before the fire, or in a tin oven You jnay add eggs, but ic will be good without

J third Rice Pudding.

TAKE Rx ounces of the Hour of rice, put it into a quart of milk, and let it boil till it is pretty thick, ftirring it all the while; then pour it inco a pn, ftir in half a pound of frtfk butter, and a quarter of a pound of. fugar; when itiscold rate in a nutmeg, beat fix eggs with a fpoonful or to of jack, beat and ftir all well together, lay a thin puff-pafte b •e bottom of your difht poMc' it in and bake it

. 7i boil a Cuftard Pudding,

TAKE a pint of cream, out of which take two or three liooR fuls, and mix with a fpoonful of fine flour; fet the reft to boil. When it is boiled, take it off, and ftir in the cold cream, and Soar very well; when it is cool, beat up five ydlks and two 'whites of eggs, and &n in a little fait and fo me nutmeg, and two or three fpoonftils of fack; fweeten to your palate; butter a wooden bowl, and pour it in, tie a cloth over it, and bpil it half an hou'-. When it is enough, untie the cloth, turn the pud 'ding out into your difh, and pour melted butter over it

To make a Flour Pudding.

TAKE a quart of milk, beat up eight eggs, but four of the 'whites,' mix with them a quarter of a pint of milk, and ftir into ibat four large jpocnfuls of flour beat it well together, boil,

fix



I



I



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. m

biUer sdmonds in two (poonfols of .water, pour the waiter wto tbe eggs, blanch the sAmondviyi'hekt them fine in a aiortar; then mix them jn with half a large nutmeg,, an a.tea fpoonful of fait then mix in the reft of the milk, flour your cloth well, and boil it an hour; pour melted butter overit, and fugar if you like it, thrown all over. Qbferire always in boiling puddings, that the water boils before you put them into the pot and have ready when they are boiled, a pan of clean cold water; jgft give your pudding one dip in, then untie tbe tloth and it will turii out, without flicking to the cloth

To make a BaitifPuik.

TAKE a quart of milk, beat up fix eggs, half the whitesj
mix as above, fix fpoonfuls of flour, a tea fpoonfurof fait, and one of beaten ginger; then mix all together, hoi) it an hour and a quarter, and pour melted butter over it You may put in eight eggs, if you have plenty, for change, and half a pouna of prunes or currants

T0 maki a Batter" Pudding without Eggs.

TAKE a quart of milk, mix fix fpoonfuls of flour, with a little of the milk firfi, a te:- fpoonful of fait, two tea- fpoonfuls of beaten ginger and two of the tindure of fafFron; then mix all together, and boil it an hour. You may add fruit as you think proper.

To make a GraiefuUPudding.

TAKE a pound of fine flour,' and a pound of white bread grated, ake eight eggs, but half the whites, beat them up, nd tanix with them a pint of new milk, then ftir in the bread and flour, a pound of raifins ftoned, a pound of currant, half a pound of fugar, a little beaten ginger; mix all well together, and either bake or boil it. It will take three quarters oi an hour baking. Put cream in, inftead of milk, jf you have it. It will be an addition to the pudding.

To make a Bread-Pudding.

CUT off all the cruft of a penny white loaf, and flice t thin into a quart of milk, fet it over a chafihg-difli of coals tili the brpad has foaked up all the milk, then put in a piece of fweet butter Air it round, let it ftand till cold; or you may boil your milk, and pour over your bread and cover it up clofe, does full vell: then take the yolks of fix eggs, the whites of three,

' ' and



taio tHt ART'QF COOKERY

Mi Wit tHeifi up ith a littlaTfe-wftter aiid irattneg a 10 fih and ftigar if yoa chafe it, Mixlitl well togpther, and bcjl it Me hdufr.

71 iM tf Jtfu Bnai-Pudding.

Take ail the cnimb of a ftale penny-loaf cut it thin, % art fA cream, fct it over a flow fire till it i fcaldiog hot, tfaeft let it ftand till it i$ cold b,eat up the bread and ceam well to lather, grale in fome nutmegs te twelve bitten almonds boH them in two fpoonfuls of iprater ppur the Water Co the creailn and ilir it in with a little fait, fweetea it to yoiir palate, blanch te almonds, and beat tbm iik a moiitar, with iWo fpoonfuls of rofe or orangeflower water, tiij they are a fine pajfte; then mix ihem fcy degrees with tUe cre m, till y ate well mixed in the'cream then take the yolks oF eight ggs, the whiter of four, beat' them well apd mix diem with your crfeslm, thcA mix all Wdi together. A wdbdeii dil is bed to boil it In; but if you boil it in a doth, be fiirc to dip it in the hot Witer and flour it welL tie it loofe and boil it an hour 8e fure the Wattfr boils wkft 'you put it iciy and keeps bojliog all the lime. When it if enough turn it into your di(h, melt butter and put in two or three fpoonfuls of whitecwihe dr fack, giie it a boil and Jour It over your pudding; then ftrew a good deal of fine fugar al
over the pudding aiid diffa, and fend i
t to table hot. Ner iniHc will do, when you cannot get cx'eam You may jfqf change put in a few currants.

To maki an ordirmrj BreadPtufdlng

TAKE twoiialf-penny rolls, dice them thin, cruft and all
pour over them a pint of newmilk boiling hot cover theoi clofe, let it ftand fome hours to foak; then beat it well with a little melted butter, and beat up the yolks and whites of tw €ggs, beat all together well with a little fait, Boil it half an hour; when itis done, turn it itito your di(h, pour melted butIter and fugar over it Some love a little vinegar iii the butter. If your roils are ftale and graced, they will do better; add % little ginger. You may bake it With a few currants.

To maki a baked BreadPud£tiz.

TAKE the crumb of a pennyloaf, as much flour, the yolkl €£ four eggs and two whites, a tea fpoonful of ginger, half a pound of raifins fioned, half a pound of currants clean wafhe4 and picked, a little fait. . Mix firft the bread and flour, ginger, lalt, and fugar to your palate, then the eggs, and as much milk

a?







MADE PJ-AIN AND EASY. z

9$ wttl make it like a. good batter, then. the fruit, butter th9 dUbj pour it in wd bake it.

Tl maii a Bcikd Loaf.

TAKE ptmw-ioaf, pour over it half a pint of atilk botKn kot, cover it loijet 4 uU it has foaked up the milk then tie it up in a cloth, and boil it half an hour. When ic is done, lay it in your difb, pojur melted butter over it, and, throw fogar all over; a fpoonful of wine or rofewattr does at welt in the butter, or j.uice of Seville orange. A French man chet does beft; but ihiere ag little loav made on purpofe for the ufe A French roll or oat-cake does very well boiled ihMS.

7i mah Chffnut Pudding.

PUT a dozen and a half of chefnuts into a fkillet or (auce-pan f water boil tbegi a quarter of an hour, then blanch and peel
tiem arn) beat thm in a marble mortar, with a litde orangeflower or rofe- water nd fack till they are a fie thin pafte then beat. up twelve egs with half the whites, and mix them well, grate half a nutmeg, a little falt mix them with three pints of creim mi half a ppuad of melted butter; fweeten to your palate, and mix all together; put it over the fire, and keep birring it till it is thick. Lay a puff-pafte all over the difli ppur jn the mixture, and bake it. When you cannot get cream, take three pints of milk, beat up the yolks of four egg, and fiir into the milk, fet it over the fire ftirring it all the time till i( M fcatdiog bpt then mix it in the room of the cream.

TV nuiig a fine plain baked Pudding

YOU muft take a quart of milk, and put three bay-leavey into it. When it has boiled a little, with ikie flour, make ic into a hafty-pudding with a little fait, pretty thick; take it off the fire, and ftir in half a pound of butter, a quarter of a pound of fugar, beat up twelve eggs and half the whites, ftir all well together, lay a puff palte all over the difl), and pour in your ftuff. Half an hour will bake it.

7i mah.fritty Utile Ckeefe'Curd Puddings.

YOtI muft take a gallon of milk, and turn it with rennet, then dram all the curd from the whey, put the curd into mortar, and heat it with half a pound of frcih butter till the butter and curd are well mixed then beat fix eggs, half the whites, and ftrainthtn to the curdtwo Naples bifcuits, or halfa penny

roil



iii THE Akt OP (SOOKERV

roll grated; mix all ttefe together, and fweeteh .to your, pz lace; butter your patty-pans and fill them with the ingredients'. Bake them, but do not let your oven be too hot; when they are done, turn them out into a dt(h, cut citron and can4ied crange-peel itito little narrow bits, about an inch long, and blanched almonds cut in long flips, ftick them heitand there on thtf tops of the puddings, juft as you fancy pour melted butter with a little fack in it into the dilh, and throw fine fygar all over the puddings and difli. They make a pretty fide-dilh.

To tnaii an Apricot Pudding.

CODDLE fix 'large apricots irtry tender, break them very fmall, fweeten them to your tafte. When they are cold, add fix eggs, only wo whites well beat; mix them well togethei' with a pint of good cream, lay si pufF-pafte all over your difb, and pour in your ingredients. Bake it half an hour, do ndt let the oven be too hot; when it is enough, throw a- little fine fugar all over it and fend it to table hot.

To make tbi Ipjivicb Almond- Pudding.

STEEP fomewhat above three ounces of the crunch of white bread fliced, in a pint and a half of cream, of grate the bread; then beat half a pint of blanched almonds very fine till thejr are like a pafte, with a little orahge-flower Water, beat up the yolks of eight eggs, and the whites of four: mix all well together, put in a quarter of a pound of white fugar, and ftir'iii little melted butter, about a quarter of a pound; put it ovcfr the fire, and keep fiirring it till it is thick; lay a fheet 6f puffw pafte at the bottom of your difh, and pour in the ingredients Half an hour will bake it.

., Tranparent Pudding.

TAKE eight eggs, and beat them well; put them in st pan with half a pound of frefli butter, half a pound of fine powdered fugar, and half a nutmeg grated; Tet it on the flre and keep ftirring it til) it is of the thickhefs of buttered eggs; then put it away to cool; put a thin puiF-pafte round the edge of your difh; pour in the ingredients, bake it half an hoiK in a moderate oven, and fend it up hot.

Puddings for liuU Vijhiu

YOU muA take a pint of cream and boil it, and ifit a halfpenny loaf, and pour the cream hot over it and cover it clofe

tiU



KfADir PLAIN AND EASY. 223

till It IS cold; then beat it fine, antl grate in Half a large liiitdieg a quarter of a pound of fugar, the yolks of four eggs, bvtt two whites well beat, beat it all well together: with the half of this fill four little wooden diflies; colour one yellow with laffitonoric red cith cochineal, gre with the juice pf fpjimchy and bu€ with the fyrup of violets; the'reft mix with an ovlbOH of fweet almonda blanched and beat:fine and fill a diih. Yomt diflies muft be fmail, and tie yoqr covers, ovei; very clofe wjt)i packthread. When yOur pot bolls, put them in. An hour will boil them.; when enough, turn them out in a difli, the white oife in the middle, and the four coloured ones round. When they inre emcugh, melt fome frefli butter with a glafs of facky and pour over, and throw iugar all over the diih. Thp white pudding difli muft be of a larger fize than the reft; and be fure to butter your difiies well before you put them in and do not fill them too fulU

To make. a Swat' Meat Pudding.

PUT a thin pufFpafte all over your di(h then have candied drange, lemon-peel, and citron, of each an ounce, flice them thin, and lay them all over the bottom of your difh; then beat eight yolks of eggs, and two whites, near half a pound of fugar, and half a pound of melted butter. Beat all well toge ther; when the oven is ready, pour it on your fweet meats An hour or lefs will bake it The oven muft not be too hot.;

To make a fine Plain-Pudding.

GET a quart of milk, put into it fix laurel-leaves boil if, then take out your leaves, and ftir in as much flour as will make it a hafty- pudding pretty thick, take it ofF, and then ftir in half a pound of butter, then a quarter of a pound of fugar, a fmatl nutmeg grated, and twelve yolks and fix whites of eggs well beaten. Mix all well together, butter a difli, atid put ia your ftuflF. A little- mor than half an hour will bake it.

To make a Ratifia-Pudding.

GET a quart of cream, boil it with four or five laurelleaves; then take them out, and break in half a pound of Na pies bifcuits, half a pound of butter, fome fack, nutmeg, and a little fait; take it off the fire, cover it up, when it is almoft cold, put ia two ounces of blanched almonds beat fine, and the yolks

of



1



M4 THE ART OP COOICERV

of five iem Mix all well eogether, and biike it in a moisr$it a balriin hottr. Scrape fugar on it as it goe$ iato the oven;

To mai s Bnad and Buitir Pudding,

GET a
x!iinyloaf, and cut it into thin flicea of bcead an fcvtter, as you do for tea. Butter your difli as you cut tbeos, hj flices over the difli, then fttw a few currants clean afli to and pidced, then a row of bread and butter, then a few curnnts, and fo on till all your bread and butter is in; then take m pint of milk, beat up four .eggs, a little fait, half a nutmeg grated; mix all together with iugar to yoor tafte $ pour this " over the bread, and bake it half an hour. A puflvpafte under does bcft. You may put ia two fpooafuls of rofewater,

T$ tfuAi a ioiUd RiaPudding.

HAVING got a quarter of a pound of the flour of rice, ptit it over the fire with a pint of milk, and keep it (Urring cooftantly, that it may not clod nor burn. When it is of a good thickneifs, take it off, and pour it into an earjthen pan
& in half a pdund of butter very fmooth, and half a pint of cream or new rajlk, fweeteo to your palafie, grate in half a nutmeg aal the outward rind of a lemon Beat up the yolks of fix eggs •and two whites, beat all well together; boil it either in fmall china bafons or wooden bowJs. When boiled, ttirn them in to a diib, pour meltbd butiter over tbeqa, with a litUe iack, od throw fugar all over. • %

To mah a cheap Rice-Pudding.

GET a quarter of a pound of rice, and half a pound bfraU fins ftoned, and tie them in a cloth. Give the rice a great deal of room to fwell. Boil it two hours; when it is enqugh turn it into your di(b and pour melted butter and fugar over it, wi a little nutmeg

To mate a chegp plain Rice-Pudding. '

GET a quarter of a pound of rice, tie it in a cloth, but give room for fwelling. Boil it an hour, then take it up, untie it, .and with a fpoon ftir in a quarter of a pound of butter, grate fctoac nutmeg, and fweeten to your tafte, then tie it up clofc, and boil it another hour; then take it up, turn it into yoql difliy and pour your melted butter over it. ' '

To



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 225

70 mqki a Aiop baked KtcePuddlngl

YOU myft take a quarter of a pound of rice, boil it In a quart of new milk, ftir it tHat it does not burn; when it begins to be thick, takeJt off, let it ftand till it is a little cool, then ftir in well a quarter of a pound of butter, and fugar to your palate; grate a fmall nutmeg', butter your difh, pour it in, and bake it.

, To mali a Spinach- Pudding'

TAKE a quarter of a peck of fpiacb, picked and wafhed clean, put it into a fauce-pan, with a little fait, cover it clofe, aad when it is boiled juft tender, throw it into a fieve to drain;' then chop it with a knife, beat up fix eggs, mix well with ic half a pint of cream and a ftale roll grated fine, a little jiut meg, and a quarter of a pound of melted butter; ftir all well together, put it into the fauce-pan you boiled the fpinach, and keep ftlrring it all the time till it begins to thicken.; then Wet aad flour your cloth very well, t'lt it up, and boil it an hour, hen it is enough, turn
t into, your di(b, pour melted butter over it, and the juice of a Seville orange, if you like it; as to. fugar you may add, or let it alone, juft to your tafte. You may bake it; but then you (hould put in a quarter of a pound of fugar. You may add bifcuit in the room of bread, if you like it better. .,

, To make a akingPudding

TAKE a pint of good creann, fix eggs, and half the whites, beat them well, and mix with the cream; grate a little nutmeg in, add a little fait, and a little rofewater, if it be agree able; grate in the crumb of a halfpenny- roll, or a fpoonful of flour, nrft mixed with a little of the cream, or a fpoonful of the flour of rice, which. you pleafe. Butter a cloth well and flour it; then put in your mixture, tie it not too clofe, and boil it half an hour faft. Be fure the water boils before you put it in.

To make a Cream-Pudding.

TAKE a quart of cream, boil it with a blade of mace, and half a nutmeg grated, let it cool; beat up eight eggs,, and three whites, ftrain them well, mix a fpoonful of flour with them, a quarter of a pouiid of almonds blanched, and beat very

.0. fine.



i26 THE Afer Of CQOtEtIt

line, with a fpoonful of orange-flower or rofeWater, mix itti c eggs, then by degrees mix in the cream,cKit ill well te gether, take a thick doth, wet it and tour it well, pouf in your ftuff, tie it clofe, and boil it half an hbui'. Let the water boil all the time faft ', whejf it is done, turn it into' your ixfhy pour melted butter ovcr with a littfc fack, and Afow fugar aU over it.



3V mati a PrwH'Pndding

TAlfilE a quart'of milk, beat fix eggs, half the whiteS
c witlt half a pint of the nilk, and four fpoonfuls offlottr, a liOle falty ami two i'poonfulai' of beaten ginger y then by degrees mix in aU the milk, and a pound of prunes, tie it in a clothy betl it ztk hour, melt butter and pour over it. Dftmfoitli esit well doae ibis way iw the fpom of pruttesv

To make a Sptfnfid''Puddini

'f AlE a fpoonful of flour, a fpoonful of cream or milk, atf egg, a little nutmeg, ginger, id fait; mix all together, anii lil it in a littte wooden dilh half an hour. Youf may add Ibw currants

t make mi AfpU'PiMing

MASE t od puffpafte, roll it out half:m inch thick, pare your apples, and core them, enough to fUl the eruft, and clofe it up, tie it in a cloth and boit it. Pf a fmall puddingy two hours: if a large one, three or four hours. When it ia enough turn rt into your di&,c cut a piece of Hie cruft out of the top, butter and fugar it to your palate; lay on the cruflf again, and fend it to table hot. A pear-pudding make the fame way. And thus you mvj make a damfoTl-pudding, o any fort of plums, apricots, c4erriesj' or mulberries, and are very fine.

Tip makeTeatDujnplmgs

FIRST make a light douglia$ for bread, withfiour, Water, fait, and yeaft, cover with a cloth, c and fet it before the fire for half an hour; then have a faucc-pan of water on the fire, anct when it boH take the dough, and make it imo little round bdlsy as brg as a fairge hen's egg; then flat them with your band, and put them into the boiling water; a few minutes boife them. Take great care they do joiot fall to the bottom of



tb ikct or faiicepani fbr then tH Will h hcivf
alid tiir to keep the Water boiling tl the time. When thejr are eiloUgD take theitl up (whicb they will be in ten minucei or lefs), lay ihedi io ybur difli and havt melM butter iii a cup; As good a way as any to fave trdable it to fend to tbe baker's for half aquarterhof dough (which will make a great nuUiy and thoft foil have dniy the trouble 6f boilihg it

n kmH Noffili DiMpBngii

Kf IX a good thick bAtter as for pancakes i take half a pint bf milk, two eggs a little falt
and make it into a battef wittt kour. Have ready a dean fauce-pan of water boilings intd ilrhich drop this bitteh Be fure the water btfils fail, aUd tWd br three minutes Will boil theoi; then throw them iiito a flevd to draih the water away
then turn thent into a difli, and ftil a lump of fre(h biitteir into tbedl
eat theih hot, and they aft Very good.

id mM hdtd DmpHngh

MtX lour and water,, with a little fait, like a pafte foil them in balli, as big as a tiirkeys egg, roll them in a littld flour, have the water boilings throw them in the watery and half an hour will boil them. They are beft boiled with a good tciece of beef; Yoii may add for change a ftw curnuitii-c Have melted butter in a Clip.

jinoib& ffihfU kuAi Hard BampBngfi

RUB into your flour firft a good piece of butter, theh ihak it like a cruft for a pie j make them up, and boil them al

tbovct •

To mah AppkDiMiingi.

Make a gdod puff-paftei pare fome large aiipled ciit ttiedH In quarters and take oiit the cdres very nicely take a piecci of cmft, inA i-dll it round, ndugh for bne apple; if they ard % they Will net look pretty fo roll the cruft fpurid each apple, sind make them round like a ball With a little flour iit your handi Have a pot of water boilings take a clean clothi dip it ih the wateiri and (hake flour over it
tie each dumpling by itfelf, arid put diem ih the water boilings which keep boii g all the tiitle add if yoUr cruft is light and good
and the

(a applci



228 THE ART OF COOKERY

apples not too large, half aii hour will boil thenar;, but if the apples be large, they will take ah hour's boiling.' When thejr are enoifgh, take them up, and lay them in a diih; throv fine fii'gar all over them, and (end them to table. Have good frefll butter melted in a cup, and fine beaten fugar in a'faucer

Jrtbther Way to make Apple Dumplings,

MAKE a good pufF-pafte cruft, roU it out a little thicker than a crown- piece, pare Tome large apples, and core them with ah applewfcoop'; fill the hole .with beaten dhnamon coarfe or fine fugar, and lemonpeci ihred fine, and roll every apple in a piece of this pafte, tie them elofe in a cloth feparate, boil them an hour, cut a little piece of the top.oif', pour in fome melted butter, and lay on yoiir piece of cruft again. Lay them in your difh, and throw fine fugar all over. .

Citron Puddings.

TAKE half a pint of crearp, rnit in it; a fpoonful of fine flour, two ounces of fugar, a little grated nutmeg, nd the yolks of three eggs beat well, put it in tea-cups, and ftick two ounces of citron cut very thin in it; bake them in a quick oven, and turn diem out on a di(h.

To make a Cheefe'Curd Florendine.

TAKE two pounds of cheefe-curd, break it all to pieces with your hand, a pound of blanrhed alnpnds finely pounded, with a little rofe- water, half a pound of currants clean waflied and picked, a little fugar to your palate fome ftewcd fpinach cut fmall; mix all well together, lay a puff-pafte in, difli, put in your ingredients, cover it with a thin cruft rolled, and laid acrofs, and bake it in a moderate oven half an hour. As to the top-cruft, lay it in what (hape you pleafe, either rolled or marked with an iron on purpofe.

A Florendlne of Oranges or Apples.

GET half a dozen of Seville oranges, fave the juice, take out the pulp, lay them in water twentyfour hours, fliift them three or four times, then boil them in three or four waiters, then drain them from the water, put them in a pound of fugar, and their juice, boil them to a fyrup, take great care they do not ftick to the pan you do them in, and fet them by for ufe.

9 When



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 129

Wben you ufe them.lay a pufF-pafte all over the difb, bqil ten pippins, pared, quartered, and cored, in a littfe water and fugar, and fltce two oi the oranges and a:iix with the pippins in the di(h. Bake it in a How oven, with cruft as above: or juft bake the cruft, and hy in the ingredients.-

To mah an Ariichoke'-Pie.

BOIL twelve artichokes, take ofF all the leaves and choke, take the bottoms clear from the ftalk, make a good puff-pafte cruft, and lay a quarter of z pound of good frefti butter all over the bottom oF'your pie j then Jay a row of artichokes, ftrew a little pepper, fait, and beaten mace over them, then another row, and ftrew the reft of your fpice over them, put in a quarter of a pound more of butter in little bits, take half an ounce of truftles and morels, b6il them in a quarter of a pint of wa ter, pour the water into the pie, cut the truffles and morels very fmall, throw all over the pie 5 then have ready twelve eggs boiled hard, take only the hard yolks, lay them all over the pie, pour in a gil) of white wine, cover your pie, and bake it. Wh the cruft is dohe,r the pie is epough. . Four large blades of mace, and twelve peppercorns well beat will do, with a tea-fpoonful of. fait .

To make a fweet Egg'Pie.

MAKE a good cruft, cover your difli with it, then have ready twelve eggs boiled hard, cut them in flices, and lay them iti your pie, throw half a pound of currants; clean waflied and picked, all over the eggs, then beat up four eggs well, mixed with half a pint of white wine, grate in a fmall nutmeg, and make it pretty fweet with fugar. You are to mind to lay a quarter of a pound of butter between the eggs, then pour in your wine and eggs, and cover your pie. Bake it half an hour, or till the cruft is done.

To male a Potatoi'Pie.

BOIL three pounds of potatoes, peel them, make a good, craft, and lay in your difli; lay at the bottom half a pound of butter, then lay in your potatoes, throw over them three teafpoonfuls of fait, and a fmall nutmeg grated all over, fix eggs boiled hard, and chopped fine, throw all oy.er, a tea-fpoontul of pepper ftrewed all over, then half a pint of white wine.

Q. 3, Cover



I3D THE ART OF COOKERY

CovfT yor pie, and bake it half an hour, or till the crui( if enough

To 9uiki Onion-PU

WASfl and pare fome potatoes, and cut thena in fltceS
pee) fome oniop99 Pi
t them in Qices, pare Tome apples and flico them, make ood eruft, coyer jrbur difti, lay a quarter of a pound of butter al) over, take a quarter of aiY pufice of mace beat fine, a ni
tmeg grated, a tea-fpoonful of beatep tcepper three tea-fpoonfuls of fait; mix a
l together ftrew fome over ihe butter, lay a layer of potatoes, a layer of onion, a layer of pples, and layer of eggs, and fo on till yo have filled your pie, firewing a Ijttle of the feafonifig betvreep each layer, an4 a quarter of a pound of butter in bits, and fix fpoonfuk of water. Clofe your pie, and bake it an hqur and a half. A

ound of potatoes, a pqufid pf QniQii8
a poun(l of pplpi aaol wclvp eggs frill do

MAKE a gopd cf uft, lay it over your dilb, ti
ke twQ oranges il them vith two lemons till tender, in four or five quarts or water. In thf laft water, which there miiii be about a pint pf, add a poupd ot loafffugar, boil it, tajce thfjm oit and flico them into your pie then pare twelve pippins, core them, and
' give them one boil in the fyrup; lay them afl oyer the orange and lemon pour in the fyrup, and ppur op them fome orange ado fyrup. Cpver your pie, anfl hake it in a qw ove half fUillo(in

• •

To Mtaii a Siirrft'Pio.

c; i • . 'r

TAfCE your ikirrcts and boi
them tender, peel thepi,
licf them, fill your pie, apd take to half a piit of cream the yoli pf an egg, beat fine with a little nutmeg, a little beaten maccr and a little fait; beat all together well, with a quarter of a pound of fre(h butter oielted, then pour in as mch as youf difli will bold, put on the top-cruft, and bake it half an hour, you may put in foine har4 yolks pf eggs i if you cannot get fream, put in milk, but cream is htHk, About two pounds ot fbc fppt will dp.

To mie an Appt-fie. MAE a ood puflF-pafte cruft, lay fome round th fides of .J? fli f9 4 qwarlpr jror apples ap ta
p put the coies

lay



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. aji

i$y a low fsf apples thick, throw in ha)f the fugar you defign for your pie, mince a little lemoo-ped fine, throw over, and fiuee a little lemon oyer them, then a kw cloves, here and there one, then the reft of your apples, and the reft of your fngar You muft fweetea to your palate, and fqueee a little more lemon Boil the peeling of the apples and the cores ia Home fair water, with a blade of mace, till it is very good; ftrain it, and boil the fyrup with a little fugar, till there is but very little and good, pour it into your pie, put on your uppercruft and bake it. You may put in a little quince or marmalade, if you plea(e

Thus make a pear- pie, but do not put in any quince. You may butter them when they cofne out of the oven: or beat up the ycdks of two eggs, and half a pint of cream, with a liule nutmeg, fweetened with fugar; put it over a flowiire, and keep ftirring it till it juft boils up, take oflFthe lid, and pour in the cream. Cut the cruft in little three-corner pieceS
ftick ibout the pie, and fend it to table coldt

Gren Codling-Pii

TAIE fome green codlings, and put them in a clean pan with fpring-water. Lay vine or cabbage leaves over them, and irrap 7 cfoth orer and round the pan, to keep in the fteam. As fopip as you think they are foft, take the fktns off, put them in the fame water, with the leaves over them, bang them a good diftadce from the fire to green, and as foon as you fee them of a ne green, take them out of the water, and put them in a deep dim, and fweeten them with fugar, and ftrew little lempn-peiel ttA fine over; put a lid of puff-pafte over them, and bake it. When it is baked, cut the lid off, and eat it ipto thr-corner pieces, and put them round your pie, with one'corner uppermoftf let it ftand till it is cold, and then make the following crean: boil a pint pf cream or milk; beat up the yolks of four eggs, fweeteii it with fine fugar, mix all well together, and put it 6vfr th fire till it is thick and fmooth; bi
t be fure you dont let it boil, for that will curdle It, and put it over your codling; or you may put clouted ireWf U yotf like it beft, and fend it to tble cold

a nuff Cberry-Pii

MAIE a goqd cruft, lay a l
tte round the fides of your difi, throw fugar at th bottom; and lay in your fruit and fugar at

0.4 0P



232 THE ART OF COOKERY

top. A fei₯ red currants docs well with them; put on your lid, and bake in a flack oven

Make a plum pie the fame way, and a goofeberry pie. If you would have it red, let it ftand a good while in the oven, after the bread i$ drawn. A cuilard is very good with the goofeberry pie.

To make a Salt- Fijh- Pie.

GET a fide of falt-fifli, lay it in watr all night, next morn ing put it over the fire in a pan of water till it is tender, drain it and lay it on the drefler, take ofFall the ikin, and pick the meat clean from the bones, mince itc fmall, then take the crumb of two French rolls, cuin flices, and boil it up with a quart of new milk, break your bread very fine with a fpoon, put to it your minced fait fim, a pound of melted butter, two fpoonfuls of minced parfley, half a nutmeg grated, a little beaten pepper, and three tea-fpoonfuls of muitard; mix all well together, make a good cruft, and lay all over your dilh, and cover it up. Bake it an hour.

To make a Carp'Pie,

TAKE a large carp, fcale, wa(h, and gutrit clean; take an eel, boil it juft a little tender, pick oiF all the meat and mince it fine, with an. equal quantity of crumbs of bread, a few fweet herbs, a lemon - peel cut fine, a little pepper, fait, and grated nutmeg, an anchovy half a pint of oyfters parboiled and chopped fine, the yolks of thec hard eggs.cut fmall, roll it up with a quarter of a pound of butter, and fiU.tbe tcelly of the carp. Make a good cruft, cover the diib, nd lay in your carp; fave the liquor you boilyour eel in, put in the eel bones, boil them with a little mace, whole pepper, n- onion, fome fweet herbs and an anchovy. Boil it till there is about half a pint, ftrain it, add to it a quarter of a pint of .white wine, and a lump of butter 9s big as a hen's egg mixed in a very little Hour; boil it up, and pour into your pie. Put on the lid, and bake it an hour in a quick oven. If there be any force-meat left after filling the belly, make balls of it, and put into the pie. If you have not liquor Enough, boil a few fmall eels, to make enough to fill your diih.

To make a Soal'Pie __

MAKE a good cruft, cover your difti, boil two pounds of eels tender, pick all the flefh clean from the bones throw the bones

' into



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 233

f '

into fhe liquor you boil the eels in, with a little mace and fait, till it is very good, and about a quarter of a pint, then ftrain it. In the mean time cut the fleih of your eel fine, with a little lemon-peel (hred fine, a little fait, pepper, and nutmeg, a few crumbs of bread, chopped parfley, and an anchovy; melt a quarter of a pound of butter, and mix with it then lay it in die diA, cut the fleih oflF a pair of large foals, or three pair of very fmall ones, clean from the bones and fins, lay it on the force-meat, and pour in the broth of the eels you boiled; put the lid of the pie on, and bake it. You ihould boil the. bones of the foals with the eel bones, to make it good. If you boil the foal bones with one or two little eels, without the forcemeat, your pie will be very good. And thus you may do a turbot.

T9 make an Eel-Pie.

MAKE a good cruft, clean, gut, and wafli your eels very well, then cut them in pieces half as long as your finger; feafon them with pepper, fait, and a little beaten mace to your ' palate, either high or low. Fill your difh with eels, and put as much water as the diih will bold; put on your cover, and bake them well.

To make a FbunderPte

GUT fome flounders, wafli them clean, dry them in a cloth, juft'boil them, cuto£F the meat clean from the bones, lay a good cruH over the diih, and lay a little freib butter at the bottom, and on that the fiih; feafon with pepper and fait to your mind. Boil the bones in the water your fiih was boiled in with a little bit of horfe-raddiih, a little parfley, a very little bit of lemon-peel, and a crufl of bread. Boil it till there isjufl: enough liquor for the pie, then ilrain it, and put it into your pie $ put on the top-cruil, and bake it.

To make a Herring' Pie.

SCALE, gut, and waih them very clean, cut off the heads £ns, and tails. . Make a good cruit, cover your, diih, then feafon your herrings with beaten mace, pepper, and fait; put a little butter in the bottom of youjdiib, then a row of herrings pare fome apples, and cut them in thin flices all over, then peel fotoe onions, and cut them in flices all over thick, lay a littl.e butter on the top, put in a little water, lay on the lid, and bake it well.

To



34 TH ART OP COOKERY

To tnake s SabnoffPiff

MAKE t good crufty cleanre a piece of falmon well, fetroif It with (alt, macep and Dutmeg, lav a piece of butter at the bottom of the di(b, and ly your ralmon in. Melt butter ac cording to your pie; take a lobfter, boil it. piclc out all tbb flefh, chop it fmall, bruife the body, nnx it wie)i with the butter, which muft be very gooc); ppur it over your falinon, pu( Plc tbe Ud and bake it well.

Ti9 make a LobftiTPUf

TAKE tWQ or three lobfiers, and boil them; take the meat out of the taiU whole, cut them in four pieces long ways i take out all the fpawn, and the meat of the claws. Beat it well in a mortar; (baron it with pepper, fait, two fpoonfuU of vinar, and a little anchovy liquor; mel
ha
f a pquiid of frefli butter, ftir all together, with tbe crumbs of an Vsdfpnny rol
rubbed through a fine cullender, and the yolks qf ti$rq eggs $ put a fine puff-pafte over your difii, lay in your tails, 4 the reft of the meat oypr tbem put on yotr poyer, and ba
t jnaflowovei.

T9 m4h lfcle-Pii,

Make a fpoA cruft, lay it all over the d'(h, waib vour ihttfc)e& clen in feveral watcri, then put then in a deep new pan, cover them, and let them ftew till they are open, picl( tbem out, and fee there be np crabs under the tongue; put them in a fauce-pan, with t
vo or three blades of mace, ftraiq liquor juft enough to cover them, a gppd piece of butter and a few crumbs of bread; flevi them a few minutes, fill your pie, put on the lid, and ba(ce it half ap hour. So ypu may make an oyfter-pie Always let your fiib be to bffofe yoif put on th lid
o
: it will fpoil the ciru.

SIX eggs boiled hard, and chopped fine, twelve pippini pared and chopped fmall, a pound of raiQns of the fun, ftoned and chopped fine, a pound f currants walhed, picked, and rubbed clean, a large fpoonful of fugar beat fine, an ounce of citron, an ounce of candied orange, both cut fine, a quarter of an ounce of mace and cloves beat fine, and a little nutmeg beat fine mix a
l together with a gill of brandy, i t gill of



MADE fhhlV AND £ASY. 135

6ek. Make yoqr craft good, and bake it in a flack oven, beii you malpe fo pie, fquee in the juice of a evi
I Wnge

TAICE a fide of Talmon, cut oflF a handfol of the tail, wai!
Ifour large piece very well, dry it with a clean cloth, wa(h it pver ith the yolks of eggs, and then make force meat with wbatypti jcutothe tail but take off the (kin, and put to it a handful of parboiled oyflers, a tall or two of lobfters, the yolk of three or for eggs, boiled haird, fix anchovies, a handful of fweet herbs chopped fmall, a little fait, cloves, mace, nutcreg pepper beat fine, and grated bread. Work all thefe together into a body, with the yolks of eggs, ay it all over the flefhy part, and a little more pepper and fait over the falmon $ fo roll It up into a collar, and bind it with broad tape, then boil it in water, falt and vinegar, but let the liquor boil firft; then put in your collars, a bunch of fweet herbs, fliced ginger and nutmeg; let it boil, but not too faft.
t will take near two hours boiling. When it is enough, take it up into your foufing-pan, and when the piide is cold, put it to your falmon and let it ftand in it till ufed, or otherwife you may pot it. Fill it up with clarified butter as yo pqt fowls; that yray ivill keep lopgef
:

0 collar Eels.

TAKE your eel iid fcour it well with fait, wipe it clean


fhen cut it dowo the back, take out the bone, cut the head

nd tail off
put the yolk of an egg over it, and then take

ifbur cloves, two blades of mace, half a nutmeg beat fine, a

little pepper anfi fait, fome chopped parfley, and fweet herbs

' chopped very fine; mix them all together, and fprinkle over


t, roll the eel up very tight, and ti it in a doth; put on water

enough to boil it and put in an onion, fome cloves and mace,

four bayIeavesj; boil it up with (he ones, bead, and tail for

half an hour, with a little vinegar and fait; then take out the

))ones, Icc and put in your eeU, boil them if large two hours,

Jefler in proportion; wtien done, put them away to cpol i then

lake them out of the liquor and cloth, and cut them in flices,

pr fend them whole, with raw parfley under and over.

N. B. You muil take them out of the cloth, and put thei fP luor, n tie rtepi loff QYfo Jjecp



t THE ART OF OO0K;ER,y

T$ pickle or bah Herrings.'

SCALE and wa(h them clean, cut ofF the heads, take oat the roes, or wa(h them clean, and put them in again as you like. Seafon them with a little mace knd cloves beat, a very little beaten pepper and fait, lay themin a deep pan, lay two or three bsly-leaves between each lay, put in half vinegar and half waiter, or rapevinegar. Cover it cIoTc with a brown paper, and lend it to the oven to bake; let it fland till cold. Thus do fprats. Some ufe only all-fpice, .but that is not (o good.

To pickle or bake Mackerel to keep all the Tear.

GUT them, cut ofF their heads, cut them open, dry them well with a clean cloth, take a pan which they will lie cleverly in, lay a few bay leaves at the bottom, rub the bone with a little bay-falt beat nne, take a little beaten mace a few cloves beat fine, black and white pepper beat fine; mix a little fait, rub tbem iniide and out with the fpice, lay them in a pan, and between every lay of the mackerel put a few bay-leaves; then cover them with vinegar, tie them down clofe with brown paper, put them into a flow oven: they will take a good while doing; when they are enough, uncover. them, let them flarid till cold; then pour away all that vinegar, and put as much good vinegar as will cover them, and an onion iluck with cloves. Send them to the oven again, let them ftand two hours in a very flow oven, and they will keep all the year; but you muflnotput jn your hands to take out the mackerel, if you caii avoid it, but take a flice to take them out with. The great bones of the mackerel taken out and broiled, is a pretty little plate to fill up the corner of a table.

Tofoufe Mackerel.

YOU mufl wafh them clean, gut them, and boil them in fait: and water till they are enough; take them out, lay them jn a clean pan, cover them with the liquor, add a little vinegar; and when you fend them to table, lay fennel over them.

To pot a Lohfler.

TAKE a live lobfter, boil it In fait and water, and peg it that no water gets in; when it is cold pick out all the flefh and body, take put the gut, beat it fine in a mortar, and feafon

it



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 237

it with beaten mace, gratedqutmeg, pepper, and fait: Mix all together, melt a little piece of butter as big as a large walnut, and' ofix it with the lobfler tis you are beating it; when it is beat tp a pafte, put it into your pottingpot, and put it down as clofe and hard as you can; then fet Ibme fitlh butter in a deep broad pan before the fire, and when it is all melted take off the fcum at the topj if any, and pour the clear butter pver the meat as thick as a crown-pjece. The whey and churn-milk will fettle at the botton of the pan; but take great care none of that goes in, and always let your butter be very good, or you will (oil all; or only put the meat whole, with the body'mixed among it, laying them as clofe together as you can, and pOur th'butter over them. You muft be fure to let thelobfter be well boiled, A middling one will take half aa hour boiling

To pot EiJs.

TAKE a large eel, ikin it, cleanfe it, and wafh it very clean dry it in a. cloth, and cut it into pieces as long aa your finger. Sea&n them with a little beaten mace and nutmeg, pepper, fait, and a little fal-prunella beat fine; lay them in a pan, then poorras much good butter over them as will cover them, and clarified as above They muft be baked half an hour in a quick oven; if a flow oven longer, till they are enough, but that you muft.judge by the largenefs of the eels. With a fork take them out, and lay them on a coarfe cloth to drain. When they are quite cold, feafon them again with the fame feafon ing, lay thein in the pot clofe; then take oiF the butter they were baked in clear from the gravy of the fifb, and fet it in a difh before the fire. When it is melted pour the clear butter over the eels, and let them be covered with the butter.

In the fame manner you may pot what you pleafe. You may bone your eels, if you chufe.it; but then do not put in any falprunella;

To pot Lampreys,

SKIN them, cleanfe them with fait, then wipe them dry; beat fome black-pepper, mace, and cloves, mix them with fait, and feafon them. Lay them in a pan, and cover them with clarified butter. Bake them an hour; order them as the eels, only let them be feafoned, and one will be enough for a pot. You muft feafon them well let your butter be good, and they will keep a long time,

Ta



j8 tliE Aitt ot fiootttit '

7) pii Cbdrri.

AFTEtt hiving cleiafed them, cut off the fios taiit, and heads, then Jay them in rows in a long bakiiig-an i covef Ibem with buttery and order them as abca

ti p9i a Piii.

VOU mufl fcaie it, cut off the faeadi Tplit it and take but the chine-boiic, then ftrew all over the infide fome bay-faii lind pepper, roll it up round, and lay it in a pot Cover it
sind bake it an hour Then take it out, and lay it on a coarfd cloth to drain; when it is cold, put it into your pot an4 cover it with clarified butter -

To pa Salmon

AICE a piece of firefh falmon, fcale it
and tiripe it tiean (let your piece or pieces! be as big as will lie cleverly on you pot), feafon it with Jamaita pepper, blackpepper, mace and cloves beat fine, mixed with falt a little (al-prunella beat fine and rub the bone with. Seafon with a little of the fpice,- pour clarified butter over it, and bake it well Then take it out carefully, and lay it to drain; ihen cold feafoh it well, lay it in your pot dofe, and cover it with clarified butter, as above.

Thus you may do carp, tench, trout and felrad UiU of fiOu

•

JnotbiT fFiiy id foi SabnoHi

SCALfe and clean your falmon, cut it down thft back,' itf it well, and cut it as near the (hape of your pot nt you can; Take two nutmegs an ounce of mace and cloves beaten half ah ouhce of white- peppery and an ounce of faltj then take out all the bones cut off the jowl below the fins, and cut off tb6 tail. Seafon the fcaly fide firft, lay that at the bottoitt of the pot; then rub tKe feafoning oh the other fide, cover it with a difii, and let it ftadd all night It muft be put doubte and the fcaly fide, top and bottom; put butter bottom and top and cover the pot vith fome ftiff coarfe pafte. Three hourit will bake It, if a large filh; if a fmall dne, two hoCirs and when it comes out of he oven let it ftand half an hour; then tinc;over it, and raife it up at one end, that the gray may fun outj then put a trencher and a veight on it to prefs out the gravy When the butter is cold take it out clear from tbe 8 gravy.



UAllB I'tAlN AKD £ASV. tj

elvy add (brae more io it, and put it in a pan before the flfeg ben it is melted, pou it over the falmon i and when it is cold, psfter it up As to th feafoning of thefe things it muft be according to jcHt piliiti iitott or lefs.

N. B. Always take great cre that no gravy oT hey of the butter is left in the potting; jf there is, it will not keep.



iAafcribMMrfMtoihiMnitaiMi4iMfcMMiMiHMMMMrfiti



CHAP. X. tcIli£CtlON9 for the SlCl£.

i do not pretend to meddle he in tht phyfical Way; but a few Diredion for the Cook, or Nurfe, I prefume, will not be improper to make fach a Diet, &c. as the Dor ihall orden

T$ mah Mittpn Brsihr

TAKE a pound of a loin of mutton, take off the fat put to it one quart of water let it boil and ikim it well; then ut in a good piece of upper-cruft of breads and one targe blade of mace. Cover it clofe, and let it boil flowly an hour; do not Sir it, but pour the brotb clear off. Seafon it with a little fait, and the mutton will be fit to eat. If you boit turnips do not boil them in the brotbj but by themfelvts in another &ttce-pa

7i boil a Sctag of VmU

SET on the fcrag in a clean fauce-pan: to eaelb pound of veaf ut a quart of water fkrm it very clean then put in a good iece of upper-cruft a blade of mace to each pound, and a little parfiey tied with a thread. Cover it clofe then let it boil very foftly two hours and both brotb and meat will be fit to eat

% maki Buf 9r MuttofH Broth fir very weak PeopU who iaki

btft Uitk Nouriflmunik

iTAKE a pound of beef, or mutton, or both together: to a und put two quarts of water, firft ikin the meat and take off" tbe fatc then cut it into little pieces, and boil it tlH it comes to a quarter of % pint, Seafon it with a yttf little com of falt

Ikim



240 THE ART OE COOKERY

fkim ofF all the fat, aod give a fpoonful of this brotb at a time. To very weuk people, half a fpooBful is enough; to fome a tea fpoonful at a time $ and to others . a tea-cup full. There is greater nourifhment fcom this than any thing eUe



To muke Btif'Drink which is ordertd fir weak People.



TAKE a pound of lean beef; then take off all the fat and

(kin, cut it into pieces, putit into a gallon of water, with the

under-cruft of a penny- loaf, and a very little fait Let it boil

till it comes to two quarts; then ftrainit off, and it is a very

' hearty drink.

To make Beef Tea. •

TAKE a. pound of lean beef and cut it very fine, pour a pint of boiling water over it, and put it on the fire to raife the fcum; ikim it clean, ftrain it off, and let it fettle; pour it clear from the fettling, and then it is fit for ufe.

To make Pork- Brotb.

TAKE two pounds of young pork; then take off the fkln and fat, boil it in a gallon of watery with a turnip, and a very little corn of fait. Let it boil till it comes to two quarts ftrain it off, and let it ftand till cold. Take off the fat, then leave the fettling at the bottom of the pan, and drink half a pint in the morning failing, an hour before beakfaft, and at noon, if the ftomach will bear it.

To boil a Chicken.

•

4

LET your faucepan be very clean and nice; when the water boils put in your chicken, which muft be very nicely picked and clean, and laid in cold water a quarter of an hour before it is boiled; then take it out of the water boiling, and lay it in a pewter-difh. Save all the liquor that runs from it in the diih cut up your chicken all in joints in the di(h; then bruife the liver very fine, add a little boiled parfley chopped fine, a very little fait, and a little grated nutmeg: mix it all well together with two fpoonfuls of the liquor of the fowl, and pour it into the diih with the reft of the liquor in the difh. If there is not liquor enough, take two or three fpoonfuls of the liquor it lyas boiled in, clap another difli over it; then fet it over a chafing- diih of hot coals five or fix minutes, and carry it to table hot

with



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 241

iith the covit dn. This is better thin butter, and lighter for theftofidacb, though fomechufe it only with the liquor, and up parfley, nor liver,' and that is according to different palates. If it is for a very weak perfon, take off the fkin of the chicken before you fet it on thechafing-dirti. If you roaft it, make nothing but bread- fauce and that is lighter than any fauce you can make for a weak ftomach.

, 'I'hus.you may drefs a rabbit, only bruife but a little piece of the liver.



