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Murrell's New Cookerie, 1615

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TITLE: A new Booke of Cookerie. Wherein is set forth the newest and most commendable Fashion for Dressing or Sowcing, eyther Flesh, Fish, or Fowle.
AUTHOR: John Murrel
PUBLISHER: John Browne, 1615 (Reprinted 1972)
DATE: 1615
THIS VERSION: This version is based on the one made available at http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/1615murr.htm, based on a scan of the reprint of 1972. It appears to be an OCR scan and has been partly edited, but still contaions significant errors.


John Murrell: A new booke of Cookerie; London Cookerie. London 1615
A NEVV BOOKE of Cookerie.

VVherein is set forth the newest and most commendable Fashion for Dressing or Sowcing, eyther Flesh, Fish, or Fowle. Together with making of all sorts of Iellyes, and other made-Dishes for seruice; both to beautifie and adorne eyther Nobleman or Gentlemans Table. Hereunto also is added the most exquisite London Cookerie. All set forth according to the now, new, English and French fashion.
Set forth by the obseruation of a Traueller.
I.M. LONDON: Printed for Iohn Browne, and are to be solde at his Shop in S. Dunstanes Church-yard. 1615.

A NEVV BOOKE of Cookerie.

VVherein is set forth the newest and most commendable Fashion for Dressing or Sowcing, eyther Flesh, Fish, or Fowle.
Together with making of all sorts of Iellyes, and other made-Dishes for seruice; both to beautifie and adorne eyther Nobleman or Gentlemans Table.
Hereunto also is added the most exquisite London Cookerie.
All set forth according to the now, new, English and French fashion.
Set forth by the obseruation of a Traueller. I.M.

LONDON: Printed for Iohn Browne, and are to be solde at his Shop in S. Dunstanes Church-yard. 1615.

[Epistle Dedicatorie; Contents; not transcribed]

A NEW BOOKE of Cookerie.

To boyle a Capon Larded with Lemons, on the French fashion.

SCald your Capon, and take a little dusty Oatmeale to make it boile white. Then take two or three ladlefuls of Mutton broth, a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, two or three Dates, cut in long pieces, a few parboyld Currins, a little whole Pepper, a piece of whole Mace, and one Nutmeg.

Thicken it with Almonds. Season it with Uergis, Sugar, and a little sweet Butter. Then take vp your Capon, and larde it very thicke with a preserued Lemmon. Then lay your Capon in a deepe Meat-dish for boyld meates, and poure the broth vpon it. Garnish your Dish with Suckets and preserued Barberries.

To sowce a Pigge.

SCald a large Pigge, cut off his head and slit him in the middest, and take out his bones, and wash him in two or three warme waters. Then collar him vp like Brawne, and sowe the collars in a fayre cloth. Then boyle them very tender in faire water, then take them vp and throw them in fayre water and Salt vntill they be colde, for that will make the skinne white. Then tace a pottle of the same water, that the Pigge was boyled in, and a pottle of white Wine, a race of Ginger sliced, a couple of Nutmegs quartered, a spoonefull of whole Pepper, fiue or sixe Bayleaues: seeth all this together, when it is colde put your Pigge into the sowce-drincke, so you may keepe it halfe a yeere, but spend the head.

To sowce Oysters.

TAke out the meat of the greatest Oysters: saue the liquor that commeth from them, and streine it into an earthen Pipkin: put into it halfe a pinte of white Wine, and halfe a pinte of white Wine vineger: put in some whole Pepper, and sliced Ginger.

Boyle all these together with two or three Cloaues, when it hath boyled a little, put in your Oysters, and let them boyle two or three walmes, but not too much. Then take them vp, and let the sirrup stand vntill it be cold: then put in your Oysters, and so you may keepe them all the yeere.

To sowce a Pike, Carpe, or Breame.

DRaw your Fish, but scale it not: saue the Liuer and the refuse of it, slit the said refuse, and wash it. Then take a pottle of fayre water, a quart of white Wine, and a Fagot of sweet Hearbes: so soone as you see your wine boyle, throw in your Fish with the scales on, and when you see your Fish boyle, poure in a little Uinegar, and it will make your Fish crispe. Then take vp your Fish, and put it in a Tray.

Then put into the liquour some whole Pepper, a little whole Ginger, and when it is boyled together well with a little Salt, and colde, put in your Fish into an earthen panne: when you serue it in, serue Gelly in Sawcers, with a little fine Ginger about the Sawcers sides, and Fennell on your Fish.

To boyle Flounders, or Goodgeons, on the French fashion.

BOyle a pint of white wine, & a pint of faire water, a few sweet Hearbs, tops of yong Time, sweet Marioram, winter Sauory, tops of Rosemary, a peece of whole Mace, a little Parsley pickt small: when all is boyled well together, put in your Fish, and scum it well. Then put in a little crust of Maunchet, a quarter of a pound of sweet Butter. Season it with Pepper, and Uergis, and so serue it in.

To boyle a Gurnet on the French fashion.

DRaw your Gurnet, and wash it cleane, boyle it in water and salt, with a Fagot of sweet Hearbes: then take st [=it] vp, and poure vpon it Uergis, Nutmeg, Butter and Pepper: thicken it with the yolkes of two new laid Egges. All this being poured vpon your Fish, garnish your dish with preserued Barberyes, or a slyced Orenge.

To boyle a legge of Mutton on the French fashion.

CUt out al the meat at the but-end, leauing the bone still in. Mince it small with Beefe Suit, and Marrow.

Then take sweet Creame, yolkes of Egs, a few Razins of the Sun, two or three Dates minst, a little grated Bread.

Season it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg: then worke it stiffe, like a Pudding, and cram it in againe. Then stue it in a Pot with a Marrow bone, and a knuckle of Ueale: serue the Legge by it selfe, and your knuckle in stued broth, and your Marrow-bones vpon Bruys, with Carrets, and Pepper.

To hash a Legge of Mutton on the French fashion.

PArboyle your Legge, and take it vp, and pare off some thinne Slices, and pricke your Legge through, and let out the grauie on the Slices: then bruise sweet hearbs with the backe of a Ladle, and put a piece of sweet Butter, Season it with Uergis, and Pepper: and when your Mutton is boyled, poure it on it, and serue it so to the Table.

To roast a Legge of Mutton on the French Fashion.

PAre all the skin as thinne as you can: Lard it with sweet Lard, and stick about it a dozen cloues: when it is halfe roasted, cut off three or foure thin pieces, and mince it small, with a few sweet hearbs, and a little beaten Ginger.

Put in a Ladlefull of Claret wine, a piece of sweet Butter, two or three spoonefuls of Uergis, a little Pepper, a few parboyld Capers: when all this is boyled together, chop the yolke of an hard Egge into it. Then dridge your Legge, and serue it vpon Sawce.

To roast a Neates tongue, on the French fashion.

CHop sweet hearbs fine, with a piece of a raw Apple season it with Pepper, Ginger, and the yolke of a new laid Egge, chopt small to mingle amongst it: then stuffe it well with that farcing, and so roast it. The sawce for it is Uergis, Butter, and the iuyce of a Lemmon, and a little Nutmegge. Let the Tongue lye in the sawce when it goeth to the Table. Garnish your Dish as you thinke fittest, or as you are furnisht.

To boyle Pidgeons with Rice, on the French fashion.