To boil Pigeons

LtiT your pigeons be cleaned, wafhed, drawn, and flcinned. Boil them in milk and water ten minutes, and pour over them fauce made thus: take the livers parboiled, "and bruife them fine, with as much parfley boiled and chopped fine. Melc fomc butter, mix a little with the liver and parfley fifft; then, iiiix all together, and pour over the pigeons.



To boil a Partriagey or any other Jfild PowL

WHEN your water boils, put in your partridge, let it boil ten minutes; then take it up into a pewter plate, and cut it in two, laying the infiAes next the plate, and, have ready fome bread-fauce made thus: take the crumb of a halfpenny-roll, or thereabouts, and boil it in half a pint of water, with a blade of mace. Let it boil two or three minutes pour away moil of thewatr; then beat it up with a little piece of nice butter, a little fait, and pour it over the partridge. Clap a Cover over it; then fet it over a chafing-difh of coals four or five minutes, and fend it away hot, cove:ed dofe.

Thus you may drefs any fort of wild- fowl, only boiling ft more or lefs, according to the bignefs. Ducks, take off the ikins before you pour the bread -fauce over them; and if you roaft them lay bread- fauce under them It is tighter than gravy for weak flomachs.

•

To boil a Plaice or Flounder

LET your watr boil, throw fome fait in; then putin 'our fifli; boil it till you think it is enough, and take it out of the water in a flice to drain. Take two fpoonfuls of the liquor, with a little fait, a little grated nutmeg; then beat up the yolk of an egg very well with the liquor, and Air in the egg; beat it well together with a knife carefully flice away all the little



24a THE ART OF CQOKERY

bones round the iifli, pour the fauce over it; then fet it Over a cbafing-di(b of coals for a minute, and fend it Iiot away. Or in the room ofhis fauce, add melted butter in a cup.

To.minci Vial or Chicken for the SUk or weak Papli.

MINCE a chicken, or fomc veal very fine, take oflFthe fkin; joAboil as much water as will moiflen it, and no more, with a very Jittle fait, grate a very little nutmeg; then throw a little flour over it, and when the water boils put in the meat. Keep Ihaking it about over the (ire a minute then have ready two or three very thin fippets, toafied nice and brown, laid in the plate, and pour the mincemeat over it.

s

To pull a Chicken for the Sickn

YOU muft take as much cold chicken as you thiiik proper, tike ofF the (kin, and pull the meat into little bits as thick as a quill; then take the bones, boil them with a little fait till . they are good,, ftrain it; then take a fpoonful of th liquor, a. fpoonful-of milk, a little bit of batter, as big as a large nutmeg, rolled in flour, a little chopped parltey, as much as will lie on a fixpence, and a little fait if wanted. This will. be enough, for half a fmail chicken. Put all together into the faUce-pan; ' then keep ihaking it till it is thick, and pour it into a hot late.

7o make Chicken Broth.

YOU muft take an old cock or large fowl, flay it; then pick off all the fat, and break it all to pietes with a rollingpin: put it into two quarts of water, with a good cruft oif bread, and a blade of mace. Let it boil foftlv till it is as good as you would have it. If you do it as it Ibould be done, it will take five or (ix hours doing pour it off, then put a quart more of boiling water, and cover it clofe. Let it boil foftly till it is good, and ftrain it off. Seafpn with a very little falc. When you boil a chicken fave the liquor, and when the meat is ear, lake the bones, then break them, and put to the liquor you boiled th chicken in, with a blade pf mace, and a cruft of bread. Let it boil till it is good, and ftrain it off.

To make Chicken-TVater.

TAKE a cock, or large fowl, flay it, then bruife it with a hammer, and put it into a gallon of waten, with a cruft of bread. Let it boil half away, and ftrain it off.

To



MADE PtAIN AKD EA$Y 243

To mdfe White Caudli.

YOU nrnft take two quarts o£ water, mix in four fpoonfuls of oatmeal, a bbde or tvo of mace, a piece of lemon -peel, let It boil, and keep fttrring it often. Let it boil about a quarter of aa hoir and take, care it does not boil over ) then ftrain it through a coarfe fieve When you ufe it fweeten it to your palate, grate in a little nutmeg, and what wine is proper; and ii% is no( for a iick perfon, fqueeze in the juice of a lemon

To make BrtnJbn Catidk,

BOIL the gruel as above, with fix fpooofuls of oatmeal, and firatn it; then add a quart of good ale, not bitter; boil it, then fveeten it to yodr palAe, and add half a pint of white-wine When you do not put in white-wine, let it be half ale

To make JFater-GrutU

You muft take a pint of water, and a large fpoonful of oat meal; then ftir it together, and let it boil up three or four times, ftirring it often. Do not let it boil over then ftrain it through a fieve, fait it to your palate, put in a good piece of fVefli butter, brew it with a fpoon tWt the butter is all melted, then it will be fine and fmooth, and very good. Some love a little pepper in it.

To mfike Panada.

YOU muft take a quart of vater in a nice clean fauce-pan a blade of mace, a large piece of crumb of bread; let it boil two minutes; then takeout the bread, and bruife it in a bafoa very fine. Mix as much water as will make it as thick as yoti would have; the reft pour away, and fweeten it to your palace. Put in a piece of butter as big as a walnut do not put m any wine, it fpoils it: you may grate 'm a little nutmeg. This is hearty and good diet for fick people.

To hoil Sago.,

PtJT a large fpoonful of fago into three quarters of a pint of water, ftir it, and boil it foftly till it is as thick as you would have it; then put in wine and fugar, with a little nutmeg to your paktc. .

R a n



4



TfaE ART OF COOKERY



7 toil SaH

' IT is a hard fione ground to powder, and gen'eraHy fold- for one (hilling an ounce: take a large tea-fpoonful of the. powder •nd put it into a pint of boiling water keepftirring it tUlic is like a fine jelly; then put wine and fugar ta your palate, and lemon, if it will agree.

7i ntah Iftnghp JtUyt

TAKE a quart of water, one ovnce of riingtafsy half anr ounce of clove$; boil them to a pint, then drain it upon a pound of loaf fugar, and when coM fweeteti your tea "with it. You may make the jelly as above, and leaveput thf cbvesTr Sweeten to your palate, and add a little wine AU ocbeir jellies yott have in another chapter,

•

To make the PeHoral DrinL

- TAKE a gallon of water, and half a pound of peart barky, boil it with a quarter of a pound of figs fplit, a pennywonh of liquorice fliced to pieces, a quarter of a pound of raiiins of the fun ftoned; boil all togethef till half is wafted, then ftrain it off. This is ordered in the meafles, and (eveial other di( orders, for a drink.

TV make ButiertdJVater or what the Germans call Egg'-Souf who are very fond of it for Supper. Tiu have it in the Chapter for Lent. ' . "

TAKE a pint of water, beat up the yolk of an egg with the water, put in a piece of- butter as big as a fmali walnut, two or three knobs of fugar, and keep ftirring it all the time it is on the Are. When it begins to boil, bruife it between the fauce-pan and a meg till it is fmooth, and has a great' froth; then it is fit to drink. This is ordered m' a cold, or where egg will agree with the ftomacb

To fnake SeedWater.

TAKE a fpoonful of coriander-feed, halfa fpoonful of cara way.feed bruifed and boiled in a pint of water j then ftrain jt arid bruife it with the yolk of aacgg. Mix it with fack and chdublerefined fugar, according to your palate.



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. HS

fo maie Bread Soup for the Sick,

TASCE 9 qujrt of water, fet it on the fire in a clean faucean, and as much dry cruft of bread cut to pieces as the top of a penny-loaf, the drier the better, a bit of butter as big as a walnut v kt it boil, then beat it with a fpoon, and keep boiling it till the bread and water k well mixed: then fe'afon it with a very lit fat and it is a pretty thing for a weak ftomach.

I

7i make artificial JJis-Mili,

TAKE two ounces of pearl-barley two large fpoonfuls of Jurtfhorn-ihavings,,ane ounce of erngo-roor, one ounce of pbipa root, one ounce of preTeryed ginger, eighteen fnails bruiCpd with the iells, to be boiled in three quarts of water fill it comes to three pints, then boil a pint of new-mi)lc mix it with the reft, and put in two ounpes pf balfam of Tu T
kP hlf a pint in the morning, and half a pint at nigbtk

Cows Milt, next to AJfei Aftlk done thus: ',

. TAKE a quart of milk, fet it in a pan over night, the next morning take off all the cream, then boil it, and fet it in.the pan again till night; then fkim it again, boll it, fet it in the pari ag
in, and the net mornipg fkim it, warm it blood- warm, and drink it a$ you do aftes-milk. It is very npar as goo and with (pipe confumptive people if is better

To make a good Drink.

BOIL a quart of milk, and a quart of water, wi(h the top cruft of a penoy-Ioaf, and one blade of mace, a quarter of aa hour very foftly, then pour it o and when you drink it let it be wariDf

fi make Barhj-Water.

PUT a quarter of a pound of pearl-barley into two quarts of water, lee it boil, flim it very clean, boil half away nd ftrain it off. Sweeten to your palate, but not too fweef, and put in two fpoonfuls of white- Wine, Drink it luke-warm.

To make SageTea,

TAKE a little (age, a little balm, put it into a pan, flice a lemon, peel and all a fw knobs oC fugr, one glais of white

R j winc







246 THE ART OF COOKERY

wine, pour on there two or throe quarts of boiliog water cover it, and drink when thirfty. When you think it ftrqng enough of the herbs, take them out, otherwife it will mak it bitter.

T make it fir a Cifld.

A little fage, balm, rue, mint and pcnny-royal, pour boiling water on, and fweeten to your palate. Syrup of cloves, .&c. and black-cherry- water, you hve in the chapter of Pre fervcs.

Liquor fir a Child thai bas tbi Tbrujb. c

TAKE half a pint of fpring-water, a knob of double- re fined fugar, a very little bit of alum, heat it well together with the yolk of an egg, then beat it in a large fpoonfijl of the juice of fage, tie a rag to the end of the ftick, dip it in this iiquor, and often clean the mouth. Give the child over. right one drop of laudanum, and the next day proper pyfic, wafhing the mouth often with the liquor.

i "

To boil Comfrey 'Roots t

TAKE a pound of comfrey -roots, fcrape (hem clean, cuf them into little pieces, and put them into three pints of water. Let' them boil till there is about a pint, then ftrain it, and when it is cold, put it into a fauce-pan. If there is .any fettling at the bottom, throw it away mix it with fugair to your palate, half a pint of molintain'wine, and the juice! of a lemon. Let it boil, then pour it into a clean earthen pot, and fet it by fof life. Some boil it in milk, and it i3 very good where it will. Pgree, and is reckoned a very great ftrengthener. '

To make tbe Knuckle Broib.

TAKE twelve fhank ends of a leg of mutton, break tbcrn ivell and fokehem in cold fpring-water for an hour, then take a fmall brufli and fcour them clean with warm water and fait, then put them in two quarts of fpring-water and let them fimmer till reduced to one quart. When they have been oo bne hour, put in one ounce of hartlhom-fliavings and the bottom of a halfpenny -roll. Be careful to take the icum ofFas it rifes; when done ftrain it oiF, and if any fat remains, take It ofF with 'a knife when cold; drink a quarter of a pint warni whea you go to bed, and one hour before you rife j it is 3 . .. . A, . ?, .w . . certain



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. • 247

certain fciftoratlve at thd begmmng of a decline or when any weaknefs is the cooplatht.,

N. B. If it is niade.righty it is the colour of calfs foot jelly, and is ftrong enough to bear a fpoon ujright. From the College of Phyficins, London.

jt Medicine for a Difirder in the Bowels.

TAKE an ounce of beef-fuet, half a pint of milk, and half a pint of water, mix together with a table-fpoonful of wheatflour, put ic over the fire ten minutes, and keep it ftirring ail the time, and take a co£Fee-cup full two or three times a-day.



CHAP. XL

For CAPTAINS of SHIPS.

To mate Catcbiip to keep twenty Tears.

TAKE a gallon of ftrong ftale beer, one pound of antovies wfhed from the pickle, a pound of ihalots, peeled, hIf an ounce of mace, half an ouce of cloves, a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper, three or four large races of ginger, two quarts of the large muihroomfiaps rubbed to pieces. Cover all this clofe, and let it fimmer till it is half wafted, then ftrain it through a flannel -bag; let it ftand till it is quite cold, cben bottle it. You may carry it to the Indies. A fpoonful of this to a pound of frefh butter melted, makes a fine fi(h-fauce; pr in the room of gravyfauce. The ftronger and ftaler the beer Uj the better the catchup will be

To make Fijh- Sauce to keep the whole Tear.

YOU muft take twenty-four anchovies, chop them, bones and all; put to them ten ihalots cut fmall, a handful of fcraped horfe raddi(b, a quarter of an ounce of mace, a quart of whicewine, a pint of water, one lemon cut into flrces half a pint of anchovy- liquor, a pint of red-wine, twelve cloves, twelve pepper-scorns. Boil them together till it comes to a quart; rain rt oflF, cover it cjofe, and keep it in a cold dry place yo fKKnipfuls ifili be fufficiVnt for a found of bmter.



248 THE ART OF COOKERY

It IS a pretty fauce either for boiled fowl, veal, &c or in the room of gravy, lowering it with hot water, and thipipeniag it with a piece of btiCter rolled in flour.

To pot Dripping, to fry Fifi Meatj Fritters (fc.

TAKE fi poundf of good beef-dripping, boil it in Ibft wa- ter, ftrain it into a pan, let it ftand till cold then take off the hard fat, and fcrape off the gfavy which fticks to the infide. Thus do eight times; when it is cold iund hard, take it off clean from the water, put it into a large fauce-'pan, with fix baykaves, twelve cloves, half a pound of fait, and a quarter of a pound of whole pepper. Let the fat be all melted and jufthot, let ic ftand till it is hot enough to ftrain through a fieve into the pot, and ftand til it is quite cold, then cover it up. Thus yoU may do what quantity you pleafe. The beft way to keep any fort of dripping is to turn the pot upHde down, and then no rats can get at it. If ic will keep on Ihip-board, tt will make as fine puff-pafte cruft as any butter can do, or cruft for nuddings, &c

To pickk Mujhropms fir the Sea.

WASH them clean with a piece of flannel in fait and water, ut them into a fauce-pan and throw a little fait over them, et them boil up three times in their owii liquor, then throw them' into a fieve to draiii and fpread them on a clean cloth; let tjiem lie till cold, then put them in wide-mouthed bottles, put in with them a good deal of whole mace, a little niitmeg diced, and a few claves. Boil the' fugar- vinegar of your owil making, with a good deal of whole pepper, fodie races of ginger, and two or three bay-leaves. Let it boil a few minutes, then ftrain it, when it is cold pour it on, and fil! thef bottl with mutton fat fried; Cork them' tie a bladder, then a leather over them, keep it down clofe, and in as cool a place as poffible. As to all other pickles, you have them iq the chap ter of Pickles.

Tio make MuJhroomPowdet

TAKE half a peck of fine large thick muQirooms, wafh them clean from grit and dirt with a flannel rag, fcrape out the infide, cut out all the worms, put them into a kettle over the fire without any water, two large onions ftuck with cloves a large handful of fait, a quarter of an ounce of mace, tWo teafpounf uls of beatea ppperc let them fimmer till the liquor js

boiled



L



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 249

jbotld away, take great care they do not burn; then lay them' on fieves to dry in the fiin, or in tin plates, and fet them in a flack oven all- night to dry, till tbey wUl beat to powder. Irefs the powder down hard in a pot and keep it fo fe• Tott may put jvhat quantity you pleaefor tl;ie fav
ce ' '

Ti keep Mujbrooms without Picili.

TAKE TS mufhrooms, peel them, fcrape out the infide put them into a fauce-paii, throw a little fait over them, and let hem .boil Ul theif own liquor, then throw them ino a fipvc to drain, then lay them on tin plates, arid fet them in a cool oven. Repeat it often till they are perfedUy dry, put them into a clean Rone jar, tie them down tight, and keep Jthem in a dry piace hcy eat deicioufly, and look as well as trufles,

J'o hep Aritchoh'B$ttoms Ay.

BOIL them juft fo as you can pull off the leaves and the choke cut them from the ftaiks, lay them on tin plates, fet thgn in a very cool oven, and repeat it til! they are quite dry; then put them in apaper-bag, tie them up clofe, and hang thehitipin a dry place. Keep them in a dry place; and When you ufe them, lay them in warm water till they are ten der. Shift the water two or three times. They are fine in almoft all fauces cut to little pieces, axid put in juft before your (iiuce is enough

7i fry JlrtichoicBotfoms:

LAY them in wter as above; then have ready fome butter hot inJthe pan flour the bottoms, and fry them. Lay them in your di(h and pour melted butter over them

To ragoo Artichoke-Bottomsm

TAKE twelve bottoms, foften them in warm water, as in ihe foregoing receipts: take half a pint of water, a piece of the fbong foup, as big as a fmall walnut, half a fpoonful of the catchup, five or iix of the dried mufhrooms, a tea- fpoonful of ithe muftroom powder, fet it on the fire, (hake all tpgether, ani let it boil foftly two or three minutes. Let the laft water you icur.to the bottoms boil 5 take them out hot, lay them in your iih pou
the fauce over them, and fend them to table hot.



9



SCO THE ART OF COOKERY

r ii€f$ Fijh.

AS to frying fift, firft wa(h it very clean, then dry it wcH, and flour it; take fome of the beeMripping, make it boil in the fiew-pan; then throw in your fifli, and fry it of a fine light brown. Lay it on the bottom of a fieve or coarfe cloth t6 drain, and make fauce according to your fancy.

7 bah Fifif.

BUTTER the pan, lay in the fifh, throw a little fait over it and flour; put a very little water in the dilh, an onion and bundle of fweet herbis, ftick fome little bitts of butter, or the fine dripping, on the fi(h. Let it be baked of a fine light brown - when enough, lay it on a di(h before the fire, and fkim oiF all the fat in the pan; ftrain the liquor, and mix it up either with the fiih-fauce or ftrong foup, or the catchup.

To mak€ a GravySoup.

ONLY boil foft water, and put as much of the ftrong foup to it as will make it to your palate. Let it boil; and if it wants fait, you muft feafon it Tb receipts for the foup you have in the chapter for foups.

To make PeasSoup.

GET a quart of peas, boil them in two gallons of water till they are tender, then have a ready piece of fait- pork or heef which has been laid in water the night before; put it into the pot with two large onions peeled, a bundle of fweet herbs, cftlery, if you have it, half a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper; let it boil till the meat is enough, then uke it up, and if the Voup is not enough let it boil till the foup is good; theii ftrain it, fct it on again to boil, and rub in a good deal of dry mint, Keep the meat hot when the foup is ready, put in the meat' again for a few minutes and let it boil, then ferve it away. If you add a piece of the portable foup, it will be very tbod. The onion-foup you have in the Lent chapter.

7i make PorkPudiing or Beef

MAKE a good cruft with the dripping, or mutton -fuet, if

Su have it, flired fine; make a thick cruft, take a piece of t pork or beef, whicb has beep twcaty-foMr hours in foft



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 151

water; feafon it with a little pepper, put it into • this cruft, roll it up clofy tie it in a cidth, and boil it$ if for about four or five pounds, botl it five hours

And when you kill mutton, make a pudding the fame way, only cut the (leaks thin; feafon them with pepper and falt and boil it three hours, if large; or two hours, if fmall, and fo according to the fize.

Apple-pudding make with the fame cruft, only pare the apples, core them, and fill your pudding; if large, it will take five hours boiling. When it is enough, lay it in the di(h, cut a hole in the top, and flir in butter and fugarj lay the piece on again, and fend it to table,

A pj-une pudding eats fine, made the fame way, oixly wheo the cruft is ready, fill it with prunes, and fweeten it according to your fancy 3 clofe it up, and boil it two hQr9•

To make a Rice Pudding.

TAKE what rice you think proper, tie it loofe in a cJotb, and boil it an hour: then take it up, and untie it, grate a good deal of nutmeg in, ftir in a good piece of butter, and fweeten to your palate. Tie it up clofe, boil it an hour more, then take it up and turn it into your diih; melt butter, with a littl fugar, and a little white-wine for fauce

To mate a Smi-Puddlng.

GET a pound of fuet ihred fine, a po4ind of flour, a pound of currants picked clean, half a pound of raifins ftoned, two tea-fpoonfuis of beaten ginger, and a fpoonfol of tinlure of faffron; mix all together with fait water very tbik j th either boil or bake it.

A Liv'Puddlng boihdn

GET the liver of a (beep when you kill one, and cut it at thin as you can, and chop it; mix it with as much fuet (hred fine, half as many crumbs of bread or bifcuit grated, feafon it lyith fome fweet herbs (hred fine, a little nutmeg grated, a little beaten pepper, arid an anchovy (hred fine; mic all toge ther with a little fait, or the anchovy liquor,, with a piece of butter, fill the cruft and clofe it Boil it three hours.

To



4 THE ART 9fGfititKY



To maii an OatfjteaJpHbii)ig

GET a pint of oatmeal once cut, a pound of fuet fhred. Dc, a pound of currants, and half;i )pound of raifins ftoned inix alt together well with a little fait, tie it in a clotb lea₯' ing room for the fwelliog.

7i iaii an Oatmeal- Puddh.

BOIL a quart of water, feafon it with a little fait; whe die water boils, Sir in the oatmeal till it is fd thick you caninot eafily ftir your fpoon; then take it off the fire, (lir in twa ipoonfuls of brandy,, or a gill of mountain, and fweeten it to your palate. Grate in a "little nutipeg, and ftir in half a pound of Cjiirrants, clean waflied and picked then butter a pan, poiif it in, and bake it half an hour. ' cc 7



Bdce-RudSng.ialsfif,!





BOIL a pound of rie juft: tiirit is tender; iben Hrain all the water from it as dry as you can, but do liot fqueee it i theh ftir in a, good piece of butter, and fweeten to your palate Grate a fmali nutmeg in, ftir it all well together, butter a pan, and pQur it in and bake it. You may add a few currants for . change. .

To make a PeaS'Pudding.

. BOIL it till it js quite tendr then take it up, untie it, in a eood piece of butter, a little fait, and. a ood deal crDeSl en pepper, then tie it up tight again, lcoiI it., hOuKlppger and it will eat fine. ' Al other pudding y6u'bavVin the chap Ut of Puddings.



•_'



To make a Harried of 'French Beans



TfAKE a pint of the feeds of French, beans, which arp radyr dried for fowing, wafli thefai cleii, arid put them into a twoffluart faucepan, fill it with water, and let them boil two hours: if the water waftes away too much, you muft put in more boiling water to keep -them boiling, in the mean time take ahnoft half a pound of nice frefii butter, put it into a clean ftew-pan, and when it is all melted, and done making any noife, have ready a pint bdfon heaped up with onfons peelfd and fliced thin, throw them into the pan, and fry them of

a fine



MADE PLAIN ANO EASV. i

a fine brown, ftirring tfaem about that they may be all a)ike then pour oflF the dear water from the beati into a bafoh, and throw the beam all into the ftew-pan ftir 2AI together, and throw in a large tea-fpoonful of beaten pepper, two hvaped Ml of fait, and ftir it all together for two or three minutesv You may make this difli of what thicknefs you think prpper (either to eat with a fpoon, or otherways) with the liquor you poured off the beans, Forchange, you may make it thin enoii for foqp. When it is of the proper thicknefs you like ktakie it off the fire, and ftir in a large fpoonful of vinegar and the yolks of two eggs beat. The eggs may be left 04iX if difliked. Di(b it upf and fend it to table.

i .

To make a Fowl-Pie,

tIRST make rich thick cruft, cover the i(h with the pafte, fhen tke fome very fine bacon, or cold boiled ham, (lice it, and lay a layer all over. Seafon with a little pepper then pun in tlie fowl, after it is picked and cleaned, and fingedj £hake very little pepper and fait into the belly, put in a little water, cover it with ham, feafoed with a little beaten pepper put oa ihe lid and 1)ake'it two hours. When it comes out of the oven, take half a pint of water,' boil it, and add to it as much of the ftrong foup as will make the gravy quite rich, pour it boiling hot into the pie, and lay on the lid again. Send it to table hot. Or lay a piece of beef or pork in foft water twfenty-four hours, • ftice it in the room of tho ham, and it will eat fine



f



Tff mah a Cheftdre PorkPiefor Sea

. TAE fome fait pork that has been boiled cut it into thin fiices, an eciual quantity Qf, potatoes pared and fliced thin, make a good cruft, cover the diih, lay a layer of meat, iea fened with a little pepper, and a layer of potatoes; thea % layer of meat, a layer of potatoes, and fo on rill four pie is fHll. Seafon it with jepper; when it is fuD, lay tome butter on the top, and fill your di(h above half full of foft waters Clofe your fk up, and bake it in a gentle oven

To mki SeehVinifin

WHEN you fefll a Aeqc, keep ftirring the blood all the tim till it is cold, or at leaft as cold as it will be, that it may not congeal then cut up the iheep, take one fide, cut the leg like

a haunci)



154 THE ART OF COOKERY

9c haunch, cut off the ihoulder and loin, the nttk and beaft ia two, fteep them all in ibe blood, as long as the weather will permit you, theA take out the haunch, and hang.it out of the fun as long as you can to be fweet, and roaft it as you do. A haunch cjf venifon. It will eat very fine, efpecially if the beat will give you leave to keep it long. . Take off all tjie fuet he fore you lay it in the blood, take th other joints and lay them in a large pan, pour over them a quart of red wine, and a quart of rape vinegar Lay the fat fide of the meat down- wards in the pan, on a hollow tray is beft, and pour the wine and vinegar over it: let it lie twelve hours, then take the neck, breaft and loin out of the pickle; let the ihoulder lie a week, if the heat will let you, rub it with bay-falt, faitpetre, and coarfe fugar, of each a quarter of an ounce, one handful of common fait, and let it lie a week or ten days. Bone the neck, bread, and loin; (eafon them with pepper and fait to your palate, and make a pafty as you do venifon. Boil the bones for gravy to fiJl the pie, when it comes out of the oven; and the ihoulder boil frefli out of the pickle, with Jk peas-pudding.

And wheft you cut up the (heep, take the heart, liver, and lights, boil them a quarter of an hour, then cut them fmall, and chop them very fine; feafon them with four large blades of mace, twelve cloves, and a large nutineg, all beat to powder. Chop a pound of fuet fine, half a pound of fugar, two pounds of currants clean waihed, half a pint of red wine; mix all well together,' and make a pie. Bake if an hour: it is very rich.

To make DumpKngs when you have Tfite-BnadM

Take the crumb of a twopenny loaf grated fine, as much beef- fuet (hred as fine as poffible, a little fait, half a fmall nuttneg grated, a large fpoonful of fugar, beat two eggs with two fpoonfuls of faCk
mix all well together, and loll them up as big as a turkey's egg. Let the waier boi), and throw them in Half an hour will boil them. For fauce, melt butter 'with a Ifttle fait, lay the dumplitigs-in a difh, pour the fauce oveT them, and ftrew fugar all over the dtA. " .

Thefe are very projtty, either at land or fea. You muft obr ferve to rub your hands with flour when you make them up.

The por table foup to carxy ab(;oad you have in the Sixth Chapter

c - .,

' CHAP,



MADE PLAIN AND EASY, 255



C H A ?• XII.



Of HOGS-PUDDINGS, SAUSAGES, &e.



Ti maie Almond Hdgt-tPuddings

TAtCE two pounds of beef-fuet or marrow, fhred very fmall, a pound and a half of almonds blanched, and beat very fine with rofe- water, one pound of grated bread, a. pound and a quarter of fine fugar, a little fait, half an ounce of mace, nutmeg, and cinnamon together,, twelve yolks of eggs, four. whites, a pint of fack, a pint and a half of thick cream, fome rofe or orangec flower water; boil the. cream, tie the (kffron in a bag, and dip in the cream to colour it Firft beat your eegs very well; then fiir in your almonds, then the fpice, the laTt, and fuet, and mix all your ingredients together; fill your guts but half full, put fome bits bf citron iH the guts as you fill them, tie them up, and boil them a qaar ter of an hour.

AnothiT Way.

TAKE a pound of bee£-marrow chopped fine, half a pound of fweet almonds blanched, and beat fine with a little orangeflower or rofe water, half a pound of white-bread grated fine, half a pound of currants clean walhed and picked, a.quarcer of a pound of fine fugar, a quarter of an ounce of mace, nutmeg. and cinnamon together, of each an equal quantity, and halfa pint bf fack: mix all well together, with half a pint of ood croam, and the yolks of four eggs. Fill your guts half fuIL tie tliem up, and boil them a quarter of an hour, and pricic them as they boil to keep the guts from breaking. You ma leave out the currants for change; but then you muft add t quarter of a pound mote of fugar.

A thirk Way.

HALF a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of fugar, a

quarter of a pound of currants, the crumb of a halfpenny roll

grated fine, fix large pippins pared and chopped fine, a gill of

2 fack,



ds6 'f HE ART Oi COOKERY

fack or two fpoonfuls of rofe-wate r, fix bitter almonds blanchr ed and beat fine, the yolks of two eggs, and one white beat fine; mix all together, fill the guts better than half fut, andf tl them i quarter of an hour.

7i mate H9gPuMmf$ with Currantst

' TAkE three pounds of grated bread to four pounds of beef fuet finely Hired, two pounds of currants clean picked and wafbh ed, cloves, mace, and cinnamon of each a quarter of an ounce finely beaten, a little fait, a pound ahd d half of fugar a pint offitck, a quart of cream, a little rote-wateiP, evdnfyegs weI7 beaten, but half the whites; mix all thefe well together, fill Che guts half full, boil them a little, and prick them as they boil, to keep them from breaking the guts. Take them upr' upon clean cloths, then lay them on your difli; of when yolif ufe them boil them a few minutes, or eat them cold".

T$ make BhckPuddings

FIRST, before you kill your hog, get a peck of gnits, boil them half an hour in water; then drain them, and put them' into a cle$n tub or large pan; then kill your hog, and fave two quarts of the blood of the hog, and keep flirriag k till the blood is quite cold; then mix it with your gruts, and ftir them well together. Seafon with a large fpoonful of fait, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, mace, and nutmeg together, an equal quatiltity of each; dry it, beat it well, and mix in. Take a little winter favoury, fweet marjoram, and thynle, pennyroyat ftripped of the ftalks, and chopped very fine; juii enough to &afon them, and to give them a flavour, but no more. The next day, take the leaf of the hog and cut into dice, fcrape and %a(b the guts very cleati, then tie one end, and begin to fill them; mix in the fat as you fill them, be fure put in a good ileal of fat, fill the fkihs three parts full, tie the other end, and lAike your puddings what length you pleafe; prick them th a pin, and put them in a kettle of boilin-g water. Boil them very fofdy an hour; then take them oat, and lay xYstm gii clean ftraw.

In Scotland they make a pudding with the blood of a gocrfe Chop oiF the head, and fave the blood; iHr it till it is cold, then mfx it with gruts, fpice, fait, and fweet herbs, according to their fancy, and fome beef-fuet chopped. Take the (kirn off the necl4 then puU out the wind-pipe and fat, fill the

ikin



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 257

ikii!) tie it at both eods, fo make a pie of the giblets, and lay he pudding in the middle. Or you may leave the grucs out if you pleafe

Savoldys

TAKE fix pound of young pork, free' it from bone and Ikin, and fait it with one ounce of Altpetre, and a pound of comnion fait, for two days; chop tt very fine, put in three tea-fpoorifuls of pepper, twelve fage leavei cbopt fine, and a pound of grated bread. Mix it well, and fill the guts, and bake them half an hour in a flack oven, and eat either hoc or told.

Tv make fini Saufages.

YOU muft take fix pounds of good pork, free from (kin, griftks, and fat, cut it very fmall, and beat it in a mortar till it is very fine; then ihred fix pounds of beef fuet very fine and free from all (kin. Shred it as fine as poffible; even take a good deal of fage, wa(h it very clean, pick off the leaves, and flired it very fine. Spread your meat on a clean drefler or table; then (bake the fage all over, about three large fpoon fuls; (hred the thin rind of a middling lemon very fine and throw over, with as many fweet herbs, when fhred fine, as will fill a large fpoon; grate two nutmegs over, throw over two tea-fpoonnils of pepper, a large fpoonful of fait, then throw over the fuet, and mix it all well together. Put it down clofe in a pot; when you ufe them, roll them up with as much egg as will make them roll fmooth. Make them the fize of a faufage, and fry them in butter or good dripping. Be fure it be hot before you put them in, and keep rolling them about. When they are thorough hot, and of a fine light brown, they are enough. You may ctiop this meat very fine, if you do not like it beat. Veal eats well done thus,' or veal and pork together. . Youmay clean fome guts, and fill them.

To make common aufageu

TAKE three pounds of nice pork, fat and lean -tet her, without (kin or griftles, chop it as fine as pofiible, feafori ic with a tea •fpoonful of beaten pepper, and two of fait, fome fage fhred fine, about three tea- fpoon fuls; mix it well together, bare the guts very nicely cleaned, and fill them, or put them

S dowa



253



THE ART OF CCyOKERY



down in a pot, fo roll tKcm of what fize you pleafe and ftf them. Beef makes utiy good faufages.

Oxford Saufages. •

TAItE a pound of lean veal, a pound of youfigvpork9 fatr and Itan, U from flciiit and griftle, a pound of beef Aief chopt all fine together; put in half a pound of grated bread half the peel of a lemon ihred fine, a nutmeg grated,, fix fage leaves wafhed and chopped very fine, a tea-fpoonful of pepper and two of falfy fome thyme, favory,, and marpram, fared fine. Mix it all well together,, and put it dole down in a pan when youure it; roll it out the fize of a common faufage and fry them in frefh butter of a fine brown, or broil theu over a clear fire, and fend them to table as hot as poffible.

To make Bolignu SaufagiS

TAKE a pound of bacon,, fat and lean together a
cound of beef, a pound pf veal a pound of pork, a pound of beef-fuet,. cut them fmall and chop them fine,' take a fmall handfai o£ fage, pick ofithe leaves, chop it fine, with a few fweet herbs feafon pretty high with pepper an fait. You muft have large gut, and fill it, then fet on a fauce-pah of water, whei it boils put it in, and priclthe gut for fear of burling. Boil it foftly an hour, thea lay it on clean flraw to dry







CHAP. xm.

To POTy and make HATVIS &c.



To pot Pigeons or Foxols

CUT off their legs, draw them and wipe them with ft efodi, but do not wa(h them Seafon them pretty well with yepper and fait, put them into a pot, with as much butter. a you think wHl over them, when melted, and baked very teiH 4ff then drain tbem vry dry.&OA the gitvy lay them on a

lotbc



kADE PLAIN AND EASY. 259

'cjoh, aiid that will fuck up all the gravy; feafon' them again ith fait, mace, cloves, and pepper, beaten fine, and put jthem down ctofe into a poC Taice the butter, when cold clear from the gravjr, fet it before the fire to melt, and pour over the birds; if yoa have not enough,, clarify fome more, and let the butter be near an inch thick atcove the birds. Thus you may do all forts of fowl; only wild fowl (honld be boned biit that you may do as you pleafe.

Tapct a cold Tngttty Befj or Ventfon,

CUT it fmall, beat it well in a marble mortar, with melted butter, feafon it wkh mace cloves, and nutmeg, beat very fine, and fome pepper and fait, till the meat is mellow and fine; then put it down clofe in your pots, and cover it with clarified butter. Thus you may do cold wild fowl; or you tnay pot any fort of cold fowl whole, feafoning them witb what fpice you pleaic.

Ti pot Ventfon.

TAKE a piece of venifon, fat and lean togetherj lay it in a di&, and ftick pieces of butter all over: tie brown paper over itc and bake it When it comes out of thepveny take it out of the liquor hot, drain it, and lay it in a di(h; when cold, take off all the fkin, and beat it in a marhle mortar, fat and lean together, feafon it with mace, cloves, nutmeg, black pepper, and fait to yQUT mind. When the butter is cold that it was baked in, take a little of it, and beat in with it to moiflen it then put it down clqie, and cpver it, wiih clarified butter .

Vou miift be fure to, beat it till it is like a paile.

. Ta pot a Har€.

TAKE a hare that has hung four or five days, cafe it, and 'cut it in quarters; put it in a pot, feafon it with pepper, falt and mace, and a pound of butter over it, and bake it four hours. When it comes out, pick it from the 'bones, and ipound it in a mortar with the butter that comes ofFyour gravy, and little beateri cloves and mace, till it is fine and fmootfr, then pdt it clofe down in potting pets, and put clarified butter over it i tre it over with white paper.



26o THE ART OF COOKERY

To pet Tongues,

TAKE a nett8 tongue, rub ie with a pound of white falr •n ounce of ft- petre, half a pound of coarfe fugar, rub it wrlF. (urn it every day in thic pickle for a fortnight. This pickle will do feveral tongues, only adding a Kttie more white fait $ or we generaHy do them after our hams. Take the tongues out of the pickle, cutofFthe root, and boil it well, till it will peel; then take your tongues and feafon them with fait, pepper, cloves, mace, and nutmeg, all beat fine; rub it well with your hands whilA it is hot; then put it in a pot, and mtlt as much butter as will cover it all over. Bake it an hour in the oven, then take it out, let it ftand to cool, rub a little freOi fpice on it; and when it is quite cold, lay It in your pickh'ngpot. When the butter is cold you baked it in, take it ofF clean from the gravy, fet It in an earthen pan before the fire; and when it is melted, pour it over the tongue. You may lay pigeons or chickens on each fide; befure to let the- butter

be about an inch above the tongue. .

• • • -

J fine tfay to pot a Tongue



TAKE a dried tongue, boil it till it is tender, tlen eel it

take a large fowl, bone it; a goofe, and bone it; take a quar

ter of an ounce of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, a

large nutmeg, a quarter of an ounce of black pepper, beat all

well together; a fpoonful of fait yruh the infide of the fowl well,

and the tongue. Put the tongue into the fowl; then feafon

the goofe, and fill the goofe with the fowl and tongue, and the

goofcwill look as if it was whole. Lay it in a pan that will

juft hold it, elt frefli butter enough to cover it, fend it tothe

oven, and bake it an hour and a half; then uncover the pot,

and take out the meat. Carefulcy'jdran it from the butter, lay

it on a coarfe cloth till it is cold, and wba.the butter is cold,

take ofF the hard fa froni the gravj', and Jay it before, the fire to

melt, put your meat into the pot again and pour the butter

over. If there is not.endugh,. clarify more, and let the butter

be an inch above the meat;. and this will keep a great while,

. tats fine, and looks beautiful. When you cut it, it muft be

cut crofa-ways down through, and looks very pretty.. It makes

a pieuy cornerdifli at table, or fi(edih for fupper. If you

cut a nice down the middle quite through, lay it in a plate,

afid garnifii with green parfky apd naftertium-flowers. c If you

. wi:i



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 261

Will be at the expence, bone a turkey, and put over the goofe. Obferve, when you pot it, to favc a little of the fpice to throw over it, before the laft butter is put on, or the meat will not be feafoned enough.

75? pot Beef Jih Ventfon.

CUT the lean of a buttock of beef into pound pieces; for eight pounds of beef take four ounces of falt-petre; four ounces of petrc-falt a pint of white-falt, and an ounce of 12Iprunella; beat the falts all very fine, mix them well together, rub the falts into the beef; then let it lie four cJays, turning it twice a day, then put it into a pan, cover it with puaip-watcr, and a little of its own brine; thep bake it in an oven wirh houfehold bread till it is as tender as a chicken, then drain it from the gravy, and bruifc it abroad, and take put all the fkin and inews; then pound it in a marble mortar, then Jay it in "a broad diO), mix in it an.punceof cloVes and mace, three quarters of an ounce of pepper, ai
d one nutmeg, all beat very fine. Mix it aUvery well with the meat, then clarify a little fre(h butter and mix with the meat, to make it a little moid; mix it yx'y well together, prefs it down into pots very hard, fet it at the oven's mouth juft to fettle, and cover it two inches thick with clarified butter. When cold, cover it with while paper?

To pot CheJInre-Cbeefef

TAKE three pounds of Chefliire cheefe, and put it into 9 mortar,- with half a pound of the beft frefh butter you can get, p6und them together, and id the beating add i gill of riclt Canary witie, and half 4n ounce of mace finely beat, thea iifted like a fine powder When all is extremely well niixed, prefs it hard down into a gallipot, cover it with clarified butc ter and keep it cooL A iOiice of this exceeds all the creaia hee& that can be niade.

Tq collar a Br toft of VeaU

TAKE a breaft of veal, and bone it; beat it with a roHing-pin, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, beat a little mace, cloves,' nutmeg, and pepper very fine, with a little fair, a handful of parfley, and fome fweet herbs, and lemon-peef (hred fine, a few crumbs of bread. Mix all together, andJifcw over % rail it up very, tight, bind it- with a fillet, and S3 ' wra



f





ftfia THE ART OF COOKERY

wrap it in a cloth, then boil it two hours and a half in watflis made pretty fait, then bang it up by one endtill cold. Make a pickle: to a pint of fait and water put half a pint of vinegar and lay it in a pan, and let the pickle cover i;; and when yoin ufe.it, cut it in Qices, and garnifh with parfley and pickles.

To mah MarhliViaL

TAKE a peats tongue and boil it til tender % peel It, and cut it in flices, and beat it in a mortar with a ppund oi butter with a little beaten mace and pepper, till it is like a pafle have fomeyeal dewed and beat in the fame manner; put feme; veal in a potting-pot, then fome tongue in lumps over th Veal, then fomc veal over that, tongue over that, and thei vea again; prefs it c)own hard, pour fome clarified butter ovei:
t, keep it in a cold dry place, and when you ufe it; cut ic ia (ices, an garni with parfley.

To collar Beef

TAISE a piece of thin flank of beef, and bone it
9ut tht

Ikin pfF, then fait it with two ounces o faltpetre,two ounces

of fal- prunella, two ounces of bay-falt," half a pound of coarf

fugar, and two pounds of white-falt, beat the hard falts iine

and mix all together; turn it eyery day, and rtb it with the

bciae well, for eight days; then take it out of the pickle, wa(h

clt, and wipe it dy; then take a cjuarter of an ounce of cloves

arid a quarter of an ounce of mace, twelve corns of all-fpice,'

and. a nutmeg beat very fine, with a fpoonful of beaten pepper,

% large quantity pf chopped parfley, with fome fweet herbs

chopped fine; fprinkle it on the beef, and roll it up very tight,

put a coarfe cloth round, and tie it very tight with beggars

tape; boi( it in a large copper of water, if a large collar, fix

hours, .a fmali one, fivcf hoursj takq it out, and put it in a

prefs till cold; if you have never a prefs, put it between two

boards, and a large weight upon it till it is coli; then take if

out of the doth, and cpt it into flices. Garniih with raw

paftley.

To collar Salmon.



I c



TAKEa fide of falmon, cut ofF about a handful of the tail afl) your large piece yery well, and dry it with a doth; theii (h.it over viith the' yolks of eggs; then make fomc forcemeat with that you cut off the tall, but take care of the ikin,

'.•..'. - . wi



PLAIN ANB EASf. s

n9 put to it a handful of parboiled oyfters, a tail or two of lobfter, the yolks of three or four eggs boiled bard, fix ancho. vies„ a good handful of fwect herbs chopped fmall, a little fait, tiloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, all beat fine, and grated bread. Work aH thefe together into a body, with the yolks of egs, h It all oyer the flefliy part, and a Ijttle more pepper and fait' over the falmon; (o roll it up into a collar, and bind it with broad tape; then boil it in water, fait, and vinegar, biit let the liquor boil firft, then put In your collar, a bunch of fweet herbs, fliced ginger add nutmeg. Let it boil, but not too faft. It will take near two hours boiling; and when it is enough, take it up: put it into your foufing-pan, and when the pickle is cold', put it to youf falmon, and let it ftaod in it till ufed. Or you may pot it; after it is boiled, pour clarified butter over it. It will keep longeft fo,; but either way is good. If you pot it, be furc the butter be the niccft you can,get.

7i- mai Dutih Berf.

TAKE the lean of a buttock of beef raw, rub it well with f)rown fugar all over, and let it lie in a pan or tra two or three hours, turnitig it two or three times then fait it well with common fait and falt-petre, and let it lie a fortnight, turning it every day; then roll it very ftrait in a coarfe cloth, put it in a cheefe-prefs a day and a night, and hang it to dry in a chimney. When you1coiI it, you fnuft put it in a oth when js cold it will cut in flivers as Dutch beef.

To make Sham Brawn.

TAKE the belly piece, and head of a young pork, rub it well with falt-petre. Jet it lie three or four days, wafh it ctean 1)011 the head, and take oiFall the meat, and cut it in pieces, have four neat's feet boiled tender, take out the bones, and cut it in thin flices, and mix it with the head, and lay it in the f)elly-piecc, and roll it up tight, and bind it round with (heettin, and boil it four hours; take it up, and fet it on one end, put a trencher on it within the tin, and a large weight upon that, and let it ftand all night; in the morning take it our and bind it with a fillet; put it in fpring- water and fait, and it will be fit for ufet When you ufe it, cut it in flices lik brawn. Garnifh with parfley. Obferve to change the pickle 4vtry four or fivedays and it will keep a lon timc

s . • %



•I



a6+ THE ART OF COOKERY

7i Soufe a Turkeyj in imitation of Sturgeon

YOU muft take a fine large turkey, drefs it very clean,' dry and bone it, then tie it up as you do (lurgeon, put into the pot you boil it in one quart of white wine, one quart of water, one

Juart of good vinegar, a very large handful of fait; let it boi),
:im it well, an(i then pu( in the turkey. When it is enough, take it out and tie it tighter. X,tt the liquor boil a little longer; and if you think the pickle wants more vinegar or fait, add it when it is cold, and pour it upon ttie turkey. It will keep fome months, covering it clofe from the air, and keeping it in a dry cool place. Eat it with oil, vinegar, and fugar, juit as you like it. Some admire it more than fturgon; it look pretty covered with fennel for a fide-dilh.

. To pickU Pork.

BONE your pork, cut it into pieces, of a fize fi( to lie in ihe tub or pan you de(ign it to lie in, rub your pieces well with falt-petre, then take two parts of common ialt,, and twg of bay-falt, and rub every piece well; lay a lyer of conunon fait in the bottom pf your vefTel, cover every piece over with .common fait, lay them one upon another as clofe as you can, filling the hollow places on the fides with fait. As your fait melts Qti the top, firew on more, lay a coarfe 9loth over the vefTel, a board over that, and a weight on the board to keep it down. Keep it clofe covered; it will, thus ordered, keep the whole year. Put a poupd of falt-petre and two pounds of bay- fait to a hog

J Pickle fer Pork which is to be eat foon

YOU muft take two gallons of pump-water, one pound of bay-falt, one pound of coarfe fugar, fix ounces of fah-petre; boil it all together, and flcim it when cold. Cut the pork in what pieces you pleafe, lay it down clofe, and pour the liquor over it. Lay a weight on it to keep it clofe, and cover it doff from the air, and it wi
i be fit to uie in a week. If ypu fin the pickle begins to fpoil, boil it again, and fkim it; hen it is cold, pour it on your pork again.

To make Veal Hams

CUT the leg of veal like a ham then take a pint of bayfalt, two ounces of falt-petfe, and a pound of common falt

mU



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. a6c

fnix them together, with an ounce of juniper- berries beat; rub the ham well, and lay it on a holloiv tray, with the fkinny fide downwards Bafte it every day with the pickle for a fort night, and then hang i cn wood-fmoke for a fortnight.. You may boil it, or parboil it and roaft it. In this pickle you may do two or three tongyes, or a piece of pork.

To moh Beef Hams

YOU muft take the leg of a fat, but fiall beef, the fat Scotch or Welch cattle is beft, and cut it ham fafhion. 1 ake an ounce of bay- fait, an ounce of faltpetre, a pound of com mon fait, and a pound of coarfe fugar (this quantity for about fourteen or fifteen pounds weight, and fo accordingly, if you pickle the whole quarter), rub it with the above ingredients, turn it every day, and bafte it well with the pickle for a month. Take it out and roll it in bran or faw-duft, then hang it itt woodfmoke, where there is but little fire, and a conftanc fmoke, for a month; then take it down, and hang it in a dry place, not hot, and keep it for ufe. You may cut a piece ofF as you have occafion, and either boil it or cut it in rafhers, and broil it with poached eggs, or boil a piece, and it eats fine cold, and will fliver iije Duii:h beef. After thia beef is done, yoa may do a thick brifket of beef in the fame pickle. Let it lie a month, rubbing it every day with the pickle, then boil it Mil it is tender, hang it in a dry place, and it eats finely cold, cut4n flices on a plate. It is a pretty thing for a fide-difli, or for fupper. A (houlder of mutton laid in this pickle for a week, hung in wood-fmoke two or three days, and then boiled itb cabbage, is very good

To mafe Muiiof Hams.

YOU muft take a hindquarter of mutton, cut it like a ham, take an ounce of falt-petre, a pound of coarfe fugar, a pound of common fait; mix them, and rub your ham, lay it in a hollow tray with the fkin downwards, bafte it every day for a fortnight, thin rcll it in faw-duft, and hang it in the woodfmoke, a orinight; then boil it, and bang it in a dry place, aud cut it out in ralhers, and broil it as jTou want

To make Pork Hams.

YOU muft take a fat hind- quarter of pork, and cut ofFa fine ham. Take two ounces oi falt-petre, a pound of coarfe

fugar.



a66 THE ART OF COOKERY

fiigar, a pound of cqminon fait, and two ounces o( (aI-pYnn clla; mix all together, and rub it well. Let it lie a month in this pickle, turning and bafting it every day, then hang it in wooa-fmoke as you do beef, in a dry place, fo as no heat comes to it; and if you keep them long, hang them a month or two in a damp place, and It will make them cut fine and fliort. Never lay thefe hams in water till you boil them, and then boil them in a copper, if you. have one, . or the biggeft pot you have. Put (hem in the cold water, and let them be four or. five hours before they boil. Skim the pot well and often, till it boils. If it is a very large one, three hours w'Al boil it; if a fmall one, two hours will do, provided it be a great while brfore the water boils. Take it up half an hour lcefore dinner, pull oflF the ikin, and throw rafpings finely Gft cd all over. Hold a red-hot fire-fhovel over it, and when dinner is ready take a few rafpings in a fieve and fift all over the aOoL', then lay in your ham, and with your finger make fine figures round the edge of the difh. Be fure to boil your hani In as much water as you can, and to keep it ikimming all the time till it bolls. It muft be at leaft four hours before it boils.

This pickle does finely for tongues, afterwards to lie In it a fortnight, and then hang in the wood-fmoke a fortnight, or to
coil them out of the pickle.

YorkQiire is famous for hams; and the reafon is this: their fait is much finer than ours in London; it is a large clear falt and gives the meat a ne flavour.,1 ufed to have it from MaU 4en in Eflex, and that fait will make any ham as fine as you can defire. It is by much the beft fait for fatting of meat.. A deep hollow wooden tray is better than a pn becaufe the pickle fwells about it.

When you broil any of tiiefe hams iti flices, or bacon, have fome botliog water ready, and let theiftices lie a minute or two in the water, then broil them -, it takes Qiit the fait, and makes fbem eat finei:.

T'c make Bcicon.

Take a fide of pork, then take off all the infide fat, lay it on a long board or drei&r, that the blood may run away, rutc it well with good fait oq jsoth fides, let it lie thus a day; then take a piiht of bay- fait, a qiiarter of a pound of faltpecre, beat them fine,, two pounds of coarfe fugar, and a quarter of a. peck of common falt Lay your por) Iq fomething that will I10I4



J



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. Uf

lepicUe, and rub it wdl with the above ingredients. Lay the fkinny fide downwards, and bafte it every day with the pickle for a fortnight; then hang it in wood-(inoce at you do the beef, and afterwards hng it in dry place, bnt not hot You are to obferve, that all hams and bacon (bould hang clear from every thing,, and not 9gainft a wall.

Obferve to wipe off all the old fait before yon put it into thi pickle, and never keep bacon or hams in a hot kitchen, or in 9 room where the fun comes. It makes them all rufty

Toave potu4 Birdsy that bigin to hi had.

I HAVE fcen potted birds, which have come a great way, pfcen fmell fo bad, that nobody could bear the fmell for the ranknefs of the butter, and by managing them in the following inanner, have made them as good aa ever was eat.

Set a Urge fauce-pan of clean water on the fire; when it boils, take off the butter at the top, then take the fowls out one by one, throw them into that fauce-pan of water half a tntnutc lhrp it out, and dry it in a clean cloth infide and out; fo do all till they are quite done. Scald the pot clean; when the birds are quite cold, feafon them with mace, pepper, and fait fo your mind, put them down clofe in a pot, and pour clarir fied butter over them.

To pickle Afaciirelf calkd Caveach.

CUT your mackerel into round pieces, and divide one ino five or fix pieces: to fix large mackerel you may take one ounce of beaten pepper three large nutmegs, a little mace, and a handful of fait. Mix your (alt and beaten fpice togethery thea fnake two or three holes in each piece, and thruft the feafonjng into the holes with your finger, rub the piece all over with the feafoning, fry them brown in pil, and let them ftahd til ey are cold; then put them into vinegar, and cover them vith oil. They will keep vfell covered a great while, and are jcjicipi?. . '



chap;



a6S THE ART OF COOKERY



CHAP. XIV.



OF PICKLING.



To pickle fFafnuU green,

TAKE the largcft and cleared you can get, pare thenr as thin as you can, have a tub of fpriiig- water (land by yotty and throw them in as you do them. Put into the water a pound of bay-fair, let them lie in the water twenty- four Jioar? take them out;' then put them into a flone-jar, and between every layer of walnuts lay a layer of vine leaves at the bottom and top, and fill it up with cold vinegar. Let then fland ail night, then pour that vinegar from them into a cop per, with a pound of bayfalt; fee it on the fire, let it boil then pour it hot on your npts, tic them over with a woollea cloth, and let them iland a weel; then pour that pickle away, f ub your liuts clean with a piece of fiannel; then put thetm again in your jar, with vine-leaves, as abbve, and boil fredi vinegar. Put ito your pot to every gallon of vinegar, a nut meg fliced, cut four large races of ginger, a quaner of an Qiince of mace, the fame of cloves, a quarter of an ounce of wholp black-pepper, the like of Ordingal pepper; then pour your vinegar boiling hot t)n your walnuts; and cover them with a woollen cloth. Let it (land three or four days, fo do two or three times; when old, put in half a pintof mi
ftard-feed, a large ftick of horfe-raddifh fliced, tie them down clofe with a bladder, and then with a leather. They will be fit to eat in a fortnight. Take a large onion, Aick the cloves in, and lay ia the nciddle of the pot. If you do them for beeping, do no boil your vinegar, but then they will not be fit to eat under £x months: and the next year you may boil the pickle thi wajte They will keep two or three years good and firm.

7i pidle Tfalnuis white.

TAKE the largeft nuts you can get, juft before the flicH begins to turp, pare them very thin till the white appears, and throw them into, fpring- water, with a handful of fait as you da

? them.



'



MADE PLAIcr ANDEAY. i



Aem. Let them ftand in that water fix hours, lay on thent a thin board to keep them under the water, then iet a ftew-pan on a charcoal fire, with clean fpring- water; take your nuts out of the other water, and put them info the ftew-pan Let them fimmer four or five minutes, but not boil; then have ready by yoo a pan of fpring-water, Vith a handful of whitcfalc in it, ftir it with your hand till the fait is meked, thed: take your nuts out of the ftew-pan with a wooden ladle, zvA put them into the cold water and fait, 'Let them iland a quarter of an hour, lay the board on thm as before; if they are not kept under the liquor they will turn black, then lay thetn on a cloth, and cover them with another to dry; then carefully wipe them with a foft cloth, put them into your jar or jglafs, with fome blades of mace and nutmeg fliced thin., Mix yoiir fpice between your nuts, and pour diftilled vinegar over them; firft let your glafs be full of nuts, pour mutton-lat over them, and lie a bladder, and then a leather,

. ' ' To' pi die Walnuts black.

YOU muft take large full-grown nuts, at their full growth before they are hard, lay them in fait and water; let them lie two days, then ihift them into freih water; lee them lie two idays longer, then (hift them'again,'and let them lie three days; then take them out of the water, and put them into your pickling jar. When the jar is half full, put in a large onion ftucfc with doves. To a hundred of walnuts put in half a pint of muftard-feed, a quarter of an ounce of mace, half an ounce of black pepper, half art ounce of all-fpice, fix bay.leaves, and a ftick of horie-raddifll; then fill your jar, and pour boiling vinegar over them. Cover them with a plate, -and whfen they arc cold, tie them down with a bladder and leather, and they will be fit to eat in two or three months. The next year,- If anyremains, boil up your vinegar again, .and fkim it; when cold, pour it over your walnuts. This is by much the beft pickle for ufe; therefore you may add njore vinegar to jt, what quantity you pleafe. If you pickle a gi:eat many walnuts and eat them faft, make your pickle for a hundred or two, the reft keep in a.ftrong brine of fait and water, boiled till ic will bear an egg, and as your pot empties, fill them up with thofe in the fait and water. Take care they are covered with pickle. In the fame manner you may do a fmaller quantity i but if

• you









ifo



THE ART OF COOEftf



you can g
et rape-vinegar, uh that inftead of fait and wailri bo them thus: put your nuts into' the jar you intend to picU4 them in, throw in a good handful of fait, and fill the pot with crape- vinegar Cover it clofe, and let them ftand a fortnight; then pour them out of the pot, wipe it clean, and juft rub the nuts with a coarfe cloth, and. then put them in the jar with the pickle, as above. If you hive the beft fugar-vinegait of your own making, you need not boil it the firft yeaf, but pour it on cold; and the next year, if any remains, tKcil iC up agaiui ikim it put freih fpice to it, and it will do ain.

To pkkU Gerkins.

TAKE five hundred gerkins, and have ready a large earth en pan of fprtng- water and fait, to ivery gal Ion, of water two pounds of fait; mi it well together, and throw in your ger kins, wafli them oUt in two hours, and put them to drain, let them be drained very dry, and put'them in ajar'; iii the mean time get a bell- metal pot, with a gallon of the beft whitewine vinegar, half n ounce of cloves and mace, one ounce of all ipice, one ounce of muftard-feed, a ftick'of faorfe-radKh cue in flices, fix bay -leaves, a little dill, two or three rates of £inger cut in pieces, a nutmeg cut in pieces and a handful of fait boil it up in the pot all together, and put it over tiie gerkins; cover them clofe down, and. let them ftand twenty four hours; then put them in your pot, apd Ihnmer theoi 4iver the ftove till they are green; be careful not to let then boil, if you do, you will fpoil them; then put them in your, jar, and cover them clofe down till cold; then tie theip ov with a bladder, and a leather over thai; put them in a cold dry place. Mind always to keep your pickles tied doWa clofe, and take them out with a wooden ipoon, or a fpoon kept on purpofct

7i fUlU targe Cucumhirt in SticH

TAKE the large cucumbers before they are too ripe, flice them the thicknefs of crown-pieces in a pewter-difh; to every dozen of cucumbers flice two large onions thin, and fooii till you have filled your difli, with a handful of fait, between evejy row: then cover them with another pewter-dilh, and let theoi ftand twenty- four hours then put them into a cullender, and let them drain very well put them in a jar coyer theni over with wbrtc-wine vinegar and let them iftand.four hours pouir '• ft- ' -.''-.- ':'.'' .the"



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



171



tlwinegar from them into a copper faucepan, and boil it with a little falc; pert to the cucumbers a little mace, a little whole pepper, a large race of ginger fliced, and then poar the boiling vinegar on. Cover them clofe, and when they are cold tie them dawn Tbey will be fit to eat in two or three days

To pickle Afparagm.

TAKE the largeft afparagas yoQ can get, cut oiF the whit ends, and waih the green, ends in fprrng- water, then put them in another clean water, and let them lie two or three hour in, it; then have a large broad ftew-pan ful of fpring-wato, with a good large handful of fait fet it on the fire, and when it boils pnt in the grafs, not tied up, but loofe, and not too ftiany at a time, for fear you break the heads. Juft fcald them, and BO more, take themi out with a broad &immer, and lay them im a cloth to cogi. Then for your pickle take a gallon ot more, according to your quantity of afparagus of white-' wine vinegar, and one ounce of bay-falt, boil it, and put your afparagus in your jars to a gallon of pickle, two nutmegs, a quarter of an ounce of mace, the fame of whole white-pepper and pour the pickle hot over them. Cover them with a linen cloth,' three or four times double, let them ftand a week, and boil thefiickle. Let them ftand a week longer, boil the pickle again, and pour it on hot as before. When they are cold cover them clofe with a bladder and leather.

TV pkkli Fiachis.

TAK£ your peaches when they are at their full growth, juft before they turn to be ripe; be fure they are not bruifpd; then take fpring-water, as much as you think will cover them, make it fait enough to bear an egg, ith bay and common fait an equal quantity each; then put in your peaches, and lay a thin bard over them to keep them under the water. Let them ftand three days, and then take them out and wipe them very carefuUy with a fine ibft cloth, and lay them in your glafs or kx thA take as nluch white- wiiie vinegar as will fill your glafs 4)r jar t to every gallon put one pint of the beft well-made muftard, to or three heaida of arlick, a good deal of ginger fliceid, halfaa ouncexcf gloves,, mace, and nutmeg; mi( your pickle ell together, and .pour ovcir your peaches. Tie them clofe with a bladder and leather; they will be fit to eat in two jnonths. You may with a'fine penkhife cut them acrofs, take

' out



4c2 THE ART OF COOKER V

out the ftone, fill them with made muftard and garlicky and . horfe-radi(h and gingec; tie them together. Yoa oiay picide oerines and apricots the fame way.

MAKE a ftrong pickle, with cold fpring-water and bayfalt, ftrong enough to bear an egg, then put your pod in and lay a thin board on them, to keep them under water. Let them ftand ten days, then drain them in a fieve, and lay them on a cloth to dry $ then take white-wine vinegar, as much as you think will cover them, boil it, and put your pods in a jar, wiih ginger, mace, cloves, and Jamaica pepper. Pour your yinegar boiling hot on, cover them with a coarfe cloth, three or four times double, that the fteam may come through a lit tie, and let them ftand two days. Repeat this twd or three times; when it is cold, put in a pint of muftard-feed and feme liCMrie-radifb j cover it clofe.

To pickle French BeOnt. FICKLE your beans as you do the gerkihs

To pickle Caulijkwerf.

TAKE the largeft and clofeft you can get; pull them in fprigs; put them in an earthen dift), and fprinkle (alt over them. Let them ftand twenty-four hours, to draw out all the water, then put them in a jar, and pour fait and water boiling over them; cover them clofe, and let them ftand till the next day; then take them out,, and lay them on a coarfe cloth to drain; put them into glafs jars, and put in a nutmeg diced, two or three blades of mace in each jar; cover them with diftilled vineg&r, and tie them down with a bladder, and ovet that a leather. They will be fit for ufe in a month.

To piciii Beet- Root.

SET a pot of fpring-water on the fire, when it boils put in your beets, and let them boil till they are tender; take hem out, and with a knife take off all the outftde, cut tbem iii pieces according to your fancy; put them iti ajar, and cover them with cold vinegar, and t?e them down clofe; when you ufe the beet take it out of the pickle, and cut it into what

(bapcs



MADE PLAIN AND .EASY. 273

fliape$ you like; put it in a little di(h with fome of the pickle over it. You inay ufe it for falJads, or garniih.

To 'pi€kk JVhiU Plums.

TAKE the Jarge White plums; and if they have ftalks, let. them remain on, and do them as you do your peaches.

To pickle Onions. !5

TAKE your onions when they are dry enough to lay up for winter, the fmaller they are the better they look; put them into a pot, and cover them with fpring- water, with a handful of white-fkltj let them boil up; then ftrain them ofF, and take three cOats off; put them on a cloth, and let two people take hold of it, one at each end, and rub them backward and forward till they are very dry; then put them in your bottles, with feme blades of mace and cloves, a nutmeg cut in pieces; have fome double-diftilled white-wine vinegar, boil it up with a little fait let it be cold, and put it over the onions; cork' them clofe, and tie a bladder and leather over it.

To pickle Lemons.

TAKE twelve lemons, fcrape them with a piece of broken glafs; then cut them crofs in two, four parts downright, but not quite through, but that they will hang together 5 put in as much fait as they will hold, rub them well, and flrew them over with fait.. Let them lie in an earthen difh three days, and turn them every day; flit an ounce of ginger very thin, and falted for three days, twelve cloves of garlick, parboiled and falted three days, a fmall handful of muftard -feeds bruifed and fearced through a hair-Iieve, and fome red India pepper; take your lemons out of the fait, fqueeze them very gently, put them into a jar with the fpice and ingredients, and cover them with the beft white-wine vinegar. Stop them up very clofe, and in a month's time they will be fit to eat.

To pickle Mujhrooms Whiu.

TAKE fmall buttons, cut the ftalk, and rub off the (kin with flannel dipped in fait, and throw them into milk and wa ters drain them out, and put them into
i ftew-pan, with a handful of fait over them cover them clofe, and put them

T over



74 THE. ART QF COOKERY

over:a gmitk ftovt for five minutes, to draw out all ike water; then put them on a coarfe.ciuth to drain till coM;

To make Pickle for Mujhrooms.

TAKE a
;a)ion of the beft vinegar, put it into a cdd ftill: to every gallon of vinegar put half a pound of bay- fait, a quarter of a pound of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, a nut meg cut into quarters, keep the top of the ftill covered with a wet doth. As the cloth dries, put on a wet one. Do not let the fire be too large, left you burn the bottom of the ftilh Draw it as long as youafle the acid, and no longer. Whcti you fill your bottles, pft in your mufhroonrs, here and there put in a few blades of mace, and a (lice of nutmeg; then fill the bottle with pickle, and melt fome mutton fat, flrain it, and pour over it. It will keep them better than oil.

You muft put your nutmeg ovef the lire in a little yinegar, and give it a boil. While it is hot you may flice it as you pleafe. When it is cold, it will not cut, for it will crack to pieces.

Note, In the 19th chapter, at the end of thq receipt for making vinegar, you will fee the beft way of pickling mufhrooms, only they will not be o white.

To pickle Codlings.

GATHER your codlings when they are the fize of a large double walnut; take a pan, and put vine-leaves thick at the bottom. Put in your codlings, and cover them well with vine-leaves and fpring-water; put them over a flow fire till you can peel the fkin off; take them carefully up in a hairfieve, peel them very carefully with a penknife; put theoi into the fame water again, with the vine-leaves as before Cover them clofe, and fet them at a diftance from the fire, till thy are of a fine green; drain them in a cullender till cold; put them in jars, with fome mace and a clove or two of garlick; cover them with diftilled vinegar; pour fome muttpnfat over, and tie them with a bladder and leather down very tight.

To pickle FenneL

SET fpring-water on the fire, with a handful of fait; when it boils, tie your fennel in bunches and put them into the water juft give them a fcald lay them on a cloth to dry


whea



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 275

Vthen cold, put it in a glafs, with a little mace and nutmeg, fill it with cold vinegar, lay a bit of green fennel on the top, and over that a bladder and leather.

To pickle Grcpesm

GET grapes at the full growth, but not ripe; cut. them irt fmail bunches fit for garnifliing, put them in a ftone jar, with vine-leaves between tycry layer of gr-pcsj then take as much fpring-vater as you think will cover them, put in a pound of bay-falt, and as much white- fait as will make it bear an egg. Dry your bay- fait and pound it, it will melt the fooner; put it into a bell- metal, or copper- po:, boil it and flcim it very well; as itbpils take all the black fcum off, but not the white fcum. When it'bas boiled a quarter of an hour, let it (land to cool and .fettle; when it is almoft cold, pour the clear liquor on the grapes, lay vine leaves on the top, tie them down clofe with a lnen cloth, and cover them with a difh. Lt them ftand twenty-four hours; then take them out, and lay them on a cloth, cover them over with another, let them be dried between the cloths; then take two quarts of vinegar, one quart of fpring- water, and one pound of coarfe fugar. Let it boil a little while, flcim it as ic boils very clean, let it fiand till it is quite cold, dry your jar with a cloth,, put frefli vine-leaves at the bottom, and between every bunch of grapes, and on the top J then pour the clear ofF the pickle on the grapes, fill your jar that the pickle may be above the grapes, tie a thin bit of board in a pitce of flannel, lay it; on the top of the jar, to keep ti)e grapes under the pickle; tie thefr- down with a bladder, and then a leather; take them out with a wooden fpoon. Se fure to make pickle enough to cover theni.

To pickle Barberries.

TAKE white wine vinegar; to every quart of vinegar put in half a pound of fixpenny fugar, then p-ick the worft of your barberries, and put into this liquor, and the beft into gfaffes J then boil your pickle with the woril of your barberries, and ikim it very clean. Boil it till it looks .of a fine co Jour, then let it ftind to be cold before ycu drain; then flrain it through a cloth, wringing it to get ail the colour you can from the barberries. Let it ftand to cool and fct'Jr, then pour it clear into the glaiTes in a little of the pickle boil a little fen- .nel I when cold, put a little bit at the top of ttie pot or glafs,

T 2 and



276 THE ART OF COOKERY

and cover it clofe with a bladder and leather. To every half pound of fugar put a quarter of a pound of white-falt.

Red currants is done the fame way. Or you may do barberries thus: pick them clean from leaves 4md fpotted ones; put them into jars j mix fpring-water and fait pretty firong, and put over them, and when you fee the fcum rife, change the fait and water, and they will keep a long time.

To pickU Rid'Cahbagi.

SLICE the cabbage very fine crofs ways; put it on an earthen difh, and fprinkle a handful of fait over it, cover it with another di(h, and let it fland twentyfour hours; then put it in a cullender to drain, and lay it in your jar $ take white-wine vinegar enough to cover it, a' little cloves, mace, and all-fpice, put them in whole, with one pennyworth of cochineal bruifed fine; boil it up, and put it over hot or cold, which you like beft, and cover it clofe with a cloth till cold; then tie it over with leather.

To pickli GohUn Pippins.

TAKE the fineft pippins you can get, fnt from fpots and bruifes, put them into a preferving-pan of cold fpring-water, and fet them on a charcoal fire. Keep them turning with a wooden fpoon till they will peel; do not let them boil. When they are enough peel them, and put them into the water again, with a quarter of a pint of the beft vinegar, and a quarter of an ounce of alum, cover them very clofe with a pewter-difh, and fet them on the charcoal fire again, a flow fire, not to boil. Let them ftand, turning them now and then, till they look green; then take them out, and lay them on a cloth to cool;, when cold make your pickle as for the peaches, only inftead of made muftard, this muft be muftard-feed whole. Cover them clofe, and keep them for ufe.

To pickle Naftirtium Berries and Limes; you pick them off tht

Lime-Trees in the Summer.

TAKE naftertium berries gathered as foon as the bloflbm is oiF, or the limes, and put them in cold fpring-water and fait; change the water for three days fucceffively. Make a pickle of white-wine vinegar, mace, nutmeg, flice fix (halots, fix blades of garlick, fome pepper-corns, fait, and horfe-radifh cut in flices. Make your pickle very ftrong c drain your berries



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 177

ries very dry, and put them in bottles. Mix your pickle well up together, but you muft not boil it; put it over the berries or limes J and tie them down clofe.

To fickle Ojflers Cockles, and MufcUu

TAKE two hundred oyfters, the neweft and beft you can get, be careful to fave the liquor in fome pan as you open them cut off the black verge, faving the reft, put them into their own liquor; then put all the liquor and oyfters into a kettle, boil them about half an hour on a very gentle fire, do them very flowly, (kimming them as the fcum rifes, then take them ofF the fire, take out the oyfters, ftrain the liquor through a fine cloth, then put in the oyfters again; then take out a pint of the liquor whilft it is hot, put thereto three quarters of an ounce of mace, and half an ounce of cloves. Juft give it one boil, then put it to the oyfters, and ftir up the fpices well among them; then put in about a fpoonful of fait, three quarters of a pint of the beft white-wine vinegar, and a quarter of an ounce of whole pepper; then let them ftand till they are cold; then put the oyfters, as many as you well can, into the barrel; put in as much liquor as the barrel will hold, letting them fettle a while, and they will foon be fit to eat. Or you may put them in ftone-jars, cover them clofe with a bladder and leather, and be fure they be quite cold before you cover them up. Thus do cockles and mufcles; only this, copkles are fmalJ, and to this fpice you muft have at leaft two quarts. There is nothing to pick ofi them. Mufcles you muft have two quarts; take great care to pick the crab out under the tongue, and a little fus which grows at the root of the tongue. The two latter, cockles and mufcles, muft be waih ed in feveral waters, to clean them from the grit; put them in a ftewpan by themfelves, cover them clofe, and when they are open, pick them out of the (hells, and ftrain the liquor.

To fickle young Suckers or young Artichokes before the Leaves are 1

hard.

TAKE young fuckers pare them very nicely, all the hard ends of the leaves and ftalks, juft fcald them in fait and water, and when they are cold put them into little glafs bottles, with two or three large blades of mace, and a nutmeg diced thin; fill them cither with diftilled vinegar, or the fugar-vinegar of your own making, with half fpring-water.

T 3 To



ayS THE ART OF COOKERY

To pickk Arti(oh-Bcttm5

BOIL artichokes till you can pull the leaves off, then take off the chukes, and cut them from the ftalk; take great care you do not let the knife touch the top, throw them into fait and water for an hour, then take them out, and lay thfem on a cloth to drain j then put them into large wide-mouthtd glaff es; put a little mace arid fliccd nutmeg between, fill them either with diftilled vinegar, or fugar- vinegar and fprlng- waiter j cover them with muiton-fat fried, and tic them down with a bladder and leather.

To pickle Samphire.

TAKE the famphire that is green, lay it in a clean pan, throw two or three handfuls of fait over, then cover it with fpring-water. Let it lie twentyfour hours, then put it into a clean brafs fauce-pao, throw in a handful of fair, and cover it with good vinegar. Cover the pan clofc, and fet.it over a very il)W fiire; let it iland till it is juft green and crifp; then tak it off in a moment, for if it flands to be foft it is fpoiled; put it in your pickling-pot, and cover it clofe. When it is cold, tie it down with a bladder and leather, and keep it for ufe. Ox you may keep it all the year in a very ftrong brine of fait apd water, and throw it into vinegar juft before you ufe it.



To pickle Alock Ginger.

TAKE thelargeft cauliflowers you can get, cut off all the flower from the flalks and peel them, throw them into ftrong fpriicg water and fait for three days, then drain them in a fievc pretty dry; put them in a jar, boil white-wine vinegar with cloven, mace, long pepper, and all-fpice, each half an ounce, forty blades of grlick, a fltck of faorfe-radifli cut in iliees a quarter of an ounce ot Cayenne pepper, and a quarter of a pound of yeilaw tormanck, two ounces of bay-falt; pour it boiling over the ftalks; cover it down clofe till the next day, then boil a again, and .rep,cat it twice more, and when coM- tic it dowii clofe. .;

To pickle Melon Mangoes

TAKE as many green melons as yoa want, and flit them two thirds up the middle, and with a fpC)cMi take all the -fecda Mt J pMt ithem in ftrong fpnng- water and fait for twenty- fouir

hours,



hours, then drain them in a iieve; mix half a pound of white muftard, two ounces of long-pepper, the fame of all-fpice, half an ounce of cloves and mace, a good quantity of garlick and horie-radifli cut in flices. aod 4 guarter of an ounce of Cayenne pepper; fill the feed -•holcs fuH of this mixture; put a fmall fkewer through the end, and tie it round with packthread clofe -to the'kewer; put thfoj "ill a jarj and boil up vinegar with fome of the mixture in it, and pour over the melons. Cover them dowi) dofc, and let them ftand till next day, then green them the fame as you do gerkins. You may do large cucumbers the fame way. Tit thcru down cloiie wio'jcplJ and kep tienji for ufe.

Elder.'ShootSy in imitation of Bamho

TAKE he largeft and yoangeft fbooCsof eldr, .which
)Ut out ki the middle of May, tbexniddie Aalks afce oagft teiidor and higgell; the fmall ooes are aot worth doing. - Peel off tfee ottwar peel or fkiii, ati4. Jay them in a Qnoag brine of fit and water for one night, thn dry them in acciod), piece by piece. In the mean- time, make your pickle of half white- wine and half beerviAcgar: to eact quart of pickle ou muft put an ounce of white or -red. pepper, an ounce of ginger fliced, a lietie mace, and a fewc coch of Jamaica pepper. When fpice has boiled in the pickle, pour it hot upon te ihootd, Aop them clofe immediately, nd fet the jar two hours before the fire, turning it often. It is as good z way of greetring pickieas oftenr boiling;- Or you may boil the pickle twocr •thrde times, and pour it on boiling hot, juft as you plcafe, Kyoa make the pickle of the fugar vinegar, you muft let cie if be fprihc water. You have the receipt, for this vinegar in

the . I th chapter; • . ..

- • . - • .. -. .

RULES to be obfcrved in PICKLING.

ALWAYS ufe ftonc-jars for all forts of pickles that re uire hot .pickle to tbem. c The firll charge is the lead; for tbefe not only lad longer, but keep the pkkle better; for vinegar and fait will penetrate through all earthen vefieis; fone and glrfs are the only things to keep pickles in. Be Ture never to put your hands in to take pickles out, it will foon fpojl jt. The beft method is, to every pot tie a wooden. fpoon, full of litUe holcs to take the pickles out with

T4 CHAP.



i8o THE ART OF COOKERY



CHAP. XV. OF MAKING CAKES, &c.



To make a Rich Cake,

TAKE four pounds of flour dried and fifted, fcveh pounlJd of currants wafhed artd rubbed, fix pounds of tbc bcft freih butter, two pounds of Jordan almonds blanched, and beaten with orange-flower water and fack till fine; then take four pounds of eggs, put half the whites away, three pounds of doublerefined'(ugar beaten and fifted, a quarter of aa ounce of mace, the fame of cloves and cinnamon, three large nut megs, all beaten fine, a little ginger, half a pint of fack, half .a pint of right French brandy, fweetmeats to your liking, they tmuft be orange, lemon, and citron Work your butter to a icream with your hands, before any of your ingredients arc in; -then put in your fugar, and mix it well together; let your eggs 4ie well beat and ftrained through a fieve, .work in. your almonds iirft, then put in your eggs, beat them together till they look white and thick; then. put in your fack, brandy, and fpices, ihake your flour in by degrees and when your oven is ready, jput in your currants and fweetmcats as you put it in your hoop. It will take four hours baking in a quick oven. You muft keep it beating with your hand all the while you are miacJng of it, and when your currants are well wa(hed and cleaned, let ihem be kept before the fire, fo that they may gp warm into your cake. This quantity will bake beft in two hoops.

To ice a great Cakei

TAKE the whites of twenty-feur egg, and a pound of doer ble-rt'incd fugar beat and fifted fine; mix both together in a deep cr.rthen pan, and with a whifk whifk it well for two or thite hr .rs till it looks white and thick; then with a thin broai board, or bunch of feathers, fpread it all over the top and fides of the cake; fet it at a proper diftance before a good clear fire, and keep turning it continually for fear of its cbang-

9 iS



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 281

ing cddur; but a cool oven is beft, and an hoor will harden it. You may perfume the icing with what perfume you pleafe.

To make a Pouni-Caki.

TAKE a pound of butter, beat it in an earthen pan with your hand 6ne way, till it is like a fine thick cream; then nave ready twelve ejggs, but half the whites; beat them well, and beat them up with the butter, a pound of flour heax in ity a -pound of fugar, and a few carraways. Beat it all well together for an hour with your hand, or a great wooden fpooo .butter a pan and put it m, and then bake it an hour in a quick oven.

For change, yoii may put, in a pound of currants, clean waibed and picked.

To make a Cheap SeedCake,

YOU muft take half a peck of flour, a pound and a half of butter, put it in a fauce-pan with a pint of new milk, fet it on the fire; take a pound of fugar, half an ounce of all-fpice beat fine, and mix them with the flour. When the butter is melted, pour the milk and butter in the middle of the flour, and work it up like paite. Pour in with the milk half a pint of good ale-yeafl-, fet it before the fire to rife, juft before it goea to the oven. Either put in fome currants or carraway-feeds, and bake it in a quick oven. Make it into two cakes. They will take an hour and a half baking.

To make a Butter-Cake.

' YOU muft take a difli of butter, and beat it like cream Wfdi your hands, two pounds of fine fugar well beat, three pounds of flour well dried, and mix them in with the butter, twenty four eggs, leave out half the whites, and then beat all toge ther for an hour. Juft as you are going to put it into the oven, put in a quarter of an ounce of mace, a nutmeg beat, a little lack or brandy, and feeds or currants, juft as you pleafe.

To mate GmgerBread Cakes

TAKE three pounds of flour, one pound of fugar, one pound of butter rubbed in very fine, two ounces of ginger beat fine, a large nutmeg grated.; then take a pound of treacle, a quarter of a pint of cream, make them warm together, and

make



tii TH6 ART OF COOKERY



inafce up tlifc bread ftrff; roll it out, and make it up into thin Ttke% CK them out with a tea-rup, or fmall glafe 5 or roll them round like nuts and bake them on tin-plates in d flack oven.

•

To make u fine Seed or Saffron Cqke,

YOU muft take a quarter of a peck of fine flour, a pound cni a half of butter, three ounces of carraway feeds, fic eggs -beat well, a quarter of an ounce of cloves and maoeixat tqe her Tery fine, a penntworrh of cinnamon beat, a pound of Tugar a pennyworth of rofc-water, a pefinynrortk of f;if roo, a pint and a half of yeail, and a quart of milk; mix it JiU togetliep lightly with' yter.hamls thus: firft boil your milk and butter, then (kirn ofi- the butter, and mix with your Jour and a little of the milk 5 ftir the yeaft into the reft and ftrain it, mix it with the flovr, put in your feed and fpice, rofe water,,tjq£liire of ijjSjron, fugar, and egg$; beat it aU up w with jpur bnis lightly, .and bake it in a hoop or pan, bufbe Tur •to -butter the p,a well. It will take an hour ?n.d a half in .a jiuick oven. You may leave out the feed if you choofe it, an4 X thiok it rather better without ix j but ibat ypu iy .do i yo like.

Tjq mh a rich Seed-Cah calbd the Nnm-Cah

' ' You muft tke four pounds of te fineft flour, and three pounds of double- refined fugar beaten and fified; mix them together, and dry them by the fire .till yo,u prepare the other materials. Take four pounds of butter, beat it with your hand till it Is foft lik cream; then beat tb-tyfiy£ eggs, leave ut fifteen whites, Arain off your eggr. frpm the treads,. and iseftt them and the butter together till all spears like, butter. Put ifi four or five ff)i09iifuli of i'ofe lOr otraage-flawer viater, .frnd beat agaicv thea take your flour and fugar, with £k oonces fcurraway- feeds, and ftrew them in by degrees, beating it up all- the time 6cr two hours together. Yctt may. put in as much tin£ture of cinnamon or amber -greafe as you pleafe; butter your hoop, aid let it ftand thcee hours in a moderate .ovn. You muft obiSyye always, in b.eatipg.of butter, 40 do it w;th a cQoI iaa(9, aid beat it;ilways 9ne way in a deep je4r.tUcn idifl).



'



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 2S3



To make Pepper-Cokes.

TAKE half a gill of fack, half a quarter of an ounce of "-

whole white-pepper, put it in, and boil it together a quar- 1

ter of an hour; then take (he pepper out and put in as oiuch double refinedfugar as will make it like a pafte; then drop it in what fhape you pleafe on plates, and let it dry itielf, I

, ... I

To make Portugal- Cahes.

MIX into a pound of fine flour, a pound of loaf-fngar bet I

and fifted, then rub it into 9l pound of pure fweet butter tiH it is thick like grated white-bred, then put to it two fpoonfuls !

of rofe- water, two of Qick, ten gga, whip them, very well with a whifk, then mix into it eight ounces of currants, mixed all well together j butter the tin- pans, fill them but haU full, and bake them;. if made without currants they will keep half a year; add a pound of almonds blanched, and beat with rofe-water as above, and Jeve out the flour, Thefe are an other fort, and better. '

9V maii a pretty Cah.

TAKE five pounds of flour well dried, one pound of fugar, half an ounce of mace, as much nutmeg; heat your fpice very fine, mix the fugar and fpice in the flour, take twenty two icggs, leave out fix whites, beat them, put a pint of aleveft and the eggs in the flour, take two pounos and n half of tefl Gutter, a pmt and a hair of cream; fet the cream and better over the fire till the butter is melted; let it ftand till it is blood-warm. Before you put it into the flour, fet it an hour by the fire to rifej then put in fcven poinds of currants which muft be plumped in half a pint of branJy, and three quarters of a pound of candied pees. It muft be an hour and 2. quarter in the oven. You muft put two pounds of chopped laifins in the flour, and a quarter of a pint of fack. When jou put the currants in, bake it in a hoop

To metke GingerBread,

TAKE three quarts of fine flour, two ounces of beaten ginger, a quarter of an ounce of nutmeg, cloves, and mace beat fine, but muft of the laftj mix all together, three quarters of a pound of fine fugar, two pounds of treacle, fet it over the ' ' fire.



a84 THE ART OF COOKERY

.fire, but do not let it boil; three quarters of a pound of butter melted in the treacle, and fome candied lemon and orangepeel cut fine s mix all thefe together well. An hour will be

it in a quick oven.



7i make little fine Cakes.

ONE pound of butter beaten to cream, a pound and a quarter of flour, a pound of fine fugar beat fine, a pound of currants clean wafhed and picked, fix ggs, two whites left out; beat them fine, mix the flour, fugar, and eggs by degrees into the batter, beat it all well with both hands; either

make into little cakes, or bake it in one.

• c

jtmther Sort of little Cakes.

A POUND of flour, and half a pound of fugar; beat half a pound of butter with your hand, and mix them well together. Bake it in little cakes.

7i make Prop-Bifcuits.,

TAKE eight eggs, and one pound of double-refined fugar beaten fine, twelve ounces of fine flour well dried, beat your eggs very well, then put in your fugar and beat it, and then your flour by degrees, beat it all very well together without ceafing; your oven mufi be as hot as for halfpenny bread; then flbur fome (Keets of tin, and drop your bifcuits of what fcignefs you pleafe, put them in the oven as faft as you can, and when you fee them rife, watch them; if they begin to colour, take them out, and put in more, and if the firft is not enough, put them in again. If they are right done, they will have a white ice on them. You may, if you chufe, put in a few carraways; when they are all baked, put them in the oveit again to dry, then keep them in a very dry place.

To make common Bifcuits.

BEAT up fix eggs, with a fpoonful of rofe-water and a fpoonful of fack; then add a pound of fine powdered fugar, and a pound of cflour; mix them into the eggs by degrees,' and an ounce of coriander-feeds; mix all well together, &ape them n white thin paper, or tin moulds, in any form you pleafe. Beat the white of an egg, with a feather rub them over, and duft fine fugar over them. Sec them in an oven moderately

heated



MADE PLAIN AND EASY, 285

heated, till they rife and come to a good colour; take them out; and when you have done with the oven, if you have noftove to dry them in, put them in the oven again, and lee them ftand all night to dry.

To mate French Bicuits

HAVING a pair of clean fcales ready, in one fcale put three new-laid eggs, in the other fcale put as much dried flour, an equal weight with the eggs, take out the flour, and as much fine powdered fugar; firft beat the whites of the eggs up well with a whiik till they are of a fine froth; then whip in half an ounce of candied lemon-peel cut very thin and fine, and beat well: then by degrees whip in the flour and fugar, then flip in the yolks, and with a fpoon temper it well together; then fliape your bifeuits on fine white paper with your fpoon, and throw powdered fugar over them. Bake them in a moderate oven, not too hot, giving them a fine colour on the top. When they are baked, with a fine knife cut them off from the paper, and lay them in boxes for ufe.

•

Ta mah Macierovns, .

TAKE a pound of almonds, let them be fcalded, blanched, and thrown into cold water, then dry them in a cloth, and pound them in a mortar, moiften them with orange-flower water, or the white of an egg, left they turn to oil; afterwards take an equal quantity of fine powder fugar, with three or four whites of eggs, and a little mufk, beat all well together, and fliape them on a wafer- paper, with a fpoon round, fiake them in a gentle oven on tin-plates.

To mah Shrewflury Cahs.

TAKE two pounds of flour, a pound of fugar finely fearced, mix them together (takeout a quarter of a pound to roll them iJDi; take four eggs beat, four fpoonfuls of cream, and two fpoonfuls of rofe- water; beat them well together, and mix them with the flour into a pafte, roll them into thin cakes, and bake them in a quick oven.

To mah'Madling Cahs.

TO a quarter of a peck of flour, well dried at the fire, add two pounds of niuttoafuet tried and ftraincd clear offj when

it



.



a86 THE ART OF COOKERY

it 18 a little cool, mix it well with the flour, Tome fait, and t very little alUfptce beat fine; take half a pint of good yeaft, and put in half a pint of water, ftir it welt together, ftrain it, and mix up your flour into a pafte of moderate ftiflPnefs. Yoa muft add as much cold watej as will make the pafte of a right order: make it into cakes about the tbickoefs and bignefs of an oat-cake: have ready fame currants clean waihed and picked, ftrew fome juft in the middle of your cakes between your dough, fo that none can be feen till the cake is broke. Yea may leave the currants out, if you do not chufe them.

To mate light Wigs.

TAKE a pound and a half of flour, and half a pint of milk made warm, mix thefe together, cover it up, and let it lie by the fire half an hour; then take half a pound of fugar, and half a pound of butter, then work thefe into a pafte, and make it into wigs, with as little flour as poi&ble. Let die oven be pretty quick, and they will rife very much. Miftd to mix a quarter of a pint of good ale-yeaft in milk.

To make very g fVigs.

. TAKE a quarter of a peck of the fioeft flour, rob it into three quarters of a pound of frefli butter till it is like grated breads fomething mofe than half a pound of fugar, half a nutm, half a race of ginger grated, three eggs, yolks and whites beat very well, and put to them half a pint of thick akyraft, the or four fpoonfuls of fack, make a hole in the flour, and pour in your yeafi: and eggs, as much milk, juft warm, as will jnake it into a light pafte. Let it ftand befoic the fire to rife half an hour, then make it into a dozen and a half of wigs, wafli them over with egg juft as they go into the oven. In a quick oven half an hour will bake them.

To make Buns.

TAKE two pounds of fine flour, a pint of good ale-yeafi ol a little ack in the yeaft, and three ge beatei;i, knad aU thefe together with a little warm milk a little 4iutmeg, ajx! a little fait; and lay it before the fire till it rifes very light, then knead iii a pound of frdh batter, a pound of rough carraway comfits, and bake then;i in a quick ovcn in what Ihape you pleafe, on floured paper,

r



MADE FLAIN AND EASY.

f •

• c

To make little Plutit'Gates •

TAKE two pounds of flour dried in the oven, or at great fire, and half a pourrd 6f fugar finely powdered, four yolks dlF eggs, two whites, half a pound of butter wafted with fofcWater, fix fpoofrfuls of cream warmed, a pound and a half of currents unwaflied, btit picked and rubbed very clean in a cloth; mix all well together, then make them up into cakes, bak them in an oven almoft as hot as for a manchet, and let them ftand half an hour till they are (coloured on both fides, thea take down the oven-lid, and Itt them ftartd to foak. You muft rub the butter into, the flour very well, then the egg and Cream, and ihen the currants.



4h



CHAP. XVU

Oi CHEESECAKES, CREAMS, TELLIES,

WHIP.SY-LLABUBS, &c.



, 7i make fine Cheefecakes

TAKE a pint of cream, warm it, and put to It five quarts of milk warm from the cowi then put runnet to it, and give it a ftif about; and when it is come, put the Curd in % linen-bag or cloth, let it drain well away from the wiey, but do not fqueeze itjnuch; then put it in a mortar, and break the curd as fine as butter; put to your curd half a pound of fwcet a'liiibnds blanched and beat exceeding fine, a ad half a pound =of mackeroons beat very fine. If you have no mackcroofts, gfet Naples blfcuits; then add to it the yolks of nine eggs beaten, a whole nutmeg grated, two perfumed plums, drflblved in rofe or orange-flower water, half a pound of fine Tugar; mix all well together, then melt a pound and a quarter of buttei, and ftir it well in it, and half a pound of currants plumped, to let ftand to cool till you ufe it then make your pufF-pafte thus:: take a pound of fine flour, wet it with cold water, roll it out, put inta it by degrees a pound of frcfli

I butter.



Lk



s88 THE ART OF COOKERY

butter, and ibake a little flour on each coat as you roll it Make it juft as you ufe it.

You may leave out the currants for change; nor need you put in the perfumed plums, if you diilike them; and for variety, when you make them of mackeroons, put in as much tijiaure of faffron as will give them a high colour, but. no currants. This we call faffron cheefecakes; the other without currants, almond cheefecakes; with currants, fine cheefecakes; with mackeroons, mackeroon cheefecakes.

To mate Lemon Cheejicaies

TAKE the peel of two large lemons, boil it very tender; then pound it well in a mortar, with a quarter of a pound or more of loaf-fugar, the yolks of fix eggs, and half a pound of frefh butter, and a little curd beat fine; pound and mix all toj;ether, lay a pufF-pafte in your patty-pans, fill them half full, and bake them. Orange cheefecakes are done the fame way, only you boil the peel in two or three waters, to take out the bitternefs.

A Jecond Sort of Lemon Cheefecakesm

TAKE two large lemons, grate off the peer of both, and fqueeze out the juice of one, and add to it half a pound of double-refined fugar, twelve yolks of eggs, eight whites well beaten, then melt half a pound of butter in four or five fpoon fuls of cream, then ftir it all together, and fet it over the fire fiirring it till it begins to be pretty thick; then take it off, and when it is cold, fill your patty-pans little more than half full. Put a pafte very thin at the bottom of your pattypans. Half an hour with a quick oven, will bake them.

To make Almond Cheefecakes.

TAKE half a pound of Jordan almonds, and lay them in cold water all night; the next morning blanch them into cold water; then take them out, and dry them in a clean cloth, beat them very fine in a little orange- flower water, then take fix eggs, leave out four whites, beat them and ftrain them, thca half a pound of white fugar, with a little beaten mace beat them well together in a marble mortar, take ten ounces of good frefli butter, melt it, a little grated lemon-peel, and put them in the mortar with the other ingredients i mix all well toge ther, and fill your p)ttypans .

To



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. %

7i maJte FairyBulter.