FJt them to boyle, and put into their bellyes sweet Hearbes, viz. Parsley, tops of young Time: and then put them into a Pipkin, with as much Mutton broth as will couer them, a piece of whole Mace, a little whole Pepper: boyle all these together vntill your Pidgeons be tender. Then take them off the fire, and scum off the fat cleane from the broth, with a spoone, for otherwise it wil make it to taste rancke. Put in a piece of sweet Butter: season it with Uergis, Nutmegge, and a little Sugar: thicken it with Ryce boyled in sweet Creame. Garnish your Dish with preserued Barberyes, and Skirret rootes, being boyld with Uergis and Butter.

To boyle a Rabbet with Hearbes on the French fashion.

FJt your Rabbet for the boyling, and seeth it with a little Mutton broth, white Wine, and a peece of whole Mace: then take Lettuce, Spynage, Parsley, winter Sauory, sweet Marioram: all these being pickt, and washt cleane, bruise them with the backe of a Ladle (for the bruising of the Hearbes wil make the broth looke very pleasantly greene.) Thicken it with a crust of Manchet, being steeped in some of the broth, and a little sweet Butter therein. Season it with Uergis, and Pepper, and serue it to the Table vpon Sippits.

Garnish your Dish with Barberyes.

To boyle Chickens in white broth.

TRusse your Chickens fit to boyle, as was before shewed in the Rabbets, cut two or three Dates in small pieces: take a piece of whole Mace: thicken your broath with Almonds: Season it with Uergis, and a little Pepper. Garnish your Dish sides with sweet Sucket & Sugar, after you haue seasoned your broth. Jn like sort you may boyle a Capon, but then you must put Marrow into your white broth.

Jf you dislike Mutton-broth then boyle it by it selfe in fayre water till it turne as white as a Curd. But the French men follow the other way, and it is the better.

To boyle a Teale, or Widgeon, on the French fashion.

PArboyle eyther of these Fowles and throw them in a Pale of fayre water (for that taketh away the ranckenesse of the flesh.) Then roaste them halfe, and take them off the fire, and put sweet hearbs in the bellyes of them: lase them downe the breast, and sticke them with two or three whole Cloues in the breasts with your knife, in euery one of them so many. Then put them into a Pipkin, with two or three Ladle-fuls of strong Mutton broth, a piece of whole Mace, two or three little Onyons minst small. Thicken it with a toast of householde bread: put in a piece of sweet Butter, as bigge as a Walnut. Season it with Pepper, and Uergis.

To smoore an old Coney, Ducke, or Mallard, on the French fashion.

PArboyle any of these, and halfe roast it, launch them downe the breast with your Knife, and sticke them with two or three Cloues. Then put them into a Pipkin with halfe a pound of sweet Butter, a little white Wine Uergis, a piece of whole Mace, a little beaten Ginger, and Pepper.

Then mince two Onyons very small, with a piece of an Apple, so let them boyle leisurely, close couered, the space of two howers, turning them now and then. Serue them in vpon Sippets.

Another way to boyle Chickens, or Pidgeons, with Gooseberryes, or Grapes.

BOyle them with Mutton broth, and white Wine, a piece of whole Mace, put into the bellies of them sweet Hearbes: when they be tender thicken it with a piece of Maunchet, and two hard yolkes strained with some of the same broth. Then put some of the same broth into a boyld-meat dish, with Uergis, Butter, and Sugar, and so boyle your Grapes, or Gooseberryes in the Dish close couered, till they be tender, & poure it on the brest of your dish.

To boyle a Chyne of Mutton, or Veale, in sharpe broth, on the French fashion.

COuer your meat with faire water, and a little white Wine, a piece of whole Mace, a Nutmeg quartered, a handfull of Hearbes cleane pickt, and bruised with the backe of a Ladle, yong Lettice, Spinnage, Parsley, tops of young Time: when all is boyled well together, thicken it with a crust of Maunchet, and the yolke of a hard Egge, steeped in some of the same broth, and draw it through a strainer, and thicken your broath with it. Season it with a little Uergis and Pepper.

To boyle Larkes or Sparrowes.

TRusse them fit to boyle, and put them into a Pipkin, with a Ladle full of Mutton broth, a piece of whole Mace, a quarter of a Nutmeg, a fagot of sweet Hearbes, and a little young Parsley, pickt cleane and short: put your Parsley loose into your broth: season it with Uergis, Pepper, and Sugar. Thicken it with the yolkes of two new layd Egges hard, and a piece of Manchet, strayned with some of the same broth, vntill they be tender.

Garnish your Dish as you will.

Bakte-meats.

A made Dish of Conyes Liuers.

PArboyle three or foure of them, and chop them fine with sweet Hearbes, the yolkes of two hard Egges.

Season it with Sinamon, Ginger, and Nutmeg, and Pepper: put in a [a in] few parboyld Currins, and a little melted Butter, and so make it vp into little Pasties.

Frye them in a Frying-panne, shaue on sugar, and serue them to the Boord.

A made Dish of a sweet-Bread.

BOyle, or roast your Sweet-bread, and put into it a fewe Parboyld Currens, a minst Date, the yolkes of two new laid Egs, a piece of a Manchet grated fine. Season it with a little Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, and Sugar, wring in the iuyce of an Orenge, or Lemon, and put it betweene two sheetes of puft-paste, or any other good Paste: and eyther bake it, or frye it, whether you please.

A made Dish of Sheepes tongues.

BOyle them tender, and slice them in thinne slices: then season them with Sinamon, Ginger, and a little Pepper, and put them into a Coffin of fine Paste, with sweet Butter, and a few sweet Hearbes, chopt fine. Bake them in an Ouen. Then take a little Nutmeg, Uinegar, Butter, Sugar, the yolke of a new laid Egge, one spoonfull of Sacke, and the iuyce of a Lemon: Boyle all these together on a chafing-dish of Coales, and put it into your Pye: shog it well together, and serue it to the Table.

A Florentine of a Cony, the wing of a Capon, or the Kidney, of a Veale.

MJnce any of these with sweet Hearbes, parboyld Currens, a Date or two minst small, a pieece of a preserued Orenge, or Lemmon, minst as small as your Date. Season it with Ginger, Sinamon, Nutmeg, and Sugar: then take the yolkes of two new laid Egges, a spoonefull of sweet Creame, a piece of a short Cake grated, and Marrow cut in short pieces. Bake this in a dish betweene two leaues of puff-paste, put a little Rosewater to it before you close your Paste. When it is baked shaue on Sugar.

A Fridayes Pye, without eyther Flesh or Fish.

WAsh greene Beetes cleane, picke out the middle string, and chop them small with two or three well relisht ripe Apples. Season it with Pepper, Salt, and Ginger: then take a good handfull of Razins of the Sunne, and put all in a Coffin of fine Paste, with a piece of sweet Butter, and so bake it: but before you serue it in, cut it vp, and wring in the iuyce of an Orenge, and Sugar.

A Chewet of Stockefish.

BOyle watered Stockefish, and make it fit to be eaten: when it is colde take the whitest of the Fish, and mince it small: put in parboyld Currens, Razins of the Sunne. Season it with Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and a piece of sweet Butter. Bake it, but before you serue it in, cut it vp, and wring in the iuyce of an Orenge.

A quarter Tart of Pippins.

QUarter them, and lay them betweene two sheetes of Paste: put in a piece of whole Sinamon, two or three bruised Cloues, a little sliced Ginger, Orrengado, or onely the yellow outside of the Orenge, a bit of sweet Butter about the bignesse of an Egge, good store of Sugar: sprinckle on a little Rosewater. Then close your Tart, and bake it: Jce it before it goe to the Boord, serue it hot. This Tart you may make of any puft-paste, or short paste that will not holde the raising.