TAKE the yolks of two bard eggs, and beat them in a biarUe mortar, with a large fpoonful of orange-flower Water, and two tea fpoonfuU of fine fugar beat to powder; beat this all togjsther till it is a fine pafte, then mix it up with about as much freih butter out of the churn, and force it through a iint (trainer full of little holes into a plate This is a pretty thing to fet offa table at fupper.

7 make Almond Cujlards.

TAKE a pint of cream, blanch and beat a quarter of a pound of almonds Hne, with two fpoonfuls of rofe- water. Sweeten it to your palate; beat up the ydks of four eggs, ftir all together one way over the fire till it is thick, then pcur it out into cups. Or you may bake it in litle china cups.

To make baked Cuflardu

ONE pint of cream boiled with mace and cinnamon; when Cold, take four eggs, two whites left out, a little rofe and orange flower water and fack, nutmeg and fugar to your pa late 5 mix them well together, and bake them in china cups.

7i fnake plain Cujlatds

TAKE a quart of new milk, fweeten it to your tafte, grate in a little nutmeg, beat up eight eggs, leave out halt the whites, beat them up well, ilir them into the milk, and bake it in china bafons, or put them in a deep china di(h; have a fcetde of water boiling, fet the cup in, let the water come siboye halfway, but do not let it boil too faft for fear of its • getting into tht ciips, and take a hot iron and colour them at iie top. You may add a little rofe- water.

To make Orange -Butter,

Take the yolks of ten eggs beat very well, half a pint of tlhenifh, fix ounces of fugar, and the juice of three fweet oranges; fet them over a gentle fire ftirring them one way till it is thick. When you take it oS ftir in a piece of butter as big as a large wainiit

U T9



90 THE ART OF COOKERY

To make Steiple-Cnam.

Take five ounces of hartfliorn and two ounces of hrory and put them in a ftonc-bottie, fill it up with fair water to the neck, put in a fmall quantity of gum-arabic, and gum dra goti then tie up the bottle very clofe, and fct it into a pot of water, with hay at the bottom. Let it ftand fix hours, thea .take i out, and let it ftand an hour before you open it, left it fly in your face; then ftrain it, and it will be a Orong Jelly; then take a pound of blancled almonds, beat them very fine, mix it with a pint of thick cream, and let it fiand a little; then (train it out, and mix it with a pound of jelly, fet it over the fire til) it is fcalding hot, fweeten it to your tafte with double refinedrugar, the;i take it o, putin a little amber, and pour it into fmall high gallipots, like a fugar-loaf at top; wheq tt is cold, turn them, and lay cold whipt-crqam about them ia heaps. Be fure it does not boil when the cream is in.

LenionCream.

TAXE five large lemons, pare them as thin a poffible, fteep them all night in twenty fpoonfuls of fpringwater, with the juice of the lemons, then flrain it through a jelly-bag intc a filver fauce-pan, if you have one, the whites of fix eggs beat well, ten ounces of double-reined fugar, fet it over a very flow charcoal fir, fl'r all the time one way, fkim it, and wheo it is as hot as you can bear your fingers in, pour it into glafies.

A fecond Lemon-Cream

TAKE the juice of four large lemons, half a pint of water a pound of double refined fugar beaten fine, the whites of ky&x egg?, and the yolk of one beaten very well, mix all together flrain it, and fet it. on a gentle fire, fiirring it all the whjle and fkim it clean, put into it the peel of one lemon, when it is very hot, but o not boil, take out the lemon-peel, and pur it into china diflies. You muft obferve to keep it ftirring one way all the time it is over the fire.

Jelly of Cream

TAKE four ounces of hartfliom, put it on in three pints of water, let it boil till it is a ftifF jelly, which you will know



MADE PLAIN AND EASY- 291

by taking a little in a fpoon to cool; then ftrain it ofF, and add to it half a pint of cream, two fpoonfuls of rofe-water, two fpoonfuls of fack, and fweeten it to your tafle then give it a gentle boil, but keep ftirring it all the time, or it will cur die i then take it oiF, and ftir it till it is cold; then put it into broad bottomed cups, let them ftand all night, and turn them out into a difli; take half a pint of cream, two fpoonfuls of rofe- water, and as much fack, fweeten it to your palate, and pour over them.

To make Orange-Cngm.

TAKE and pare the rind of a Seville orange very fine, and fqueeze the juice of four oranges; put them into a ftew-pan, with half a pint of water, and half a pound of fine fugar, beat the whites of five eggs, and mix into it, and fet tbem on a flow fire; ftir it one way till it grows thick and white, ftrain it through a gauze and flir it till dold; then beat'the yolks of five eggs very fine, and put into your pian with the cream; flir it over'a gentle fire till it is ready to boil; then put it in a ba fan, and ilir it till it is cold, and then put it in your glaflfes.

To make GoofeherryCxeam.

TAKE two quarts of goofeberries, put to them as muchr water as will cover them, fcald them, and then run theiU through a fieve with a fpoon: to a quart of the pulp you mufl have fix eggs well beaten; and when the pulp % hot, put in an ounce of frefh butter, fweeten it to your tafle, put in your eggs, and flir them over a gentle fire till they grow thick, then fet it by; and when it is almofl cpld, put into it two fpoonfuls of juice of fpinach, and a fpoonful of prange- flower water or fack 5 flir it well together, and put it into your bafon When it is cold, ferve it to the table.

To make Barley- Cream

TAKE a fmall quantity of pearl-barley, boll it in milk and water till it is tender, then ftrain the liquor from it, put your barley into a quart of cream, and let it boil a liitle; then take the whites of five eggs and the yolk of one, beaten with a fpoonful of fine flour, and two fpoonfuU of orange-flower water; then take the cream off the fire, and mix in the eggs by degrees, and fet it over the fire again to thicken. Sweeten- to your tafte, pour it into bafons, and when it is cold frvc it up

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2 THE ART OF COOKEKr

To mafe Pijlachio-Creafni

TAKE half a pound of Piftachio nuts, break them, and take out the kernels beat them in a mortar with a fpoonfuf

of brandy put them in a (leiv-pan with a pint of good cream, and the yolks of two eg;s beat very fine j ftir it gently over flow fire till it is thick, but be fure it do not boil; then put ic into a foup-plate; when it is cold, ftick fome kernels, cut longways, ail over it, and fend it to table.

Harljhorri'-Cream

TAKE four ounces of hartfhorn fiiavings, and boil it m three pints of water till it is reduced to half a pint and run it through a jellybag; put to it a pint of cream and four eunces of fine fugar, and jufl boil it up i put it ioto cups op glaiTes, and let it ftand till quite cold Dip your cups or glp.fTes in fcaldjng water, and turn them out into your diih;, Aick Hiced almonds on them. It is generally eat with white wine and fugar.

To make Almond-Cream

TAKE a quart of cream, boil it with a nutmeg grated; a blade or two of mace, 9 bit of lemon-pee), and fweeten tc your tafte; then blanch a quarter of a pound f almonds, beat them very fine, with a fpoonful of rofe or orange-flower water, take the whites of nine eggs well beat, and drain them to your almonds, beat them together, rub them very well through at coarfe hair- fieve; mix all together with your cream, fet it oir the fire, ftir it all one way all the time till it almoft botk pour it into a bowl, and flir it till cold,, anil then put it ! cups or glaflfea, and fend it to table.

To maki a fine Cream.

TAKE a quart of cream, fweeten it to your palitc, grate Rttle nutmeg, put in a fpoonful of orange-flower water and rofe water, and two fpoonfuls of fack, beat up four eggs, but two whites; ftir it all together one way over the fire till it is thick, have ctia ready, and pour it in



To make RatafiaCreatn.

TAKE fix large laurel leaves, boil them in a quart of thick cream: whea it is boiled throvtr ayay the leaves beat the yolka



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MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 29J

•f Hve eggs with a littk cold cream, and fugar to your tafte,

-then thicken the cream with your eggs, fct it over the fire

again, but do ioc let it boil; keep it ftirring all the while one

way, and pour it into china difhes When it is c&ld it is fit '

for ufe.

_ if 7i maki Whipt-Crtanu

TAKE a quart of thick cream, and the whites of eight eggs eat well, with half a pint of fack; mix it together, and fweeten it to your tafte with double-refined fugar. You may 4)erfame it, if you pleafe, with a little mufk or ambergreafe tied in a rag, and fteeped a little in the cream; whip it up with a whiik, and fome lemon-peel tied in the middle of the whifk; take the froth with a fpoon, and lay it in your glafies 4)r bafons, This does well over a fine tart.

T maki JVhipt' Syllabubs.

TAKE a quart of thick cream, and half a pint of fack, the juice of two Seville oranges or lemons, grate in the peel of two mons, half a pound of double-refined fugar, pour it into a broad eacthen pan, and whiik it well; but firft fweeten fome ced-wine or fack, and fiU your glafles as full as you chufe, then as the froth rife take it on with a fpoon, and lay it on a fieve to drain then lay it carefully into your glafies till they are as -full as they will hold. Do not make thefe long before you ufe chem; Many ufei cyder fweetened, or any wine you pleafe, or lemon, or orange whey made thus: fqueeze the juice of -a lemon or orange, into a quarter 6f a pint of milk when the curd is hard, pour the whey clear ofF, and fweeten i to your 4ca)ate, You may coflour fome with the juice of fpinach, fome with (aJffVon and fome with cochineal, juft as you fancy.

r

Ta mah Evtrlafting Syllabubs

TAKE five half pints of thick cream, half a pint of Rhenifli, half a pint of fack, and the juice of two large Seville oranges;, grate in juft the yellow rind of three lemons, and a pound of double- refined fugar well beat and fiftd; mix all together with a fpoon ful of orangefiower water; beat it well together with a wiii& half an hour, then with a fpoon take it ofF, and lay it on a fieve to drain, then fiil your g;laffes. Thefe wiH keep above a week, and is better made the day before. The beft way to whip fyllabub is, have a fine Urge chocolate mlll

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S94 THE ART OF COOKERY

?

which you muft keep on purpofe, and a large deep bowl to mill them in. It is both quicker done, and the froth ftronger. For the thin that is left at the bottom, have ready fome calfso foot jelly boiled and clarified, there, muft be nothing but the calf s- foot boiled to a hard jelly: when cold, take. off the fit, clear it with the whites of eggs', run it through a flannel bag, and mix it with the clear, which you faved of the fyllabubs. Sweeten it to your palate, and give it-a boil; then pQur it into bafons, or what you pleafe. When cold turn it out and it is a fine flummery,

Ta make Stiid Syllabub.

TO a quart of rich cream put a pint of white-wine, the juice of two lemons, the rind of one grated, fweeten It to yoar taAc mill it with -a chocolate mill till it is all of a thicknefs; then put it in glafles, or a bowl, and fet it in a cool place till next day.

To make a Trifie

COVER the bottom of your dilh or bowl with Naplca bifcuits broke in pieces, riackeroons broke in halves, and ratafia cakes. Juft wet them all through with fack, then make a good boiled cuAard, not too thick, and when cold,pour it iDver it, then ptit a fyllabub over that. You may garnifh it with rata iia cakes, currant jelly, and flowers, and drew different coloured nonpareils over it. Note, thefe are bought at the ton fcdioners.

To make Hartjhorn Jelly.

BOIL half a pound of hartfliorn in three quarts. of water over a gentle fire, till it becomes a jelly. If you take outi, little to cool, and it hangs on the fpoon, it is enough. Straim it while it is hot, put it in a well tinned fauce-pan, put to it a .pint of Rhenifh wine, and a quarter of a pound of loaf-fugar % beat the whites of four eggs or more to a froth; ftir it all together that the whites mix well with the jelly, and pour it in, as if you were cooling it. Let it boil two or three minutes; then put in the juice of three or four lemons; let it boil a minute or two longer. When it is finely cur(?led, and a pure white colour, have ready a fwan ikin jelly-bag over a china sbafon, pour in your jelly, and pour back again till it is as clear as rock water then fet a very clean china bafon under have

your



t







MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 295

your glailes as clean as poflible, and with a clean fpoon fill your glafies. Have ready fome thin rind of the Jemons, and hefi you have filled half your glalTes throw your peel into the bafon; and when (be jelly is ail run out of the bag, with a clean fpoon fill ttie refl of the glafles and they will look of a . fine amber colour. Now in putting in the ingredients there is no certain rule. You muft put in lemon, and fugar to your palate,' Jofl people love them fweet; and indeed they are good for nothing unlefs they are.

(hange'JeUy.

TAKE half a pound of hartfhorn fhavings, or four ouncej ' of ifinglafs, and boil it in fpring-water till it is of a flrong jelly; take the juice of three Seville oranges, three lemons, and fix china oranges, and the rind of one Seville orange, aiid one lemon pared very thin; put them to your jelly,, fvvcetin it' ivith loaf-fugar to your palate beat up the whites of eight eggs to a froth, and mix well in, then boil it for ten minutes, then run it through a jelly-bag till it is very clear, and put it in moulds i cold, then dip your mould in warm water, and ' turn it out into a china diih, or a flat glafs, and garniih with flowers.

7i make Ribbcnd- Jelly.

TAKE out the great bones of four calves feet, put the feet into a pot with ten quarts of water, three ounces or hartfhorc,. tbree ounces of ifinglafs, a nutmeg quartered, anS four blades of mace; then boil this till it comes to two quarts, (Irain it through a flannel bag, let it fland twentyfour hours, then fcrape ofFall the fat from the top very clean, then (lice it, put. to it the whites of fix eggs beaten to a froth, boil it a little, and flrain it through a flannel bag, then run the jelly into little high glades, run every colour as thick as your nnger, one co lour muft be thorough cold before you put another op, and that you put on muft be but blood-warm, for fear it mix together. You muft colour red with cochineal, green with fpinach, yellow with faffron, blue with fyrup of violets, white with thick cream, and fometimes the jelly by itfelf You may add orange-flower water, or wine and fugar, and lemon, if you pfeafe i but this is all fancy.

To make Calves- Feet Jelly

BOIL two calves feet in a g&Uon of water till it comes to a

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2j,6 THE ART OF COOKERY

quart, then ftrain it, let it ftand till cold, (kim off all the fat clean, and take the jelly up clean l( there is any fettling in the bottom, leave it; put the jelly 4010 a faucepgn, with a pint of moil main- wine, half a poMPd of leaf-fugar, the juice of four large lemons; beat up fxn or ight whites of eggs with a whifk, then put theip into a faucepan, and, ftir 11 together well till it boils. Let if boil a few minutes. Have ready a large flannel bag, pour it in, it will run through quick, pour it in again till it runs clear, then have ready a large china balbn, with the lemon-peels cut as thin as pofBble, let the jelly run into that bafon $ and the peels both give it a fine amber colour and alfo a flavour i with a clean filver fpoon fill your glafies.

To make Currant-Jelly.

STRIP the currants from the ftalks, put them in a ftone jar, ftop it clofe, fet it in a kettle of boiling water half way the jar, let it boil half an hour, lake it out and flrain the juice through a coarfe hair-fieve 1 to a pint of juice put a pound of fugar, fet it over a fine quick dear fire in your preferving-pan. or bell -metal ikillet; keep (lirring it all the time till the fugar is melted, t-hen fkim the fcum off as fail as it rifes. When your jelly is very clear and fine, pour it into gallipots; when cold cut white paper, jufl the bignefs of the top of the pot, and lay on the jelly, dip thofe papers in brandy; then cover the cop clofe with white paper, and prick it full of holes fe( irin a dry place, put fome into glafies, and paper them,

Xo mh Rajbtrry-Gam

TAKE a pint of this currant-jelly and a quart of rafbcrries, bruife them well together, fet them over a flow fire, keeping them ftirring all the time till it boils. Let it boil gently half an hour, and ftir it round very often to keep it from fticking, and rub ft through a cullender; pour it into your gallipots,, paper as you do the currant-jelly, and keep it for ufe. They will keep for two or three years, and have the full flavour of the rafberry,

Tp make Harthorn Flummery

BOIL half a pound of the fhavings of hartfhorn in three pniits of water till it comes to a pint, then ftrain it through a jieve into a bafon, and fet it by to cool; then fet it over the fire, let' it JMfl nielt, and put to it half a pint of thick cream,

II fcgldd



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 297

fcaI4ed and grown cold again, a quarter of a pint of white wine, and two (poonfuls of orange-flower water; fweeten it with fugar, and oeat it for an hour and a half, or it will not 0iix well, nor look well; dip your cups in water before you put in the flummery, or elfe it will not turn out welL It is heft when it fiands a day or two- before you turn it out. When you ferve it up, turn it out of the cups, and ftick blanched almonds, cutin long narrow bits, on the top. You may eat them either with wine or cream.

A fecond Way id mdki Hartjborn Flummery

TAKE three ounces of hartfhorn, and put to it two quart!

of fpringwater, let it Ammer over the fire fix or feven hours,

till half the water is confumed, or elfe put it in a jug, and fet

it in the oven with hoaihold bread, then ftrain it through a

fieve, and beat half a pound of almonds very fine, with Tome

orange flowerwater in the beating; when they are beat, mix a

little of your jelly with it, and fome fine fugar; ftrain it our,

and mix it with your other jelly, ftir it together till it is little

more than blood-warm; then pour it into half pint bafons or

dilhes for the purpofe, and fill them up half full. When you

ufe them, turn them out of the difh as you do flumnery. If

it docs not come out clean, fet your bafon a minute or two in

warm water. You may flick almonds in or not, jufl as you

pleafe. Eat it with wine and fugar. Or make your jelly this

way; put fix ounces of hartfhorn in a glazed jug with a long

neck, and put to it three pints of foft water, cover the top of

the jug clofe, and put a weight on it to keep it fieady; fet it

in a pot or kettle of water twenty- four hours, let it not boil,

but be fcalding hot then ftrain it out, and make your jelly.

To make Oatmeal- Flummery.

GET fome oatmeal, put it into a broad deep pan, then co. vet ic with water, ftir it together, and let it ftand twelve hours, then pour off that water clear, and put en a good deal of freih water, ihift ic again in twelve hours, and foon in twelve morei theh pour cfithe water clear, and ftrain the oatmeal through a coarfe hair-fieve, and pour it into a faucepan, keeping ic ftirs ring all the time with a ftick till it boils and is very thick; then )cour ic into difties; when cold turn it into plates, and eat it with what you pleafe, either wine and fugar, or beer IM)d fugar, or milk. " It eats very pretty with cyder and fugar.

You



4



S9d THE ART OF COOKERY

You muft obferve to put a great deal of water to the oat meal and when you pbur off the laft water, pour on juft enoih frefh as to 'ftain the oatmeal well. Some let it ftand forty-fight hours, fome three days, fhifting the water every twelve hours; but that is as you love it for fweetnefs or tartnefs. Oruts once cut does better than oatmeal, Mind to ftir it together when you put in cfre(h water,



I

To make a fim Syllabub from the Cow.

MAKE your fyllabub of eithtr cyder or wine, fweeten ft pretty fweet, and grate nutmeg in; then milk the mitk into the liqoor; when this is done, pour over the top half a pint or a pint of cream, according to the quantity of fyllabub you make.

You may make this fyllabub at home, only have newmilk;

make it as hot as milk from the cow, and out of a tea- pot, or

aifiy fuch thing, pour it in, holding your hand very high, and

ftrew over fome currants well wa(hed and picked, and plumped

. before the fire.

To make a Hedge Hog

TAKE two pounds of blanched almonds, beat them well in a mortar, with a little canary and orange- Hower- water, to keep ihem from oiling. Make them into ftiff pafte, theii beat in the yolkfi of twelve eggs, leave out five of the whites, put to it a pint of cream fweetened with fugar, put in half a pound of fweet butter melted, fet it on a furnace or flow fire, and keep it conftantly (lirring, till it is fliff enough to be made in the ioim of a hedge-hog then ftick it full of blanched almonds, flit and ftuck up like the brlflles of a hedgehog, then pUt it into a difh; take a pint of cream, and the yolks of four eggs beat up, fweetened with fugar to your palate. Stir them to- gether over a flow fire till it is quite hot; then pour it round the hedge-faoe in a diih, and let it ftand till it is coid, aiid ferve it up. Or a rich calf's-foot jelly made clear and good poured into the difb round the hedge-hog; when it is cold ic looks prett% and makes a neat diOi; or it looks pretty in the ' middle of a table for .fupper.

Yi make French Flummery.

TAKE a quart of cream, and half an ounce of ifinglafs, beat it fine, and ftir it into ihe crcam. L?t it boil foftly over a

flow



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 299

flow fire a quarter of an hoar, keep it ftirring all the time then cake it ofF, fweeten it to your palate, and put in a fpoon ful of rofe- water, and a fpoonful of orange-flower water; ftraia it, and pour it into a glafs or bafon, or what you pleafe, and when it is cold turn it out. It makes a fine fide-difh. You may eat it with cream, wine, or what you pleafe. Lay roun4 it leaked pears. It both kcoks very pretty, and eats fine,

J buttered Tort.

TAKE eight or ten large codlings, and fcald them, when cold ikin them, take the pulp and beat it as fine as you caa with a filver fpoon then mix in the yolks of fix eggs and the whites of four, beat all well together; fqiieezc in the juice of a Seville orange,' and (hred the rind as fine as poffibJe wttli fome grated nutmeg and fugar to yourtafte; melt fome fiiW fre(h butter, and beat up with it according as it wants, till it ii all like a fine thick cream, an then make a fine pufF-pafte, have a large tin-patty that will juft hold it, cover the patty with the pafte, and pour in the ingredients. Do not put any cover on, bake it a quarter of an hour, then flip it out of the patty on a diih, and throw fine fugar well beat all over it. It is a very pretty fidediih for a fecond courfe. You may make is qf any large apples you pleafe,



MooH'Shinim

FIRST have a piece of tin, made in the (hapeof a halfmoon, as deep as a half- pint bafon, and one in the (hape of a large ftar, and two or three leffer ones. Boil two calves feet in a gallon of water till it comes to a quart, then ftrain it off and when cold fkim off the fat, take half the jelly, and fweeten it with fugar to your palate, beat up the whites of four eggs, flir all together over a flow fire till it boils;; then run it through a flannel bag till clear, put it in a clean fauce-pian, and take an •unce of fweet almonds blanched and beat very fine Hi a marble mortar, with two fpoonfuls of rofe-water, and two of orangeiflower- water; then ftrain it through a coarfe cloth, mix it with the jelly, ftir in four large fpoonfuls of thick cream, ftiritaH together till it boils; thn have ready the diih you intend it for, lay the tin in the ihape of a half-moon in the middle, and the ftars round it; lay little weights on the tin to keep them in the places'yott would have them lie; then pour in the atove blanch.

manger



300



THE ART OF COOKERY



manger into the iUh and when it is quite cold take out the tin things, and mix the other half of the jelly with half a pint of good white-wine, and the juice of two or three lemons, with loaf-fugar enough to make it fweet, and the whites of eight gs beat fine 'ftir it all together over a flow fire till it boils, then run it through a flannel bag till it is quite clear, into a china bafony.and very carefully fHl Mp the places where you took the tin out; let it fiand till cold, and fend it to table.

Note, You may for change fill the diih with a fine thick almond cufiard; and when it is cold, fill up the half-moon and ftars with a clear jelly.

fbe FUaiing'IJland, a pretty Dijh for the Middle tf a Tdbk at m

Second Courfgy or for Supper •

' YOU may tke a foupdiih, according to the fize and quantity you would make, but a pretty deep glafs is heft, and fet it on a china difli; firft take a quart of . the thickeil cream yoa can get, make it pretty fweet with fine fugar, pour in a gill of fack, grate the yellow rind of a lemon in, and mill the cream till it is all of a thick froth; then carefully pour the thin from the froth, into a di(h; take a French roll, or as many as you want, cut it as. thin as you can. Jay a layer of that as light as poffible on the cream, then a layer of currantjelly, then ji very thin layer of roll, and then hartfliorn-jelly, then French roll, and over that whip your froth which you faved off the cream very well milled up, and lay at top as high as you can heap it; and as for the rim of the diC, fet it ound with fruit or IWeetnfeats, according to your fancy. This looks very pretty in the middle of a table with candles round it, and you may tnake it of as many different colours as you fancy, and accoMiHg to vhat jellies and gams, or fweetmeats you have; or at the bottom of your dib you may put the thickeft cream you can get; but that is as you fancy.



CHAP.



MADE PLAIN AND cEASY. 301-



C H A P. XVII.

OF MADE-WINES, BREWING, FRENCH

BREAD, &c

To make Rafjin-Wsne.

IrAKE two hundred of raiiins, ftalks and all, and put them into a large hogfhead, fill it with water, let them fieep a fortnight, . (iirring ihem every day; then pour off aU the liquor and prefs the raifins. Put both li4uors together in a nic9 clean veflel that will juft bold it, for it muft be full; ht it ftand till it has d5ne hii&ng, or making the leaft noife, then ftop it clofe and let it ftand fix months. Peg it, and if you find it quite clear rack it oiF in another vefiel i ftop it clofe, and let it ftand three months" longer; then bottle it, and when you ufe it, rack it oflF into a decanter.

To make Elder-Wine

PICK the eldcr.bcrrie when full ripe, put them into a ftoncjar, and fet them in the oven, or a kettle of boiling water till the jar is hot through; then take them out andftraln them through a coarfe cloth, wringing the berries, and put the juice into a clean kettle: to every quart of juice put a pound of fine Liftwn fugar, let it boil and (kirn it well. When it is clear and fine, pour it into a jar; wh€n cold, cover it clofe, and keep it till you make raifin-wine; then when you tun your wine, to every gallon of wine put half a pint of the elder-fyrup.

To make OrangeWtnes

AKE twelve pounds of the bcft powder fwgar, with the whites of eight or ten eggs well beaten, into fix gallons of fpringwater, and boil thie quarters of an hour. Whert cold, put into it fix fpoonfuls of yeaft, and the juice df twelve kmocM, which) being pared, muft ftand with twkc tnds of white- fiigar in a tankard, and in the morning Ikim off' the top, and then put it into the water; then' add the juicte and rindtsof fifty oranges but not the white parts of the rinds, and foiet it wotck ali toc gether two days and two nights; then add two quarts of Rhew mfll or white-wine, and put it into your veOil

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30 THE ART OF COOKERY

7i make OrangeWim with Ralfns.

' Ik

TAKE thirty pounds of itew Malaga raifins picked clean, chop them fmall, take twenty large Seville oranges, ten of them you muft pare as thin as for preferving $ boil about eight gallons of foft water till a third be coofumed, let it cool a little; then put five gallons of it hot upon your raifins and orange peel, ilir it well together, cover it up, and when it is cold let it ftand five days, ftirring it once or twice a.day; then pafs it through a hair neve, and with a fpoon prefs it as dry as you can, put it in a runlet fit for it, and put to it the rincT' of the other ten oranges cut as thin as the firft; then make a fyrup of the juice of twenty oranges, with a pound of white fugar. It muft be made the day beforeyou tun it up; ftir it well together, and flop it clofe; let it ftand two months to clear, then bottle it up. It will keep three years, and is better for keeping '

7 make Elder- Flower Uine very Uh Frentimac.

TAKE fix gallons of fpring- water, twelve pounds of white fugar, fix pounds of raifins of the fun chopped. Boil thefe to gcther one hour then take the flowers of elder, when they are ling, and rub them off to the quantity of half a peck. When the liquor is cold, put them in, the next day put in the juice of three lemons, and four fpoonfuls of good ale yeaft. Let it ftand cowered up two days; then ftrain it off, and put it in a vefTel He for k. To evei'y galloaof wine put a quart of Rhenifli, and put your bung ligMly on a fortpibt, then ftop it down clofe. Let It ftand fix manthss and if yoti find it is fine, bottle it off.

T make GofehirfjWim

GATHER your gooAberries in dry weather, when they are half ripe, pick them, and Wuife a peck in a tub, with a wooden, mallet; then take a borfe hair cloth, and prefs them as much as poffible, without breaking the feeds. When you have preffed put all the juioe to every gallon of goo(eberries put three -pounds of fine dry
Kcwder fiar, ftir it all together till the fugar. if diffolved, then put it in a veflel or cafk, which muft be quite fulU If ten or twelve gaHoM let it ftand a fort night; if a twenty gallon calk, five weeks. Set it in a cool place, then draw it off from .the lees, clear the veffel of the lees, and pour in the clear liquor again. If it be a ten gallon

cafk,



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 303

aik, kt it fland three months if a twenty gallon fatir Booths then bottle it off.

7i make Currant- Irine.

GATHER your ciirrants on a fine dry day, when the fruit . li full ripe; ftrip them, put them in a large pan, and brusfe them with a wooden peftle. Let them ftand in a pan or tub twenty-four hours to ferment; then run it through a faair fieve, and do not let your hand touch the liquor. To every gallon of this liqupr, put two pounds and a half of white fu gar, fiir it well together, and put it into your veflel. To every fix gallons put in a quart of brandy, and let it ftand iir weeks. If it is fine, bottle it; if it is not, draw it off as clear as you can, into another veflel or large bottles i and in a iort night) bottle it in fmall bottles.

To make CherryWim

PULL your cherries when full ripe off the ftalks, and prefs them through a hair-fieve. To every gallon of liquor put two pounds of lumpfugar beat fine, ftir it together, and put it into a ?eflel; it muft be full: when it has done working and making any noife, ftop it clofe for three months, and bottle it off.

To make Birch-lVine. •

THE feafon for procuring the liquor from the birch-rees is in the beginning of March, while the fap ts rifing, and before the leaves fhoot out; for when the fap is come forwarxl, and the leaves appear, the juice, by being long digefted in the back, grows thick and coloured, which before was thin and clear.

The method of procuring the juice is, by boring holes in the body of the tree, and putting in fofTets, which are commonly made of the branches of elder, the pith being taken outw You may without hurting the tree, if large, tap it in fever al places, four or five at a time, and by that means fave from a good many trees feveral gallons every day; if you have not enough in one day, the bottles in wiich it drops muft be corked clofe, and rouned or waxed; however, make ufe of it as foon as you can.

Take the fap and boil it as long as any fcum rifes, fkim ming it all the time: to every gallon of liquor put four pQunds of good fugar, the thin peel of a lemon, boil it afterwards

S half





304 tHE AUt OP COOkfekV

half an hour, fkimming it very well, pour it into a cliean tut
and when it is almoft cold, fet it to Work with jeaft fpread upon a toaft, let it ftand five or fix days, ftirring it often $ then take fuch a caik as will hold the liquor, fire a large match dipped in brimftone, and throw it into the caik, ftop it clofe till the match is extinguiOied, tun your wine lay the bing on light till you find it has done working
fiop it clofe and keep it three months, then bottle it off.

To make inaffne,

GATHER the quinces when dry and full ripe; take twenty large quinces, wipe them clean with a coarfe cloth, and grate them with a large grate or rafp as near the core as you can, hut none of the core; boir a gallon of fpring- water, throw in yourquinces, let it boil foftly about a quarter of an hour; then ftrain them well into an earthen pan on two pounds of doublerefined fugar, pare the peel of two large lemons, throw in and fqueee the juice through a fieve. Sir it about till it is very cool, then toaft a little bit of bread very thin and brown, rub a little yeaft on it, let it ftand clofe covered twenty- four hours then take out the toaft and lemon, put it up in a cagg, keep i
three months, and then bottle it. If you make a twenty galioa cafk, let it ftand fix months before you bottle it; when you ftrain your quinces, you are to wring them hard in a coarfe cloth.

To maki Cowflip or Clary-fVini.

TAKE fix gallons of water, twelve pounds of fugar, the juice of fix lemons, the whites of four eggs beat very well, put all together in a kettle, let it boil half an hour, (kim it very well: take a peck of cowflips; if dry ones half a peck; put them into a tub, with the thin peeling of fix lemons, then pour on the boiling liquor, and ftir thenfl about; when almoft cold, put in a thin toaft baked dry and rubbed with yeaft. Let it ftand two or three days to work. If you put in before you tun it fix ounces of fyrup of citron or lemons, with a quart of Khenifh wine, it will be a great addition; the third day ftraia it off, and fqueeze the cowflips through a coarfe cloth; then ftrain it thfough a flannel bag, and tun it up; lay the bung loofe for two or three days to fee if it works, and if it does not bung it down tight; let it ftand three months then bottle it.



KlADfi PLAIN ANDEASY. 305

To maie TurAtp'tfint.

TAKE a good many turnips, pare, flice, and pui thtni in d cyder- prefs, and prefs out all the juice vciry well. To every gallon of jiiice have three pounds of lump-fiigar, have a vcflcl ready, juft big enough to hold the juice, put your fugar into a VefleJ, and alio to every gallon of juice half a pint of Brandy. Pour in the juice, and lay foraething over the bung for sk week, to fee if it works. If it does, you miuft not bung it down till It has done working • then ftop it clofc for three months, an4 draw it off in anothci: veflil. When it is finfe, bottle it off.



70 make Rafpberry Wtrie,

TAIE fortie fine rafpberries, bruife them vitH the back of i fpoon, then ftrain them through a flannel bag into a ftone-' jar. To each quart of juice put a pound of double-refined fugar, ftir it well together, and tQver it clofe; let it ftand three days, then pour it off clear. To a quart of juice put two quarts of wbite-wine, bottle it off; it will be fit to drink in a week. Brandy mlde thus is a very fine dramj and H much better ay than fteeping the rafpberries.

RULES for BREWING.

CARE muft be takeri in the firft place, to have the malt dean; and aftbr it id ground it ought to ftand four or five days.

For Arong Ofiober, five quitrters of itialt to three hogfheads, and twenty-four pounds of hops. Thi will afterwards iiiake two hogflieads of good keeping fmall-beer, allowing five pounds of hops to it.

Fot middling beer a quarter of malt makes a hogfliead of die; and one of fmall-becr; or it will make three hogllipads of good fmall-beer, allowing eight pounds of hops. This iilll keep all the year. Or it will make twenty gallons of firong ale, and two hogflieads of fmall-beer that will keep all the year.

If you' intend your ale to keep a great while, allow a pound of hops to every bufliel; if to keep fix months, five pounds to a hogftiead if for prefent drinking, three pounds to a hogfliead and the foftcft and cleared water you can get.

Qbfervc the day before to have all your veffels yefy cljjan, and iicver ufe your tubs for any other ufe except to make wines.

. ' X Ut



30 THE AIT OF COOKERY

Jjtt your calks be very cfeto the day before with bdling wa itr tod if your buog is big enough, fcriib them well with a Cttlc birch-broom or bru(h; but if they be vei bad, take out the headi, and let them be fcrobbed clean with a hand-brulb, fiuid, and fullers-earth. Put oo the head again, and' fcata them well, throw into the barret a piece of unitacked Itme, and &op the bung clofe.

The firf copper of water, when it boils, pour into your lia(h-tub, and let it be cool enough to fee your face in; then put in your malt, and let it be well malhcd; have a copper of water boiling in the mean time, and when your malt is welt niafhed, fill your maihing-tub,. ftir it welFagain, and cover k Over with the facks. Let it fland three hours, kt a broad (hallow tub under the cock, let it run very foftiyy and If It is thtck throw it up again till it runs fine, (heif throw a handful of hops in he under tuW, let the ma(b run into it, and fill your tub's till all is run off. Have water boiling in the copper, actd Hy as much more on aa you have occafion for,-alIowing one third for boiling and wafle. Let that fand an hour, boil ilig more water to fill the malh tub for fmall-beer; let the fire down a little, and put it into tubs enough to fill your mafli. Lat the fecond ma(h be run oflT, and fill your copper with the firft wort; put in part of your hops, and make it borl quick. About SLtt hour is long enough; when it h ha
f boiled, throw in a hand- ful of fatt. Have a cleaft whke wand and dip ft into the copper, and if the wort feck clammy it ia boiled enough; then ilacken your fire, and take off your wort. Have ready a large tub, put two fticks acroTs andfet your draining baftet over the tab on the ftkks, and ftrain your wort through it. Put your other wort onto boil with the reft of the hops; let your math be covered again with water, and thin your wort that i& cooled in as many things as you can; for the thinner it lies,: and the quicker it coob, the better. When quite cool, put it infe the tunning-tub. Throw a handful of Mt inCoevery boif. When the ma(h has ftood an hour draw it dF, then.filt your mafli with cold water, takeoff the wort in the copper and order it as before. When cool, add to it the firft in the tub; fo foon as you empty one copper, fill the other, fo boif your fmall-beer 1. Let the laft malh run off, and when both are boiled with frefii hops, order thenras the two firft' boilings; when cool empty the malh tub, and put the fmall. beer to work there. When cool enough work it fet a woodenr bowl fttU- tcf ytft lA. the beer, and it will work over with a

little



MADE PLAIN AND EAS'V. 307

little of tbe beer in the hoiU Stir your tn up every twelve lKcur3, let it ftand two days, then tun it, taking oSF the yaft, jill your veSels fol), and fave fome to fill your barrels; let it ibod till it has done Working; then lay on your bung: lightly for a fortnight, after that ftop it as clofe as you can. Mind you have a viCpcgat the top of the veflel; in warm weather, open it) aftdiJF your drink hifles, zs it often will, loofen. til ihbae done Ifabn ftop it clofe again. If. you can boil your ale in on boiling it 13 beft, if youi: copper will allow of it; if not, boil it na coiiveniency fei'ves.

When youxmie to draw your beer, and find it is not fincs draw off a gallon and fet it on the fire with two ounces of jfinglafs at fmM and beat. Oiflblve it in the beer over, the fire: when it is all melted, let it ftand (ill it is cold, and pinxr it in at the bung,, which, aiuft c lay loofe on till it bas done fisr menting then ftop it clofe for a month.

Take great care yojur ca(ks are not mufty, or have any ill hifte; iir they have, it is a hard thing to fweeten them. '

You are to vvalb your cafks with cold water before you fcald them, and they (hould lie a day or two foalcing, and clean them well, then fcald, them.

f%i beji thing f or Rbpel

MIX two handfuls fif beaa flour, and one handful of fait, throw this into a kilderkin of br, do hot ftop it clofe till it has dpn fermenting, then let it ftand a ioiith, and diaw it off but fo)€
iBiea nothing will do with it.,

ffhen a Barrel 9fBeer has iurmd Solar.

TO a kilderkin of beer throw in at the buhg a quart of oat-kneal lay the bung on loofe two or three days, then ftop it down clofe and let it ftand a ciionth. Some throw in a piece of chalk as big as a turkey's egg, and when it has done work ing ftop it clofe for a month, then tap it.

fi A K I N G.

To mate Whiu-Bready after thi London Way.

TAB a bufliel of the fineft flour well Jiefled, put it m the kneading-trough at one end, take a gallon of water (which We call liquor), andfomeyeaft ftir it into the liquor till it looks of 41 good brown colour and begins tocurdle ftrain and

X % mix







3o8 THE ART OP COOKERY

mix It with your flour till it is about the thickncfs of a (eedcake; then cover it with the lid of the trough, and let it fiand 'three hours, and as Toon as you fee it begin to fall, take a gallon more of liquor; weigh three quarters of a pound of fait, and with your hand mix it well with the water:- firain if, and with this liquor make your dough of a moderate thicknefs, fit to Ihake up into loaves; then cover it again with the lid, and let it (land three hours more. In the mean time, put the wood into the oven and heat it. It will take two hours heating. When your fpunge has (lood its proper time, clear the oven, sind begin to make your bread. Set it in the oven, and clofc it up, and three hours will bake it. When once it is in you muft not open the oven till the bread is baked; and obferve in fummer that your water be milk-warm, and in winter as hot as you can bear your finger in it.

Note, As to the quantity of liquor your dough will take, experience will teach you in two or three times making, for all flour does not want the fame quantity of liquor; and if you make any quantity, it will raife up the lid and run over.

c

To make French Bread.

TAKE three quarts of water and one of milk; in winter fcalding hot, in fummer a little more than milk- warm. Seafpn it well with fait, then take a pint and a half of good ale yeail jiot bitter, lay it in a gallon of water the night before, pour It off the water,, itir in your yeaft into the milk and water, thcn with your hand break in a little more than a quarter of a pound of butter, work it well till it is diflblved, then beat up two eggs in a bafon, and ftir them in, have about a peck and a half of flour, mix it with your liquor; in winter make your dough pretty ItifF, in fummer more flack; fo that you may ufe a little more or lefs of flour, according to the fliffnefs of your dough; mix it well, but the lefs you work the better. Make it into rolls, and -have a very quick oven. When they have lain about a quarter of an hour turn them on the other fide let them lie about a quarter longer, take them out and chip all your French bread with a knife, which is better than rafping it, and makes it look fpungy and of a fine yellow, whereas the rafping takes ofF all that fine colour, and makes jt look too rfmooth. You muft flir your liquor into tlie flour as yOu do for pie-cruft. After your dough is made cover it with a cloth, and let it He to riie while the oven is heating.

To



.



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. .309

To make Muffins and Oat -Cakes.

c

TO a bufliel of Hertfordhire white flour, take a pint and a half of D ale yaft, from pa)emalt, if you can get it, becaufe it is whiteft; let the yeaft lie in water all night, the next day pour off the water clear, make two gallons of water juft milk-warm, not to fcald your yeaft, and two ounces of fait; mix your water, yeaft, and fajt well together for about a quarter of an hour; then ftrain it and mix up your dough as light as poffible, and let it lie in your trough an hour to rife; then with your hand roll it, and pull it into little pieces about as big as a large walnut, roil them with your hand like a ball, by them on your table, and as fafts you do them lay a piece of flannel ' over them, nd be fure to keep your dough covered with flannel; whe you have rolled out all your dough begin to bake the firft, and by that time they will be fpread out in the right form; lay them on your iron; as one ftde begins to chmge colour turn the other, take great cafe they do not burn, or be too much difcoloured, but that you will be a judge of in twa or three makings. Take care the middle of the iron is not too hot, as if will be;, but then you may put a brick-bat or two in ttie middle of the fire to flacken the heat. The thing you bake on muft be made thus:,

Build a place as if you was going to fet a copper, and in the Read of a copper, a piece of iron all over the top fixed in form jul the fame as the bottom of an iron pot, and make your fire anderneath with coal as in a copper. Obferve, muffins are made the fame way; only this, whep you pull them to pieces roll them in a good deal of flour, and with a rolling-pin roll them thin, cover tbem yith a piece of flannel, and they will rife to a proper thicknefs; and if you find them too big or too little, you muft roll d'ough accordingly. Tbefe muft not be theleail difcoloured. When you eat them, toaft them crifp on bothfides, then with your hand pull them open, and they will be like a honeycomb; lay in as much butter as you intend to ufe, then clap them together again, and fet it by the fire. When you think the butter is melted turn them, that both fides may be buttered alike, 'jut do no touch. them with a knife, either to fpread or cut them open, if you do they will be as heavy as lead, only when they are buttered and done, you may cut them acrofs with a knife.

Note, Some flour will foak up a quart or three pints more water than other Spur; then you muft dd more waller, or (hake

X 3 in



310 THE ART OF COOKERY

in more flour in making up, for th( dough muft be as light as polSble.

A Receipt fir making Bread without Barm by the bdptf Leaven

. TAK.£ a lump of dough, about two pounds of your laft ' making, which has been raifed by barm, keep it by you in a wooden velTel, and cover it well with flour. This is your leaven: then the pigbt before you intend to bake, put the fatd leaven to a peck of flour and work them well tcether with arm water Let it lie in a dry wooden veilel, well covered with a linei) cloth and a blanket, and keep it in a warm plaoe. This dough kept warm will rife again next morning, and will h? fuiEcient to mix with two or three bufhels of flour, being worked up with warm water and a little fait. WKen it is well worked up, and thoroughly mixed with all the flour, let it be well covered with the linen and blanket, until you find it rife; then knead it well, and work it up into bricks or loaves, making the loaves broad, and not fo thick and high as is frequently done, by which means the bread will be better baked. Then bake your bread.

. -Always keep by you two or more pounds of the dough of your laft baking well covered with flour, to make leaven to kre from one baking day to another; the more leaven is put to the flour, the lighter and fpungier the bread will be. The frefher the leaven, the bread will be the lefs (bun

From the Dublin Society,

AMithad.to pnferve a large Stock of Yeaji which will keep and be ' f 'A f Several Montbsy either to make Bread er Cakes.

' WHEN yoju have yeaft in plenty, take a quantity of it, flir and work it well with a whifk until it becomes liquid and tbinc then gee a large wooden platter, cooler, or tub, clean and dry, and with a fofrbrufb, lay a thin layer of the yeaft on the tub, and turn the mouth downwards that no duft may fall upon it, but fo that the air may get under to dry it. When that coat is very dry, then lay on another till you have a fuflicient quanc tity, cviJn two or three inches thick, tafervp for feveral months, atwiatys taking care the yeaft in the tub be very dry before yoii lay ipore on. Whew you have occafion to ufe this yeaft ciit a. piece ofF, and lay it in warm water; ftir it together, and it will be fit for ufe. If it is for brewing, take a large kapdful of birch tied together, and dip it into the yeaft and hang it up

to



MADE PLAIH AND £ASY. jti

to dr; take great care no duft c!oise8 to it and fo you may do aa many as you pteafe. When your beer is fir to let to virorky thrQU in one of riiefe, and it will bake it work as well as if you bad frefli yeaft.

You nkuft whip ii about in the wort, and then k.t it lie; when the vat works well, take out the brooo, and dry it agaio and it will do for the next brewing.

Note, In the building of your oven for bakings obfeive that you make it round, low roofed, and a litde mouth; then it will take lefs fire, and keep in the heat better than a long ovea and high roofed, and will bake the bread better.



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CHAP. XVIII. JARRINQ CHERRIES, AND PRESERVElB, be.

To Jar fherriis . Lady NortVs Way.

TAKE twelve pounds of cherries, ftone them, put them' in your preferving-psii) with three pounds of double-refined fugar and a i
uart of water; tfaeii fei them on the fife till they ar fcaiding hot, take them dS a little while, and (et on the fire again. Boil them till they are tender, then fprinkle them with half a pound of double- refined fugar pounded, and (kiot them clean. Put them all together sx a china howl, let them ftand in the fyrup three day$; drain them through a fieve, take them out one by one, with .the holes cjownwards on a wicker-fieve, then fet them in a ftove to dry, and as they dry turn them upo;i clean fievefl. Whcri they are dry enpogh, put a clean white jeet of paper in a preferving-pan,4hen put all the cherries in with another clean white meet of paper on he top of them; coyer them clofe with a cloth, and fet them over a cool fire till they fweat. Take them ofF the fire, then let them fiand till they are cold, and put them in boxes or jars IQ keep.

. 7i dry Cherries.

TO four pounds of cherries put one pound of fugar, and juft put as mcb ater to th
fugar as iirill wet it j, when i: is melted,

X4



3ti c THE ART OF COOKERY

cd make it boil; ftone your cherries, put them in, and make them boil i flcim them two or three times, take tbem off, and let them ftand in the fyrup. two or three days, then boil your fyrup and put to them aeain, bu do not boil your cherries any more. Let them' ftana three or four days longer, then take themoutj lay them in fieves to dry, and lay them in the fun, or in a flow oven to dry; when dry, lay them irf rows in pa pers, and fo a row of cherries, and a row of white paper in bonces.



••



To preferve Cherries tviih thi Leaves and Stalks grftn

FIRST dip the ftalks and leaves in the heft vinegar boiling hot, flick the fprig upright in a fieve till they are dry; in chs; mean time boil fome double refined fugar to fyrup, and dip the chc?rries, ftalls, and leaves in the fyrup, and juft let theai fcald; lay them on a fieye, and boil the fuaar to a candy height, then dip the cherries, ftalks, leaves aiid all; then ftick the branches in fieves, and dry them as you do other fwectmeans They look very pretty at candle-light in a dcfert, ' ".

• ' " ' •,

To make Orare Marmalade.

TAKE the cleareil Seville oranges, and cut thetp in two; take out all the pulp, and juice into a pan, afid pick all the: ikins and feeds out; boil the rinds in hard water ti
l they are vry tender, and change the water three times while they are boiiing and then pound them in a mortar, and put in the luic land pulp; put thern in -a preferving-pan, with double their weight of loaf-fugar, fet it over a flow fire, boil it gently foi-ty minutes, put it into pots, Cvfr it with brandy-paper, and tie u down clofe.

To fnake Whte Marmalade.

PARE and core the quinces as fafl as you can, then take to

t p'ound'of quinces (being cut in' pieces, lefs tbn half quar tefs), three quarters of a' pound of double refined Aigar beat imall, then throw half the fugar on the raw quinces, fet it on jl flow fi)Ce till tli6 fugar is melted and' the quinces tender; then put in the reft 6f the fugar, and boil it up s faft as you can. When it Is almoft enough, pu in fome jelly and boil it lipace; then put ic up, and when it is quite cold, coyer it itb white paper. '' .-'.-: . . . . . ., c i .



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 013

To make Red Marmaladi.

TAKE full ripe quinces, pare and cut thetn in quarters, nd core them; put them in a fauce-pan, cover them with the parings, fill the fauce-pan nearly full of fpring-water, cover it clofc, and ftw thcin gently till they are quite fofr, and a jdeep pink colour then pick out the quince from the parings, and beat them tJ a pulp in a mortar; take their weight in loaf-fugar, put in as much of the water they were boiled in as will difiolve it, and boil and Ikim it well; put in your quinces, and boil them gently three quarters of an hourj keep fiirring them all the time, or it will ftick to the pan and burn put It into flat pot, and when cold tie it down clpfe.

Tq preferve Oranges whole

TAKE the bcft Bermudas or Seville oranges you can gef, and pare them with a penknife very thin,nd lay your oranges ti witcr thre or four days, (hifting them every day; then put them ih a kettle with fair water, and put a board on them to keep them down in the Wfiter, and have a fkiliet on the fire with water, that may be ready to fupply the kettle with boiling water; as it wades it mud be filled up three or four times, while the orges are doing, for they will take tip feven or eight hoAirs bioiiingii they mud be boiled till a white draw will run through them, then take them out, and fcoop the (tcAs, out of them very carefully, by making a little hole in the top, nd weigh them. To every pound of oranges put a pound and three quarters of double-refined fugar, beat well and fifted through a. clean lawn fieve, fill your oranges with fugar, and rew fome on them. Let tbem lie a lit(le while, and make your jelly thus:

Take two doen of pippins or John apples, and flice them into water, and when they are boiled tender drain the liquor jrom the pulp, and to every pound of oranges you mud have a pint and a half of this liquor, and put to it three quarters of the fugar you left in filling the oranges, fet it on the fire, and let it boil, (kirn it well, nd put it in a clean earthen pan till it is cold, then put it in your (killet; put in your oranges; with a fmall bodkin job your oranges .as they are boiling to let the fyrup into them, drew on the red of your fugar whild they are boiling, and when they look clear take them up and put them in your glades, put one in a glafs jud fit for them, and boil the fyrup till it is almod a jelly, then fill up your glades. When

theyarf cold paper them up and keep them in a dry place.

I . . . . .: • Of



JI4 THE ART OF COOKERY

Or thus: Cut a bole out of the ftalkead of your orange 99 big as a fixpence, fcoop out all the pulp very clean, tie them fingly in muflln, and lay them two days in fpring-water; change the water twice a day, and boil them in the muflin till tender; be careful you keep them covered with water, weigh the oranges before you fcoop them; to every pound add two pounds of double- refined fugar, and a pint of water; boil the fugar and water with the orange juice to a fyrup, fkim it well, let it ftand till it is cold, take the oranges out of the muflin, and put them in, and boil them til) they are quite clear, and put them by till cold j then pare and core fome green pippins, nd boil them in water till' it is very ilrong of the pippin do not ftir them, put them down gently with the back of a poon, aind drain the liquor through a jelly-bag, till it is clear. Put to every pint of liquor a pound of double-refined fugar, and the juice of a lemon, ftraind as clear as you can; boi) it to aftrongjelly; drain the oranges out of your fyrup, and put them in glafa or white ftone jars, of the fize of the orange and pour the jelly on them Cover them with brandy'papers, and tie tbem over with a bladder Yqu may do lempns in this lame manner.

TAKE your quinces and pare tbem
cut them in quarters, or leave them whole, which you pleafe. Put them into a ftucepan, and cover them with bard water; lay your parings over them, to keep hem under water; cover your faucepan clofc, that no fieam can come out; fet them over a flow, fire till they are foft, and a fine pink colour; then let them ((and till cold. Make a fyrup of double-refined fugar, with as much water as will wet it; boil and ikim it well. Put in your quinces, let them boil ten minutes; take them off, and let them ftand three hours; then boil them till the fyrup is thick' and the quinces clear; then put them in deep jars, and wheii cold put brandy paper over them, and tie them doiyn clofe.

To maii Confenu $ Rtd RofeSj or any othm Flower $.

TAKE rofe-buds, or Any other flowers, and pick them; cut off the white part from the red, and put the red flowers, and fift them through a fieve, to take out the feeds; then weigh them, and to every pound of flowers take two pounds and a half of loaf-fugar beat the flowers pretty fine in a flone mortar% then by degrees put the fugar to thrm, and beat it very

well.



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. jif

well, till it it wen incorporated togedter; chtti put it intc
gallipots, tie it over with paper, over that a leather and it cil keep Teren years.

TV mah Cnfirvi 9f Htps.

GATHER hips before thev grow foft, cut off the heads and ftalks, flit them in halves, take out all the feeds and White ihat is in them very clean, then put them into an earthen pan, and ftjr them every day, or they will grow mouldy. Let them ftand till tlwy are foft enough to rub them through a coarfe hair-fieve; as the pulp comes take it off the fieve: they are a dry berry, and will require pains to rub them through. Then add its weight in fugarj mix them well tcther without boiling, and keep it in deep gallipots for ufe.

Tp matt Syrup rf Rtfeu

INFUSE three pounds of damaflc rofe-Ieave in a gallon of warm water, in a well-glazed earthen pot, with a narrow moath, for eight hours, which flop fo clofe that none of the virtue may exhale. When they have infufed fo long, heat the water again, fqueese them out, and put in three pounds more of rofe-Ieaves, to infufe for eight hours more; then prefs them out very hard; then to very quart of this infufion add four pounds of fine fugar, and boil it to a fyrup.

T make Syrup of Citron.

PARE and flice your citrons thin, lay them in a bafon, with kyers of fine fugar. The next day pour off the liquor into a. glafs, ikin it, and clarify it over a gentle fire.

Xo makt Syrup of Clove- GilKfiowers

CLIP your gilliflowers, fprinkle them with fair water, put them into an earthen pot, ftup it up very clofe, i it in a kettle of vrater, and let it boil for two hours; then firain out the ' juice, put a pound and a half of fugar to a pint of juice, put it into a Ikillet, fet it on the fire, keep it fttrring till the fugar is all melted, do not let it boil then fet it by to coolj and put it into bottles.

To nake Syrup of Piad-Bloffims, .

INFUSE peachbloflbms h hpt water, as much as will Jiand fimely cover theip. Let them fiand in balneo, or in fand, for

8 twenty



j6 THE ART OF COOKERY

iwenty-four hours covered clofc; theo firain out the floien from tlve liquor nd put in frefli flowers. JLet them, (land to jnfufe as before, then ftrain them ou;, and to the licuor put frefli peach-bloffoms the third time, and, if you pleafe, a fourth time. Thqn to every pound of your infufion add two sounds of double-refined fugar j and fetting k in fand, or balnco, make a fyrup, which keep for ufe.

To make Syrup of inces.

GRAE quinces, pafs their pilp through a cloth to txtrsQ, the juice, fet their juices in the fun to fettle, or before the fire, and by that means clarify it; for every four ounces of this juice take a pound of fugar boiled brown. If the putting in the juice of the quinces (hould check the boiling of the fugar too much, oive the fyrup fome boiling till it becomes pearled; then take ic ofF the fire, and when cold, put it iuto the bottles

•

To preferve JprtcoU,

TAKE your apricots, ftone and pare them thin, and take their weight in double-rcfined fugar, beaten and fifted; put vour apricots in a filver cup or tankard, cover them over with fugar, and let them ftand fo all night. The next day put them in a preferving-pan, fet them pn a gentle fire, and let them fitpmer a little while, then let them boil till tender and clear, taking them oflF fometimes to turn and fkim. Keep them under the liqubr as they arc doing, and with a fmall clean bodkin, of great needle, job them, that the fyrup may penetrate into them. When they are enough, take them up, and put them in glaffcs. Boil and (kirn your fyrup; and when it is cold, put it on your apricpts. Put brandy paper over, and tie them clofc.

' ' s

To prefirve Damfons whok

YOU muft take fome damfons and cut them in pieces, put them in a fldllet over the fire, with as much water as will co- . ver them. When they are boiled, and the liquor pretty ftrong, ftrain it out. Add for every pound of the damfons wiped clean, a pound of fingle-refincd fugar, put the third part of your fugar into the liquor, (et it over the fire, and when it fimmers, put in the damfons. Let them have one goofl boil, and take them off for halian hour, covered up clofe'j then fet them on asain, and let them fioimfJf pypr the fire after turning them; then



-. KKVL FLA IN; AND, EASY. . 3,7

then take theiti but and put them in a ba(oo, ftrew all the fu gar that was left on them, and pour the tKct liquor over them. Cover them up, and let them fland till next day, then boil them up again til) they are enough Take them up, and put them in pots; boil, the jiquor till it jellies and pour it on them Vihcn it is Impl cqI i to paper them up.

To candy any Sort of Fidwrs.

TAKE the btft trcble-refincd fugar break k into Iximps and 6ip it piece by- piece into water, put tbem into a vcffcl of filver, and mck them over the. fire; when itjuft boib, ilrain .it, and fet it on the fire again, and let it boil till it draws in hairs, which you may perceive by holding,up your fpoon • then put in the flowers, and fet them in ctips or glafies. When it is gf a hard candy, break it in lumps, and lay it as high as you pleafe.; Dry it in a flove, or in tbciunj, and it will look like iiigai- candy

To preferve Goofeberries whole without Jjoning.

c- TAKE the largcft prcferving goofeberries, and pick off the black eye, but not the ftalk; then -fet them over theire in a pot of water to fcald, cover them very cbfc, but not boil or break, and when they are tender take them up into cold water then take a. pound and a half of double-refined fugar to a pound of goofeberries, apd clarify the fugar with water, a pint to a pound of fugar, and when your fyrup is cold, puthe goofeberries Ijngle in your preferving pan, put the fyrup to them, and fet' them on a gentle fire; Ipt them loil, but not too fafl, left they break 5 and when they have boiled, and you perceive that the fugar has entered them, take them ofj; cover them with white paper, and fet them by till the next day. Then take them out of the fyrup, and boil the fyrup till it begins to be ropy; (kim it, and pit it to tbem again, then fet them on a gentle fire, and let them fimmer gently, till you perceive the fyrup will rope; then take them off, fet them by till they are cold, cover them with paper;then boil fome goofeberries in fair water, and when the liquor is ftronc enough, ftrain it out. Let it ftand to fettle, and to every pint take a pound of double-refined fugar, then make a jelly of it, put the goofeberries in glafTes hen they are cgld; coI'er them with the jelly the next day, paper tbem wet and then half dry the paper that oes m the infide, it clofes down

' better.



f







3i tHE Alt o eoolttitt

beHor, tnd then white paper wet fi ghft Set it m;ii tkf₯€ or a dry place.



T pnjirve fnke tfUntiih

FIRST pare your walnuts till the white appears, and nothing elfe. You muft be very careful in the doing of them that they do not turn black, and as faft as you do them, throw them into (alt and water, and let them lie till your fugar is jesiy.' Take thee pounds of good loaf-fhgar, put it into yout pre£enrtngpan, cet it over a charcoal fire, and put as much water as will juflf wet the fugar. Let it boil, theii hve ready ten or a doen whitet of eggs ftrained and beat up to froth; cover your fitgtr with the froth as it boils, and fkim it; then 4x111 ft, and ikim it till it is as clear as 'Cryftal, then fhrpw in ur walnuts s juft ve ihem a borl till they are tender then ttke them out, and lay them in a difh to cool i when eool put them in your preferving-pan, and when theiugariaas warm as milk, pour it over them; when quite cold, paper them dowjt.

' Thus clear your fugar for all preferves apricots pees, £Oofebcrries, currants, ice.

. WIPE them very dean, and hy them m flrohg fait zxA wa tWentyfbur hours; then tse them out, and wipe them very clean,Nhave ready a fkillet of water boiling, throw them in, let them boil a minute, and take tbetti out. Lay them oh a coarfe cloth, and boil your fugar 2 above; then juft give yoor walnuts a fcald in the fugar, take fhem ud, and lay them to cool. Put them in your preferving-pot, and pou on yout fytup as ibove.

TopTfferve the large Green Plums

FlICST dip the fialks and leaves in bpilin vinegar; when they are dry, have your fyrup ready, and iirft give them a Jcaidi and very carefully with a pin take off the fkin; boil youi; fugar to a candy height aud dip in your plumsj han them by the ftalk to dry, and they will look finely tranQcarc;ot aiid by banging that way to dry, will have a clear drop. at thk topi You muft take great care to clear your fugar nicely.



%







MADE LAIM AND £ASY. 319

TAKE the largeft peacAes you can get, not wtx ripe, rub off the lint with a cloth, and run them down the fetm with pin (kin deep; cover them with French brandj, tie a bladder ott them, and let them ftand a week. Make a ftrong fyrup and boil and ftum it well; take the peaches out of the brandy, and put them in and boil them till they look clear; then Hiee them out, put them in gUfles, mix the fyrup with the brandy, and when cold pour it over your peaches. Tie them cloie iloira with a bkdder and leather over it.

79 mah inci Caiis.

YOtJ muft let a pint of the fyrup of quinces, with a quart of two of rtifpberries, be boiled and clarified over a clear genib fire, taking care that it be well flcimmed from time to time; then add a pound and a half of fugar, caufe as siuch more to be brought to a candy height, and poured in hot. Let the whole be continoally fttrred about till it is almoft cold, then fpreai it on plates, and cut it out into cakes.



•s"



CHAP. XIX.

To make Anchovies, Vermicelli, Catchup, Vinegar; and to ' keep Artichokes, French Beans, &c,

70 mah jnchvies,

O a peck of fprats, two pounds of common falt a quarter of a pound of bay-falt, four pounds of falt-petre, two ounces of fal-prunelia, two penny-worth of cochineal; pound all in a inortar, put them into a ftone pot, a row of fprats, a layer of your compound, and fo on to the top alternately. Prefs them hard down, cover them ctofe, let them ftand fix months and they will be fit for ufe. Obfefve that your fprats be very frefli, and do not wafli or wipe them, but juft take tbem ai as they come out of the water.

• Ta picik SmeltSf vicheri y$u have plenty.

TAKE a quarter of a peck of fmclts, half an ounce of prepcer, half an ounce of nutmeg, a quarter of an ouncte of mace

half



3,6 tat Aftt Qt COO'KERV

S . plX ."J wben eld u. Ihrn clwii dofe. They .xceed ancbovk.

T mate VermheUi,

niiY-vnlks of ces and flouf togher in a pretty ftiff paftey

MIX yo'ls;5f ' cleverly, and roll it as thin as it is pof-

fo as you "'X Pf' XV in the fiin; when it is quite

T with" veVSp ScuJ'it thin as'poffiblc, and iceep 4jry, with a very .j j,,,

• i," dir.' hoJgh hT beft way'is to tun it throu
h a coarfc cell' •' ' .u. f"A„;, foft. If Tou want fome to be made in JX' ty U t; fhe fire, .li cutt fmall. It will dry by the foe i, 1 quarter of an hour. This far exceeds what comei from abroad, being frefter.

79 makt Catchup. TAKE the large flaps of muflirooms gathered dry, and V X- .h.m out fotne at the bottom of an earthen pan; n" feme fa'lt over tlen muftroon.then f.lt, till you haveftw foj;;;,f l „„„„ of cloves and mace, and the like Kl.fJce. L them ftand fix days, ftir hem -p every day, I K them to the oven, and bake them gently for four then fei. 7JJ, out, and ftrain the liquor through a cloth, '' W Ive T eve;y gallon of liquor add, quart of red -ne If not fa t enough, add a little more a race or two of wine. It no" "" ., .? .'„ „i is wafted; ftrain it in-

s?r-" -"s '- •''""- '™" ""' '"""' '' '"''

it, and cork it fight.

Jmthir iVay io makt CHUhup. T AREtbe large flaps, and fait them as above boil the li.uX ftriinit through a thick flannel bag; to a quart of that lirjr put a quart of ftale beer, a large fV.ck of horfe-radia cut in little flips, five or fix bay-leaves, an onion ftuck with Jienty or thirty coves, a quarter of an ounce of Aace, a quarLr of an ice of nutmegs beat, a quarter of -"e f Sack and white pepper, a quarter of an ounce of all fp.ce, and



MADE PLAIN AND EASY; jij

four Ctf five races of ginger. Cover it clofe, aH4 let It ftminer very fofdy till about one third is wailed; then,ftrain it througK a flannel bag: whea it is cold bottle it in pint bottles, cork ic clofe, and it will keep a great while. The other receipt yo
i have in the chapter f6r the Sea.

' .' ' -.

Articbokis tp keep all the JTeaK

BOIL as many artichokes as you intend to keep; boil them fo as juft the leaves will come out; then pull ofFall the leaves and choke cut them from the firings, lay them on a tin-plate, and put them in in oven where tarts are drawn; let them ftand till the oven is heated again, take them out before the wood is put in, and fet them in again, after the tarts are drawn; fo do till they are as dry as a board, then put them in a paper bag, and bang them in a dry place. You fhoulJ lay them in warm water three or four hours before you ufe them, (hifting the water often. Letthe laft water be boiling hot. They will be very tender, and eat s fine as freih ones. You peed not dry all your bottoms at once, as the leaves are gckcd to eat: fo boil a dozen at a time, and fave the bottoms for this ufe.

' . 7i iep French Beans all the Tear.

TAKE fine young beans, gather them on a very fine day,, have a large ftone-jar ready, clean, and dry, lay a layer of falc at the bottom, and then a layer of bean, then faU, and then beans, and fo on till the jar is full; cover them with fait, tie a coarfe cloth overthem, and a board on that, and then a weight to keep it clofe from all air; fet them in a dry cellar, and, when you ufe them cover theqi clofe again; wa(h chem you took out very clean, and let them lie in foft water twentyfour hours, fiiifting the water often; when you boil them dp not put ahy fait in the water. The beft way of drefing them 18, boil them with juft the white heart of a fmall cabbage, then drain then, chop the cabbage, and put both into a fauce-pan with a piece of butter as big as an egg, rolled in flour, hake a little pepper, put in a quarter of a pint of good gravy, let them ftewten minutes, and then difii them up for a fide-di(h. A pint of beans to the cabbage. You may do more or lefs, juft as you pleafe.

To keep Green Peas till Chriftmas:

TAKE fihe young peas, fhcll them, throw them intoboilTng water vith fome fait in, let them boil five or fix minutes, throw

Y them



311 THE ARl OF COOItE.V

Aem into culleiider to drain; then ky dodi fimircr4i times doubk on a table, and fpread them on dry them very well, and have yoor 4cottles rcady fill them and cover them . with mutton-fat tried; when it is a litde cool, fill the seeks almoft to the top, cork them, tie a bladdor and a bth over them, and Tet them in' a cool dry place; When you ufe them boil your water, put in a little ialr fbme fugar, and a piece of butter when they are boiled enough, throw them iato a iieve to drain; then put them into a fauce-pao with a good piece of but? ter, keep (baking it rouhd all the time tUI the butter is melted then turn them into a di£h, and fend them to table.

jmtbiT Wof to frefervi Gran Puiu

GATHER your peas on a very dry day, vfhen they arc nei- . ther old, nor too young, (hell them, and have ready lime quwt bottles with little jnouths, being well dried
fill the bottles and cork them well, have ready a pipkin of roGn ipektd, into which dip the necks of the bottles, and fet them in a very dry place that is cooU

To keep Green Goofeberries till Cbrilmas.

PICK your large green goofeberries on a dry day, have ready your bottles clean and dfy, -fill the bottles, and cork them, fee ' them in a kettle of water up to the neck, let the water boil very foftly till you find the goofeberries are coddled, take tbem out, and put in the reft of the bdttles till all are done; then have ready fome ofin melted in a pipkin, dip the necks of the? bottles in, and that will keep all air from comirtg at the cork, keep them in a cold dry place where no damp is, and they will bake as red as a cherry. You may keep them without fcalding but then the (kins will not be (b tender, nor bake fo fine

To hep lied' Goofeberries.

PICK them when full ripe; to each quart of goofeberries put a quarter of a pouAd of Lifoon fugar, and to each quarter of a pound of fugar put a quarter of a pint of water; let it boil, then put in your goofeberries, and let them boil foftly two or three minutes, then pour them into little ftonejars; when cold cover them up, and keep them for ufe; they make fine pies with little trouble. You may pre(s them through a cuU leoder; to a quart of pulp put half a pound of fine Liibon Aigar, keep ftirring over the fire till both be well mixed and

boiled.



MAliE HaIN ANP easy. 323

iledy aiiid pour it into a ftooe-jsiri when cold' cover it with bfaite paper, and itmaks very pretty tarts or puffs.

To iap Walnuts all thi Tgar.

TAKE a large jar a layer of fea-iand at the bottom then a layer of walnuts, then fand, then the nuts and fo on till the Jar is full; and be fure they do not touch each other in any of the1ayrs. When you would ufe them, lay then in warm wa ter for an hour, flilft the water as it cools; then rub them dry, and they wilt peel well and eat fweet. Leaioiis will keep thus covered better than any other way.

Anothtr Way to kiep Lemnns

TAKE the fine large fruit that are quite found and good, and te a fine packthread about a quarter of a yard long, run it through the hard nib at the end of the lemon; then tie the ftring together, and hang it on a little hook in an airy dry place; fo do as many as you plea(e, but be fure they do not touch one an other, nor any thing elfe, but bang as high as you can. Thus joa may keep pears, &c. only tying the firing to theftalk.

Ti keep JfTnte BuUice Pear- Plums or Damfons. lc.for Tarts or

Pt€Sc



GATHER then when full grown, and juft as they begin to lurn. Fick sdl the largeft out, fave about twothirds of the fruit, the other third put as much water to as you think will cover the reft. Let them boil, and ikim them; when the fruit4s boiled very foft, then ftrain it through a coarfe hair-fieve; and to every quart of this liquor put a pcund and a half of fugar, boil it, and flcim it very well; then throw in your fruit, juii: give them a fcald; take them off the Aire, and when cold put them into bottles with wide mouths; pour your fyrup over them, lay 'a iece of white paper over them and cover them with oil. Bfe fure to take the oil well off when you ufe them, and do not put them in' larger bottles than you think you (hall make ufe of at a time, becaufe all thefe forts of fruits fpoil with the air.

7i mahe Vinegar

TO every gallon of water put a pound of coarfe Lifbon fugar,, let ii boil, and keep fkimming it as long' as the fcum rifes;,then pour it into tubs, and when it is as cold as bfeer to work, t(caft a good toaft, and rub it over with yeaft. Let y- '' ' Y 1 it



•k



324 THE ART OF COOKERY

It work twenty-four hours; jhcn have ready a veflel iron

hooped, and well painted, fixed in a place where the fun ha

full power, and fix it fo as not to have any occafion to move

it. When you draw it off", then fill your veflels, lay a tile on

the bung to keep the duft out. Make it in March, and it will

be fit to ufe;n June or July. Draw it off into littk ftone

bottles the latter end of June or beginning of July, let it ftand

till you want to ufe ir, and it will never foul any nnore f but

when you go to draw it oflF, and you find it is not fourenoueh,

ilet it ftand . a month longer before you draw it ofi. For

pickles to go abroad ufe this vinegar alone; but in England

you will be obliged, when you pickle, to put one half told

fpring-water to ir, and then it will be full four with this vi

negar- You need not boil unlefs you pleafe, for almoft any

fort of pickles; it will keep them quite good. It will keep

walnuts very fine without boiling, even to go to the Indies;

but then do not put water to it. For green pickles, you

may pour it fcaldfng hot on two or three times. AH other fort

of pickles you need not boil it. Mufbrooms only wafh them

clean, dry them, put them into little bottles, with a nutmeg

juft fcalded in vinegar, and diced (whitft it is hot very thin,

and a few blades of mace i then fill up.the bottle with the cold

vinegar and fpring- water, pour the mutton fat 'tried over it,

and tie a bladder and leather over the top. Thefe muihrooms

Will not be fo white, bat as finely tafted as if they were juft

gathered'; and a fpoonful of this pickle will give fauce a very

fine flavour. . .

White walnut?, fuckers, and onions, and all white pickles, do in the. fame manner, after they are ready for the. pickle.

To fry Smettu

LET your fmelts b frefli caught, wipe them very dry with a cloth, beat up yolks of eggs and rub over them, ftrew crumb of bread on; have fome clear dripping boiling in a frying-pan, and fry them quick of a fine gold colour. Put them on a plate to drain, and then lay them in your difh. Garnifh with fried parfley, with plain butter in a cup.

To dres mite- bait.

TAKE ycur white-bait frefh caught, and put them in a cloth with a handful of flour, and fhake them about till they are feparated and quite dry have fomc hog's lard boiling

quick.



MADE PLAIN AND EASfY. 325

Cfutck, fry them two mmutes, drain them, and difh up witii plain butter and foy. .,

Ta rnajl a Pound of Butter.

LAY 2t inTalt apd water two or three hour?, then fpit it, and rub it all over with crumbs of bread, with a little grated nutmeg, lay it to the iire, and as it roafls, bade it with the yolka of two eggs, and thert with crumbs of bread all the time it is a roafting but have ready a pint of oyfiers ftewed in their own liquor, and lay in the di(h under the butter; when the bread hafoaked up all the butter brown the outfide, and lay it 00 your oyfters. Your fire muft be very flow.



rfi



C H A p. XX. D I S T I L L I N G.

c

To dm JValmt-JVater.

TAKE a peck of ine green walnuts, bruife them well in large mortar, put them in a pan, with a handful of bauoji bruifed, put two quarts of good French brandy to them, cover them clofe, and let them lie three days; the next day diftil them in a cold ftill; from this quantity draw three quarts which you may do in a day



How to ufi this Ordinary StilL

YOU muft lay the plate, .then wood aihes thick at the bottom, then the iron pan which you are to fill withour walnuta and liquor; then put on the head of the ftill i ihake a pretty brifk fire till the ftill begins to drop, then flacken it fo as juft to have enough to keep the ftill at work. Mind all the time to keep a wet cloth alt over the head of the ftill all the time it is at work, and always obferve not to let the ftill. work longer than the liquor is good, and take great care you do not burn the ftill c and thus you may diftil what ygu pleafe. If you

Y 3 draw



c



326 THE ART OF COOKERY

draw the ftill too far it will bira, and give your Ii
wci a bl ufte., • • '••.'•.

T$ mafi Tria£UWaUr

TAKE the juice of green walcmtt four pounds of roe, car dupSy marygold and baam, of eiich thee poundS) rodta of butttr-bur half a pound, roots of burdcx:k one pound, n gelica and mafter-wort, of each half a poand, leaves of icordium fix handfuts, Venke treacle and mirhridate. of each haf a pound, oM Canary wine two pounds, white ine vinegar fix pounds juice of kmon fix pounds and diftil thii in an aleaibic.

To maki Black Cberry-Water

" TAKE fix pounds of black cherries, ztA bruifc them fmati j then put to them the tops of rofchfiary, fwcet oiarjoraoi, fpeari mint, angelica, baum, marygold flowers, of each a handful, dried violets one ounce, anifefeeds ind.fweet fqnnel feeds, of each half an ounce bruifed; cut the herbs fmall
mix all togei tber, and diftil them off in a cold fiilh

To maii HyUrical Water.

TAKE betony, roots of lovage, feeds of wild parfpips, o£ trch two ounces, roots of fingle-piony four ounces, of itiilietoe t)f the oak three ounces, myrrh a quarter of an ounte, eaflot half an ounce; beat all thelfe together, ind add to therti a quarter of a pound of dried nnillepedes: pour on thefe hrce quarts iof miigworC water, and two quarts 6f brani dy; let them fland in a clofc vcfTcl eight days, then difHl it in a cold dill pafted up. You may draw ofF nine pints of water, and fweeten it to your taile. Mix all together, and bottle it up. . '

' To dijiil RedRofi 6uds.

WET yourrofes in fair water; four gallons of rofes wi fafce near twp'
IIons of wavr, then' fWt them in a cold ftill "j take the fame ((illed' water, and put into it as tny frefh rbfet ast will wet, then fllH them again.

Mint, baum, parfley, and penny-royd water, diftil the feme way, • c ..- • . • • ' • ? "';



MADE



iN



?7



Roots,

Angelica Dragon, Maywprt) Miot,

RU€.

CarauSj .

Oriffuiy,

Win(?r-favoury,

$roa(t thyme,

ofeoiaryt

rimpernell,

8agc,

Fumatory,

Colisfootg

Scabcou9

fiorragc, '

gaxafrage,

Betony,

Liverwort,

Germander.



7i Wtfl Plagui-Water. Flowers. Seed-



Wormwood,

Succory,

Hyfop,

Agrimony,

Fennel,

Cowflips,

Poppies,

Plantain,

Setfoyl, '

Vocvain,

Maidenhair,

Motherwort,

Cawagit,

Golden- rod,

Gromwell,

pill.



Hart's tongue,

Hoicfiound,

Fennel,

Melilot,

St. Johis wpr,

Comfrey,

Feverfew,

Red rofe leaver,

Wood-forre),

Pellitory of the w?ll,

Hearts-eafe,

Centaury,

Sea-driak, a good handful of

each of the af9refaic) things Gentian-ro9t, Dockcroot, Biitterbur-root, Piony-root, Bay-tcerries, Juniper- berries, of each of

thefe a poiind.

One ounce of nutmegs, on ounce of cloves, and half an ounce of mace; pick the herbs and Howers, and thred them a little Cut the roots, bruife the berries, and pound the fpiies fine; take a peck of green walnuts, and chop them fmall; mix all thefe to gether, and lay them to fteep ip fack lees, or any white wine lees, if not in good fpirrts; but wint lees are btft. Let them lie a week, or better; be fure to ftir them once a day with a fiick, and keep them clofe covered, then ftill them in an alembic with a flow fire, and take care your fiill does not burn. The iirft, fecond, and third running is good, and fome of the fourth. Let them ftand till cold, then put them together.

. 7i male Surfeit'-Watir.

YOU rouft take fcurvygrafs, brook- lime, water creiles, Ro inan wormwood, rue, mint, baum, fage, clivers, of each one handful; green merery two handfujs; poppies, if freih half a peck, if dry g quarter of a peck; cochineal, fix pennyworth, iaffron, fi;; pennyworth anife-feeds, carraway-feed, Gorian-

y 4 -



328 THE ART OF COOKERY

der-feedsy cardamom-feeds,' of each an ounce; liquor! two ounces fcraped, figs fplic a pound, raiflns of the fun ftoned a pound, juniper-berries an ounce bruiftd, nutmeg an ounce beat, mace an ounce bruifed, fweet fennelfeeds an ounce bruifed, a few flowers of rofemary, marygold and fage- flowers: put all thefe into a large ftone jar, and put to them three gallons of French brandy; cover it clofe, and let it ftand near the fire for three weeks. Stir it three times a week, and be fure to keep it clofe flopped, and then flrain it off; bottle your liquor, and pour on the ingredients a gallon more of French brandy. Let it ftand a week, ftirring it once a day, then diftil it in i cold ftill, and this will make a fine white furfeit-water.

You may make this water at any time of the year, if you live at London, becaufe the ingredients are always to be had cither green or dry; but it is the bed made in fummer.

To mah MiU -Water.

TAKE two good handfuls of wojrmwood, as hiuch carduus as much rue, four handfuls of mint, s fnuch baum, half as much angelica; cut thefe a little, put them into a cold ftill, and put to them three quarts of milk. Let your fire be quick till your ftill drops, and then flacken your fire. You may draw off two quarts. The firft quart will keep all the year.

How to diftU vinegar you' have in the chapter of Pickles..



C H A P XXL

HOW TOMARKET,

And the Seafons of the Year for Butchers Meat, Poultry Fifli, Herbs, Roots, jcc; and Fruit.

Piece in a Bullocks

THE bead, tong4ie, palate; the entrails are the fweetbreads, kidneys, fkirts, and tripe 3 there is the double the roll,

and the reed- tripe. .

_ •

7 he Fore- Quarter.

FIRST IS the haunch; which includes the clod, marrow- JjQiic, in, and the flicking- piccc that is the neck-end. The

next



MADE PLAIN. AND EASY. jt,

next is the leg of matton piecr, wbtch has part of the ble bone 3 'then thexhuek, the brifket, the fore ribS
and middle rib, which is called the cbuck-rib.

the Hind'rttr.

FIRST flrloin and rump, the thin and thrick flank, the vernjr. piece, then the ifch-bone, or chuck- bone, buttock, and leg.

In a Sbitp

THE head and pluck; which includes the liver, lights heart, fweetbreadsy and melt.

The Fore'uarter. The neck, breaft, and (boulder,

ne Hind'arter,

THE leg and loin. The two loins together is called a chine of mutton, which- is a fine joint when it is the little fat muttpn.

In a Calf.

THE head and inwards are the pluck) which contains the heart; liver, lights, nut, and melc, and what they call the ikirts (which eat finely broiled), the throat-fweetbread', and the wind-pipe-fweetbread, which is thefineft.

The fore- quarter is the fhoulder, neck, and breaft. .

The hind-quarter is the leg, which contains the knuckle and fillet, then the loin.

In a HoufeLaml.

THE head and pluck,, that is the liver,, lights, heart, nut; and melti Then there is the fry, which is the fweetbreads lamb-ftones, and fkirts, with fome of the liver.

Thefore-quarter is the fhoulder, neck, and .breaft. together.

Th hind-quarter is the leg and loin. This, is in high ieafoil at Chriftmas, bu( lafts all the yean

Grafs-laoiib comes in in April or May, according to the fe;i loo of the year and holds good till the middle of Auguft.

In a Hog

THE head arid inwards; and that is the haffct, which is the liver and crow, kidney and ikirts. It is mixed irith a great

deal



SP



THE ART OF COOEKRY



dnlef rage and fweet herM, pepp bki mifpk fo rMoi in the caul and foaied: . theft theie aie tho ebtlierlkiv ai (h guts, which are cleaned for faufiiges;

c The fore-quarter it the forelbin and fprini if a large hogr you may cut a fpare-rrb off. Tbe bind-qiiarter only leg and loin.



j( Bac9n Hogn

THIS ic cutdiiFerrnt, btcaore of making hams, bacon, and

Eickled pork. Here you have fine fpareribs, chines, and grii ins, ahd fat for hog's-lard. The liver and crov is much ad mired fried with bacon; the feet and earl are both eduafly good foufed.

Pork comes in (eafen at Brtholomew-tide, 9M holds gQQ4 ill Ladyday,

How tolMife BUTCHERS MEAT,

To chufi Lamb.

IN a fore-quarter of lamb mind the neck-vein $ if it be ai
;izure blue it is new and good, but if greenifh or yellowifh, it 1 near tainting, if npc tainted already. In the iinder-quaner 4ineU uncr the kidney, and try tlie knuckle; if you meet with a faint fceht, and the knuckle oe limber, it is flale killed. For ' Iambus head, mind the eyes if they be unkor iriplfied i
s ftale if plum nd lively it is new and lf cet

IF the bloody vein in the ihoulder looks blue or a bright rti it is new killed; but IF btackiib, greenifh, or yellowiih it is tabby and ftale If wrapped in wet clothi, fmell whetUcr it be muft or not Thc Ibin &rf
taints under the kid ney, and the flefli if ftale killed, wttl be foft and fllmy.

The bitaft and neck uints firft at the upper end, and yoti •rill peretivefoasedaflcy yellowifli, or gretnifl) appearance; the fweetbread on the breaft will be ciaitlmy, otherwiie it iq fdlh and good. The leg is Jbnown to be new by the ftiffnefs of thejoit; if limber, and the ftefll fesms damoiy and haq geen or yellowiCh fpecks, it is ftale. The head is known aa the lambs. The flefli of a bulUcalf is more red and firm thax (bat of a cow-calfp and Ue fat more lrd and curdled







Muitpu



M AD£ fhkltS AND EAt.



14'



IF the tiiuttoti be young, the flefli will pinch tender i if oM, ft nt wrinkle and remain (6; if young, the fat WHI eafily pai from the lean if old, it wHl tAck by firings atnd fkllis; if rakhC rntittoti,' the fat feels QQrrgy, the fldh clofe-grined and tdiigh, not rifiiig grn, when dented with yourfingef; If ewe-oimtoh', the flfb is paler than wedder-mutton, a clofer gria, and eafily parting. If there be a rot, the flefli wil be pitm and the '
at a faint vhitifb, t ncliinng- to yel low, and tfe fieA wil) be tbofe at the bone If you fqueeKe it hard, forae dikcp of water wiH faoid 'irp like fwtat; at xo the aewnefs and ftakneft, the ftm
s to be obferyed a by lamb,

IF Jit lc right ox-becf, it will bare ap open grain i if yoirng, I tender and otly fa?oocfaners if rougb aad fpuiigy, it ia oW PC. iic(inipg to. be .foc lxcept neck, briftct, and fuch partfi im RHS.vary fibrous, which in, youa meat 1 be nioie rough baa in o(lef parts. A carnation pieaTant colpvir betokena oojd fpendiflg meal, the fuet a curioua white
yiilpwiih is not fo good.

Cow-beef is lefs bound and dofer grained than the ox, the at whiter, but the lean Ibmiftwhat paler; if youhg, the dent rdu make with your finger will rife ain in a little tiihe.

Bull-beef it of a cldfe grain, deep duflcy red, tough (ii pinchiaf, the fat fidnny, hard, and that a rammifh railk fmell i and jfor newnefs and ftalenefs, this flefh bought frefli has but few figns; the more maternal is its clabminefs, and the reft ypu fmell will inform. you. If it be bruiftd, tbefe places Will look more dufy or blackiih than the reft.

Port. • ' .'

IF k be Qungt the lean will break in pinching between yotir fiogert, and if you nip thb ikio with your nails, it wiM liiakea. dent;. alfo if the fat be foft and pulpy; in a manner like lard; if the lean be tough, and the fac flabby and (ngy, feeling rough, it is old j efpecially if the rind be ftubbOrn, and you cannot n
c it wjh yoar nails.

If of f boar, though young, or of a boa; gelded at full growth, the flelh will be hard, tough, reddiffi, and rammifli bf fmell tfec fat ffinny and hird; the ikia very thick and (pugb and pinched up, will immediately fall again.

At



I



33tt THE ART OF COOKERY;

As for oU and new killed, try the legs, bands, and fprings, by puttins; your finser under the bone that comes out, for if it be tainted, you will there find it by fipelliog your finger; belides, the (laiq wUl be fweaty and clanuny when ftale, but cool and fmooth when new.

If you find little kernels in the fat nf the pork, like bail (hot, if many, it is m(;afly and dangierous to be eaten.

•

How to (hufe Br awn f Vinifon Wphalia Hams &r.

BRAWN is known to.be old ot young by the ejraordinarf or moderate tbickneft of the rind; the thick is old, the mode rate is young. Jf the rind and fat be very tender, it is not boar brawn, but barrow or fow.

Venifon

TRY the hautiches or (houldefs under the bones diat come cmt, with your finger or knife, and as the fcent is fweet or rank, it is new or ftale; and the like of the fides in the moft flefliy intrts: f tainted, they will look greenilh in fome places, or more than ordinary Mack. Look on the hoofs, and if the defrs are very wide and rough it is old; if clbfe and fmooth, it is young.

Tlr iafin for Vemfon. . THE buck venifon begins in May, and is in high feafon till AllHaUows-day; the doe is in feafon from Michaelmas to the end of December, or lometimes to the end of January,

JVpbatia Hamsy and Englijb Bacon

PUT a knife under the bone that flicks out of the ham, and if it comes out in a manner clean, and has a curious flavour, it is fwtet and good % jf much fmeared and dulled, it is tainted or rufty.

£ngti(b gaqnmons are tried the fame way $ and for other parts try the fat $ if it be white, oily in feeling, does not break or crumble, good j but if the contrary, and the lean has fome little ftreai of yellow, it is rufly, or will foon be fo.

To cbufe Batter 9 Cheefe and Eggu

WHEN you buy butter, truft not to that which will be given you to tafle, but try in the middle, and if your fmell and tafle be good, you cannot be deceived

Cheefe



MADE PLAIN AND EASY.



33i



Cheefe h to ht cbofen by its moift and fmooth doat; if old cbeefe be rough coated, rugged, or dry at top, beware of little wbrms or mites, if it be over- full of boles, moift or fpungy, is fubje£i: to maggots. If any foft or peri(hed place appear on the outfide, try how deep it goes, for the greater part may be hid within.

Eggs hold the great end to your tongue; if it feela warait be fure it is new; if cold, it is bad, and fo in proportion to the heat and cold, fo is the goodnefs of the egg. Another way t6 inow a good egg is to pitt the egg into a pan of cold water, the freffaer the egg the fooner it will fall to the bottom $ if .rotten, it will fwim at the top. This is alfo a fure way not to be der ceived. As to the keeping of them, pitch them all with the fmall end downwards in fine wck)d-afhes, turning them once' a week end- ways, and they will keep fome months.

Poultry in Seain.

JANUARY. Hen-turkeys, capons, pullets with egg, fowls, chickens, hares, all forts of wild- fowl, tame rabbits, and tame pigeons.

February. Turkey8,'and pullets with eggs, capons, fowk, fmall chickens, hares, all forts of wild-fowl (which in thia jmontb begin to decline), tame and wild pigeons, tanie rabbits green geefe, young ducklings, and turkey- ppults.

Marc4. This month the fame as the preceding month; and in this month wild-fowl goes quite out.

April, Pullets, fpring fowls, chickens, pigeons, young wild rabbits, leverets, young geefe, ducklings, and turkeypoults.

May, and June. The fame.

July. The fame; wit)i young partridges, pheafants, and wild ducks, called flappers or moulters.

Auguft. The fame.

September, Oftober, November, and December. In thefe months all forts of fowl, both wild and tame, are in feafon; and in the three lad is the full feafon for all manner of . wildc fowl

How to chufe POULTRY.

Tc inow whether a Capon is a true one young or oldy new orjldl

IF he be young his fpurs are fhort, and his legs fmooth; if a true capon, a fat vein on the iide4)f bis breaft, the comb

pale,



iii ' THE ART OF CObkERV

tie, and a ihitk belly and rump: if iew, he will Mve a dofe, ajrd yent j if ftale, a loofe open vent.

A Cock or Htn Turhf t9ritf'P6nUt.

IF 'the cock be young, bis legs will hr black mid fmootb, and his fpurs fhorc; if ftale, his eyes will be funk in his head, and the feet dry i if new, the eyes lively and feet limber. Obfcrve the like by the hen ) add nioreover, if ihe be with

?g, ihe will have a foft open vent c if not, a hard clofe veni. lukeypoulu are known the fame way, and their age cannot deoeive yopu

A Cod, Hm lie.

IF young, his fpurs are fbort and dubbe;d; but takfc particu lar notict they are not pared nor fcraped; if old, he will have an open vent; but if new, a clofe hard vnt: and fo of a hen for newnefs or ftaenefs
if old, her legs and comb ate rough
finooth. . -



A Tamo Goofe Wild Goofi, and Bran Goofi.

IF the bill be yellowKb, and fhe has but few hairs, he IS young; but if full t)f hairs, and the bill and foot red, (hii is old; if new, 1 imber- footed; if ftale, dry footed And fo Off a wild goofe, and bran goofe.

Wild and Tame Ducks.

THE diick, when fat, is hard and thick on die belly, but if not, thin and lean; if new, limber-footed; if ftale, dry-footed. A true wild duck has a reddifli foot, fmaljer than the tame one,,

GoodwettSj Marie, Knots, Ruffs, Gull, Dotterels, and Wheats

Ears

If tbefe be old, their legs will be rough if young, fmooth.; if fat, a fat rump; if new, limber, fpottd: if ftale, ihry-fopted.

Pheafant, Cock and Hen.

The cock, when young, has dubbed fpurs; when old, (harp' fmall fpurs; if new, a fat yent; and if ftale, an open flabby one. The hen, if young, has fmooth legs, and her defti of a curious grain;' if with egg, ftie will have a foft open vctit, jtnd if net, a dafe one. For newnefs or ftalenefs, as the cock.

Heath



MAOi£ rtAIN AND tZ% )3j

r -

t

Jieatb and Phiafant Pouksp

IF new, tfaey mil be ftliF aad white in tkevent, tod tbt foot limber; .if fac, dwy will have a hard vent 4 if Aale, dtjifoaied lad limber; and if Jmchod thejr will pccL

HiMbCk and Hen.

IP young, they have fmoot
i legs and bills % and if old roug For the reft, they are Jurown as the foregoinf

JpMTtrif Cci and Hen.

THE bill iriiite, and the legs bluiOi, iktw age $ for if youtig the bin it black and legs yellowifli; if new, a faft vent; if ftale, a green and epen one If their crops be full, and they have fed on green wheat, they may taint there; and for this fmell in their mouth

Wodcod and Snipe.

The woodcock, if fat, is thick and hard; if new, Kniberi footed; when ftaie,dry-cfooted; or if their noies are fnotty, and their throats muddy and moorkQi, they are naught, A fntpe if Ckt has a fat vein in the fide under the wing, aad in the vent fteb- thick for the reft, like the woodcock,

Devee and Pigeeeu

TO know the turtle-dove, look for a bluifh ring round his neck, and the reft moftly white: the ftock-dove is bigger; and the ring-dove is lefs than theftpckdove. The dove-houfe pigeons, when old, are red-legged; if new arid fat, thev will feel full and fat in the vent, and are lifflberlboted; nut if ftale, a flabby and green vent.

And fo green or grey plover, fieldfare, blackbird, tbrufli, hrks, ice.

V

Of Harey Leveret or Rabbit.

HARE will be whitifb and ftiff, if oaew and clean killed i if fialen the flefli blackiih in moft parts, and the body limber, if the cleft in her lips fpread very much, and her claws wide and ragged,- flie is old, and the contrary young; i( the bare be young, the ears will tear I'Jce a piece of brown p2cer; if old, dry and tough. ISo know a true leveret, feel on the fore-leg near the

foot.



336 TH ART or COOKERY

foot, and if there be a foiall bone or knob ic is right, if not, it is a hare: for the reft obferve zi in a hare. A rabbit, if ftale, win be Ifanber and iliaiy; if new, white and ftiffj if oM, her daws are very long. and rough, die wool molded with grey hairs; if young, the claws and wool fmoodi

FISH in SEASON,

-i CandUmas mrUrm

LOBSTERS, crabs, crawfi(h, river eraw-fifli, guard-fifh, mackarel, bream, barbel, roach fhad or alloc, lamprey or 1am' pereels, dace, bleak, prawns, and horfe-mackarel.