Jf you bake it in any of these kindes of pastes, then you must first boyle your Pippins in Claret Wine and Sugar, or else your Apples will be hard, when your Crust will be burnt and dryed away. Besides, the Wine giueth them a pleasant colour, and a good taste also. Though you boyle your Pippins tender, take heed you breake not the quarters, but bake them whole.

A Gooseberry Tart.

PJcke the stalkes of your Gooseberries, and the pips in the toppes: put them in good Paste, with a little greene Ginger, sliced in slices: cast on good store of Sugar, and Rosewater, and so close them.

A Cherry Tart.

BRuyse a pound of Cherries, and stampe them, and boyle the sirrup with Sugar. Then take the stones out of two pound: bake them in a set Coffin: Jce them, and serue them hot in to the Boorde.

To make an Oyster Pye.

SAue the liquour of your largest Oysters, season them with Pepper, and Ginger, and put them into a Coffin: put in a minst Onyon, a few Currins, and a good piece of Butter.

Then poure in your sirrup, and close it.

When it is bakte, cut vp the Pye, and put in a spoonefull of Uinegar, and melted Butter: shake it well together, and set it in againe into the Ouen a little while: Then take it out, and serue it in.

A made Dish of Mussels and Cockles.

PArboyle them, and take out the meat, and wash them very cleane in the water they were boyled in, and a little white Wine: mince them small with two or three yolkes of new layd Egges. Season it with Pepper, Salt, and a little Nutmeg. Then wring in the iuyce of a Orenge, and put them betweene two sheetes of Paste. Bake it, Jce it, and vse it: you may also fry them.

To bake a Neates tongue to be eaten hot.

BOyle it tender, and pill off the skinne, take the flesh out at the but-end: mince it small with Oxe suit, and marrow. Season it with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, parboyld Currens, and a minced Date cut in pieces. Take the yolkes of two new layd Egges, and a spoonefull of sweet Creame, worke all together with a siluer spoone, in a Dish, with a little powder of a dryed Orenge pill: sprinckle a little Uergis ouer it, and cast on some Sugar. Then thrust it in againe as hard as you can cram it. Bake it on a Dish in the ouen: baste it with sweet Butter, that it may not bake drye on the outside: when it is to be eaten sawce it with Uinegar and Butter, Nutmeg, Sugar, and the iuyce of an Orenge.

A delicate Chewit.

PArboyle a piece of a Legge of Ueal, and being cold, mince it with Beefe Suit, and Marrow, and an Apple or a couple of Wardens: when you haue minst it fine, put to a few parboyld Currins, sixe Dates minst, a piece of a preserued Orenge-pill minst, Marrow cut in little square pieces. Season all this with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, and a little Sugar: then put it into your Coffins, and so bake it. Before you close your Pye, sprinckle on a little Rosewater, and when they are baked shaue on a little Sugar, and so serue it to the Table.

To make an Vmble Pye, or for want of Vmbles to doe it with a Lambes head and Purtenance.

BOyle your meate reasonably tender, take the flesh from the bone, and mince it small, with Beefe suit and Marrow, with the Liuer, Lights, and Heart, a few sweet Hearbs and Currins. Season it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg: Bake it in a Coffin raised like an Umble Pye, and it will eat so like vnto Umbles as that you shall hardly by taste discerne it from right Umbles.

To bake a Calues Chaldron.

PArboyle it, and coole it, and picke out the Kernels, and cut it in small pieces: then season it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg: put in a few sweet Hearbes chopt, a piece of sweet Butter, sprinckle it with Uergis, and so close it. When you serue it in, put to it a little of a Cawdle, made with

Nutmeg, Uinegar, Butter, Sugar, and the yolkes of two newe layde Egges, a spoonefull of Sack, and the iuyce of an Orenge.

To bake a Carpe.

SCalde, wash, and draw a fayre large Carpe: season it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, and put it in a Coffin with good store of sweet Butter: cast on great Razins of the Sunne, the iuyce of two Orenges, put your butter vppermost, to keepe the rest moyst: sprinckle on a little Uinegar before you close it, and so bake it.

To bake a Tench with a Pudding in her belly.

LEt your Fish blood in the tayle, then scalde it, and scowre it: wash it cleane, and drie it with a cloth. Then take grated Bread, sweet Creame, the yolkes of two or three new laid Egges, a few parboyld Currins, a fewe sweete Hearbes, chopt fine.

Season it with Nutmeg, and Pepper, and make it into a stiffe Pudding, & put it into your Tenches belly. Season your Fish on the outside, with a little Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, and so put him in a deepe Coffin, with a piece of sweet butter, and so close your Pye, and bake it. Then take it out of the Ouen, and open it, and cast in a piece of a preserued Orenge minst. Then take Uinegar, Nutmeg, Butter, Sugar, and the yolke of a new layd Egge, and boyle it on a Chafingdish of coales, alwayes stirring it to keepe it from curding: then poure it into your Pye, shogge it well together, and serue it in.

To bake Eeles.

CUt your Eeles about the length of your finger: season them with Pepper, Salt, and Ginger, and so put them into a Coffin, with a good piece of sweet Butter. Put into your Pye great Razins of the Sunne, and an Onyon minst small, and so close it and bake it.

To bake Chickins with Grapes.

TRusse and scald your Chickens season them well with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg: and put them into your Pye, with a good piece of Butter. Bake it, and cut it vp, and put vpon the breast of your Chickins, Grapes boyld in Uergis, Butter, Nutmegge, and Sugar, with the iuyce of an Orenge.

To bake a Steake-Pye with a French Pudding in the Pye.

SEason your Steakes with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg: and let it stand in a tray an houre. Then take a piece of the leanest of a Legge of Mutton, and Mince it small with Oxe Suit, and a few sweet Hearbes, toppes of young Time, a branch of Pennyroyall, two, or three leaues of red Sage, grated bread, yolkes of Egges, sweet Creame, Razins of the Sunne: worke all together like a Pudding with your hand stiffe, and rowle it round like balles, and put them in your Steakes in a deepe Coffin, with a good piece of sweet Butter, sprinckle a little Uergis on it, and bake it: then cut it vp, and rowle Sage leaues in Butter, and frye them, and sticke them vpright in your walles, and serue your Pye without a couer, with the iuyce of an Orenge or Lemmon.

To make a good Quince Pye.

PAre them, and coare them (the best of the Quince is next vnto the skinne, therefore pare it as thinne as is possible) stuffe them with Sugar, then with as much other Sugar as they weigh, put them with pieces of sliced Ginger in a Coffin, sprinckle on a little Rosewater before you close your Pye.

Bake it, and let it stand long a soaking in the Ouen, Jce it, and serue it in.

To make a Pippin Pye.

TAke their weight in Sugar, and sticke a whole Cloue in euery piece of them, and put in pieces of whole Sinamon, then put in all your Sugar, with a slice or two of whole Ginger: sprinckle Rosewater on them before you close your Pye: bake them, and serue them in.

To bake a Pigge.

SCalde it, and split it in the middest, flay it, and take out the bones. Season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloues, Mace, and Nutmeg: chop sweet hearbs fine, with the hard yolkes of two or three new layd Egges, and parboyld Currins. Then lay one halfe of your Pigge into your Pye, and Hearbes on it: then put on the other halfe with more Hearbes aloft vpon it, and a good piece of sweet Butter aloft vpon all.