The eels that are takea in running water, are better than pond-eels; of thefe the iiiver ones are moft efteemed.

Midfummer artif,

TURBOTS and trouts, foals, grigs, and (hafflings and glout, tenes,Tamon, dolphin, flyingfifli, iheep-head, tollis, both land and'fea, fturgeon, feale, chubb, lobfters, and crabt. '

Sturgeon is a fi(h commonly found in the northern feas; but now and then we find them inour great rivers, the Thames, the Severn, and the Tyne. This fifh is of a very large fizey-and will fometimes meafure eighteen feet in length. They are much efleemed when frefh, cut in pieces, roalkd, bked, or pickled for cold treats. The cavier is efkemed a dainty, whiph is the fpawn of this filh. The latter end of
Lhis quarter come

fmclts.



Michaelmas garter

COD and haddock, coal-fifb, white and pouting hake, lyng, tufke and mullet red and grey, 'weaver, gurnet, rocket, herrings, fprats, foals and flounders, plaife, dabs and fmeare dabs, eels, chars, fcate, thornback and homlyn, kinfgn, oyfters and fcollops, falmon, feapearch and carp, pike, tench, and fea-tench. - '

Scate-maides are black, and thornback-maides whlte Grey bafs comes with the mullet

In this quarter are fine fmelts, and hold till after Chriftmas.

There are two forts of muIIetSj the fcamu!Ict and river mullet i both equally good.

9 Cbrifimas



MADE PLAIN AND, EASY. 337

% • • •

Chriflmai larter.

DOREY, brile gudgeons, gollin, fmelts, crouch, per6h, anchovy and loach, fcollop ' and wilks, periwinkles, cockles, inufcles,v geare, bearbet and hollebet.

How to chufe FISH.

To chufe Salmon Pike Trout Carp, Tench, GraUing, Barlefy Chub, Ruff, Eel, iHiting, Smelt, Shad, c.

ALL thefe are known to be new or ftale by the colour of their gHJs, their, eafinefs or hardnefs to open, the hanging or keeping up their fins; the ftanding cut or linking of their eyes, &c, and by foiellng their gills.

TurboU

HE is cfaofen by his thicknefs and plumpnefs; and if hts belly be of a cream colour, he muft fpend well; but if thin and his belly of a bluifh white, he will eat very loofe.

Cod and Codling,

CHUSE him by his thicknefs towards his head, and the whjtenefs of his flefli when it is cut: and fo of a codling.

Lyng.

FOR dried lyng, chufe that which is thickeft in the poll, anil the fleOi of the brighteft yellovi.

Scate and Thornback.

THESE are chofen by their thicknefs, aiid the (he-fcate 13 the fweeteft, efpecially if large.

Soals

THESES are chofen by their thicknefs and ftiiFnefs; when their bellies are of a cream-colour, they fpend the firmer.

Sturgeon.

IF it cuts without crumbling, and the veins and griftles give a triie blue where they appear, and the ilefli a perfe white,

then conclude it to be good;

. - Z Ffejb



3i8 THE ART OF COOKERY

Frejh Herrings and MdckreU

IF their grlls are of a lively (hining rednefs, their eyes ftand full, and the fi(b is ftiff, then they are new; but if dufky and faded, or finking and wringled, and tails limber, they are fiale.

Lohjlers.

CHUSE them by their weight; the heavieft are beft, if no water be in them: if new, the tail will pull fmart, like a fpring; if full, the middle of the tail will be full of hard, or redd ilh- (kin ned meat. Cock lobfter is known by the narrow back-part of the tail, and the two ufpermoft fins within his tail are ftifF and hard but the hen is foft, and the back of her tail broader

Prawns f Shrimps and Crabjijh.

THE two firft, if ftale, will be limber, and caft a kind of flimy fmell, their colour fading, and they flinty: the latter will be limber in their claws and joints, their red colour turn blackiOi and dufky, and will have an ill fmell under their throats j otherwife all of them are good.

Plaife and Flounders,

IF they are ftifF, and their eyes be not funk or look dull, they ar new; the contrary when ftale. The beft fort of plaife look bluifti on the belly.

Pickled Salmon.

IF the ftefli feels oily, and the fcales tire ftpfF and ftiining, and it comes in flakes, and parts without crumbling, then it is new and good, and not otherwife. '

Pickled and Rid Herrings.

For the firft, open the back to the bone, and if the flefh be white, fleaky and oily, and the bone white, or a bright red, they are good. If red herrings carry a good glofs, part well from the bone, and fmell well, then conclude them to be good,

FRUITS and GARDEN-STUFF throughout the Year.

January.- Fruits yet lajiingy are SOME grapes, the Kentifl), ruflet, golden, French, kirton and Dutch pippins, John- apples, winter queeniogs, thenuiri-

7 golcJ



mad£ plain and easy.



339



gold and Harvey apples pom-water, golden-dorfet, renneting, love's- pear main, and the wintei;-pearmain; winterburgamor, winter- bonchretien, winter-mafk, winter Norwich, and great furrein pears. AU garden things much the fame as in December,

February. - Fruits yet lafling.

THE fame s in January, except the goldenpippin and pom-water alfo the pomery, and the winter- peppering and dagobent pear.

March.-Fruits yet lafiing,

THE golden ducket-daufet, pippins, rennctings, loveVpearmain and John-apples. The latter bonchretien, and double bloiTom pear.





w

ApriL - Fruits yet lajling.

YOU have now in the kitchen-garden and orchard, autumn carrots, winter-fpinach, fprouts of cabbage and caulifloers, turnip-tops, afparagus, young radiihes, Dutch brown lettuce and crefies, burnet, young onions, fcallions, leeks, cand early kidney-beans. On hot-beds, purflain, cucumbers, and muflirooms. Some cherries, green apricots, and . goofebcrries for tarts.

Pippins, deuxans, Weftbury apple, ruffeting, gilliflower, the latter bonchretien, oak-pear, &c.

May.-The ProduSf of the Kitchen and Fruit Garden.

ASPARAGUS, cauliflowers, imperial, Silcfia, royal and cabbage- lettuce.9, burnet, purflain, cucumbers, naftertiumflowers, peas and beans fown in October, artichokes, (parlet ftrawberries, and kidney-beans. Upon the hotbeds, May cherries. May dukes. On walls, green apricots, and gooleberries.

Pippins, devans, or John apple, Weftbury apples, rufTeting, gilliflower apples, the codlin, he.

The great karvile, winter- bonchretien, black Worcefter pear, furrein, and double blpfTompear. Now is the proper time. to diftil herbs which are in their greateft perfection.

yune.'-The Produii of the Kitchen and Fruit Garden

ASPARAGUS, garden beans and eas, kidney-beans, cau liflowers, artichokes, Batterfea and Dutch cabbage, melons on the iirft ridges, young onions, carrots, and parfnips fown a

Z 2 February,



I



340 THE AtiT OF COOKERY

February, purflaiD, borage, burnet, the flowers of nafterlwm, the Dutch brown the imperial, the royal, the Silefia, and cofs lettuces, fome blanched endive and cucumbers, and alL forts of pot-herbi.

Green goofeberries, ftrawberries, fome rafpberries, currants white and black; duke-cherries, red-hearts, the Flemifli and carnation-cherries, codlins, jannatings, and the mafculine apricot. And in the forcing-frames all the forward kind of grapes.

July.Thi Produei of the Kitchen and Fruit -Garden.

RONCIVAL artd winged peas, garden and kidney beans, Qaulifiowers, cabbages, airtichokes, and tbeiiLfmaH fuckers, all iorts of kitchen and aroit.atic herbs. Sallads, as cabbage-iet ttice, purilain, burnet, young onions, cucumbers, blanched en dive carrots, turnips, beets, naftertiumflowers, mu(k-melons, wood-ilrawberries. Currants, goofeberries, rafpberries, red and white jannatings, the Margaret apple, the primat-rufiet, fummer- green chiird and pearl pears, the carnation morella, great bearer, Morocco, origeat, and beggareaux cherries. The nutmeg, IfabcIIa, Per n an, Newington, violet, mufcal, and rambouillet peaches. Nearines; the primodial, myrobalant red, blue, amber, damafk pear; apricot, and cinnamon- plums; alfo the king's and lady Elizabeth's plums, &c. fome figs and grapes. Walnuts in high feafon to pickle, and rock-pimpfaire. The fruit yet laAing of the laft year is, the deuxans and winter-rufleting.

Jugujl. - The ProduSf of the Kitchen and Fruit -Garden

CABBAGES and their fprouts, isauliflowers, artichokes, cabbage- lettuce, beets, carrots, potatoes, turnip, fome beans, peas, kidney- beans, and all forts of kitchen herbs, radiflies, horfe radifli, cucumbers, creiTes, fome tarragon, onions, gar licky rocamboles, meltosy and cucumbers for pickling.

Goofeberries, rafpberries, currants, grapes, figs, mulberries and filberts, apples; the Windfor fovereign, orange burgamot flipper, red Catharine, king Catharine, penny- prufltan, fummer poppening, fugar, and louding pears. Crown fiourdeaux, lavur, difput, favoy and wallacotta peaches; the muroy, tawny, red iloman, little green clufier, and yellow nedarines.

Imperial blue dates, yellow late pear, black pear, white nutmeg late pear, great Antony or Turkey and Jane plums.

Clufter, mufcadin, and cornelian gcapes.

Sepifmir



MApE PLAIN AND EASY, 341

Sept ember. -The Prsdu£f of the Kitchen and Fruit Garden.

Garden and foane. kidney oWansroncival peas,- artichokes, radiflies, cauliflowers cabbage- lettuce, crefles, thervile, onions, terragon, burnet, celery, endive, mufhroomf. Carrots, turnips, fkirrets, beets, fcorzonera, horfe-radifli, garlick, flialots, rocambole, cabbage !and their fpfouts, with favoys, which are better when moreTweetcned with the froft.

Peaches, grapes, figs, pears, plum, walnuts, filberts, al monds, quinces, melons, and cucumbers.

OSiiAer. - The Pro dull of the Kitthin and Fruit Gar den .

SOME cauliflowers, arttchekes, peas, beans, cucumbers, and melons; alfo July- Town kidnejr beahs, turnips, carrots, parfnlps, potatoes, fkirrets, fcorzonera, beets, onions, gar lick, (halots, rocambole, chardones, creffes, chervile, muftard, radifb, rape, fpinach, lettuce fmall and cabbaged, burnet, tarragon, blanched celery and endive, late peaches and plum, grapes and figs. Mulberries, filberts, and walnuts. The bullaeV, pines, and arbutas; and great variety of apples and pears.

November, - The ProduSf of the Kitchen and Fruit Garden.

CAULIFLOWERS in the green-houfe, and fome rtfchokes, Arrots, parfnips, turnips, beets, (kirrets, fcorzonera, borfe-radiih, potatoes, onions, garlick, (halots, rocambole, celery, parfley, forrel, thyme, favoury, fweet- marjoram dry, and clary cabbages, and their fprouts, fa voy- cabbage, fpinach, late cucumbers. Hot herbs on the hotibcd, burnet, qabbage, lettuce, endive blanched; feveral forts of apples nd pears.

Some bullaccs, medlars, arbutas, walnuts, hazel- nuts, and chefnuts.



December, - The ProdtiSi -0 the Kitchen: and Fruit Garden.

MANY forts of cabbages and favoys, fpinach, and fome cauliflowers in the confervatory, and artichokes nn fand. Roots we have as in the laft month. Small herbs on the hot-beds for fallads; alfo mint, terragon, and cabbage-lettuce preferved under glaflfes; chervile, celery, and endive blanched. Sage, thyme, favoury, bdet- leaves, tops of young beets, parfley, forrel, fpmach, leeks, and fweet marjoram, marigold-flower, -and mint dried. Afparagus on the hot-bed, and cucumbers on the plants fown in Julj and Auguft, and plenty of pjpars and apples.

Z3 CHAP.



34 THE ART OF COOKERY



CHAP. XXII.

A artatn Cure fir thi Bite of a Mad Dog.

LET the patient be blooded at the arm nine or ten ounces. Take of the herb, called in Latin, lichen cinereus terrejlris in Engl i(h,.a(h- coloured ground-liverwort, cleaned, dried, and povrdered, half an ounce. Of black pepper powdered, two drachms Mix thefe well together, and divide the powder into four dofe one of which muft be taken every morning failing, for four mornings fucceffivelyi in half a pint of cow's milk warm. After thefe four doies are taken, the patient muf); go into the cold bath, or a cold fpring or riyer every morning fafting for a month. He mud be dipped all over, but not to ftay in (with his head above water) longer than half a minute, if the water be very cold. After this he muft go in three times a week for a fortnight longer.

N. B. The lichen is a very common herb, and grow$ generally in fandy and barren foils all 'Over England. The right time to gather it is in the months of Odober and November. D. Mead.

Amther for the Bite of a Mad Dog.

FOR the biteof a mad dog, for either man or beaft, take fix ounces of rue clean picked and bruifed, four ounces of garlick peeled and bruifed, four ounces of 'Venice treacle, and four ounces of filed pewter, or fcraped tin. Boil thefe in two quarts of the bcft ale, in a pan covered clofe, over a gentle fire, for the fpace of an hour then (irain the- ingredients froip the liquor. (Jive eight or nine fpoonfuls of it warm to a man, or a woman, three mornings fafiag. Eight or nine fpoonfuU is lufficient for the ftrongeft j a leffer quantity to thofe younger, or of a weaker conAitution, as you may judge of their flrength. Ten or twelve fpoonfuls for a horfe or a bullock; three, four, or five to a (heep, hog, or dog. This muft be given within nine days after the bite: it feldom fails in man or beaft. If you bind fome of the ingredients on the wound, it will be A) much the better.

Receipt again Jl the Plague

TAKE of rue, fage, mint, rofemary, wormwood, and la vender, a bandful of each iofufe them together in a gallon

of



M.4DE PLAIN AND EASY. 3+3

of white- wine vinegar, put the whole into a ftonepot clofely covered up, upon warm wood-a(hes, for four days; after which draw ofF (or ftrain through fine flannel) the liquid, and put it into bottles well corked; and into every quart bottle put a quarter of an ounce of camphor. With this preparation wafli your mouth, and rub your loins and your temples every day; fnuSa little up your noftrils when you go into the air, and carry about you a bit of fpunge dipped in the fame, in order to, fmell to upon all occafions, elpecially when you are near anyplace or perfon that is infeded. They write, that four malefadors (who had robbed the infefted houfcs, and murdered the people during the courfe of tfie plague) owned, when they came to the gallows, that they had preferved' them (elver from the contagion by ufing the above medicine only; and that they went the whole time from houfe to houfe without any fear of the diftemper.

How to keep clear from Bugs,

FIRST take out of your room all filver and gold lace, then fet the chairs about the room, fbut up your windows and doors, tack a blanket over each window, and before the chimney, and over the doors of the room, fet open all clofets and cupboard doors, all your drawers and boxes, hang the reft of your bedding on the chair-backs, lay the feather- bed on a table, i'len fet a. large broad earthen pan in the middle of the rooni, and in that fet a chafing-difh that ftands on feet, full of charcoal well lighted. If your room is very bad, a pound of rolled brimftone; if only a few, half a pound. Lay it on the char' coal, and get out of the room as quick as poifibly you can, or it will take away your breath. Shut your door clofe, with the bfankct over it, and be fure to fet it fo as nothing can catch fire. If you have any India pepper, throw it in wi(h the brimftone. You muft take great care to have the door op€n whilft you lay in the brimftone, that you may gee out as fopn as poffibleP. Do not open the door iinder fix hours, and then you muft be very careful how you go in to open the windows; therefore let the doors ftand open an hour before you open the windows. Then brufh and fweep your room very clean, wafli it well with boiling lee, or boiling water, with a little unpacked lime in it; get a pint of fpirits of vAine, a pint of fpirits of turpentine, and an ounce of camphor, (hake all 'well tpgether, and with a bunch of feathers wafti your bedfltad very well, and fprinkle the reft over the feather-bed, and about the wainfcot and room.

Z 4 If







344 THE ART OF COOKERY

I you find great fwarms about the room, and fome no dead, do this over again, and you will be quite clear. Every fpring and fall, wafh your bedftead with half a pint, and you will neccr have a bug j but f you find any come in with new goods or boxes, &c. only walh your bedftead, and fprinkk all over your bedding and bed, and you will be clear; but be fure to do il as foon as you find one. If your room is very bad, it wjll be well to paint tne room after the brimftone is burnt in it. . This never fail, if rightly done.

An e£'eSIual IFay to char your hedflead of Bugs,

TAKE quiclcfilver, and mix it well in a, mortar with the white of an egg till the guickfilver tjsall well mixt, ajEid there is no blubbers.; then beat uffbme white of an egg very fine, and mix with the quickfilver till it is. Uke a fine. ointment, then with a feather anoint the bedfiead all over in every creek and corner, and about the lacing and binding, where you think there is any. Do this two or three times: it -is a certain cure, d will not fpaii any thing.

DIRECTIONS ta.thc HOUS E-M AID.,

ALWAYS when you fweep a room, throw a little vet fand all over it, and that will gather up all the flew and duft, prevent it from rifinjr, clcjn the boards, and fave the bedding, pidiuies, and all other furniture, from dufland dirt;



A D D I T I ON S,

Firft printed in the Fifth Editfon, and now enlarod

and improved.

To drefs a Turtle the Wajl India Way.

rkyjL the turtle out of water the night before you drefs it, and lay it on its back, in the morning cut its head otT; aid hanr it up by its hind-fins for it to bleed till' the blood is all out; then cut the callapee, which is the belly, roaad, a,d raiie it upi cut as much meat to it as you can;

9 throw-



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 345

throw it into fpringwater with a little fait, cut the fias off, and fcald them with the had; take off all the fcales, cu 11 the white meat out, and throw it into fpring-water and fait; the guts and lungs muft he cut out; wafh the lungs very clean from the blood; then. take the guts and maw, and flit them open, wafh them very clean, and put them on to boil in a large pot of water, and boil them till they are tenr der; then take off the inGde (kin, and cut them in pieces qf two or three inches long: have ready a good veal broth made as follows; take on large or two fmall knuckles of veal, and put them on in three gallons of water; let it boil, Ikim it ' well, feafon with turnips, onions, carrots, and celery, and a good large bundle of fweet herbs; boil it till it is half wafted, then drain it off. Take the fins, and put them' in a ftewpan, cover them with veal broth, feafon with an onion chbp, ped fine, all forts of fweet herb chopped very fine, half an ounce of cloves and mace, half a nutmeg beat very fine, ftew it very gently till tender; then take the fins oi4t, and put in a pint of Madeira wine, and ftew it for fifteen minutes j beat upi. the whites of fix eggs, with the juice of two lemons; put the liquor in and boil it up, run it through a flannel bag ipal.e it hot, waih the fins very clean, and put them in. Take a piece of butter and put at the bottom of a ftew-pan, put your wbit meat in, and fweat it gently till it is almoft tender, ' Take the lungs and heart, and c;over them with veaI-broth with an onion herbs,- and fpice, as for the fins, ftew then& ' titl tender; take out the lungs, ftrain the liquor off, thickeo, it, and put in a bottle df Madeira wine, feafon with Cayenne pepper, and fait pretty high: put in the lungs and white meat, ftew them up gently for fifteen minutes; have fome force-meat balls made. out of the white pare inftead of veal, as for Scotch coll ops: if any eggs, fcald them; if not, take twelve hard, yolks of eggs, made into egg- balls; have your callapafti or deep ftiell done round the edges with pafte, feafon it in the infide with Cayeunc pepper and fait, and a little Madeira wine, . bake it half an hour,' then put in the lungs and white meat force-meat,, and eggs over, and bake it half an hour. Take the bones, and three quarts of veal- broth, feafoned with an 'onion, a bundle of fweet herbs, two blades of mace, flew it _ an hour, ftrain it through a fieve, thicken it with flour and' Dutter,.put in half a pint of Madeira wine, ftew it half anhoiir . feafon with Cayenne pepper and fait tq your liking: this is (he foup. Take the callapee, run jour knife between the meat and (bell, and fl it full of fore-ojeat; feafon it all over

with





346 THE ART OF COOKERY

. with fweet herbs chopped fine, a fliailot chopped, Cayenne pepper and fait, and a Ihtle Madeira wine; put a pafte round the edge, and bake it an hour and a half. Take the guts and maw, pu them in a ftew-pan, with a little broth, a bundle of fweec herbs, two blades of mace beat fine; thicken with a little butter rolled in flour'; Hew them gently for half an hovr,' feafon with Cayenne pepper and fait, beat up the yolks of two eggs in half a pint of cream, put it in, and keep ftirring it Qne way till it boils up; then difli them up as follows;

Callapee. Fricafee, Soup. Fins. Callapaih.

The fins eat fine when cold put by in the liquor.

Another Way to drefs a Turtle

KILL your turtle as before, then cut the belly-lhell clean off, cut off the fins, take all the white meat out, and put it into fpring-water; take the guts and lungs out; do the guts as before; waft the lungs well, fcald the fins, head, and belly- (hell; take a faw, and faw the iheil all round about two inches deepc fcald it, and .take the (hell off, cut it in pieces. Take the (hells, finj:, and head, and put them in a. pot, co' yer them with veal- broth; feafon with two large onions chop ped fine, all forts of fweet herbs chopped fine, half an ounce of cloves and mace, a whole nutmeg, fteW them till tender take out all the meat, and (train the liquor through a fieve, cut the fins in two or three pieces; take all the brawn from the bones, cut it in pieces of about two inches fquare; take the white meat, put fome butter at the bottom of a ftew-pan, put your meat in, and fweat it gently over a'flow fire till almoft done; take it out of the liquor, and cut it in pieces ajbout the bignefs of a goofe's egg; take the lungs and heart, and cover them with veal-broth; feafon with an onion, fweet herbs, and a little beatfpice (always obferve to boil the liver by itfelf); (tew it till tender, take the lungs out, and cut them in pieces; drain off the liquor through a fieve: take a pound of butter and put in a large (tew- pan, big enough to hold all the turtle, and melt it; put half a pound of flour in and ftir it till it is fmooth; put in the liquor, and keep ftirring it till it is well mixed, if lumpy ftrain it through a fieve; put in your meat of ail forts, a great many force-meat balls and egg-balls, and put. in three pints of Madeira wine; feafon

with



r



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 347

With pepper and fait, and Cayenne pepper pretty Jiigh; ftcw it three quarters of an hour, add the juice of two lemons; have your deep ihell baked, put fome into the (hells, and bake it or brown it with a hot iron, and ferve the reft in tureens. N. B. This is for a turtle of fixty pounds weight.

To make m Mock Turtle.

TAKE a large calf's head with the flcin on, well fcalded and cleaned, boil it three quarters of an hour j take it out, and flit it down the face, ta'ke all the ikin and meat from the bones as clean as poffible, be careful you do not break,ofF the ears; lay it on a dreffer, and fill the ears full of force-meat, tie tbem round with a cloth; take out the eyes, and pick all the meat from the bones, put it in a large ftefw-pan with the heft and fatteft parts of another head without the (kin,- boiled as long as thi above, and three quarts of veal -gravy j lay the (kin on the meat, with the fle(h fide up, and. cover the pan clofe, and let it ftew one hour over a moderate fire; put in three fweetbreads cut in pieces, two ounces of truffles and morells, four artichoke bottoms, boiled and cut in four pieces eacii, an anchovie boned and chopt fmall,feafon it pretty high with fait and Cayenne pepper, put in half a lemon, three pjots of Madeira wine, two fpoonfuls of catchup, one of lemon pickle, half a pint of pickled or fre(h mu(hrooms, a quarter of a pound of butter rolled in flour, and let it all ftew half an hour longer; take the yolks of four eggs boiled hard, and the brains of both heads boiled, cut the brains in pieces of the fize of a nutmeg, make a rich force-meat, and roll it up in a veal caul, and then in a cloth, and boil it one hour; cut it in three parts, the middle piece the largeft j put the meat into the di(h, and lay the head over it, the (kin fide uppermoft; put the largeft piece of force-meat between the ears, the other two.flices at the narrow end, oppofitc each other 5 put the brains, eggs, mu(hrooms, &c. over and round it, and pour,the liquor hot upon it, and fend it up as quick as poffible,.as it foon gets cold.

To make Ice- Cream.

PARE and ftone twelve ripe apricots, and fcald them, beat them fine in a mortar, add to them fix ounces of doublerefined fugar, and a pint of fcalding cream, and work it through a iieve; put'it in atin with a ciofe cover, and fet it in a tub of Xt broken fmall, 'with four handfuls of fait mixed among ₯ the



8 THE ART OF COOKERY

the ice. When you fee yocir cream grows thick round the

edges of your tio, ftir it wll, and put it ia again tiJl it is quite

tbictc i when the cream is all froz uf, uke it out of the tin,

and put ijt iftto tlik: mould you intend io turn it out of; put o -


the lid, and have another tub of fait and ice ready as befqre;

put the mould in the middle, and lay the ice under and over -J

it; let it ftand four hours, an never turn it out till the

moment you want it, then dip the nould m cold fpring-

water, and turn it into a plate. You may do any fort of

fruit the fame way.

J Turhy ic, in Jelly.

BOIL a turkey, or a fowl, as white 9S you can, let it ftand till cold, and have ready a jelly made lhu&: take a fowl, fkin it, take off all the fat, do not cut it to pieces, nor break the bones; take four pounds of a teg of vcal, without any fat or ikin, .put it into a well-tinned fauce pan, put to it full three quarts of water, fet it on a very clear fire till it begins to £inmer; be fure io flcim it well, but take great care it docs not boil. When it is well (kimmed, fct it fo as it will bc juft fccm to fimmer; put to it two large Wrvdes of mace, baljf a nutmeg, and twenty corns of white-pper, a little bit of lemon- peel as big as a fixpence. This will take iix or feven hours doing. When yqu think, it is a ftiff jelly, which you will know by taking a little out to cool, be fure to. ikim off all the fat, if any, and be fure not to ftir the meat in the faucepan. A quarter of an hour before it is done, throw io a large tea-(poonful of fait, fqueezc in the juice of half a fine Seville orange or lemon; when you think it is. enough ftraiij. it ofiF throucih a clean fieve, bjut do not pour it ofF quite to the bottom, for fear of fettlings. Lay the turTcey or fowl in the difii you intend to fend it to the table inc beat up the whites of fix ecigs to a froth, and put the liquoc to it, thdi boil it fiye or fixniinutes, and run it through a jelly-bag till it is very clear, then pour the liquor over it, let.it Hand til quite cold; colour fome of the jelly in different colours, and when it is near cold, with a fpoon fprinkle it over in what form or fapcy vou plefe, and fend it to table. A few naftertium flowers iluck here and the r"c look pretty, if you can get them; but lemon, and all thoIc things, are entirely fancy. This is a very pretty difli for a cold collation, or a fupper.

AU forts of birds or fowls may be done this way.



r



MADE PLAIN AND EASY. 39

To mah Citron,

QUARTER your melon, and take out all the infide, tn put into the fyrup as much as will coVer the coat; let it boH iit the fyrup till the coat is as tender as the inward part, then put flKm m th pot with as m4i€h iyrup as wiU caver them. Let them ftand for two or three days, that the fyrup may penetrate through them, and boil your fyrup to a candy height, with as much ntoun tain- wine as will wet your fyrup clarify it,, and then boil it to a candy height; then dip in the quarters, an( lay them on a fieve to dry, and kt them before a flow fire, or put them in a flow oven till dry. Obferve that your melon is but half ripe, and when they are dry put them in deal boxes in paper.

To Candy Cherries 'or Green Gages.

DIP tile ftalks and leaves in white-wine vintgar bdiHng, then fcald them in fyrup; take them out and boil the fympto a candy height; dip in the cherries, and hang them to dry with the cherries dowiiWard"s. Dry them before the fire;, or in the inn. Then take the ploms, after boiling them in a thin fyrup, peel off the flcin and candy them, and fo hang theoi up to dry.

To take Iron molds out of Linen,

TAKE forrel, bruife it well in a mortar, fqueeze it through a cloth, bottle it, and keep it forufe. Takealittleof the above juice, in a filver or tin fauce-pan, boil it over a lamp, as it boils dip in the iron-mojd, do not rub it, but only fqueeze it. As foon as the iron mold is out, throw it into cold iater.

. To make India Pickle.



TO a gallon of vinegar, one pound of garlick, three quarters of a pound of long-pepper, a pint of muftard-fced, one pound of ginger, and two ounces of turmerick; the garlick oiuft be laid in fait three days, then wiped clean and dried in the fun; the long-pepper broke, and the muftard-feed bruifed: mix all together in the vinegar; then take two large hard cabbages, and two cauliflowers, cut them in quarters, and fait them well; let them li three days, and dry them weJlJn the fun.

N. B The ginger muft lie twenty- four hours in fait nd water, then cut Imall, and laid in fait three days

To



3$o DIRECTIONS FOR CARVING.

To prvifii thi InfiSthn ammg Horned CattU.

'MAKE an ifltie in the dcwiapc put in a peg of black hellebore, and rub all the vents both behind and before with tar



NECESSAR'Y DIRECTIONS,

Whereby the Reader may eafily attain the u&ful Art of

C A R V I N Q.



To cut Up a Turkey.

RAI SE the leg, open the joint, but be Aire not to take off the leg; lace down both fides of the breaft, and open the pinion of the breaft, but do not take it olFj raife the merrythought between the breaft-bone and the top; raife the brawn, and turn it outward on both fides, but be carefiil not to cut it off, nor break it; divide the wing-pinions from the joint next the body, and ftick each pinion where the brawn was turned out; cut off the (harp end of the pinion, and the middJe-piece will fit the place exadly.

A buftard, capon, or pheafant, is cut up in the fame manner.

To rear a Goofe.

CUT off both legs in the manner of (houlders of Iamb; take off the belly-piece clofe to the extremity of the breaft; lace the goofe down both fides of the breaft, about half an inch from the iharp bone: divide the pinions and the fle& firft laced with your knife, which muft be raifed from the bone, and taken off with the pinion from the body; then cut off the merry-thought, and cut another flice from the breaftbone, quite through; laftly, turn up the carcafe, cutting it afunder, the back above the loin-bones.

To unbrace a Mallard or Duck.

FIRST, raife the pinions and legs, but Cut them not off'; then raife the merry-thought from the breaft, and lace it down both fides with your knife.

To







DIRECTIONS FOR CARVING., 351

To unldce a, Coney

THE back muft be turned downward, and the apron divided from the belly; this done, flip in your knife between the kidneys, loofening the flefli on each fide; then turn the belly, cut the back cfofs-ways between the wings, draw your knife down both fides of the back-bone, dividing the fides and leg from the back. Obfervc not to pGll the fcg' too violently from the bone, when you open the fide, but with great exadnefs lay open the fides from the fcut to the fhoul dcr; and then put the Jegs together.

To wing a Partridge or alL

AFTER baving raifcd the legs and wings, ufe fait and powdered ginger for fauce.

To allay a Pheafant or Teal,

THIS difFers in nothing from the foregoing, but that you muft ufe fait only for fauce. '

To dlfmember a Hetn%

CUT oflF the legs, lace the breaft down each fide, and open the brpaft-pinion, without cutting it ofF; raife the merrythought between the breaft-bone and the top of it j then raife the brawn, turning it outward on both fides; but break it not nor cut it off; fever the wing-pinion from the joint neareft the body, fticking the pinions in the place where the brawn was; remeinber to cut off the fharp end of the pinion, and fupply the place with the middle-piece.

In this manner fome people cut up a capon or pheafant, and likewife a bittern, ufing no fauce but fait.

To thigh a Woodcock,

THE legs and wings muft be raifed in the manner of a fowl, only open the head for tfie brains. And fo you thigh curlews, plover, t)r fnipe, ufing no fauce but fait.

To difplay a Crane,

AFTER his legs are unfolded, cut off £he wings; take fhemup, and fauce them with powdered ginger, vinegar, fait, and muftard.

To



35. DIRECTIONS FOR CARVING.

To lift a Swatu

SLIT it fairly down the middle of the breaft, clean through the back, from the neck to the rump; divide it in two parts neither breaking or tearing the flefli; then lay the halves in a charger, the flit fides downwards throw fait upon it, and fet it again on the table. The fauce muft be chaldronc ierved up ia faucers.





i



AFP£NcIXir



mm



A P P E N D I X



t)bfervations on Preferving Salt Meat, fo as to keep it mellbvif and fine far three or four Months; and 'to preierve Potted Butter.

TAKE care when ybu fait your meat in the fummer, that it be quite cool after it comes from the butchers; the way is, to lay it on cold bricks for a few hours, and when you fait it, lay it upon an inclining board, to drain of the blood; then fait it afrefh, add to every pound of fait half a pound of Lifbon fugar, and turn it in the pickle every day; at the mdnth's end it will be fine. The fait which is commonly ufed hardens and fpoiis all the meat; the right fort is that called Lowndess fait; it comes from Nantwich in Chefliire: there is a very fine fort that comes from Maiden in EfTcx, and jprom Suffolk, which is the reafon of that batter being finer than any other; and if every body would make ufe of that fait in potting butter, we ihould not have fo much bad come t market; obferving all the general rules of a dairy. If you Keep your meat long in fait, half the quantity of fugar will do and then beftow loaf fagar, it will eat much finer. This pickle cannot be called extravagant, becaufe it will keep a great while; at three or four months end, boil it up; if you have no meat in the pickle, fkim it, and when cold, only add a little more fait and fugar to the next meat you put in, and it wil( be good a twelvemonth longer.

Take a leg of-mutton-piece, veiny' or thick flank-piece. Without any bone, pickled as above, only add to every pound of fait an ounce of falt-petre; after being a month or two in the pickle, take it out, and lay it in fofc water a few hours, then roafl it; it eats fine A leg of mutton or fhoulder of veal does the fdme. It is a very good thing where a market is at a great diftance, and a large family obliged to provide a great deal of meat.

As to the pickling of hams and tongues you have the receipt in the' foregoing chapters; but ufe either of thtfe fine falts, and

A a they



y



354 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

they will be equal to any Bayonne hams, prbvided yout porkc ling is fine and well fed

Tff maki MnkTurtli Soup.

TAKE a calf's head, and fcald the hair off as you would a pig, and wafh it rery clean; hoil it in a large pot of water half an hour then cut all the (kin off by itfelf, take the tongue out; take the broth made of a knuckle of veal, put in the tongue and (kin, with three large onions, half an otince of cloves aad mace, and half a nutmeg beat fine, all forts of fwect herbs chopped fine, and three anchovies, ftew it till tender, then take out the meat, and cut it in pieces about two inches fquare, and the tongue in dices mind to (kin the tongue; firatn the liquor through afievej take half a pound of butter, and put in the ftew-pan, melt it, and put in a quarter of a pound of flour, keep it ftirring till it is fmootb, ' then put in the liquor; keep it ftirring till all is in, if lumpy ftrain it through a fieve; then put to your meat a bottle of Madeira wine, feafon with pepper and fait, and Cayenne pepper pretty high; put in force-meat balls and egg-balls boiled, the juice of two lemons, ftew it one' hour gently, and then ferve it up in tureens.

N. B. If it is too thick, put fome more broth in before yon ftew it the laft time.

To dnfs Haddocks after the Spanijb TVaj.

TAKE a haddock, waihed very clean and dried, and broil it nicely then take a quarter of a pint of oil in a ftewpan feafon it with mace, cloves, and nutmeg, pepper and fait, two cloves of garlick, fome love-apples, when in feafon, a litfle vinegar; put in the fi(h, cover it clofe, and let it ftew hstlf an hour over a flow fire.

Flounders done the fame way are very good.

To drefi Haddocks the Jews IVqy.

TAKE two large fine haddocks,' wafli them very clean, cut them in flices about three inches thick, and dry them in a doth; take a gill either t)f oil or butter in a ftew-pan, a middling; onion cut fmalt, a handful of parfley warned and cut fmalT; let it juft boil up in either butter or oil, then put ia the fifli; feafon it with beaten mace, pepper and fait, half a pint of foft water let ftew foftly, till it is thoroughly done

then



- APIENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 35J

ihen take the yoIk of two eggs, beat up with the juice of il lemon, and juft u it is done enough throvlr itover and fend it to table.

J Spanijh Peas- Soup.

TAKE one pouhd of Spanifli peas, and lay them in Water the night before jou ufe them; then take a gallon of watei one quart of fine fweetoil, a head of garlick $ coyer the pot clo(e, and let it boil till the peas are foft; then feafon with pepper and fait; then beat the yolk of an egz, and vinegar to your palate i poach fome eggs, lay on the dim On fippets, and pour the foup on ihcnu Send it to table,

7i maii Omoh-Soup the Spanijh Waj.

TAKE two large Spanilh onions, peel and flice tKem; let them boil very foftiy in half a pint of fweet-oll till the onions irevery foft; then poui on them three i)int8 df boiling water $ . ibafon with beaten pepper, fait, a little beaten clove and ihace two fpoonfuls of vinegar a handful 6f parfley wafhed clean and chopped fine; let it boil faft a quarter of an hour in the mean time, get fome fippets to cover the bottoni of the di(b fried quick, not hard; lay them in the di(b( and cover each fi4cpet with a poached egg ) beat up the yolks of two eggs and throw over them; pour jn your foup, and fend it to table. Garlick and forrel done the fame way, eats well

Milk' Soup the biiteh Woj.

iTAKE a quart of milk, boil it with cinnamon and ifioift fugar; put fippets in the di(h pour the milk over it, and fet it over a charcoal fire Co fimmer, till the bread is foft. Take the yblks of two eggs, beat them up, and mix it with a little of the milk, and. throw it in; mix it all together, ahd fend it up t6 uble.

Ftfi Pafttes theltatidn Jaj.

TAKE fome flour, and knead it ith Oil; take a flice qf fal mon; feafon it with pepper and falt andp into fweet-orl chop an onion and parfley fine, and ftrew over it; lay it in the pzStci and double it up in the (bape of a flice of falmon: take a pice of white papery oil it, and lay under the pafty, and hke it; it is beft cold and will keep a month.

Mackerel done the fame way, head and tail together folded ill a pafty, ets fine.

A a 2 ' jljragtn





356 APPENplX TO THE AR.T OF COOKERY '

Jpwrtgus dreffed tht famt Way

TAKE the afparagusy break them in pieces, then boil thettf fofc, and drain the water from them: take a little oi, water and vinegar, let it boil, feafon it with pepper and fait, throw io the afparagus, and thicken with yoiks of eggs.

Endtve done this way is good; the Spaniards add fogar, but that fpoils them. Green peas done as ab6ve are rery geod i only add a lettuce cut fmall, and tvro or three onions, and leave out the eggs.

Hid Cabbage dvejfed after the Dutch JVay good fit a Cold v

the BreaJI.

TAKE the cabbage, cut it fmall, and boil it foft, then drain

it, and put it in a Itew pan, with a fufiicient cuantity of oi


and butter, a little water and vinegar, and an onion cut fmall i

feafon it with pepper and fait, and let it fimm.er on a flow iire

till all the lior is wafted.

Caulslowers drejid the Spanijff Way,

BOIL them, but not too much; then drain them, and put them into a ftew-pan; to a large cauliflower put a quarter of a pint of fweet-oil, and two or three cloves of garlick; let thedi' fry till brown; then feafon them with pepper and fair, ttvo or three fpoonfuls of vinegar; cover the pan very elofe and let ChefA fimmcr over a very flow fire an hour.

Carrots and French Beans drejfed the Butch Way.

SICE the carrots very thin, and juft cover them with wa ter; feafon them with pepper and fait, cut a good many anion? and parfley fmall, a piece of butter; let them iMmer over a flow fire till done. Do French beans the fame way.

Beans drejfed the German Way

TAKE a large bunch of onions, peel andflice tbem, a great quantity of parfley wa(hed and cut fmall, throw them into Itew-pan, with a pound of butter; feafon them well with pepper and fait, put in two quarts of beans; cover Acm clofc, and let them do till the beans arc brown (haking the'pan oftM; Do peas the &me way

Artichoke



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 357

Jrtichshe Suckers dreffid the Spanijh Way

CLEAN and wafh them, and cut them in halves thenWiI them in water, drain them from the water, and put them into. afteW'pan, with a littie oilj s little water, and a little vinegar; feafon them with pepper and fait itew them a little while, and then thicken them with yolks of eggs.

They make a pretty garniih done thus; clean them, and half boil them; then dry them, flour them, aod dip them in yolks irfcggs, and fry" them brown.

Ti dry Pears without Sugar,

TAKE the Norwich pears, pare them with a knife, and put them in an earthen pot, and bake them pot too foft; put them into a white plate pan, and put dry flraw under them, and lay them in an oven after bread is drawn, and every day warm the oven to the degree of heat 93 when the bread is newly drawn Within one week they muft be dry.

Ginger Tablet.

MELT a pound of loaf-fugar with a little bit of butter over the fire, and put in an ounce of pounded ginger; keep It ftir- ring till it begins to rife into a froth, then pour it into pewter plates, and let it ftand to cool. The platter muft be rubbed with a little oil, and then put them in a china did, and fend them to table Garnifh with flowefs of any kind.

Artichokes preferved the Spanijh Way

TAKE the largeft you can get,' cut the tops of the leaves ' oiF, wfh them well and drain theth; to every artichoke i)our in a large fpoonful of oil; feafon with pepper and fait, fend them,to the oven, and bake them, they will keep a year.

N. B. The Italians French, Portugucfe, and Spaniards have variety of ways of dreffing fifh, which Weve not, viz., As making fifbfoups, raod, pies, &c.

For their foups they ufe no gravy, nor in their fauces, thinking it improper to miK ilefh and fifh together; but make their fifh-foups with fiflb, vi. either of craw-fifli, lobflers, icc ting only the j uice of theoi.:

FOR EXAMPLE.

TAKE ypur craw-fifh, tie them up in a muflin rag, and boil tbems then prefs ou; thpir juice for the abovffaid ufe.

A a 3 Fcr,



)5S APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

For tUir Pies,

THEY make fome of carp others of different fifli: and fome fhey make like our minced pies, viz. They take a carp, find cut the flelb. from the bones, and mince it, adding cur f4nt8, ice.

jUmmi Ric€

BLANCH the almondS) and pound them in inarble of wooden mortar, and mix them in a little boiling water -, prefs them as long aa t
)ere it ny milk in the almonds; adding frefb fater every time; to every quart of almond juice a quarter of a pound of rice, and two or three fpoonfuls of orange- flowec watei; mix them all together
and finmer it over a very flow charcoal fire keep firring it often wheif done, fweeten it to your palate pyt it into plates, and (brow besten inMmpn pvprit,

Sbam Chocolate.

TAKE a pint of milk, boil it over a flow fire, with fome whole cinnamon, and fweeten it with Lifbon fugar; beat up the yolks of three' eggs, throw all together into a chocolatepot, and mill it one way, or it will turn. Serve it up in cho-p COlate-cups.

Marmalade of Eggs the Jews Way. .

,TAKE the yolks of twenty-four eggs, beat them for an hour; clarify one pound of the beft moift fugar, four fpoonfuls pf orange-flowcr-watcr, one ounce of blanched and pounded almonds; ftir all together over a very flow charcoal fire, kec ing Rirring it all the while one way, till it comes to a confidence; then put it into coffee-cups, and throw a little beaten cinnamon on the top of the cups. "

This marmalade, mixed with pounded almpnds, with pratigecp, peel, and citron, are macje in cakes of all fliapes, fucb as birds, fifbc and fruit

A Cake the Spanijh Way.

TAKE twelve eggs, three quarters of a pound of the beft TOoift fugar, mill them in a chocolate-mill, till they are all of "a lather; then mix in one pound of flour, half a pound of pounded almonds, two ounces of candied orange-peel, tiyo ounces f

jpitron,



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 359

citron, four large l
coonfu1s of orange- water, half an ounce of cinnamon, and a glafs of fack. Ic is better when baked in a flow oven.

Another Way

TAKE one pound of flour, one pound of butter, eiht eggs, one pint of boiling milk, two or thrcefpoonfuls of ale yeaft, or a glafs of French brandy; beat all well together; then fet it beforethe fire in a pan, where there is room tor it to rife cover it clofe with a cloth and flannel, that, no air comes to it; when you think it is raifed fufliciently, mix half a pound of the beft moiil fugar, an ounce of citnamon beat fine: four fpoonfuls of orange-flower- water, one ounce of candied orangepeeI, one ounce of citron, mix all well together, and bake it.

To dry Plums.

TAKE pear-plums, fair and clear coloured, weigh them, and flit them up the fides; put them into a broad pan, and fill it full of water, fet them over a very flow fire; take care that the fkin does not come oiF; when they are tender take them up, and to every pound of plums put a pound of fugar, flrew a little on the bottom of a large filver bafon; then lay your plums in, one by one, and iirew the remainder of your fugar over them; fet them into your flove all night, with a good warm fire the next day; heat them, and fet them into your dove again, and let them (land two days more, turning them every day; then take them out of the fyrup, and lay them on glafs plates to dry,

To make Sugar of Pearl,

TAKE damaflc rofe-water half a pint, one pound offine fugar, half an ounce of prepared pearl beat to powder, eight leaves of beaten gold; boil them together according to art; d the pearl and gold leaves when juft done, then caft them on a marble

To make fruitffafers, of Codlins Plums bfc

TAKE the pulp of any fruit rubbed through a hair-fieve, and to every three ounces of fruit take fix ounces of fugar finely, fifted. Dry the fugar very well till it be very hot heat the pulp alfo till it be very hot; then mix it, and fet over a flow charcoal fire, till it be almoft a-boiling, then pour it into glaflfea

A a4 01



36o APPENDIX TO THE ART OF CP0KEi
.V.

or trenchers, and fet it in the dove till you fee it will leave th glafles i but before it begins to candy, turn them oo papery in what fdrm you pleafe. You may colour them, red witi clovc-gilly- flowers ftccped in the juice of lemon.

To make IVbite jyafirs.

BEAT the yolk of an eg, and mix it with a quarter of a pint of fair water I then mix half a pound of beft ft our, and thin it with daitialk-rofe-water till you think it of a proper ihicknefs to bake Sweeten it to your palate with fine fugar finely fifted



To make Brcwn Wafers

TAKE a quart of ordinary cream, then take the yoks of' three or four eggs, and as much fuie flour as will make it intq a thin batter; fweeten it with three quarters of a pound of fine fugar finely fearced, and as much pounded cinnamon as wilt make it taiie. Do not mix them till the cream be cold; butte your pans and make them very hot before you bake them.

How to dry Peachei

TAKE the falreft and ripeft peaches, pare them 'into fair; water; take their weight in double-refined fugar, of one half make a vf ry thin fyrup; then put in your peaches, boiling themi till they look clear, then fplit and ftone them. Boil them till they ae very tender, lay them a-draining, take the other half of the fugar, and boil it almoft to a candy; then put in your peaches, and let them lie all night, then lay them on a glafs 0nd fct them in a ftove till they are dry. If they are fugared too much, wipe them with a wet cloth a little: let the firft fy . rup be very thin, a quart of water to a pound of fugar

HdW to mah' Almond Knots "

TAKE twa pounds of almonds, and blanch them in hot water; beat them in a mortar, to a very fine pafte, with rofewater'; do what you can to keep them from oiling. Take a . pound of double-refined fugar, fifted through a lawn fieve,' leave out feme to make up your knots, put the reft into a part upon the fire, till it is fcalding hot, and at the fame time bavd your almonds fcalding hot in another pan j then mix them together with the whites of three eggs beaten to froth, and let u ftaiid till it' is cold; then roll it with fomc of the fugar yoii •.'•• left



- " J



1



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 361

left our, and lay them in platters of paper. They will not roll Into any fiiape, but lay them as well as you can, and bake them ti a cool oven i
muft not be hot, neither muft they be coloured.

To prfirve Apricots.

TAKE your apricots and pare them, than ftone what you ' • (:anc whole; then give them a light boiling in a pint of water or according to your quantity of fruit; then take the weight or your apricots in fugar, and take the liquor which you boil them in and your fugar, and boil it till it comes to a fyrup, and give them a light boiling, taking off the fcum as it .rifes When the fyrup jellies, it is enough; then take up the apri- cots, and cover them with the jelly, aad
)ut cut paper over ihem and lay them down when cold.

How to make Almond Milk for a Wajk.

TAKE five ounces of bitter almonds, blanch them and beat them in a marble mortar very fine. You may put in a fpoonful pf fack when you beat them; then tak the whites of three new-laid eggs, three pints of fpring-water, and one pint of fack. Mi them all very well together; then ftrain it through 9 fine cloth, and put it into a bottle, and keep it for ufe, Yoa may put in emori, or powdrr of pearl, when you make ufe of it.

How to make Goofeberry Wafers

' TAKE gpofeberrics before they are ready for preferving, cut off the black beads, and boil them with as much water as will cover them all, to mafli; then fafs the liquor and all, ja$ t will run, through a hair-fieve, and put fome pulp through With a fpoon, but not too near. It is to be pulped neither too thick nor too thin; meafure it, and to a gill of it take half a pound of doublerefined fugar; dry it, put it to your pulp, and let it fcaLd on a flow fire, not to boil at all. Stir it very well, nd then will rife a frothy white fcum, which take clear off s it rifes; you muft fcald and fkim it till no fcum rifesj. and it co(ne& clean from the. pan-fide; then take it off, and let it cool a little. Have ready (heets of glafs very fmooth, about the thicknefs Cff parchment, which is not very thick. You nuft fpread it on the glaffes with a knife, very thin, even, and fmooth, then fet it in the ftove wrth a flow fire: if you do it in the morning, at aight yuimuft cut it into long piccet with broad cafe-knifi aj put your knife clc under it, and old



32 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. .

it two or three times over, and lay them in- a ftove, turning them fometimes till they are pretty dry; but do not keep tbeoi too long, for they will lofe their colour. . If they do not come clean ott your glafles at night, keep them till next morning.

H9Uf,t9 maki the thin Jpricot Qhips.

TAKE your apricots or peaches, pare them and cut them Tery thin into chips, and take three quarters of their weight in fugar, it being finely fearced $ then put the fugar and the apricots into a pewter difh, and fet them upon coals; and when the fugar is all difTolved, turn them upon the edge of the diih out of the fyrup, and fo fet them by. Keep them turning till they have drank up the fyrup; be lure they never boil. They muft be warmed in the fyrup once every day, and fo laid out tpon the edge of the di(h till the fyrup be drank.

To preftrve Golden Pippins.

TAKE the rind of an orange, and boil it very tender, lay it in cold water fpr three days; take two dozen of golden pippins, pare, core, quarter them, and boil them to a ftrong jelly, and run it through a jelly-bag till it is clear i take the iame quantity of pippins, pare them, and take out the cores put three pounds of loaf-fugar in a prefervine-pan, with three half pints of fpring-water; when it boils, (kim it well, and put in your pippins, with the orange-rind, cut in long thin flips let them boil faft till the fugar is thick, and will almoft candy then put in three half-pints of pippin jelly, and boil it faft till the jelly is clear; then fqueeze in the juice of a lemon, give it a boil, and put them in pots or glafles, with the orapge-peel. You may ufe lemon-peel inftead of orange, but then you mu only boil it, not foak it.



T? puferve Grapeu

GET fome fine grapes, not over ripe, either red or white, but very clofe, and pick all the fpecked ones; put them in ajar, with a quarter of a pound of fugar-candy, and fill the jar with common brandy: tie them down clofi:, and keep them in s dry cold place. You may do morellp cherries the fame way.

To, puftrve Green CodHngSm

GATHER your codlings when they are the fize of a walnut, with the ftalks, 9x4 a )eaf or two on % put a handful of • vine-



. APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 36

Yine- leaves inta a preferving'paii, then a layer of codlings, then vine-leaves, and then codlings, till it is fufl, and vine leaves pretty thick at top, and fill it with fpring water, cover it clofe to keep in the fteaqi, and fet it on a flow fire till they grow foft i then take them out, and take off the ikins w:ith a pehknife, and then put them in the fame water again with the vine-leaves, whif:h muft he quite cold, or it will make them crack; put in a little rock-allum, and fet them over a flow fire till they are green, then take them out, and lay them on a fifve to drain. Make a good fyrup, and give them a gentle Wil for three days, then put them in fmall jars, with brandy-r paper oyer them, and tie (hem dovirn tight.

How to make Blackberry Wine.

TAKE your berries when full ripe, put them into a large veffcl of wood pr ftone, with a fpicket in it, and pour upon them as much boiling water as will juft appear at the top of them; as foon as you can endure your hand in them, bruife them very well, till all the berries be broke: then let them ftand clofe covered till the berries be well wrought up to the top,, which ufually is three or four days; then draw off the clear juice into another veffel; and add to evesy ten quarts of this liquor one pound of fugar, ftir it well iq, and let it ftand to work in another veffcl like the firft, a week or ten days; then draw it off at the fpicket through a jelly. bag, iiito a large yeflcl; tak four ounces of ifinglafs, lay it in fteep twelve hours in a pint of white wine 5 the next morning boil it till it te all diffolved, upon a flow fire; then take a gallon of your blackberry juice, put in the diffolved ifinglafi, giv it a boij together, and put it in hot

T!be heft Way U make Raiftn Wine.

TAKE a plean wine or brandy hogfeead; take great care it is very fweet and dean, put in two hupdred of raifins, ftalka arid all, and then fill the veffel with fine clear fpring water; let it ftand till you think it has done hifling, then throw iv two quarts of fine French brandy 5 put in the bung flightly, and in about three weeks or a month, if you are fure it has one fretting, ftop it down clofe j let it ftand fix months, peg it near the top, and if you find it very fine and good, fit for drinking, bottje it off, or elfe ftop it up again, and let it ftand (ix months longer. - It fliould ftand fix months in the bottle, Jbis is by miich the beft wa of makiig it, as I .have fecn by

experiences



34 APPENDIX ro THE ART OF COOKERY,

cxpeience, as the wine will be much ftrongr, but kfs of it t the different form of raifins make quite a (lifferent wme; and after you have drawn oiFall the wine, throw on ten gallons of Ipring water; take off the head of the barrel, and ftir it well twice a day, preffing the railins as well as you can; let it ftand a fortnight or three weeks, then draw it off into a proper vcflel to hold it, and fqueexe the raifins well; add two quarts of braady, and two quarts of fyrup of elderberries, ftop it clofe when it has done working, and in about three months it will be fit for drinking. If you do not chufe to make this fecond wine, fill your hogfhead with fpring water, and fet in in the fun for three qx four months, and it will make excellen
vinegar.

Hstv to preferve TPhite inces whole.

TAKE the weight of your quinces in fugar, and put a pint of water to a pound of fugar, make it into a fyrup, and clarify it; then core your quince and pare it, put it imp your fyrup and lee it boll till it be ail clear, then put in three fpoonfuls of jelly, which muft be made thus: over niht, lay your quincekernels in water, then drain them, and put them into youf quinces, ax;d let; them have but one boil afterward

Hgw. to make Orange Wafers.

TAKE the bed oranges, and boil them in three or fourwa ters, till they be tender, then take out the kernels and the juice, and beat them to pulp-Jn a clean marble mortar, and rub them through a hair fieve; to a pound of this pulp take pound and half of double- refined fugar, beaten and fearced
take half of your fugar, and put it into your oranges, and boil it till it ropes; then take it from the fire, and when it is cold make it up in pafte with the other half of you fugar; make but a little at a time, for it will dry too fafi; then with a little rolling-pin roll them out as thin as tiffany upon papers; cut them round with a little drinking g
afs, apd let thecn dry, a(
4 they will look very clear.

How to make Orange Cakes.

TAKE the peels of four oranges, being firft pared, and the ipeat taken out, boil them tender, and beat them fmall in marble mortar; then take the meat of them, and two more oranges, your feeds and ikins being picked out, and mix it with the peelings that are beaten i fet them on the fire, with a

fpoonfut









APPfiKDIX: TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 3.

fpdoitful or two of orangcfloir-water, keeping it ftirfinc till that moifture be pretty. weH dried up; then have ready fo ' every pound of that pulp, four pounds and a quarter of double . refined fugar, finely fearced; make your fugar very hot, and dry it upon the fire, and then mix ic and the pulp together and fet it on the fire again, till the fugar be very well melted but be fure it does not boil: you may put in a little p?e fmall, (hred, or grated, and when it is cold, draw it up in double papers j dry them before the fire, and when you turn them, put two together; or you may keep them in deep glaffes or pots and dry them as you havexcccafion.

How to make JfT)ite Cakes like China Dijhes

TAKE the yolks of two eggs, and two fpoonfuls of fack, and as much rofe-water, fome carraway-feeds, and as much fiour as will make it a pafte ftiff enough to roll very thin: if you would have them like difhes, you muft bake them upon diihes buttered. Cut them out into what work you pleafe to candy them'; take a pound of fine fearced fugar perfumed, and the white of an egg, and three or four fpoopfuls of rofe-water, ftir it till it ooks white; and when that pafte is cold, do it With a feather on one fide. This candied, let it dry, and do the other fide fo, .and dry it alfo.

7i make a Lemon Honeycomb,

TAKE thejuice of gne lemon, and fweeten it with fine fu

gar to your palate; then take a pint of cream, and the white -

' of an egg, and put in fome fugar, and beat it up j and as the

froth riles, take it ofF, and put it on the juice of the lemon, tilt

you have takenr all the creamr off upon the lemon; make it the

day before you want it, in a diih that is proper.

Hm) to dry Cherries.

TAKE eight pounds of cherries, one poifnd of the beft powdered fugar, ftone the cherries over a great deep bafon or glfs, and lay ihem one by one in rows, and ftrew a little fugar: thus do till your bafon is full to the top, and let them fland till the next day; then pour them out into a great pofnip, fet them on the fire, let them boil very faft a quarter of an hour, or more; then pour them again into your bafon, and let them ftand two or three days; then take them out, and lay them one by one aa hair-fieves, and fet them in the fun, or an oven, till they

5 sue



t66 APPENDIX TO THE ART 01 COOlCERt

are dry, turning them every day upon dry fieves: if in thft oven, it muft be a$ little warm as you can juft feel it when yoil . hold your band in it.

Hnv to ftiah fine AtinmdCaki$.

TAKE a pound of Jordan almonds, blanch them, beat tfaeoi very fine with a little orange -flower- water, to keep them froni oiling then take a pound and a quartef- of fine fugar, boil it to' a candy height: then put in your almonds; theri take two frefli lemons, grate ofFthe rind very thin, and put as much juice as to make it of a quick tafie; then put it into your glafles, and fet it into your ftove,. fiirring them often, that they do not candy: fo when it is a little dry, put it into little cakes upon Iheet of glafs to dry.

Hm U maii tJxbridgi Cdkis. '

TAKE a pound of wheat-flour, feven pounds of currants
iialf a nutmeg, four pounds of butter rub your butter cold very well amongft the meal; drefs your currants very well in thdflour, butter, and feafoning, and knead it with fo much good hew yeaft as will make it into a pretty high )cafte ufually two hny worth of yeaft to that quantity after it is kneaded well together let it ftand an hour to rife j you may put half a. pound of pafte in a cake

Hwi to make Mead.

TAKE ten gallons of water, and two gallons 6f Honey, ai handful of raced ginger; then take two lemons cut them in
)ieces, and put them into it, boil it very well keep it ikimming; let it ftand all night in the fame veflel you boil it in, the iiext morning barrel it up, with two or three fpoonfuls of good yeaft. About three weeks or a month after, you may bottle it



Marmalade of Cherries



Marmalade of Cherries.

TAKE five pounds of cherries, fioned arid tw0 pounds of bard fugar $ (hred your cherries, wet your fugar with the juice that runneth from them; then put the cherries into the fugar and boil them pretty faft till it be a marmalade
when it is



Tf



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY, j

To dry Damofnu.

TAKE four pounds of damolins; take one pound of fine fugar, make a fyrup of it with about a pint of fair water; then put in your daimofins, ftir it into your hot fyrup,' fo let then ftand on a little fire, to keep. them warm. for half an hour; then put all into a bafon, and cover them, let them ftand till the next day; then put the fyrup from them, and fet it.on the fire; and when it is very hot, put it on your damofins: this do twice a day foir three days together; then draw the fyrup from the damofins, and lay them in an earthen difli, and fee them in an oven after bread is drawn; when the oven is cold, take them and turn them, and lay, them upon clean difhes fee them in the fun, or in another oven, till they are dry.

Mcrmaladi of ince Tfljiu.

TAKE the quinces, pare them and core them, put them into water as you pare them, to be kept from blacking; then boil them fo tender that a quarter of ftraw will go through them; then take their weight of fugar, and beat them, break the'quiaces with the back of a fpoon; and then put in the fugar, and let them boil faft uncovered, till they ilide from the bottom of the pan: you may make pafte of the fame, only dry it in a flove, drawing it out into what form you pleafe

To preferve Apricots or Plums Gran.

TAKE your plums before they have ftones in them, which you may know by putting a pin through them; then coddle them in many waters, till they are as green as grafs; peel them and coddle them again; you muft take the weight of them in fugar, and make a fyrup; put to your fugar a jack of water, then put them in, fet them oq the fire to boil fiowly, till they bfe clar, fkimming them often, and they will be very green Put them up In glafles, and keep them for ufe.

To preferve Cherries.

TAKE two pounds of cherries, one pound and an half of fugbr, half a pine of fair water, melt- your fugar in it; when' it is melted, put in your other fugar aiid yolir cherries, then boi
them foftly, till all the fugar be melted; then boil them faft, and ikim them; take them oS two or three times and (hake them, and put them on again, and let them boil faft; and when they are of a gQod colour, and the fyrup will ftaadj they are enough,

4 r.



I





368 APPENDIX TO THE ARt OK COOfCERti

1

To pnferve Barbrrus.

TAKE the ripeft and heft liarberis yoa cart find; take thif weight of, them in fugtr then pick out the feeds and tops; wet your fugar with the juice of them, and make a fjrup; theii put in your barberries, and when they boil take them off and ihake thecn, and fet them on again, and let them boil, and re' peat the fame, tiU they are cleail enough to put into glafies.

TAKE three pounds of well-dried flour, one nutmeg, a little mace and fait, and almoft half a pound ofcarraway-comfits; mix thefe well together, and melt half a pound of butter in a pint of fweet jthick cream (ix fpooofuls of good fack, four yolks and three whites of eggs, and near a pint of good light ycaft; work thefe well together and cover it, and fet it down to the fire to rife: then let them refl, and lay the remainder the half pound of carraways on the top of the wiggs, and put them upon papers well floured and dried, and let them have as quick an oven as for tarts.



To make Fruit Wafer $; Codlins or Plums do heft

TAKE the pulp of fruit, rubbed through a hair-deve, and to three ounces of pulp take fix ounces of fugar, finely feaced; dry your fugar very well, till it be very hot, heat the pulp alfo. very hot, and put it to your fugar, and heat it on the fire, till it be almoft at boiling; then pour it on the glaflies or trenchers and fet it on the ftove, till you fee it will leave the glaflt;s (but before it begins to candy) take them ofi, and. turn them upon papers, in what form you pleafe. You may colour them red with clove-gilliflowers fleeped in the juice of lemon..

To make German Puffi

TAKE two fpoonfuls of fine Sour, two eggs beat wellj half a pint of cream or milk, two ounces of mdted butter, fiif iC all well together, and add a little fait and nutmeg; pu( them in tea- cups, or little deep tin moulds, half .fuTi, and bake them a quarter of an hour in a quick oven; but let it b hoc enough to colour them at top and bottom: turn them into a di(h, and ftfew powdcr-fugar over them.

CfacinelSm



APPENDIX rO THEART OF COOKERY. 3,

Cracihih. . TAICE half a pound of the whitell iHouj:, and a pound of fugar beaten final), two ounces of butter Cotd,'pnc fpoonful of, carraway feeds, Aeeped all night in vinegar; then put in three yolks of eggs, and a licile rofe-water, work your palle altoge ther J and after that beat It wiih a rolling- pi ti, till it be light; then roll it out thin, and cut it with a glafs, lay it thin on plates buttered, and prick them with a pin; then take the yalkft of two eggs,' beaten with rofe-viater, and rub-them over with it; then fer jCheni into a pretty quick ovcni and when they aft . brown tike rhem out and lay them in a dry place. . - .

To make Orange LsOvtfi ...,- -., _

TAKE your orange, and cut a round bole Ii out all the, meat, and as much of th? white as y out breaking fhe Ikin j then boil them in water ti ing the water till it is not bitter, then take ihei themdty; then take a pound of fine fugar, a qu! in proportion to the oranges; boil Ity and take of rifcth; then put in your oranges, and let them b let them lie a day or two in the fyrup; then' tal two eggs, a quarter of a pint of cream (or more), beat them wep together, then grate in two Naples bifcuits (or white bread)', a quarter of a pound of butter, and four fpoonfuU of fack; mix it al together till your butter is melted, then liil the oranges with it, and bake them in a flaw oven as long as you would a cuHard, then flick in fome cut citron, and fill theai up with fack, butter, and fugar grated over.

Ta mah a Lemon tewer ar PiddiHg. GRATE the outward rind of three lemons; take three quarters of a pound of Tugar, and the fame of butter, the yolks of eight eggs, beat them in a marble mortar at lealt an hour, then lay a thin rich cruft in the bottom of the dilh you bake ic in, as you may fomething alfo over it: three quarters of an hoUr will bake it. Make an orange-pudding the fame way, but pare the rinds, and' boil them Jiilt in feveral waters, till the bitternefs is boiled out.

ITbw ta make ibt CUar LemcH Cnartti '

TAKE a gill of clear water; infufe in it the rind of a lerrusn,

till it talles of it; then take the whites of fix eggs, the juice

B b of.



J70 Af PENDIX TO THE AET OF CQOJPtY;

of four lemont; bctt all well together, and run them through a hair-ficvc, fwcctcn .them with doubjc-rcfined fugar, and fet theoi on the fire, not too hot, keeping ftirring j and when H is thick enough, take it off.

Hiui t9 mate CHeolatf.

TAKLE fi pounda of cocoa-nutS) one ppund qf anife-fodt lour ounces of long- pepper, one of cinnamon, a quarter of a BQUiid of a)fBpnils one ouod of piftachios a oiach achiote 91 will make U the colour of hrick (hre(p graim.pf fPMik, and at much ambeirii fix pounds of loaMugar, one oince ol nutmi, dry and beat them, and fearcc them through a fine (ovc s your almondt muft be beat to a pafte, and mixed with the other ingredients 5 then dip your fugar in oraQgc-flower or rofe. water, and put it in a (killet, on a very gentle charccial fii; then put in the fpicc, and ftew it wdl together, thcii the teuflc and ambergreafe, then put in the cpcoanuts laft of all then achiote, wetting it with the water the fagar was dipt in • fteW all thcfe very well together over a hotter fire than before i then take it up, and put it kito boxes, or what form you like and fet it to dry itf a warm place. The. piftachios and almonds muft.be a little beat in a mortar then ground upon a ftone. ' .

1 .' Another Way f9 make Choalaif.

TAKE fix pounds of the beft Spaniflx nuti, when parched and cleaned, from the hulls take three pounds of ftir, two ounces of the beft cinnamon, beaten and fiftcd very fine; to ' every tw6 pound of nuts put in three good vaneUs, or more or fcfs as you ple.afe j to every pound of nuts half a drachm of cardamum-fceds, very finely beaten an fearccd.

Cheefecahs ufithaut Currants. .

TAKE two quarts of new milk, fet it as " comes from the cow, with as little runnet as you can i when it is com€, break it as eently as you can, and whey it well; then pafs it through a hair-ficw, and put
t into a roarbfe mortar, and beat imo it Dound of new butter, walhed in rofe-water; when that is weH inincled in the curd, take the yolks of fix eggs, and the whites of three, beat them very well with a little thvclt cream and fait • anS after you have made the cof&ns, juft as youput then into' the cruft (which muft not be till you are ready to fet tben into the overt), then 'put ift your eggs and fugar, and whole



APrtatlJdt to tllE AJLt OF C0Oitet. pt

MlJtmeg finely grated; ftir thto all wdl together axid fo OH) youf crafts'; and if you put a little fifie fuga fearced into Ibtf! truft it will rdl the thinner and cleaner; three fpooofuis of thick fVreet cream irtrill be, enough to beat up jrour eggi with.

HifW to prejervi WhiU Ptdr Plumi. .

TAKE the fineft and cieareft froiii fpecks yoo can get $ to a ouild of plains take 2 pound ahd a (quarter of fugai-, i (itidk yo can get, a pint afid a quarter of ater; flit the lluma aii4 flone theciiy and prick them fuU of holes, favingNfome fugaf beat finelaid in a bafoii $ as yoa do them lay thedi iq and. ftrew fugar over them; when you have thus dc3ine have half a pound oi fUgar, and your Watery rtady made into a thin fyrup abd .2t little cold;.(rut in your plunis with the flit fide downwards, fet them on the fire, Jceep them cotitihually boil, ing, neither too flow nof too faft; take them often off, fliake them round, and flcim thm wlU kep them down into the fy rup cntlnually, for fear tbty lofe their' colour; when thy arU thoroughly fcalded, ftrcw oa the reft of your fugar, and keeji doing fo.till they arc enough, which you' may know by their jla(ing4. tpwardu . cr end bdil them up quickly.

7i prefefvi CtHrtanis.

Take the weight of the currants in fugafr pick out the feeds; cake to a pound of fugar half a jack of water, let it ipelt, then put in your berries and let them do very leifurelyt, fkim them, and take them up, let the (yrup boil; then put them dn again, and vhcn they ' ate deaY; ahd the (jfrup thick enough, take theiti off, add when they are cold put them up in glaile.



To preferve Rafpberties

TAKE of the rafpberries that are not too ripe and take the t)ircight of. them in fugar, wet your fugar with a littld water,' and put in your berries and let them boil foftly, take heed of breaking them; when they are dear, take them up, ahd boil; the fyrup till it be thick en6ugh, then put them in again,; and' hen they are cold put them up in glaJOfes,

To make Bifcuit Bread:

TARE half a pound of very fine wheat flour, and as mtfth' Aigar finely fearced, and dry them very well before thefiiHi, dry'' the flour more than the fugar; then take four ncwlaid eggs-,

B b 2 take



371 APPENDIX TO THE.ART OF.COOKERY-

Cake out tbc-fliriiis, then fwingthem very weU, then put tbe Ajgar in, and fwing rt well with the eggs, then put the flour in it, and beat all together half an hour at theleaft; put in fome an ife- feeds, or car ra way -feeds, and rub the plates with butter, and fct them into the oven.

TAKE it in April, boll it in water till it 1)e tehder; then take ft up and drain it from the water very weli then ferape the outfide of ir, apd dry it in a clean doth; and Iy ttin the fyrup, and 1 it lie in three or four days, and cover, it clofe; tlve fy rup muft be flrcyng of fugar, and keep it hot a good while, and let it not boil after it heated a good while, lay it upon a pie plate, and fo let it dry keep it near the fire left it diffolvc.

7i preferve Cbirries.

TAKE their weight in fugar beftre you ftone them; when f -cned, make your fyrup, then put in your cherries, let them boil flowly at the firft, till they be thoroughly warmed, then boil them a faft-as jjou can; 'when they are, boiled clear, put in the jelly, with almoft the weight in fugar, ftrew the fugar on the cherries; foi:the colouring you muft be ruled by your eye; to a pound of fugar put a jack of water, ftrew the fugar on them before they boil, and put in the juice of currants foon after they boil.

To barret Morelh Cherries.

TO one pound of full ripe cherries, picked from the ftcms, and wiped with a cloth, take half a pound of double- refined fdgar, and boil it to a candy height, but not a high one; put the cherries into a fmail barrel, then put in the fugar by a fpoonful at a time, till it is all in, and roll them about every day till they have done fermenting; then bung it up clofe, and they will be fit for ufe in a month. It muft be an iron hooped basreU i

I

To dry Pear-Plums.

TAKE two pounds of pear-plums to one pound of fugar; ftone them, and 11 them every one with fugar 1ay them in an earthen pot, put to them as much water as will prevent burnill them I then fet them in an oven after bread is drawn Jet

i them



APPENDIX TO XWE ART OF COOKERY- 373

tteixv fland tiH they be tepdcr, then put ihcm into "a fieve to' drain well from the fyrup, then fet them in an oven again, until they be a little dry; then frngoth the fkins as .well as ybti can, and fo fill them; then fee them in the even again to harden; then wafh them in water fcaldiiig hot, and dry them very well; then put themin the oven ain very cool, t6 blu them; put them between two pewter difiies, and fee them in the oven.

The Filling for the afcrefaid Plums.

Take the pldms, wipe them, prick them in the Teams, put them in a pitcher, and fet them in a little boinng water, let them boil very tender, then pour moft of the liquor from them, then take ofFthc: (kins and the Aones to a pint of the pulp a pound of fugar well dried in the oven then let it boil fill the fcum rifes, which take off very clean, and put into earthen plates, and dry it in an oyen, and fo fill the plums.

To candy CaJJia.

V

TAKE as much of the powder of brown caflia as will lie uppn two broad (hillings, with what mufkan,d ambergreafe you think fitting; the caifia and perfume muft be powdered together, then take a quarter. of a pound of fugar, and boil it to a . . candy height; then put in your powder, and mix it well togec ther, and pour it in pewter faucers or plates, which muft be buttered rery thin, and when it is coid it will flip out; the cafiia is to be bought at London; fometimes it is ir powder, nd fometimes ip a hard lump.

To make Carraiuay Cakes.

TAKE two poutidj of white flour, and (wo pounds of CQarfe loaf-fugar Well drifed, and tine fifred; after the flour and fugar are fified and weighed, then mingjc thm together, fift the flour and fugar together, through a hair-fieve, into the bowl you u(e it in; to them you muft have two pounds of good butter, eighteen eggs, leaving t)u eight of the- whites j to the(e you muft have four ounces of candied orange, five. or fix ounces of carraway comfits j:ybu muft firft work the butter with rofewater, till you. can fee none of the watery and your butter muft be very foft; then put in flour and fugzir,. a little at a time, and likewife your eggs; but you muft beat your eggs very well, with ten fpoonfuls of fack, fo you muft put in each s you think fit keeping it conantly beating with youi" hand,

. ' . b3 ' til)



374 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

till you have put it into tbe hoop for the oven; do not put ii
your fvcetnieats and feeds, till you are ready to put it into your, hoops; you mufi have three or four dpubiet of cap-paper under the caketi and butter the paper and hoop: you muft fife fomc fine fugar upon your cake, when it goes into the oyen.

•

7i preferve Pipptns in Slius.

WHEN your pippins are prepared, but not cored, cut them in dices, and t.ake tt weight of them in fugar, put to your fur gar a pretty quantity cf water let it melt, and (kirn it, let it boil again very high, then put them into the fyrup when they are clear; lay them in (hallow glafies, in which you mean tq fcrve .them up; then put into the fyrup a candied orange-peel cut in little flices very thin, and lay about the pippin; cover them with fyrup, apd keep them about the pipjiin.

Saci Cream like ButUr. _ • -

TAKE a quart of cream boil it with mace, put to it fi% egg yolks well beaten, fo let it boil up; then take it off the fire, and put in a. little fack, and turn it; then put it in a cloth, and let the whey run from it; then take it out of thcS cloth, and feafon it with' rofe-waiter and fugar, being yery well broken with a fpoon; ferve it up in the difl), and piak it as you would do a difh of butter, fo fend it in with cream and fugar.

, Barky Cream.

TAKE a quart of French barley, boil it in three or four waters, till it be pretty tender; then fet a t)uart of cream on the 'fire with fome mace and nutmeg; when the water begins to boil, drain out the barley from it, put in th cream, siqd let It b(Ml till it be pretty thick and tender then (efon it with fu gar and fait Whea it is cold ferve it up,

9

jUmfind Butter

TAKE a quart of cream, put in fome mace whole, and a quartered utmeg, the yolks of eight eggs well beaten, and three quartets of a pound of almopds well blanched, and beateit extremely fmall, with a little rofe- water and fugar and put all thefe together, fet them on the fire, and ftir them till they begin to boiljf then take it off, and you will find it a Itctle cracked fo lay a drainer in a cullender, and pour it into it and let it dram a day or two till you fee it is fifin like butler;

ft thici



I







APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY, 375

then run it through a culkudtr, then it will be like little comAu, and to ferve it up.

Sugar Cakes,

TAKE a pound and a half of very fine flour, one povind rf iTold butter, half a pound of fagar, work all thefe well cpgctbtt into a pafte, then roll it with the palms of your, bands intd balls and cbt them with a glafs into caks; lay them in n fhttt of paper, with feme flour under them: to bake them yo4 may make tumblets, only blanch in almonds, and beat therft fmall, and lay them in the midft of a long piece of pafte aai roll it round with your fingers, and caft them into knocg ik what faffaion you pleafe; prick them and bake them

Sar Cakes another Wj.

TAKE kalf a pound of fine fagar fearced, and as much flaitr two eggs beaten with a little rofe-water, a piece of butter about the bignefs of an gg, work them well together till they be a fmooth paSe; then make them into cakes, working every one with the palms of your bands; then lay them in plates, rubbed over with a little butter; fo bake them in an oven little more than warm. You may make knots of the fame the cakes are made of; but in the mingling you muA pi
t in a few carrawayfeeds; when they are wrought to pafte, roll them with theend 0f your finger into fmall rolls, and make it into knots; lay them upon pie-plates rubbed with butter, and bake them

Clouted Cream

TAKE four quarts f new milk from the cow, and put tt in a broad earthen panand kt it ftand till the next day, then put it over a very flow fire for half an hour; make it nearly hot to fet the cream, then put it away till it % cold, and take; die creaip ofF, and beat it fmooth with a fpoon. It is accounted in the Weft of England very fine for tea or coffee, of to put over fruit tarts or pies.

tme Cream.

TAKE your quinces and put them in boiling water un pared, boil them apace uncovered, left they dlTcolour when they are boikd, pare themi beat them very tender with fugar; then ake crm, and mijic it till it be pretty thick j if yQu boil youJT cream with a little cinnamon, it will be better, but let it bf cold before you put h to your quince

BM dim



1











1



g76 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

Citron Cnam TAKE a quart of cream, and boil it with three;)ennywprtli of good clear iiinglafs, which muft be tied up in a piece of thin tiffany; put in a blade or two of mace ftrongly boiled in your craoi and ifinglafs, tijl the cripam be pretty thick fweeten it to your tafte, with perfumed hard fugar; when it is taken o the fire put in a little rofe- water to yoMr tafte; .then take a piece of your green freOMil citron and ciit it in fittle bits, the breadth of point-cdaIe8, and about half as long; and the cream being fir ft put into diflies, when it is half cold, put in your citron, fo as it may but fink from, the top, that it may not be ieei), and may lie before it be at the bottom if you wafh your citron befpre in rofe water, it will make the colour better an freiher fo It-t it ftand till the next day, where it may get no water, and where it may not be fliaken.

Cream of Apples ince Goofibeniis Prunes or Rafphirrns.

Take to every quart of cream four eggs, being firft well beat and drained, and mix them with a little cold cream, and put it to your cream, being firf! boiled with whole mace; keeji It ftlrring, till you find it begins to thicken at the bottom atod fides; your iipples, qiiinces, and berries muft be tenderly boiled, fo as they will cruOi in the pulp; theneafon it with ro(t water and fugar to ydur tafte, putting it into difhes; and when they are cold, if there be any rofe- water and fugaf, which lies Waterifli at the top, let it be drained out with a fpoon: this pulp 'muft be 'made ready before you boH the' cream; and when it is boiled, cover over your pulp a pretty thicknefs with your egg cream, which muft have a little rofe- water and fugar iput to ic. . .- .

Sugar- Loaf Cream,

TAKE a quarter of a pound of hartfliorn, and put ittoa potile of Wdter, and fet on the fire in a pipkin, cpverfed till ft .be ready to feeth j then pour ofF the water, and put a pottle Of water more t6 it, and kt it ftand fimmering on the fire till it be confumed to a pint, and with it two "ounces Cfifinglafs wafhed in rofe-water, which muft be put in with the fecond water
then ftrain it, and let it cool; then take three pints of cream, and oil it very well with a bagof hutnieg, doves, cinnamon, and mace; then take a qtiarter Of a pound of Jordan aWiOnds, and iy them one night in cold water to blanch; and when they are blanched, let them lie two hotirs in cold Water; thtn take them out, and dry thenl in a clean linen clotb, and beat them in m&rbl,e mortar, with fair water or



APPENDIX TO rm ART OP COOfCEfty. 3

rofewater; beat them to a very .fine pulp then take fome of the aforefaid cream Well wrpiied, and put the pulp by degrees into it, ftraining it through a cloth with the back of a fpoon till all the goodnefs of the aimpnds be ftrained out into the cream; then feafon the cream with rafe water and fugar; then take the aforefaid jelly, warln it till it diflblves and feafoait. with rofe- water and fugar, and a grain of ambergreafe or mujQc, if you pleafc; then mix your cream, and jelly together very well, and put it into glafTes well warmed (like fugar loaves) d let it ftand all njght; then put them out upon a plate or two, or a white china di(h, and ftick the cream with piony kernels or ferve them in glafTes, one on every trencher.

Cenfervi of Rofi$ hiled,

TAKE red rofes, take off all the whites 'at the bottom, or clfewhere, take three times the weight of them in fugar, put to a pint of rofes'a pint of water (kim it well, jQired your rofes a little before you put them into water, cover them, and boil the leaves tender in the water and when they are tender put in your fugar; keep them ftirring, left they burn when they aire tender, and the fyrup be confMmed, Put them up, ind fo keep them for yoiir ufe

How to make Orange Blfcuits

PARE your oranges, not very thick, put them into water, but firft weigh your peels, let it ftand over the fire, and let it boil till it be very tender; then beat it in a marble mortar, •till it'be a very fine Cmooth pafl; to every ounce of pecJs put two ounces and a half of double- refined fugar well fearced kiix them well together with a fpoon in the mortar, then fpread it with a knife upon pie-plates, and itt it in an oven a little warm, or before the fire j when it fee dry upon the top, ciit, it into what fafliion you jjleafe, and turn them into another plate, and fet them in a ftove till they he dry 3 where the edges look rough, when it is dry they muft be cut with a pair of fciflTars.

How to make 'bellow Vamijh.

TAKE a quart of fpirit cA wine, and put to it eight ounces of fandarach, fliake it half an hour; next day it wiH be fi for ufe,'but ftrain it fiift; take lamp-black, and put in your varnlfli about the thicknefs of a pancake 5 mix it well,' but ftir it not 'too faftj then do it eight times over, and let it ftnd ftill the "' " ' next





fft APPENDIX TO rHE AKT OF COOKERT.

next day; then take one burnt Imrjr, md oil of turpentiiie afe fine as butter; then mix it with fetaie of your varnifli, tUl you liaTe Tarniflied tt fit for poltflmg; thtn poKlh it with tripoly in fine fionr; then lay it on nie wood fmooih, wiA onef bruflies, then let it dry, and do it fo eight" times at tle leaft; when it is very dry, lay on your vamifli that is mixed nnd when it is dry, polift it with a wet cloth dipped in tripol j nnd rub it as hard as you would do platters.

Jtow t9 maii a pretty Varnljh ti coUur UttU Bajkets Bamby or

any Board where nothing hot is fit on.

TAKE either red, black, or white wax, which colour you want to make: to every fwooun6es of fealiag-wax one ounce of ipirit of wine pound the wax fine, then fift it chrough a fine lawn fieve, till you have made it extremely fine; pul it into a large phial with the fpirits of wine, (hake it, let it fiand within the air of the fire forty-eight hours, (baking it often $ then with a little bruQi rub your baflcets all over with it: let it dry, and do it over a fecond time, and it makes them look very pretty.

How to clean Gold or Silver Lace.

TAKE alabafter finely beaten and fearced, and put it inter an earthen pipkin, and et it upon a chafing difli of coals, and let it boil for fome time, ftirring it often with a ftick firft % when it begins to boil, it will be very heavy; when it is enough, you will find it in the ftirring very light; then take it off the fire, lay your hce upon a piece of flannel, and ftrew your powder upon it; knock it well in with a bard cloth brufli; when you think it is enough, brulh the powder oQyC with a clean bruih.

How to make Sweet Powder for Clothes.

TAKE orris-roots two pounds and a half, of lignum rodi cum fix ounces of fcraped cyprefsc roots three ounces, of damaik rofes, f:arefully dried, a pound and a half, of benjamin four ounces and a half, of ftorax two ounces and a half, of fweetniarjoram thre ounces, of Ubdanum one ounce, and a drachm pf calamus aromaticus, and one drachm of muflc cods, fix drachms of lavender and flowrs and mclpt powers, if you pleafi



APPENDIX TO THE AltT OP COOKERV. . j

?V cfiMt ffUfite Sattins FUiuired Silks with G$ld and Sihir in

th0n.

TAKE flalc bread crumbled vtrj fine, mixed with powder blue, rub it veiy well over the nlk or fattin; then (bake.it well, and with clean oft cloths duft it well; if any gold crflU yer flowers, afterwards take piece f or imibn in grain velvet 9nd rub the flowers with it.

TAKE t)ie filings of lea or duft of lead, finely beaten in in iron rtiortafe-, putting to it oil of Q)ike, which will make the iron fif)eli well and if you oil yOur artlfs, or ny rhing that is made of Iron or ftetl yon may kotp them ill inoift ai from rafting.

5TJ Jrttf WaU piclU iif iphich ivstt go good to the Will Ins and kefp a Tear good in the PickUy and with Cate mif po to the Eaft Indies.

TAKE any piece of tf witboiit bones, or take the bon out, if you ill tend to keep it abqe a nofith i uke mace cloves nutmeg, and pepper, and juoip- berries bitat fine, and rub the beef well, mix fait and Jamaica pepper, and bay-leaves
let it be well feafoned, let it lie in this feafoning a week or teii days, throw in a good deal of garlick and ihalot; boil fome of I the beft white-wine vinegar, lay your ipeat in a pan or good ycijel for the purpoie, with the pickle; and when the vinegar is quite qojd pour it over, pover it clofe. If it is for a vpyage, cpver it with oil, and let the cooper, hoop up the barrel very well. This is a good wy in a hot country, here mtH will not keep: then it muft be put iinto the vinegar diredly with the feafoning, then yoi may either roaft or ftew it, but it is be$ ftewed and add a good deal of onion and parfley Chopped fine, fome white-wine, a little catchup, trujffles and morels, a little good gravy, a piece of butter rolled in flour or a little oil, in which the meat and onions ought to ftw a quarter of an hour before the other ingredients are put in; then put all in, and ftir it together, and lei it ftew till yoi think it is enough. This is good pickle in a hot country, to keep beef pf veal that is dreiled. to eat cold.







380 APPBNDIX.TO THE ARfF OF COOKERY.

AFTER all your apples arebruifed, takehalf of your quantity apd fquecCJbcm, and. tbc juke you pre(s fron them pour vpoo the.oihers half bruifed, but not fqueezed. In a tub for the purpofcy having a tap at the bottom;Jet the juice remain upon the apples three or four day.S4..thea pull-out your tap, and let Jbiif juice run into fomc other vefleLf under thc;tub to. receive it; and if it runs thick, as at the iirft it will, pour it upon the apples again, till you feeit jiun clear
and as you hve aquan tity, put ft into your it€flcl;but do ifor force tire cyder, but let t drop ai long as it w'iH of its oyTii ccprd;. bjayiAg done this, after you iperceive that the fides gt ic.work,i9 quantity of ifinglafs,- an ounce wilt lerviDic fpfty IJQn inufe this v forqc. of, (hficydiXitiU be.4ifii
)yc
.pu4:c n ounce of ifinglafs a quart of cyder, and when it is fo diflfolved, pour it into the veflel, and ftop it clofe for two days, or fomething more; then draw, off the cyder into anothjcr veflbl: ti do fo often till you perceive your cder to be free from aU manner of fedi-, ment, that may mke it ferment and fret itfelf: after Chrift' mas you may boil it. You may by pouring water on the apples, and preffing them, male pretty fmall cyder; M it be thick and muddy, by ufingifinglafs you may n'lake it as clear as the red; you muft diflblve the ifihglafs over the % till it be jelly.

. . . For fiw Cyder

TAKE two quarts of fkim-milk, four ounces of ifinglafs, cut the ifinglafs in pieces, and work it luke-warmin the milk over the fire; and -when it is diiTqlvcd, then put it cold into the hogihead of Cyde?, and take a long ftick, and ftir it well from top to bottom, for half a quarter of an hour.

4fter it has fined.,

TAKE ten pounds of raifins of the fun, two ounces of turmerick, half an ounce of ginger beaten; then take a quantity of raifiiis, and grind thejn as you do muftard-feed in a bowl, with a little cyder, and fo the reft of the raifins then fprixikle the turmerick and ginger amongft it; then put all into a fine canvafs bag, and hang it in the middle of the hogfhead' clofe, and let it lie. After the cyder has ftood thus a forthight or a montb then you may bottle it at your pleafure,

fa











APPENDIX rO THE ABLT OE COOKERY. 381

T'tnake Choudtr.a Sa Diflj.

TAKE a belly- piece of pkUedaport, flice off the faster parts, and lay them at the bottom of tbekeitk, &xtif over it onions, and fuch' fweet herbsi as you c. procure 4 takea middling large cod, bone'and ftice it as fcvr crimping, pepper, fait, alU fpice, and flour it a little'; mak;c a layex with,pirt of the fliccs, upon tbat a flight layer of pork, again, tand on hat a layer of bifcuit; and fo on, purfuing the like rule, until the kettle is filled to abcipt four iniches • covet it. with anke pafte, pour in about a pint of water, lute down the cover of the Icedle, and let the top be .fuppiicd with live wood cnabara,l Kee
it over a flocv fire about four bquts.. ? . . • -

, When you takejt up lay jt inthc dllb, poiir in a glafs of bot Madeira wine, aad a vjpry fiule InJia pepper; if you have oyfters, or truffles and morfels,, it is Hill bcttcj j' thicien it with butler. Obferve, before you put this Q.uce in, to fkim the ftew, and then Tay on ibe cruft, and iend it. to table reverfe as in the kettle j cover it clofe with the pafte, which fliould be brown.,.

To" clarify Sugar afiet th Spanijh Way."

TAKE one pound of the beiliLifbon fugar, nineteen poinds

of water, miy the white and fliellof an egg, then beat it up to

a lather 5 then let bojl, and ftrain it off: you muft let it fimmer

over a charcoal fire till it diminifli to half a pint; then put in

a large fpoonful of orange- flower water.

To make Spanjjh Fritters

TAKE the infide of a roll, and flice it in three; then foak it in milk; theil pafa it through a batter of eggs, fry them in oil; when almoft done, repafs them in another batter; then let them fry till they are done, draw them off the oil, and lay them in a difli; over every pair of fritters yo muft throw cin pamon, fmall coloured fugar-plums, and clarified fugar.

To frkafiy Pigeons the Italian Way.

QUARTER them, and fry them in oil; take fome graen peas, and let them fry in the oil till they are almoft ready to burfti then put fome boiling water to them; feafon it with' fait, pepper, onions, garlick, parfley, and vinegar. Veal artd aiid lamb do the fame way and thicken with yoik of eggs.

eukui





31 APPfiWpiX TO Tte iKKT OF COOEElVi



. Pukbd Biiffir piifikt Ufii

TAKE th0 rib of bcief, flkk t with garlkk and cli; fea: fim it vrith MCy Javnuqa pcfifcsr mace aad foiBc garlick poundtti;. Acer the meat with whil-vine viojegar and Spanifh thyme: yon muft take care to tani thd nEieat every day anil add more viogar ifrequirtld, fck a fortnight $ tbenr put it in a ftevrpan, and cover it clofe, and let it fimieroQ a flow f far fix hours, adding vinegar and wiiiiecwtne $ if yoachufe, yotf may ftew a good qnanticy of ootons, it mU be morepalauble

._ Bsrf Stmii iHf tie FrenA Wf.

TAKE fome beef fteaks broil thetti tiH they are kalf dSMIr while the leaks are doing have ready in a ffewpatt'faktte tedwine, a fpoonful or tvro ofgravy feafon it with iaity pepper, Ibme fhalots; theni take the flks, and cut in fquare and put ia the fauce; you muft put f6mtf vinegar cover it €lofe and

let it fimmer on a flow fire half an hour.

•

A Caon done after the Freneb Haj.

' TAKE a quart of whitcwine, feafon the capon wfth falf cloves, and whole pepper, a few fhalots then put the capcm • in an earthen pan you muft take care it has -not xikiA to Ihakei it muft be covered dofe, and done ori a fl0 chariMl' fire.

To male MamiOrgb SaUfageu

Take a pound of beef, mince it very fmall, with half a pound of the beft fuet; then mix three quarters of a pound of fuet cut in targe pieces; then feafon it widi pepper; cIoYbsj flutmeg, a reat quantity of garlick cut fmatl Cottbt whrtewine Vinegar, fome bay- fa4t, and common' fak, a giafs of redwinbf tid one of rum; 'mix all thafe vevy weii together then x the largeft gut yOu can find and ftu£f it very tight; theif hang it up in a chioiney and fmokoit w4th fawdaft for a:woeko ten days; hang them in the air till they are dry, and they will keep a year. They are very good boiled- in peas pottage and roafted with toafted breadiinder it, or in an amlti.

Saufages after the German Way

TAKt the crumb xcf a two- penny loaf, one pound of fuef, half a lamb's lights, a handful of paifley. Tome thyme, marjory,

and



PEN WX TO THE ART OF COOKERY, 383

aad CNiioii mince all very finally tbcn. Icalba it with fait and pepper. Thefe.o)iift be ftuied io a flieep's gut; they are frie JA oil at iQelted.iiet od are only fit for iincnediate ufe,

A Turkey Jluffid afUr Ha Hamburgh Way.

TAKE one pound of beef, three quartnra of a pound eC fiiety ain it very fmall, feafon it with fait, pepper, cloves mace, and fwee t . maijoram; then mix t3ieo or three eggs with it, loofen the Ikia all round the turkey, and fluff it Ujiiuftbcrafted.

V

Chichm drijfcd tht French Way.

TAKE them and qoariee themc then broil, csiimble. over Aem nUttle bread.and pariley 1 when they arc half done, pit theme in aflew'i)an:, With three or four (pogafuls of gravy, and dovUe the quantky of white-wine, fat, and pepper ibme fried veal-balls, and fome fvckera, omonv Aialot3i ftqcioee gnH goofeberries or grapes when in feafon; cover the pan clofe, and let it llew on a charcoal fire for an hour; thicken the liquor with. the. yolk3 of eggs, and the juice of lemon; gjtfuii
jie diib. with fried fuckers,, diced femon, and the livery.

A Calfs Head dr0d after the Dutch Way.