Jt is a good Dish both hot and cold.

To bake Fallow-Deere in the best manner.

BAke it first in his owne blood, onely wipe it cleane, but wash it not, bone it, and skin it, and season it with Pepper and Salt. Then bake it in fine Paste afterward, eyther puft-paste, or short-paste.

To bake redde Deere.

PArboyle it, and presse it, and let it lye all night in redde Wine, and Uinegar: then Lard it thicke, and season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloues, Mace, Nutmeg, and Ginger. Bake it in a deepe Coffin of Rye-paste, with store of Butter: let it soake well. Leaue a vent-hole in your Pye, and when you draw it out of the Ouen, put in melted Butter, Uinegar, Nutmeg, Ginger, and a little Sugar: shake it very well together, and put it into the Ouen againe, and let it stand three or foure houres at the least, to soake throughly, when your Ouen is colde take it out, and stop the hole with Butter.

To bake wilde Boare.

TAke the buttocke of a Brawne, and the fillets: parboyle it, and mince it small, and stampe it in a Morter till it come like Paste, all in a lumpe. Then Lard it, and vse it like the red Deere.

The fillets also of Beefe for a need will serue very well.

To bake a Swan.

SCald it, and take out the bones: then parboyle it, and season it well with Pepper, Salt, and Ginger. Then Lard it, and put it in a deepe Coffin of Rye paste with store of Butter. Let it soake well, when you take it out of the Ouen put in more Butter moulten at the venthole.

To bake a Turkey, or a Capon.

BOne the Turkey, but not the Capon: parboyle them, & sticke cloues in their breasts: Lard them and season them well with Pepper and Salt, and put them in a deepe Coffin with the breast downeward, and store of Butter.

When it is bakte poure in more butter, and when it is colde stop the venthole with more Butter.

To bake a Hare on the French fashion.

PArboyle two Hares, and take the flesh from the bone, and mince it small, and beat it in a Morter, into a lumpy substance. Then sawce it in wine and Uinegar, as you would doe redde Deere, and season it so also. Lap all this pulp about the chyne of one Hare, so it will seeme but one: Lard it well, and put it into a Coffin with store of Butter, and so bake it. Then take it out of the Ouen, and put into it a little melted Butter, Nutmeg, Ginger, and Sugar, and set it into the Ouen againe to soake: when it is colde stop the hole with butter.

To bake a wilde Goose or Mallard.

PArboyle them, and breake the brest bone of a large Goose, or take it quite out and all the other bones also, but not out of a Mallard. Season them, and Lard them, and put them into deepe Coffins, with store of Butter: when you draw them out of the Ouen put in more, and doe as before is shewed.

To bake a Curlew or Hearneshoe.

TRusse them, and parboyle them but vpon one side. Seasen them with Pepper, Salt, and Ginger. Put them in deepe Coffins, with store of Butter, and let the heads hang out for a show.

To bake Woodcockes or Blacke-Birds.

TRusse, parboyle, and season them with Pepper, and Salt: your Woodcocke may be Larded, doe as in others.

Larkes, or Sparrowes.

SErue them as before was shewed in the Woodcockes and Blacke-birds.

Fritters on the Court fashion.

TAke the Curdes of a Sacke Posset, the yolkes of sixe new layd Egges, and the whites of two of them, fine flower, and make thicke batter: cut a Pomewater in small pieces: season it with Nutmeg, and a little Pepper, put in a little strong Ale, warme Milke: mingle all togethrr, [=together,] and put them into Lard, neither too hot nor too colde.

Jf your Butter swimme, it is good temper.

To make Pancakes so crispe that you may set them vpright.

MAke a dozen, or a score of them in a little frying pan, no bigger then a Sawcer, & then boyle them in Lard, and they will looke as yellow as golde, beside the taste.

A Sallet of Rose-buds, and cloue Gilly-slowers. [=Gilly-flowers.]

PJcke Rosebuds, and put them into an earthen Pipkin, with white Wine-vineger, and Sugar: so may you vse Cowslippes, Uiolets, or Rosemary-flowers.

To keepe greene Cucumbers all the yeere.

CUt sixe Cucumbers in pieces, boile them in Spring-water, Sugar, and Oyll, a walme or two. Take them vp and let your pickle stand vntil it be cold.

To keepe Brome Capers.

BOyle the greatest and hardest buds of the Brome, in Wine-vineger, and Bay Salt; scum it cleane: when it is colde you may put in Raw ones also, each by themselues: put in a piece of Lead on the raw ones: for all that swim will be blacke, and the other that are pressed downe as greene as any Leeke.

The boyld-ones will change colour.

Purslaine stalkes.

GAther them at the fullest growth but not too olde: parboyle them, and keepe them in white Wine-vineger, and Sugar.

To make Caper rowlers of Radish cods.

TAke them when they be hard, and not ouermuch open: boyle them tender in faire water, boyle white Wine-vineger, and Bay-salt together, and keepe them in it.

Diuers Sallets boyled.

PArboyle Spinage, and chop it fine, with the edges of two hard Trenchers vpon a boord, or the backe of two chopping Kniues: then set them on a Chafingdish of coales with Butter and Uinegar. Season it with Sinamon, Ginger, Sugar, and a few parboyld Currins. Then cut hard Egges into quarters to garnish it withall, and serue it vpon sippets. So may you serue Burrage, Buglosse, Endiffe, Suckory, Coleflowers, Sorrel, Marigold leaues, water-Cresses, Leekes boyled, Onions, Sparragus, Rocket, Alexanders. Parboyle them, and season them all alike: whether it be with Oyle and Uinegar, or Butter and Uinegar, Sinamon, Ginger, Sugar, and Butter: Egges are necessary, or at least very good for all boyld Sallets.

Buds of Hoppes.

SEeth them with a litle of the tender stalke in faire water: and put them in a Dish ouer coales with Butter, and so serue them to the Table.

A Sallet of Mallowes.

STrip off the leaues, from the tender stalkes, sauing the toppes: let them lye in water, and seeth them tender, and put them in a Dish ouer coales with Butter and Uinegar, let them stand a while: then put in grated Bread, and Sugar betweene euery lay.

A Sallet of Burdock rootes.

CUt off the outward rinde, and lay them in water, a good houre at the least: when you haue done, seeth them vntill they be tender. Then set them on coles with Butter and Uinegar, and so let them stand a pretty while: then put in grated Bread and Sugar, betwixt euery lay, and serue them in.

To make blauncht Maunchet in a Frying-pan.

TAke halfe a dozen Egs, halfe a pint of sweet Creame, a penny manchet grated, a Nutmeg grated, two spoonefuls of Rosewater, two ounces of Sugar: worke all stiffe like a Pudding: then fry it like a Tansey in a very little frying Pan, that it may be thicke: fry it browne, and turne it out vpon a plate.

Cut it in quarters, and serue it like a Pudding: scrape on Sugar.


Puddings.

A fierced Pudding.

MJnce a Legge of Mutton, with sweet Hearbes: searce grated Bread through a Collinder, mince Dates, Currens, Razins of the Sunne being stoned, a little Oringado, cut finely, or a preserued Lemmon, a little Coriander-seeds, Nutmeg, Ginger, and Pepper: mingle all together with Milke, and Egges, raw wrought together like Paste: wrap the meate in a caull of Mutton, or of Ueale, and so you may eyther boyle or bake them. Jf you bake them, beat the yolke of an Egge with Rosewater, Sugar, and Sinamon. And when it is almost bakte draw it out, and sticke it with Sinamon and Rosemary.

A Pudding of Veale.

MJnce rawe Ueale very fine, cut some Larde, like Diamonds: mince sweet Marioram, Pennyroyall, Camomill, Winter-Sauory, Nutmeg, Pepper, Ginger, and Salt, made hot, the gut of a fat Mutton Hogge: cut it about an inch long: worke it together with store of Sinamon, and Sugar, and Barberryes, sliced Figges, blauncht Almonds, halfe a pound of Beefe Suit, most finely minst: put this into your short skinnes: set them aboyling in a Pipkin of Claret wine, with large Mace, a sliced Lemmon, and Barberryes in knots, or Grapes: this is a delicate Pudding.

A Fregesey of Egges.

BEat a dozen of Egs with Creame, Sugar, Nutmeg, Mace, Rosewater, and a Pomewater cut ouerthwart in slices: put them into the Frying-pan with sweet Butter, and the Apples first: when they be almost enough take them vp, and cleanse your Pan: put in sweet Butter, and make it hot: put in halfe the Egges and Creame at one time: stirre it with a Sawcer, or such a thing. Take it out, and put it in a Dish, put in the rest of the Egges and Creame, like the former, and then put in your Apples round about the batter. Then cast on the other side on the top of it, and keepe it from burning with sweet Butter. When it is fryed on both sides enough wring on the iuyce of an Orenge, and serue it in.

A Cambridge Pudding.

SEarce grated Bread through a Cullinder, mince it with Flower, minst Dates, Currins, Nutmeg, Sinamon, and Pepper, minst Suit, new Milke warme, fine Sugar, and Egges: take away some of their whites, worke all together. Take halfe the Pudding on the one side, and the other on the other side, and make it round like a loafe.

Then take Butter, and put it in the middest of the Pudding, and the other halfe aloft. Let your liquour boyle, and throw your Pudding in, being tyed in a faire cloth: when it is boyled enough cut it in the middest, and so serue it in.

A Swanne or Goose Pudding.

STirre the bloud of a Swanne, or Goose, steepe fine Oatmeale in milke, Nutmeg, Pepper, sweet Hearbes, minst Suit: mingle all together with Rosewater, Lemmon pils minst fine,

Coriander seeds, a little quantitie thereof.

And this is a rule both for grated Bread-Pudding, or any other Pudding that is made to a Swanne, or Goosenecke.

A Liueridge or Hogges Pudding.

BOyle a Hogges Liuer well, let it be through colde: then grate it like Bread: grate Bread, take new Milke, the fat of the Hogge minst fine, put it to the bread, and the Liuer, the more the better, deuide it into two parts. Take store of drye Hearbes, that are very well dryed, mince them fine, put the Hearbes into one part, with Nutmeg, Mace, Pepper, Annisseedes, Rose-water, Creame, and Egs, wash the skinnes, and then fill them vp, and let them boyle enough. To the other sort put Barberryes, sliced Dates, Currins, new Milke and Egs, worke them as the other.

A Chiueridge Pudding.

LAy the fattest Guts of your Hogge in faire water and Salt, to scowre them. Take the longest and the fattest gut, begin at the middest of the gut, and stuf it with Nutmeg, Sugar, Ginger, Pepper, and sliced Dates, boyle it and serue it to the Table.

A Ryce Pudding.

STeep it in faire water all night: then boyle it in new Milke, and draine out the Milke through a Cullinder: mince beefe Suit handsomely, but not too small, and put it into the Rice, and parboyld Currins, yolkes of new layd Egges, Nutmeg, Sinamon, Sugar, and Barberryes: mingle all together: wash your scoured guttes, and stuffe them with the aforesaid pulp: parboyle them, and let them coole.

A Florentine of Veale.

MJnce colde Ueale fine, take grated Bread, Currins, Dates, Sugar, Nutmeg, Pepper, two or three Egges, and Rosewater: mingle all well together, and put it on a Chafing-dish of coles, stirre them till they be warme, and then put some betweene two sheetes of puft-paste, and bake it, put the rest vpon slices of a white loafe and frye it in a Frying-pan, washt before with the yolke of an Egge: serue it with Sinamon and Ginger, at the second course.

A Marrow toast.

MJnce colde parboyld Ueale, and Suit very fine, and sweet Hearbs each by themselues, and then mingle them together with Sugar, Nutmeg, Sinamon, Rosewater, grated bread, the yolkes of two or three new layd Egges: open the minst meat, and couer it with the marrow. Then put

your toast into the Pipkin with the vppermost of some strong broth: let it boyle with large Mace, a Fagot of sweet hearbs, scum them passing cleane, and let them boyle almost drye. Then take Potato-rootes boyld, or Chest-nuts, Skirrootes, or Almonds, boyled in white Wine, and for want of Wine you may take Uergis and Sugar.

Another in a Frying-pan.

TAke the Marrow whole out of the bone, so neere as you can: ten Oysters is a fit proportion, for that Marrow being parboyld, and bearded, and cut in small pieces. Put in a little yong Time Pennyroyal, and Parsley, minst fine: worke all together like batter.

Then roule your Marrow within that, and season it with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg. Then make it in little Pasteyes with fine Paste: some like Peasecods: fry them, shaue on Sugar, and serue them in.

A Pudding stued betweene two Dishes.

TAke the yolkes of three Egges, and the white of one, halfe a dozen spoonefuls of sweet Creame, a Nutmeg grated, a few Cloaues and mace, a quarter of a pound of Beefe Suit minst small, a quarter of a pound of Currens, temper it like a Pudding with grated bread, and a spoonefull of Rosewater.

Then take a Kell of Ueale, cut it in square pieces like Trenchers, lay three spoonefuls of the batter vpon one side, then roule it vp in the Cawle: pin one side ouer the other with two small prickes, and tie each end with a threed. You may put two, three, or foure of them in a Dish, then take halfe a pinte of strong Mutton broth, and halfe a dozen spoonefuls of Uinegar, three or foure blades of large Mace, and an Ounce of Sugar. Make this broth to boyle vpon a Chafingdish of coales, and then put in your Pudding: when it boyles couer it with an other Dish,

and let it stue a quarter of an houre longer. Turne them for burning, then take vp your Pudding, and lay it vpon sippets, and poure the broth vpon the toppe. Garnish your Dish with the coare of a Lemmon, and Barberryes: serue them hot, eyther at Dinner or Supper.

To make French puffes with greene Hearbes.

TAke Spinage, Parsley, Endife, a sprigge or two of Sauory: mince them very fine: season them with Nutmeg, Ginger, and Sugar. Wet them with Egges, according to the quantitie of the Hearbes, more or lesse.

Then take the coare of a Lemmon, cut it in round slices very thinne: put to euery slice of your Lemmon one spoonefull of this stuffe. Then frye it with sweet Lard in a Frying panne as you frye Egges, and serue them with sippets or without, sprinckle them eyther with white Wine or Sacke, or any other Wine, sauing Rennish Wine.

Serue them eyther at Dinner or Supper Dropt Razins.

TAke the fayrest Razins of the Sunne, slit them on one side: lay them open, as round and as broad as you can. Then take of the aforesayd hearbes minst, and seasoned, and lay betwixt two Razins as many as you can close betwixt them. Take halfe a spoonefull of the foresayd stuffe, that

browne.