TAKE half a pound of Spaniih peas, %y tlvem in water 4 night then one pound of wboUi rice, i9,ix,ihe pea and ric together, ad lay it xound t&$ bead in a, deep dUh then tke two qoarts of watet, feafoned . wJAb pepper ai
d (ajlt, and cof iMireik wkh faffran; then fend it.lo bake.

Chickens and TurMes drefd after tie Butch Wayf.

BOIL them, feafon them with fait, pepper, and cloyej then to every quart of broth pt 4 quarter of a pound of rice or vermicelli: it is eat with iijgar and cinnaoiion The two laift may be left oiitv

7 make a Fricajit tf Cdw Fttt md. Cbalirm qfir th liuium

Way.

TAKE the crumb of a thrfeepenny-Joaf, one pound of fiief, %, large onion, two or three hand fUts of parfley, mince xt vey fmaU, feafon it with falc aiid pepper, three o four cloves of gtf lick niix with eight or ten eggs; then (tuff the chaldron;

take



384 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERti

faicc the ftct and pat them iita deep ftcw-pan: it muft fteur. upon a flow fire till the bones -arc loofc; therj take two quarts of sreM pca$ " P"' " qxor; and when done, yot muft thicken it. with the yolks of two eggs, and the juice of a lemon. It muft be feafoned with pepper, fait,- mace, and Mion, fomc parfley and garJick. You muft ferve k up With the ' abovefaid pudding in the middle. of. the dijfbj.aiidigarniih thct iilh' with fried fuckers and fliccd onion. . . .

7i pLiU tbi fine Purple Cabbage fa much admired the great

' Tables.

',

TAKE two cauliflowers, two red cahbages half a peck of Wdney-bcana, fix fticks, with fijc cloven of gariick on each ftick • wa(h all well, give them one boil up, then drain them on aVicve, and lay them leaf by leaf upon large table, and fait them with bay-falt j then
ay them a-dryingfai the fun or in a flow OTcn, until as dry as cork.'

• • ft a -

To make the PicUe.

TAKE a gallon of the.beft vinegar, with one quart of water and a handful of fait, and an ounce of pepper; boil them, let'it ftand till it is cold; ihen take a quarter of a pound of irlneer, cut in pieces, fait it, let it ftand a week; take half a Sound of muflard-fced, wafli it, apd lay it to dry; when very drv broife half of it; when half is ready for the jar, lay a rdw of cabbage, a row of cauliflowers and beans, and throw betwixt every row your muftard-feed, fome black peppw:, fomc Jamaica pepper, fome ginger, mix an ounce of tlje root of turmerick powdered j put in the pickle, which muft go over all. It is beft when it hath been made two years, though it may be uftd the firft year.

t 7i raife Mujbrooms.

COVER an old hot-bed three or four inches thick wit fine earden mould, and cover that three or four inches thick' •with mouldy long muck, of a horfe muck-hill, or old rottep ftubble; when the bed has lain fome time thus prepared, boil any muflirooms that are not fit for ufe, in water, and throvr the water 6a your prepared bed; in a day or two after,, you will have thf beft AmII button muihrooms.



;



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 3




Tie Stages Heart WaUt.

TAKE baum four handfuls, fweet-roarjoram one handful, rofemary flowers, dove-gilli flowers dritd, dried rofc-buds, borrage flowers, of each an ounce; marigold- flowers half an oujfice, lemon-peei two ounce mace and cardamum, of eaclk tiiirtjr grains; df cinnamon fixty grains, or yellow and whit fanders, of each quarter of an ounce fiiavings of hartftorfiy n ounce; talce nine oranges, aod put in the peel, then cut' them in fncali pieces; pour upon thefe two quarts of thebeft Rhenifh, or the beft white-wine; let it inrufe three or fout days being very clofe flopped in a celiac or cool place: If it infu Atite or ten days, it is the better.

Take a ftag's heart, and cut ofr all the fat, and cut it very fmallaad pour in fo much Rhenilh or white-wine as will cover it; let it (land all night clofe covered in a cool place; the next day add the aforefaid things to it, mixing it very ' well together; adding to it a pint of the beft rofe-water, and a pint of the juice of celandine: if you pleafe you may put in ten grains of fafFron, and fo put it in a gkfs dill, diftilling in water, raidng it well to keep In the lleam, both of the ftill and receiver.

TV make Angelica fVateK

Take 'eight handfuls of the leaves, walh them and cut them, arid lay them on a table to dry; when they are dry put them into an earthen pot, and pUt to them four quarts of ftrong wine les; let it ftay for twenly-four hours, but ftir It twice in the titne; then put it into a warm ftill or ariIenii bic, and draw it off; cover yoiit bottles with a paper, ahd prick holes in it; fo let let it ftand two or three days; then mintle it all together, and fweeten it; and when it is fettled, bottle it up, and ftop it clofe. '

fi make Milk-Jfater.



Take the herbs agrimohy, endive, fumitory, bauto, elder-flowers, white-nettles, water-creffes, bank creffes, fag, each three handfub; eye-bright, brook- lime, and celahdihe, each two handfuls; the rofes of yellbw-dock, red-madder, fennel, jiorfe radiih, and Uquorice, each three ounces; raifins ftoned one pound, nutmegs fliced. Winter's bark, turmeric, g'alangal, each two drachms; carraway and fen acl- feed th red

C c ouilCeS', '



386 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

ouncei, one gallon of milk. Diftil all with a gentle fire in one day You may add a handful of May wormwood.

c •

To maki Slip-ceat Cbeefe.

TAKE fix quarts of new milk hot from the cow, the ftroakings, and put to it two fpoonfuls of rennet; and when it it hard coming, lay it into the fat with a fpoon, not breaking it all; then prefs it with a four pound weight, turning of it with a dry cloth once an hour, and every day (hifting it in to frcOi grafs. It will be ready to cut, if the weather ice hot, in Fourteen days.

To maii a Brick- Bat Chafe. It mufi ht modi in September

TAKE two gallons of new milk, and a quart of good cream, heat the cream, put in two fpoonfuls of rennet, and when it is come, break it a little, then put it into a wooden mould, in the ibape of a brick. It muft be half a year old be fore you eat it: you muft prefs it a little, and fo dry it.

To make Cordial Poppy Water.

TAKE two gallons of very good brandy, and a peck of poppies, and put them together in a wide-mouthed glafs, and let them ftand forty-eight hours, and then firain the .poppies out; take a pound of raifins of the fun, ftone them, and an ounce of coriander- feed, an ounce of fweet-fennel feeds, and an ounce of liquorice fliced, bruife them all together, and put them into the brandy, with a pound of good powder-fugar, ' and let them ftand four or eight weeks, (baking itevery day and then firain it off, and bottle it clofe up for ufe.

To make White Mead.

TAKE five gallons of water, add to that one gallon of the beft honey; then fee it on the fire, boil it together well, and fkim it very clean; then take it off the fire, and fet it by; then take two or three races of ginger, the like qiiantity of cinnamon and nutmegs, bruife all thefe grpfsly, and put them In a Ifttle Holland bag in the hot liquor, and fo lee it fland clofe covered till it be cold; then put as much ale-yeaft to it as wil! make it work. Keep it in a warm place, as they do ale and when it hath wrought well, tun it up; at two months you may drink it, having been bottled a month. If you keep it lQii monthj it will ce the better

TV



Appendix to tHE art op cookery. 'i$f

To indke Btoiim PittageM

TAKE a piece of lean gravy-beefj and cut it into tftiri collops, and hack them with the baclc of a cleaver; have d llew-pan over the fire, with a piece 6t biitter, a little bacott cut thin; iet them ht brown over the fire, arid put in your beef, let it ftew till it be very brovirn; put in a little flour, and then have your broth ready, and fill up the ftew-pan; put in two onions, a . bunch of fweet herbs, cloves, mace,; and pepper; let all ftew together an hour covered, then have your bread ready toafled hard to put in your di(b, and ftrain fome of the bfioth to it, through a fine fieve j put a fowl of fbme fort in the middle, with a little boiled fpinach minced in it: gari)i(hiag your diih with boiled lettuces, fpinach and Iec mon.

7i mah Whin Barley Pgitagiy with a large Chicken in the Middle •

FIRST make your ftock with an old hen, a -knuckle of veal, a fcrag end of mutton, fome fpice fweet herbs, and onions; boll all together till it be ftrong enough then have your barley ready boiled very tender and white, and iirain fome of it through a cullender; have your bread ready toafted ti your diih, with fome fine green herbs, minced chervil fpinach forrel; and put into your diih came of the' broth to you t bread, herbs, and chicken, then barley ftrained and re-ftraih ed; ftew all together in the difti a little while i garniib your diih with boiled lettuces, fpinach, and lemon

To make a Frangas tncopadeU

TAKE three quarters of a pound of lean bacoii or Ham, twd large onions jfliced, four Ibalots, and two quarts of water, with t Ifttie beaten pepper, cloves, and mace, and a pennyworth off fafiron, ftew ic gently till it u redacted to three pints and ftrain it through a fieve; cut two fowls, as for a fricafe- and ftew them in the broth till they are tender; mix two fpoonfuls of flour in two fpoonfuls of vinegar, and beat it dp with fome Qf the liquor till it is quite fmooth; and mix the whole toge ther, and boil it for ten minuted gently; put fippets iri a foupdifa, and pour it all over them. You may add fmall force-nieac balls, if you ploafe, in it or you make it df veal made in the form of veal olives 3 and you may fend it ih a tureenj if you .like



388 APPENDIX TO T8I ART OF COpEHV.

TV mats a S€$tcb Haggafi.

TAKE Chf ligbu, heart, aod.chiUeriiiigt of a calf, chop tbeoA very fine, and a pound of fiiet chopped fine; deafon with pepper and fait lo your palate $ min in a pound of flcuir or oatmeal, roll it up, and put it intp a caU' bag,, and boil ifi a hour and a hIf will do it Some add a pint of gpod thick eream, and put in a little beateQ mace,. plovesy or nutmegs oc all-fpice ia very od in it.

i Ta m€h it Jwat with Fruit •

TAKE the meat and fuet as above, and flour, Wftk bettm mace cloves, and ntitmeg, to your palate, a pounrf of (kirc r.Tnts waflied very clean, a pound of raifins ftoned tod- thop ped fine, half a pmt of fack mix all well together, and boil it in the calfs bag two hours. You muft carry it to table in xhe bag it was boiled in

Tr maie Sour Crcut

TAKE your fine hard white cabbage, cut them very Anally have a tub on purpofe with the head out, according to the quantify you intend to make; put them in the tub to every four or five cabbages throw in a large Handful of falf wheif. you have done as many as you intend, lay a very heavy tiight on them, to prefs them down as flat .as poAfede' thr6w a clotb on them, and lay on the cover; Jet them fiand a month, then ynu may begin to ufe it. It will keep tWiFlv months; but be fure to keep it always clofe covered, and the weight on it; if you throw a few carraway- feeds pounded fine amongft ir, they give it a fine flavour. The way la te% it Is with a fine fat piece of beef ftewed together. It is a diftv much made ufe of amongft the Germans, and in the North countries, where the froft kills all the cabbages; therefore they preferve them in this manner before the froft takes them., Cabbage-ftalks, cauliflower-ftalks, and artichoke- ftalks, peel- " cJ, and cut fine down in the fame manner, are very good.

Ti Ue Green Peas, Beansj fcfr. and Fruity frejh and good till

Chriimas,

OBSERVE to gather all your things on a fine clear day, ' in the increafe or full- moon; take well-ghzed earthen or ftone pots quite new, that have not been laid in water, wipe them.

t ', . - cleao •



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 39

clean, lay in your fruit very carefully, and take great care none i$ briiifed or damagtd in the ieaft, nor too ripe, butjuftin their prime; ftop down the jar cloCe, and pit'Ch it, and tit a Jeatber over. D kidneybeans the fame; bury two feet deep in the earth, and keep them there till you haveoccafioti for theno. Do peas and beam the fame way, only keep them im ihe pods, and 4o not let your peas be ciihcr too young or tob old; tiic one will ran to water, and the other the worth ir'M Mt; as to tiie two latter, lay a layer of fine writing faiid,"and Sk layer of pods, and fo on till full i the reft as above. Pkawess you auiy keep the faoie way.

T( mtah Pa€$iiUa mr Indian Picklt the fame th Mangoes eomi

ovftr in.

TAKE a pound of race-ginger, and lay it in water on night; then fcrape it, and cut it in thinilices, and pt to it fome fafr, and let it ftand in the fun to dry; take long-peppelr tvro ounces, and do it as the ginger. Take a pound of garlick, and cut it in tbin dices, and fait it, and let it ftand threi days; then wafti it well, and let it be fahed again, and ftand three days more; then wafli it well, and drain it, and put it in the fun to dry; take a quarter of a pouid of muftard-feedi bruifed, and haFf a quarter of an ouhce of turmerick, put thefe mgredients, when prepared, into a large ftone or glafs jar, with a gallon of very good white- wine vinegar,;ind ftir it very often for a fortnight, and tie it up clofe.

In this pickle you may put white cabbage, ut ip quarters and put in a brine of fait and water for three days, and then boil frefli (alt and water, and juft put in the cabbage to (bald, and prefs out the water, and put it in the fun to dry, in the lame manner as yoti do cauliflowers, cucumbers, melons, apples, French beans, plums, or any fort of fruit. Take care they are well dried before you put them into the pickle: you need never empty the jar, but as the thing's come in feafon put them in, and fupply it with vinegar as often as there is occafion

, If you would have your pickle look green, leave out the turmerick, and green them as tlfual, and put them into this pickle ooM

In the above, you may do walnuts in ajar by themfelves; put the walnuts in without any preparation, tied clofe down, and kept &caie time.



Cc 3



To



180 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

TV prefervi Cucumbirs equal with any Italian Swatmiot.

TAKE fine young gerkins, of two or three different fixes fcut them into ilone jar, cover them well with vine-leaveaf fin the jar with fpring-water, cover it dofc let it ftand near the fire, fo as to be quite warm, for ten days or a fortnight; then take them out, and throw them into fpring water; the IKrill look quite yellow, and ftink, but you muft not mind that. Have ready your preferving-pan i take them out of that water, and put them into the pan, covr them well with vine leaves, fill it with fpring water, fet it over a charcoal fire, cover them clofe, and let them finjmer very flows lok at them often, and when you fee them turqed qiiite of a fine green, take ofi the leaves, and throw them into a harge fieve; then into a coarfe cloth, four or five times doubled; w:he
i they are cold, put them into the jar, and have ready your fy-

fup, made of double-refined fugar, in which boil a g(eat deal of lemon-peel, and whole ginger; pour it hot over them, and cover tbem down clofe do it three times pare your lemonpeel very thin, and cut them in long thin bits, about two inches' long: the ginger muft be wcH'boile in water before it is pat in the fyrup. Take long cucumbers, cut them in halfs, fcoop out the infide; do them the fame way: they eat very fine in minced pies or puddings; or boil the fyiup to a candy, and dry them on ficves. ? .

Thi Jews Way of prefervin Salmon and all Sorts of Fijh

TAKE either falmon, cod, or any large fi(h, cutofFthe liead, wafli it clean, and cut it in flices as crimped cod is, dry It very well in a cloth; then flour it, and dip it in yolks of eggs, and fry it in a great deal of oil, till it is of a fine .brown, and well done; take it out, and lay it to drain, till it is very dry and cold. cVhitings, mackarel, and flat- fifb, are- done whole, yhen they are quite dry and cold, lay them' in your pan or .vefiTel, throw in between them a good deal of niace, cJoves and fliced nutmeg, a ftew bay-leaves have your pickle ready made of the beflr white-wine vinegar in whih you niuft boil

a great many cloves df garlick and ibalot, black and white pep per, Jamaica and long pepper, juniper- berries, and fait; wheic ihe garlick' begins to be tender, the pickle is enough when it i quite cold, pour it on your fi(h, and a little oil on the top: They will keep good a twelvemonth, and are to be eat colcf with oiland vinegar; they will %o good to the £afi Indies. All



! ?



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY. 3i

forts of fifli fried well in oil, eat very fine cold with (halot, or oil and vinegar. Obferve, in the picklins; of your fifli, to have the pickle ready; iicft put a little pickle in, then a Fajrer of fiflb, then ptcWe, then a little fi(hj and (o them down very clofe, to be well covered; put a lirtlc fafFron in the pickle. Frying fih in common oil is not fo cxpenfivc with care; for present ufc a little does, and if the cook is careiful not to burn the oil, or black it, it will fry them two or three times.,

To prefervt Tipe to go to the Eaft IndUs.

GET a fine belly of tripe, quite frefh, take a four gallon ca(k well hooped, lay in your tripe and have your pickle ready, made thus: take (even quarts of fpring- water, and put as much fait into it as will make an egg fwim, that thjc little

id of the egg may be about an inch above the water (you mufl take care to have the fine clear fair, for the common fait will fpoil it); add a quart of the beft white- wine vinegar, two fprigs of rofemary, an ounce of alUfpicc, pour it on your tripe; let the cooper fallen the cafk down diredly; when it comes to the Indies, it mufl not be opened till it is juft going to be dreed, for it will not keep after the cafk is opened. The way to drefs it s lay ic in water half an hour, then fry it or

. boil it as we do here.



The Mannerof drejjing various Sorts lof Dried Fijh as Stock fijhy

Codf Salmon Whitings c.

The general Rule for fteeping of Dried Filh, th Stock-fi(h

excepted.

• ALL the kinds, except ftock-fiih, are filted, or eitber dried in the fun, as the moil common way, or in prepared kilns, or. by the fmokc of .wood-fires in chimney-corners, and, in either cafe, require the being fofiened and frefhened in proportion to theirbulk, their nature or dryncfs j the very dry fort, as bacalao, cod-fifh, or whiting, and fuch like, ihould be fteeped in luke-warm milk and warer; the leaping kept as near as poffible to an eqUal degree of heat, lhe Wger fiih fhould be fleeped twelve, the fmaU, as whiting, &c. about two hours; the cod are therefore laid to fteep in the evening, thijj.Whiiings, &c. in the morning before they are to be drefied after the time of deeping, they are to be taken out, and hung up by the Uib lentil they are drefTcd i the reafon of banging them up is,

C c 4. . . tna.



3 APPENDX.TO THE ART pF COOKERY.

tbat they foften equally as in tbe fteeping, withoMt eKtraidiDg too much of thereUA, wbtch would ma'ke them infipid $ when thus prepared, the fmall fiih, as whiting, tuflc, and fuch like, are floured aiui laid on the gridiron, and when a little hardened on the one fide, mufl: be turned and bafled with oil upon a feather; and when bafled on both fides, and well hot through, taken up, alway obferving, that as fweet-oil fupples and fupplies the fi& with a kind of artificial juices, fo the fire draws out thofe juices, and hardens them; theref(re be careful not to let them broil too long j no time can be prelbnbed, be- caufe of the difference of fires, and various bignefs of the fifh. A cler charcotl fire is muck the beft and the fiih kept at a gogd diflance to broil gradually: the beft way to know when they are enough is, they will fwell a little in the bailing, and you muft not let them fall again.

The fauces are the fame as ufual to falt-fiih, and gainiih with oyders fried in batter.

' But for a fupper, for thofe that like fweet oil, the beft fauce IS oil, vinegar, and muilard, beat up to a coafiAtncCf and ferved up in faucers

1( boiled, as the great fi(h ufually are, it ihould be in milk and water, bqtnot fo properly boiled, as kept juft fimmering over an equal fire; in which way, half an hour will do the Jargeft fifh, and five minutes th fmalleft. ? Some people broil both Yorts after fimmering, and fome pick them to piecesi and then to(s them up ip a pan with fried onions;ind apples,

They are either way very good, and the choice depend OA the weik or ilrong ilomachs of the eaters,

Dried Salmon muft be differently managed'

FOR though a Jarge filli, they do not require more ilccping than a whiting; and whefi laid on the gridiron, ihould be moderately peppered, -

I

' The Dried' Herrings

INSTEAD of milk and water, ihould be fleeped tbe like time as the whiting, in fmalj-beer; and to which, as to all kinds of broiled falt-fifli, Aveet-oil will always be found the beft bafting, and no ways ae(3; even the delicacy of thofe who do ioc love oil

Stitk





I



Af PENDI5C TO .THE ART OP COOKKRY, 39

Suck'KJb

ARE very different from thofe before mentioned; fhey be ing dried in the froft without fah, are in their ilcinti very in(i pid, and areooly eatable by the ingredients that majce them fo aod the arc of cookery; they (hoy Id be firift beat with a fledgec hammer on an iron anvil, or on a tTy. fojid fmooch oakea block; and when reduced almoft to atoms, the flda and bgnpa taken away, and the remainder of the fi(h fteeped in milk and warm water until very foft j then ftrained out, and put into a foup-di(h with new milk, powdered cinnamon, mace, and nutmeg, the chief part cinnamon; a parte round the ecJge of the. dilh, and put in a temperate ovep to fimmer for ahoutan hour aifd th ferved up in the place of pudding.

N. B. The Italians eat the ftin boiled, either hot or coW, 9tid moft uftially with oil and viaegar, preferring the ikin to th body of (he fi(h.

' T%e Way of curing MackareU

BUY them as freib as poffible fplit them down the bafcka open them flat, take out the gutS) and wa& thfl fi& very ckfta from the blood, hang them up by the tails to drain welt; da ' this in the cool of the evening, or in a very cool place; rtrew fait at the bottom of th pan, (prinkk the fi(h well with clean fait, hy them in the pan belly to belly,, and back to back; let them lie in the fait about twelve hours, wa(h the < cleaa. off in the pickle, hang them again up by the tails half am hour to drain y pepper the infides moderately, and lay them to dry on inclining ftones f4cing the fun; never leaving them out when the fun is ofF, nor lay them out before the fun has difperfed the dews, and he ftones you lay them on be dry and warm A week's time of iihe weather perfeSly cures them; when cured, bang them up by their tails, belJy to be)ly in a very dry place, but not in fea-coal fmoke, itcwill fpoj their flavourt '

7i drefi cured Mackarth

EITHER fry them in boiling oil, and lay them to drain, or. broil them before, or on a very clear fire: in the laft cafe, bafte them with oil and a feather; fauce Will be very little wanting, s they will be very moift and mellow, if good in kind; other wife yoti may ufe melted butter and -crimped parflcy.

Calvi%



394 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

' Calvn Ftii fiewid.

CUT t calfs foot into four pieces, put it into a fauce-pan with half t pint of foft water, and a middling potatoe; fcrape the outfide flcin clean oflF, fltce it thin, and a middling onion peeled and fliced thin, fome beaten pepper and fait, cover it clofe, and let it ftew very fofciv for about two hours after it boils; be fure to let it fimmer as feftly as you can; eat it with •ttt any other fauce: it is an excellent di(h.

yi makt Fricandillas.

TAKE two pounds of lean veal, and half a pound of kidney fuet chopped fmall, the crumb of a twopenny French xM foaked in hot milk, and fqueeze the milk out, put it to the veal $ feafon it pretty high with pepper and fait, and grated nutmeg; make it into balls as big as a tea-cup, with the yilks of eggs over it, and fry them in butter til) 4hey are of a fine light brown; have a quart of veal broth in a ftew-pan, ftew them gently three quarters of an hour, thicken it with butter rolled in flour, and add the juice of half a lemon; put it in a difli with the fauce ovpr, and garnifh with notched lemon and beet' root.

To make a fim BitOr.

TAKE an ounce of the fineft Jefult powder, half a quarter of an ounce of fnake-root powder, half a quarter of an ounce of fait of wormwood, half a quarter of faSron, half a quarter of cochineal % put it into a quart of the beft brandy, and let it ftand twenty. four hours; every now and then fhaking the bottle.

An approved Method praSiifed hy Mrs. Dukely the eeris Tyro IVomany to prefervt Hairy and make it grow thick.

TAKE one quart of white-wine, put in one handful of rofemary flowers, half a pound of honey, diftil them together; then add a quarter of a pint of oil of fweet almonds, fiiake it very well together, put a little of it into a ccup, warpi it blood warm, rub it well on your head, and comb it dry.

To make Carolina Snow-Balls.

TAKE half a pounc of rice, wafh it clean, divide it into fix parts take fix apples, pare them, and fcoop out the core, in

which



APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY, 35

which place pitt a little lemon peel (hred very irne; then have ready fome chin cloths to tie the balls in; put the rice in th cloth, and lay the apple on it; tie them up ciofe, put them into cold water, and when the water boils, they will take aA liour and a quarter boiling: be very careful how you turn them into the difli) that you do not break the rice, and they will look as white as fnow, and make a very pretty di(b The fauce is, to this quantity, a quarter of a pound of ireih butter, melted thick, a glafs of white-wine, a little nutmeg and beaten cinnamon, made very fweet with fugar; boil ail up together, and pour it into a bafon, and fend to table

J Carolina Rice-Pudding.

TA
CE half a pound of rice, wafh it clean, put it into % fauce pan, with a quart of milk, keep ftirring it tiU k is very thick, take great care it does not burn; then turn it into % pan, and grate fome nutmeg into it, and two tea-fpoonfuls of beaten cinnamon, a little lemon-peel (hred fine, fix applet pared and chopped fmall; mix all together with the yolks of three eggs, and fweeten to your palate; then tie it up dofe in a cloth, put it into boiling water, and be fure to keep it boiling all the time; an hour and a quarter will boH it. Melt butter and pour over it, and throw fome fine fugar all over it; j littli winp in the fauce will be a great addition to i(

T9 difttl Tnach'Water Lady MonnfutVt Way.

TAKE three ounces of hartfhofn, ihaved and boiled in bor rage-water, or fuccory, wood-forrel or re fpice- water, or three pints of any of thefe waters boiled to a jelly; and put the
(y and hartfiiorn both into the ftill, and add a pint naore of thefe waters when you put it into the ftill; take the roots of elecam pane, gentian, cyprefs-tuninfil, of each an ounce, blefled thiftle, called carduus, and angelica, of each an ounce; forreU roots two ounces; baum, fweet-marjoram, and burner, of each half a handful; lily-comvally flowers,' borrage, buglofs, rofemary, and marigold-flowers, of each two ounces; citron-rinds, carduus- feeds, £ind citron-feeds, alkermes berries, and cochineal, each of thefe an ounce

Brepare all ibefe Simples thus:

GATHER the flowers as they come in feafon, and put (hem in glafles with' a large mouth, and put with them as

much



396 APPENDIX TO THE ART OF COOKERY.

9MJdi good fiick M will conrfr dieoi to4 lie vp the glaflei cl6& wicb UadderB wet in llic fack, wub a cork and katker uH vpon k clofe, adding more iowera aad feck as occafioo is; aa4 whea ooe glafs ta full cake aoocher, till you have your uan iky of flowera t diftil; Hit cochineal into a pint hlottle, mUh baif a pint of fack, ao tie il up clofe wiih a bladder luiyler ttie corki aad aMther on the lop, wet with fock tied up eloft wi brown thread and then oovej ic up ciofe with leather and bury it ftanding upright in a. bed pf hot horfe-dung for ainc or ten dajt s I( ac it, and if diflolvd, take it out of the dung, but do not open it till yon diftil; flice alt the roCi, beat the feeds and' the alkermes- berries, and put them into another gUfs amongft alh, put no more fack than needs; and when you intend to diftil, take a pound of the beft Venice treacle, and diiTolve it in Iht pints of the beft whitewine, and three of red rofe-water, and put all the ingredients rnto a bafon, and jlir them all together, and diftil them in a glaYs ftiil, balneuni Mariae; open not the ingredients till th fame day jrou diftrl.



RECEIPTS



r



1



RECEIPTS



FOR



PERFUMERY, &c.



ADVERTISEMENT.

THE following CoUeftion of approved Receipts in Perfumery hath been added co this Edition •f the Art of Cookery, in order to render the Work

of more .extend ve Utility than the fornner; and which,



it is prefumed, will be confidered by the Reader as a valuable Acquifition.



1



R E C EI P T S



FOR



PERFUMERY, Sec.

To make Red Lights r Purple ffajh- Balls.

GET fomc white- foap, beat it in a mortar; then put it into a pan, and cover it down clpfe j let the fame be put into a copper, (o that the water does not come to the top of the pan; then cover your cbpper as clofc as you can, to flop the fteam; make the water boil fome time: take the pan out, and beat it well with a wooden ftirrer, till it is all melted with the beat of the water; then pour it out into drops, and ?u
them into fquarc pieces as fmall as a walnut; let it lie three days on an oven in a band-box, afterwards put fhem intd a pan and damp them with rofe-watcr, mafli it well with your hands, and mould them according to your fancy, viz. fqueeze them as hard and as clofe as you poffibly can; make thtnx very round, and put theip into a band-box or a fieve two or three days; then fcrape them a little with a wa(hball Tcraper (which arc made for that purpofe), and let them lie eight or nine days afterwards fcrape them very fmooth and, to your

mind, '

N. B. If you would have them red, when you firft mafli them, put in a little vermilion; if light, fome hair-powder j and if purple fome rofe-pink,

Tomaie Blue Red or Purple WaJh'Balls or to marble Ditto.

GET fome white-foap, and cut it into fquare pieces about the bignefs of dice; let it lie in a band-box or a fieve on the top of an oven to dry; beat it in a mortar to a powder, and put it into a' pan; damp it with rofe-water, mix it well with your hands, put in fome hair-powder to make it ilifF; thea (gait it'wicb of oijl'tbyme, and oil of carraways



''



400 RECEIPTS FOk PERFUMERY, &c.

If you would have them blue, put in fome powder-blue tf red, ixmn itniiltoti;. if purple fome rofe-piftk mix them well together with your hands,' and fqueeze them as clofe as poflible make them very round, of a fize agreeable to your tnind $ put them into a fieve two or three days j then fcrape them a little with a waihball fcraper, and let them lie in the fieve eight or nine days. Afterwards fcrape them very fmooth, and agreeable to your mind

If you would have them marbled, after being fcented with oil of thyme and oil of carraways (as in the iirft procefs), cut them into pieces about as much as will make a ball each, make .it into a flat fquire picce then take a very thin knife, and dip it into the powder-blue, vermillion, or rofe-pink (according to the colour you would fancy), and chop it in ac cording to your mind; double it up, and make it into a hard and round ball, and ufe the fame procefs as before mentioned.

miu Aimvud WaJh'Balb:

TAKE fome white-foap and flice it thin, put it in a band box on the top of an oven to dry three weeks or morei when it is dry beat it in a mortar till it is a powder ) to every four ounces of foap, add one ouAce of hair-powder, half aa ounce of white-lead put them into a pan, tnd ciamp them with rofe- water to make it of a proper confiftency; make them into balls as hard and clofe as poi&ble, fcrape them with a balU fcraper, and ufe the fame procefs as before mentioned, letting them lie three weeks in a fieve to dry % then finiih thci wiUi a ball-fcraper to your mind.

Brown Jbmnd WajhBaUi.

TAtCE fome common brown hard foap, flice it thin, and put it into a band-box on the top of an oven to dry, for the fpace of three weeks, of more; when quite dry, .beat it in a mortar to a powder to every three ounces of: foap add one ounce of brown almond-
cowder; put it in a mortar, and damp it with rofe-water, to make it of a proper confiftency beat it very well, then make them into balls according to a procefs before mentioned, ktting them lie thre weeks in si fieve to dry; then finilh them with a ball-fcraper, agiteabM to your mind.



RlGElPTS FOR f fiRFUMERY, &c. 401



To make Lip Salve

TAKE half a pound of hog's lard, put it into a pan, with one ounce and a half of virg'tnwax; let tt ftand on a flow fire tiW It n mehd chen take a fmall tin- pot, and fill it with watery and' put therein Tome alkanet-root; let it boil till it is of a fi4ie:red colonr; then ftrain fome of it and mix it with the ingredients according to your fancy, aid fcent it with t (Fence oi lemon; pour it into fmall boxes, and fmooth the top with your fftiger.

N. B. You may ptnir a little out firfl:, to fee if it is .of a jproper coloor to your fancy.

j1 Suck or Compofitlon to take tialr out hy the Roots

' TAICE two ounces and a half of rofin, and one ounce of bees- wax 3 melt them together, and make them into fticks for ufe.

To make JVhite Ltp Salve and for chopped Hands and Face.-

She Shillings and Three-pence per Pot.

MELT fome fpermaceti in fweet-oil, add thereto a fmall bit of white-wax; wlien it is melted j:cut in a fmall quantity of white fugarcandy, and ftir it well therein; then pour itf into pOts for ufe,

French Jtotige. - Five Shillings per Pot.

TAKE fame carmine, and mix it with haiir-povvder to .make it as pale as you pleafe, according to your fancy.

Opiate for the Teeth. - Two Shillings and Sixpence per Pot.

TAKE one pdund of hdney, let it be very well boiled an4 Ikimmed, a quarter of a pound of hole- ammoniac, one ounce of dragon's-blood, one ounce of oil of fwect-almonds, half an ounce of oil of cloves, eight drof)s of eflence of brgamot, onje gill of ho ney- water; mix all well together, and pour it into pots for ufe. -

bkfcot's opiate.

Half an ounce of boleammoniac, one ounce of powder of myrrh, one ounce of dragon's-blood, half an ounce of orri€eroot, half an ounce of r'och-alum, half an ounce of grouad

• D d . gngri



4M RECEIPTS FOR PERFUMERY, &tf.

ginger, two ounces of honey; mix all well together, and put it in pots for ufe.

To maki Shaving- OiL- One Shilling per Bottle.

DISSOLVE a quantity of oil-foap, cut into thin dices, irf fpirits of wine; let it Itand a week, then put in as much foftfoap till the liquor becomes of a clammy fubftance: fcent as you pleafe, and bottle it for ufe.

To take Iron- Molds out of Linen and Greafe out of Woollen or

SilL - One Shilling a Bottle.

TAKE four ounces of fpirits of turpentine, and one ounce of eflence of lemon; mix them well together, and put it into bottles for ufc.

JVaJbfor the Face.

TAKE one quart of milk, a quarter of a pound o faitpetre beaten to a powder; put in two pennyworth of oil of anife-fced one pennyworth of oil of cloves, about four thim bles full of the bed white-wine vinegar; put it into a bottle, and let it (land in fand half-way up, in the fun, or in fome warm place for a fortnight without the cork; afterwards cork and feal it up.

Liquid for the Hair. - Two ShlUings a garter of a Pint.

TO three. quarts of fvecioil, put a quarter of a pound of alkanet-root, cut in fmall pieces,; let it be boiled fome time over a (learn i add thereto three ounces of oil of Jeflamine, and one ounce of oil of lavender; ftrain it through a coarfe cloth, but do not fqueeze it.

To make Tfite Almmd-Pqfte. TAKE pne pound of bitter-almonds, blanch and beat them very fine in a mortar; put Inc the whites of four eggs, one ounce ot French white of Trois; add iom rofe-water and irits of wincy a little at a time, unti.it is of a conliftency for pafte.

To make Brown Almond-Pajie.

TAKE one pound of bitter-almonds; beat them well irt i mortar; add to them one pound of raifins of the fun floned 5 beat' and mix them very well together, and put in a little

trandy.

N " Sweet



RECEIPTS FOR PERFUMERY, &c. 403

Sweet-fienied Bags to lay with Limn.--At One Shilling and Six pencei Two Shillings and Sixpena; bfc. Vc. e. ioch Bag.

EIGHT ounces of coriander-feeds, eight ounces of fweet 6rxc€'t6oty eight ouiices of dmafk-rofe leaves, eight ounces of calamus- aromaticus, one ounce of mace, one ounce of cinnamon, half an ounce of cloves, four drachms of mu(kpowcder, two drachms of White loaf-fugar three ounces of laven aer-flowers, and fome Rhodium wood; beat them well toge thef, nd ttiake theni in fmall filk bags.

Honey-Water. - Om Shilling per Bottle.

c ONE uart of re£lifie() fpirits of wine, two drachms of tincture of ambergreafe, .two drachms of tinfture of mufk, half a jnt of water; filter it according to your fancy, and put it in to iinall bottles.

Orange Bttttir.

Melt a rmall quantity of fpermaceti in fweet-bil, and put in a Htde iine Datch pink to colour it; then add a little oil of orange to fcent it; and laftly, while it is very hot put in fome fpirits of wifie to curdle it.

LemonButter.

IS made the fame as orahge-biittet-. Only put in no Dutch pink, and fcent it with eflfence of lemons, inftead of oil of Orange.

Marechalle Powder. - Sixteen Shillings fer Pound.



ONE ounce of cloves, one ounce of mace, one ounce of cinnamon, beat them very well to a fine powder; add to them four pounds of hair-powder, and half a pound of Spaniih burnt amber beaten very fine, a quarter of an ounce of oil of laven,der, half an ounce of oil of thyme, a quarter of an ounce of efience of amber, five drops of oil of laurel, a quarter of aa ounce of oil of faflafras; mix them all well together.

Virgin's ATtlLTwo Shillings per Bottle.

PUT one ounce of tindure of benjamin into a pint of cold water: mix, it well, and let it ftand one day; then run it through a flannel- bag with fome tow in it; put it in bottles for ufe

D d 2 Eau



404 REQEIPTS FOR PREFUMV 4tA

TAKE one quart of tpitiu of win, half an ounce of muik, two drachcD3 of tioStaie of faffroo,. mix t;hcin well to-' gethefji aad let thevi ftin one day j tbijcn filter it with ai);

71 Amhrojia iJofegaj.

TAK£ one inC of fpiiUs of wioe, one drachm of oil of cloves, one ounce of oil of nutmegs mix them, aiid filter it; as you plcafe.

MIX pcafl-powdcr with honey and hvender-water; and theii the pearl-powder will never be difcoloured.

Eau de Luce,

TWO ounces of the heft reftified fpirits of wine, on drachm of oil of amber, two drachms of fait of tartar prepaijed powder of amber two drachms, twenty drops of oil of nutmegs;, put them all into a bottle, and fhalce it well; let it ftand five hours, then filter it, and always keep it by you, and when you would make eau de luce, put it into the ftrongeft fpirits of fal-ammoniac.

Milk Elude Water.

ONE quart of fpirits of wine, half an ounce of oil of cloves, one drachm of eflencc of lemons, fifteen drops of oil of Rhodium, a little cochineal in powder, to colour it of a fine pink; let. it (land one day, then filter it, but with no water.

Mif$ in her Teens.

ONE quart of fpirits of wine; eflfence of bergamot, one nunce; oil of Rhodium, two drachms trn£ure of mufk, half a drachm, and half a pint of water; mix them well together and put them ifito bottles for ufe,

Lady Lilles Ball.

TAKE twelve ounces of oil-foap (haved very fine, fpermaceti three'ounces, melt them together; two ounces of bismuth dMlolved in rofe- water for the fpace of three hours, one ounc of oil of thyme, one ounce of the oil of carraway one' ounce of eiTence of lemons mix all well together.

Hard



iEJElCEIPTSFOR.PRFUKIETLYfic. 405

: • ' .

Hard Pomatum,

TAKE %hree pounds of muttohfuet, boil and fk!m it welf till it' is qtiite cUar, poihrit dfF frotti the drdfs hich remains, at the bottom'; then add thereto eight ounces of virginwcr, melt them together, and fcent it with eflence of lemon i make it into rolls according to. iiincy.

• • • • '

Soft Pomaium.

TAKE aquantity of hog's lard, boil and fkrm it very well; put in a fmall quantity of hairpowder, vtrhen it is cool ttc make it agreeable to your qiind; and fcent it with cffbnce of lemons.

N. B. You may take a fmall quantity out firft, and let it

cool i if it is too foft add a little haircpowd&'r to make it fliffer.

. . ., • - • "

Nun's Cream.

ONE wice of pearl-powder, twenty drops of oil of Rho dium, and two ounces of fine pomatum mix all welt together.

Eau fans PareiL

OlfO'E quart of fpitlts bf wine, one bunce of eflence of 6ergamot, two drachms of tinfture of mdfk, add to them half a pint of water, and bottle therfi for ufe.

Beautifying Water

IS balfaneum cofmeticumi a fmall quantity put into eldeN ilower- water.

Lozenges fir the Heart-hum,

Take 6ne pound of chalk, beat it to a powder in a mortar, Wh one pound and a half of white loaf fugar, and one ounce of boIeammtniiac; tttiit ilhem well together, and put in fomething to. moiften them to make it of a proper confift ency or pafte make them into fmall lozenges, and let them lie in a band-bbx on tbe top of an oven a week or more to dry, Ihaking tbe box fometimes

Lozenges for a Cold.

TAKE two pounds of common white loaf.fugar, beat it

WE in a mortar, diflblve fix ounces, of Spanifli liquorice in a

'. ' • Pd3 little



4o6 RECEIPTS FOR PERFUMERY, &e.

little warm water; one ounce of gum arable difTolved likewife; add thereto a little oil of anife-fced; mix them well to a proper fPbnftftency, and cut them into (mail lozenges i let them lib in a hand- box on the tqp of an oven a conAderablq time to dry fluking the box fonietimet,

To make Dragon. Rot.

TAKE fome mallow-roots, (kin them, and pick one end with a pin or needle till you have made it like a hrufli; then take fome. powder of brafil, and fome coehineal boil them together, and put in th roots till you think they are tfaoroughly dyed; then take them out and lay them by the fire to dry,

To mate SiavingPowdor.

TAKE fome white-foap, and fliave it in very thin dices $ )ct it be well dried on the top of an oven in a band box; beat it in a mortar till it is very fine, fift it through a fine fieve and fcent it as you pleafe.

Undfor Soap.-Two Shillings per Found.

• •

GET fome of the whiteft fpap, (have it into thin flces; melt it in a (lew- pan over a flpw fire, and fcent it very firong with oil of carraways; pour it into a drawer made for that purpofe; let it (tand three days or more, and cut it into fquarc pieces to your fancy.

&oap to fill Shaving' Boxes.

TAKE fome of the whiteft foap, beat it in a mortar, and fcent it with oil of carraways, make it flat; then chop in fome vermilion, or powder- blue, to marble it, with a very tlin knife dipt in the fame; double it up, and fqueee it hard into tb boxes; then fcrape it fmooth with a knife.

Tfioih- Powder. - One Shilling per Bottle.

BURN fomerochalum, and beat it in a mortar, fift it fine; then take fome rofe-pink, and mix them well together to make it of a pale red. colour; add thereto a little powder of myrrh, and put it into bottles for ufe.


RECEIPTS FOR PERFUMERY, &c. 407,

Cold Cream

TAKE one pint of trotter-oil a quarter of a pound of hog's-lard, one ounce of fpermaceti a bic of virgin-wax; warm them together with a little rofe-water, and beat ic up withawhiik.

The genuine Receipt to make Turlington s Balfam.

BALSAM of Peru, one ounce bcft ftorax, two ounces j benjamin, impregnated with fweet-almonds, three ounces . aloes Succotoriie, myrrh eleA, pureft frankincenfe, ropts.of angelica, flowers of St. John's wort, of each of thefe half an ounce; beat the drugs well in a mortar, and put themjnto a large glafs bottle; add thereto a pint, or rather more, of the beft fpirits of wine, and let the bottle ftand by the kitchen fire,' or in the chimney-corner, two days and two nights; then decant it oiF in fmaller bottles for ufe, and let them be well corked and fealed.

N. B. The fame quantity of fpirits of wine poured on the ingredients, letting them ftand by the fire, or in fome warm place for the fpace of fix day& and nights, will ferve for comnoon ufe; pour ofF the fame in fmall bottles, and let tbeni be ell cbrled and feated.

r

To make Sirop de Capillalre.

PUT feven pounds of common lump-fugar into a pan, and thereto add feven pints of water; boil it well,' and keep flcimming it; then take the white of an egg, put it in fome water, and beat it up well with a whifk; take the froth ofFand fcatter it therein, and keep it fkimming until it is quite clear; then add thereto half a pint of orange- flower- water; mix it well together, let it fiand till cold, and put it into a ftone bottle, or in bottles for ufe, let them be quite clean and dry before it is put into them', otherwife it will make it mothery and fpoH it. .

NB. If you chufe to have it of a high colour, burn a little fugar in a pan, of a brown colour; afterwards put a little capillaire thereto, flir it about with a wooden fpoon,. and mix it well with the capillaire according to your fany.

D d 4 For



408 RECEIPTS FDR, PERFUMERY, UcK

For a Confumptlon; an apprwsd RidifU by a Lady at Padding ton.

TAKE the yolk of a new-lfid egg, beat it up rH with three large fpoonfuls of rofe-jvater; mix it well in Jialf a pioi: of new milk frocn the cow, fweetcjo it well with iirop de captU laire, and grate fame nutmeg in it. Drink it evsry motraiog fading for a month, and refrain from fpirituous liquors of any kind.

N. B. Mr, PoweJ, who kept the Crown, a public houfe in Swallow-ilrect, St. James's, was in fo deep a decline as to be fcarcc able to walk; whpn he coughed, the phlegm he brought, from his (lomch was green 'anq yllpw; ana he was given ovpr by his phyficiaot who, as th laft refqurce, advfed him to go into the country to try what te .air would do% Hf bapi pily went to. lodg a( Paddingcqn: the wgman-pf tbe boufe underftanding hi? CQ;)dition, r:collp£led thatn old Udy, wo had lodged in the fame haufe, had left a book with a con'ecSllof of receipts in it for'' various diforders; inftantly fecrbed it, and (icxupd tkt foregoing, which he having ftrily fpllpwd fovind himC?Jf ijiucb better in fortnight; and by CQntio.uing.thcj fame, in lefs tbani a month he began to bav an ap.etite, and, wit4) the bleffing of God, in a fhort time by degrees e recovered his health, to the aftonifliment and furpri;)? of all who knew him, and declared to me he was as well and hearty as ever he was in his life, and did p,o fcruple to tell every perfon the means and method of his recovery.

N. B.'This receipt 1 had from his own mouth.

7i Jlop a violent Purghg or the Plnx,

TAKE a third part of a giTl 0 the very beft double diftilUd anlfefecd; grate a third part of a large nutnpeg into it., Tv7 be taken, the famp quantity an hour after breakfaft, one. hour after dinner, and, if occalion, an hour before goin: p, bed. Probatum (ft.

For ObJlruSiions in the TVomb,

SUCCOTORINE aloe;, one ounce; car d;mutnfeedj
a, quarter of sn ounce; fnakcroot, a quarter of an ounqe;r gum-myrrh, a quarter of an ounce; faiFrioni, a. quarter of ia ounce; cochineal, two fcruples; sedoary, two fcruples; rhubarb, two fcmples: let thefe drugs be well beaten in a mortar, and put them into a large bottle; add thereto a pint and a half of mountain-wine; place it near the fire for the fpace of three days


RECEIPTS FOR PERFUMERY, &c. 409

days and nights, (baking it often. Let the patient take a fmall tea-cup-full twice a week in the morning, an hour before fifing,

Jnoiher fir ObftruSious

THREE pennyworth of alkermes, two pennyworth of Venice treacle, and a quarter of an ounce of fpermaceti; to be made into four bolufes, one to be taken every evening going to bed.

Haifa pint of pennyroyal-water, a quarter of a pint of hy- ileric-water, and a quarter of a pint of pepper-mint- water; to be taken every morning and evening, a tea'Cup full.

For a Hoarfenefs.

TWO ounces of pennyroyal-water, the yollc of a new-laid egg beaten, thirty drops of cochineal, twenty drops of oil of anife-feed, mixed well and fweetened with white fugar-candy,

A lare fpoonful to be taken night and morning.


INDEX Omitted

FINIS.





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