A fond Pudding.

TAke eyther Mutton, Ueale, or Lambe, roast or raw, but raw is better. Mince it fine with Beefe Suit, take Spinage, Parsley, Marigold, Endiffe, a sprig of Time, and a sprig of Sauory: chop them fine, and season them with Nutmeg, Sugar, minst Dates: take Currins, and grated bread, the yolkes of three or foure new

laid Egges, a spoonefull or two of Rosewater, as much Uergis: worke them vp like Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Peares, or what you will. Fry them, or bake them, and serue them vpon sippets, with Uergis, or white Wine, Butter, and Sugar: serue them eyther at Dinner or Supper.

To make Puffes, on the English fashion.

TAke new Milke curds, presse out the Whay cleane, take the yolkes of three Egges, and the white of one, fine Wheat-floure, and mingle amongst your Curdes. Season it with Nutmeg, Sugar, and Rosewater, mingle all together. Butter a fayre white Paper, lay a spoonefull at once vpon it, set them into a warme Ouen, not ouer hot, when you see them rise as high as a halfe peny loafe, then take Rosewater, and Butter, and indale them ouer: scrape on Sugar, and set them in the Ouen againe, vntil they be dryed at the tops like yce. Then take them out, and

serue them vpon a Plate, either at Dinner or Supper.

To make a Pudding in a Frying-panne.

TAke foure Egges, two spoonefuls of Rosewater, Nutmeg grated, Sugar, grated Bread, the quantitie of a penny Loafe, halfe a pound of Beefe Suit minst fine: worke them as stiffe as a Pudding with your hand, and put it in a Frying-pan with sweet Butter, frye it browne, cut it in quarters, and serue it hot, eyther at Dinner or Supper. Jf it be on a fasting day leaue out the Suit, and the Currens, and put in two or three Pomewaters minst small, or any other soft Apple that hath a good relish.

To make Apple pufs.

TAke a Pomewater or any other Apple that is not hard, or harsh in taste: mince it small with a dozen or twenty Razins of the Sunne: wet

the Apples in two Egges, beat them all together with the backe of a Knife, or a Spoone. Season them with Nutmeg, Rosewater, Sugar, and Ginger: drop them into a Frying-pan with a Spoone, frye them like Egges, wring on the iuyce of an Orenge, or Lemmon, and serue them in.

To make Kicks-Hawes.

TAke the Kidney of a Ueale, or Lambe, or if you haue neither of both, then take the Eare of a Mutton, fat and all. Boyle it, and mince it fine: season it with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt. Then take two or three Egges, a spoonefull of Rosewater, two or three spoonefuls of Sack, as much grated Bread, as will worke them like Lithpaste.

Then floure your moulds, and fill them with that paste: then roule a thinne sheet of paste, wet it and couer it ouer: frye them, and turne them into small Dishes, and keepe them warme in the Ouen, serue them at Dinner, or Supper. Jf you will bake them then

you may turne them into the Dish raw, out of your moulds, and Jce them with Rosewater and Sugar, and set them in the Ouen, when your Pyes are halfe bakte.

To make some Kickshawes in Paste, to Frye or Bake, in what forme you please.

MAke some short puftpaste, rowle it thinne: if you haue any moulds you may worke it vpon your moulds, with the pulp of Pippins, seasoned with Sinamon, Ginger, Sugar, and Rosewater, close them vp, and bake them, or frye them: or you may fill them with Gooseberryes, seasoned with Sugar, Sinamon, Ginger, and Nutmeg: rowle them vp in yolkes of Egs, and it will keepe your Marrow being boyled, from melting away, or you may fill them with Curds, boyled vp with whites of Egges, and Creame,

or yellow with the yolkes, and Cream, and it will be a tender Curde: but you must season the Curd with parboyld Currins, three or foure sliced Dates put into it, or sixe bits of Marrow, as big as halfe a Walnut: put in some small pieces of Almond-paste, Sugar, Rosewater, and Nutmeg. And this will serue for any of these Kickeshawes, eyther to bake, or for a Florentine in puftpaste: any of these you may frye or bake, for Dinner or Supper.

To make an Italian Pudding.

TAke a Penny white Loafe, pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like vnto great Dyes, mince a pound of Beefe Suit small: take halfe a pound of Razins of the Sunne, stone them and mingle them together, and season them with Sugar, Rosewater, and Nutmegge, wet these things in foure Egges, and stirre them very tenderly for breaking the Bread:

then put it into a Dish, and pricke three or foure pieces of Marrow, and some sliced Dates: put it into an Ouen hot enough for a Chewet: if your Ouen be too hot, it will burne: if too colde, it will be heauy: when it is bakte scrape on Sugar, and serue it hot at dinner, but not at Supper.

To boyle a Rack of Veale on the French fashion.

CUt it into Steakes, cut a Carrot, or Turnup in pieces, like Diamonds, and put them into a Pipkin with a pinte of white Wine, Parsley bound in a Fagot, a little Rosemary, and large Mace, and a sticke of Sinamon: pare a Lemmon, or Orenge, and take a little grose Pepper, halfe a pound of Butter: boyle all together vntill they be enough: when you haue done, put in a little Sugar, and Uergis.

Garnish your Dish as you list.

To fearce a Legge of Lambe, on the French fashion.

TAke the Flesh out of t'hinside, and leaue the skinne whole, mince it fine with Suit: take grated Bread, minst Orenge pill, sliced Nutmeg, Calander seedes, Barberryes pickt, a little Pepper: worke all together with yolks of Egges, like a Pudding, and put it in againe. Jf you want a Cawle of Mutton to close it with: then take the yolk, of an Egge, and smeare it all ouer, and it will hold it fast. Then put it in a Dish raw, and set it vpright, and put a little Butter into the Dish, and set the Dish into the Ouen: put to the aforesaid things, Sugar, Currens, and sliced Dates, Salt, and Uergis. When it goeth to the Table, strow it with yolks and Parsley, eyther of them minst by it selfe.

To hash Deere, Sheepe, or Calues tongues, on the French fashion.

BOyle, Blanch, and Larde them, sticke them with Cloues and Rosemary, and put them on a Spit vntill they be halfe roasted. Then put them into a Pipkin with Claret Wine, Sinamon, Ginger, Sugar, sliced Lemmon, a few Carraway-seeds, and large Mace. Boyle all together and serue them in with fryed toasts.

London Cookerie.

To boyle a Capon.

TAke strong broth of Marrow-bones, or any other strong broth, put the Marrow into a Pipkin with Salt: boyle your Capon in the Pipkin, and scumme it cleane, before you be ready to take it off, put in your Salt. Take a pinte of white-Wine in a Pipkin, for one Capon, if you haue more, you must haue more Wine: halfe a pound of Sugar a quarter of a pound of Dates sliced, Potatoes boyled, and blauncht, large Mace, Nutmeg sliced: if you want Potatoes take Endiffe, and for want of both, boyle Skirrets & blaunch them: boile all together, with a quarter of a pint of Uergis,

and the yolkes of Egges, straine it and stirre it about, and put it to the Capon with the strong broth.

To garnish your Dishes.

GArnish your Dishes round about with fine Sugar: take Orengado dipt among Biskets and Carrawaies.

Take a Pomegranate, and garnish the side of your Dish with it, take Currins, and Prunes, and wrap them in fine Sugar, hauing beene first boyled tender in faire water. Take a Lemmon and slice it, and put it on your Dish, and large Mace steeped or boyled, or preserued Barberryes. Any of these are fit to garnish your Dish: take your Capon out of the broth, and put it into a Dish with sippets, and any of these garnishes round about it.

To boyle a Capon another way.

BOyle a Knuckle of Ueale vntill it [ma]ke strong broth: then take your Capon, and boyle it in faire water and

Salt, and when it is almost boyld, take it and put it in a Pipkin, and straine your broth into the Capon. Then wash and scrape Parsley, and Fennelrootes cleane, pith them, and slice them along: boyle them in a Skillet of water, and when they are halfe boyled take them from the fire, and put them in a Strainer, and then in a cleane Pipkin.

Then take a little Rose-water, and a quarter of a pound of fine Sugar, vntill it be as cleere as glasse: then take a little large mace, a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, a minst Lemmon, the pill taken off. Boyle a few Razins of the Sunne with it, but first take out your Capon and straine the broth: put the Capon into a Dish very finely garnisht: then put the broth to the Capon: then take Parsley rootes, and iay them on the top of the Capon with your minst or sliced Lemmon, your Razins of the Sunne, and your large Mace. Garnish your dish as before is shewed.

To boyle a Capon in Rice.

BOyle a Capon in Salt and water, and if you like it, you may put into a faire Cloth, a handfull of Oatmeale: then take a quarter of a pound of Rice, and steepe it in faire water, and so halfe boyle it: then straine the Rice through a Cullinder: then boyle the Rice in a Pipkin, with a quart of Milke: put in halfe an ounce of large Mace, halfe a pound of Sugar: boyle it well, but not ouer thicke, put in a little Rosewater: blaunch halfe a pound of Almonds, and beate them in a Morter, with a little Creame and Rosewater: beat them fine, and straine them into a Pipkin by it selfe. Then take vp your Capon, and set your Almonds a little against the fire. Garnish your Dish as you thinke fit, and lay in your Capon, and put your Rice handsomely vpon the Capon, and then the broth vpon the Rice.

To boyle a Capon with Oysters, and pickled Lemmons.

BOyle the Capon halfe enough, with faire water and Salt: then straine some of the broth into a quart of Rennish wine: then put in a few sweet Hearbes, minst with a pickled Lemon, or Orenge, put all into the Pipkin, and let them boile together. Then take the Oysters, pick and beard them, and parboyle them: then put them out of the broth into a Cullinder, and then put them into the Pipkin. Then take a few Razins of the Sunne, and if you loue the iuyce of an Onyon, first boyle some Onyons by themselues, and straine them, and then put them into the Pipkin, and serue it in with what garnish you haue.

To boyle a Capon with Pippins.

PArboyle it as before, then put two Marrow bones into a Pipkin, or rather put the Marrow of two or three bones into a Pipkin, with a quart of white Wine, a little sliced Nutmegge, halfe a score Dates. When you haue so done, put in a quarter of a pound of Sugar, then pare your Pippins, and cut them into quarters, and put them into a Pipkin, and couer them with a little Rosewater and Sugar, and boyle them. Then take (if you haue it) Hypets of Bisket, and for want thereof take other Bread: then boyle seauen or eight hard Egges, take out the yolkes and put them in a Strainer. Then take a little Uergis, and strong broth where the Capon is boyling, straine it, and put it in a Pipkin, and stirre alle together with the Pippins and Muscadine: let the Muscadine be put on, when the Pippins are colde.

To boyle Chickins in White-broth.

TRusse and parboyle them very white: then put them with sweet Hearbes into a Pipkin, with Mace, pieces of Sinamon, chop a little Parsley but course, and straine the yolkes of foure or fiue Egges, with a little Uergis, which must bee put in when they are ready to be taken from the fire. Garnish your Dish.

To boyle Chickins in a soope.

BOyle them vntill they be enough, boyle Hartichockes very well, and blanch them. Then put your Chickins into a Pipkin with strong broth.

Cut your Hartichockes, and put them into a Pipkin with a few sliced Dates: wash a few Razins of the Sunne, and a few Currins cleane, put them into a Pipkin: then take Cola Flora, and wash it cleane, and parboyle it very well. When you take them from the

fire, and blaunch them very cleane, and put them into a Pipkin: then take some of your Hartichockes left, and a little

broth and Uergis, halfe a dozen yolkes of hard Egges, and a little strong broth and Uergis, a quarter of a pound of Sugar, put it into the Pipkin, and stirre all together, with a good quantity of Butter: then mince the flowers of Marigolds, and boyle them with the rest. Scumme the broth cleane, and then it will looke very cleere: with this boyling you may boyle Capon, Pigeon, Rabbet, Larke, etc.

To boyle the common way.

TRusse and parboyle them, and put them into a Pipkin with strong broth: then take Parsley, Endiffe, Spinnage, a Fagot of sweet Hearbes.

Bruise your Parsley and Endiffe, and put them into a Pipkin, and two or three ribs of Mutton, and if you haue any Potatoes, or Skirrets, put them

in with Marigold Flowers, and let them boyle well together: then slice one Carrot, and cast it in, and serue it with a few large Mace, and a little Uergis. Take the yolkes of halfe a dozen Egges, mince them by themselues fine, and the parboyld Parsley by it: then mingle them with a few Barberryes, cast all these things on the top of the Chickens, after you haue put them in the Dish: so also may you doe with a Knuckle of Ueale.

To boyle Chickins with Lettice, the best way.

CUt euery Chicken in foure quarters, after the parboyling of them, and put them into a Pipkin with two or three sweet-Breads of Ueale: or if you can not so readily come by so many then take the Udder of a Ueale, and parboyle it very well. Cut it in pieces, and put it into the Pipkin, with a sliced Lemmon. Then take

Lettice: cut them, and wash them cleane, and bruise them with the backe of a Ladle, and put them into the Pipkin: then take a good deale of sweet Butter, about the quantity of halfe a pound, halfe a pinte of Sacke, a quarter of a pinte of white Wine, Mace, a sliced Date, a Nutmeg: you may put in three or foure Dates sliced, if you haue so many. Let all these boyle together ouer the fire with Marigold-flowers, and sweet Hearbes.

To boyle a Rabbet.

PArboyle your Rabbet well, and cut it in pieces: then take strong broth, and a Fagot of Hearbs, a little Parseley, sweet Marioram, three or foure yolkes of Egges, strained with a little white Bread, and put all in a Pipkin with Mace, Cloues, and a little Uergis to make them haue a taste.

To boyle a Rabbet with Grapes or Gooseberryes.

TRusse your Rabbet whole, and boyle it with strong broth, vntill it be ready. Then take a pinte of white-Wine, a good handfull of Spinnage, chopt in pieces, the yolkes of Egges, cut in quarters, and a little large Mace. Let all boyle together with a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, and a good piece of Butter.

To boyle a Rabbet with Claret Wine.

VSe it as before is shewed, slice Onyons and a Carrot-root, a few Currins, and a Fagot of Hearbes, minst Parsley, Barberryes pickt, large Mace, Nutmeg, and Ginger: throw them all into the Pipkin. Boyle it with halfe a pound of Butter.

To boyle a wilde Ducke.

TRusse and parboyle it, and then halfe roast it, then carue it, and saue the grauey: take store of Onyons, Parsley, sliced Ginger, and Pepper: put the grauie into the Pipkin with washt Currins, large Mace, Barberryes, a quart of Claret Wine: let all boyle well together, scumme it cleane, put in Butter and Sugar.

To boyle a tame Ducke, or Widgin.

PArboyle your Fowle well, take

of Parsley, choppe them fine with an Onyon, and Barberryes, pickt Endiffe washt: throw all into the Pipkin with a Turnup cut in pieces, and parboyld, vntill the rankenesse bee gone: then put in a little white Wine, or Uergis, halfe a pound of Butter: boyle all together, and stirre it, and serue it with

the Turnups, large Mace, Pepper, and a little Sugar.

To boyle Pigeons.

PArboyle your Pigeons with Parsley in their bellies, and Butter: put them in a Pipkin with strong broth, about a quart thereof, a ribbe of Mutton, large Mace, a little grosse Pepper, beaten Sinamon, a little Ginger and Sugar, a few Razins of the Sunne, a few Currens, Barberryes in bunches, halfe a pinte of white wine, boyle all together with a little Bread steeped in broth, to collour it: straine it with some of the broth, and put it into the Pipkin: let them boyle till they be enough, and so serue them in.

This broth may serue to boyle Woodcockes, or Patridges in, with this difference, take some of the broth out of the Pigeon, and put in a minst Onyon.

Let it boyle vntill it be enough.

To boyle Pidgeons with Capers or Sampyre.

PUt them into a Pipkin, with a pinte or more of white-Wine, a little strong broth, a ribbe or two of Ueale: wash off the saltnesse of your Capers, or Sampyre: blaunch halfe a pound of Almonds, put them in colde water, and cut them longwise, put them into the Pipkin with Razins of the Sunne. Take large Mace, a little sliced Ginger, a sliced Nutmeg: let them all boyle together with a Fagot of Hearbs. Throw into them three or foure yolkes of Egges whole, and a piece of Butter, then put in the Sampyre or Capers. This boyling will serue well for Rabbets.

To boyle Sawceges.

PUt them into a quart of Claret Wine, large Mace, Barberryes,

Sinamon, a handfull of sweet Hearbs.

Garnish this Dish with Sinamon, Ginger, and fine Sugar.

To boyle Goose-giblets, or Swannes-giblets.

PJcke and parboyle them cleane, and put to them some strong broth, with Onyons, Currins, and Parsley, and let all boyle together with large Mace, and Pepper: boyle them well with a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, and then put in Uergis and Butter.

Giblets with Hearbes, and Rootes.

PJcke and parboyle them, and put them in a quart of claret wine into a Pipkin, halfe an ounce of sugar, a good quantitie of Barberryes, Spinage, and a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, boyld Turnups, and Carrots sliced, and put them into the Pipkin, and boyle them well

together: then take strong broth, Uergis, and the yolkes of two or three new layd Egges: straine them, and put them into the Pipkin.

To smoore a Racke, or ribbes of Mutton.

CUt your Mutton in pieces, and split it with the backe of a Cliuer, and so put it into a Dish, and a piece of sweet Butter, and put it into the bottome of your Dish: then take a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, and grosse Pepper: stue them in a couered dish, with a little Salt: turne them now and then, and when they are enough put them in a cleane Dish with sippets. This Dish is best garnished with Barberryes, and Pepper.

For the fillets of a Veale, smoored in a Frying-panne.

CUt them as for Oliues: hacke them with the backe of a Knife: then

cut Larde fine, and larde them, then put them in a Frying-pan with strong Beere or Ale, and frye them somewhat browne: then put them into a pinte of Claret Wine, and boyle them with a little Sinamon, Sugar and Ginger.

A Dish of Steakes of Mutton, smoorde in a Frying-panne.

TAke your Legge of Mutton cut into Steakes, and put it into a Frying Panne, with a pinte of white Wine, and smoore them somewhat browne: then put them into a Pipkin.

Cut a Lemmon in slices, and throw it in: then put in a good quantitie of Butter, and holde it ouer the fire: when it is ready to frye, put in a handfull of Parsley, and when it is fryed put it into the Pipkin, and boyle it together. This Dish would be garnished with Sinamon, Sugar, and sliced Lemmons.

To smoore a Chickin.

CUt it in small pieces, and frye it

or white Wine, Parsley, an Onyon chopt small, a piece of whole Mace, and a little grosse Pepper: put in a little Sugar, Uergis, and Butter.

Then take a good handfull of Clary, and picke off the stalkes, then make fine batter with the yolkes of two or three new layd Egges, and fine flowre, two or three spoonfuls of sweet Creame, and a little Nutmeg, and so frye it in a Frying-panne, with sweet Butter: serue in your Chickins with the fryed Clary on them. Garnish your Dish with Barberryes.

To frye Mussels, Perywinckels, or Oysters, to serue with a Ducke, or single by themselues.

BOyle these shell-Fishes: then flowre and frye them: then put

them into a Pipkin, with a pinte of Claret Wine, Sinamon, Sugar, and Pepper.

Take your Ducke boyled or roasted, and put them into two seuerall Pipkins, if one be boyled, and the other roasted and a little Sugar, large Mace, and fryed toasts, stuck around about it with Butter.

To marble Smelts, Soales, Flounders, Plaice, &c.

FRye sallet Oyle in a Frying-pan or Chafer, wype your Fish, and when the Oyle is hot, put in so much Fish as the Oyle will couer and when it wastes

where the Fish hath beene fryed in whole pieces: put Claret Wine into an earthen Panne, put the fryed leaues into the bottome of the Panne, and let some of them lye aloft: slice an ounce of Nutmeg, or rather two, as much Ginger, and large Mace, a few Cloues, and Wine-vinegar: put your

marble Fish into the liquour, so as the Bay leaues and spices couer it, as well as it that lyeth vnder. And vpon occasion serue it with the Bay-leaues, and the spices of the liquour.

To congar Eeles, in collars, like Brawne.

CUt them open with the skinne on, and take the bone cleane out, large Mace, grosse Pepper, some fine sweet Hearbs, chopt vnder your Knife. Then straw the Hearbes and the Spices, all along the inside of your Eele, and rowle it like a collar of Brawne: so may you doe with Tenches, boyled in fayre water, white Wine, and a quantitie of Salt, so put in some sliced Ginger, Nutmeg, and Pepper in graine. When it is well boyled put it into an earthen Pan, couered with the owne liquour, and a little white Wine-vinegar.

To sowce a Pigge in collors.

CHine your Pigge in two parts: take out all the bones, lay it in a day scrape off all the filth from the backe, and wipe it very drye: then cast Pepper on it, a little large Mace, and Ginger, with a Bay-leafe or two, euen as you would doe a collar of Brawne, and let your Pan boyle before you put it in: keepe it with scumming vntill it be halfe boyled, then take out a ladlefull or two, and put it in a Panne by it selfe, put into this boyling some Rennish or Claret Wine, sliced Nutmeg, grosse Pepper, sliced Ginger. Let it stand vntill it be almost colde, and then dish it with Bay-leaues.

To sowce a breast of Veale.

BOne your breast, and lay it in faire water, vntill the blood bee gone.

Then take it, and drye it, and take all kinde of sweet Hearbes, Nutmeg beaten, Sinamon beaten, Ginger beaten, but not too fine, Callander, pared Lemmon-pill cut in fine pieces: mingle all together, spread your Ueale, and cast it on the inside, and then rowle it like a collor of Brawne, binde it close. Let your liquour boyle, and put in your Ueale. So you may vse Rackes vnbound, and Breasts vnbound. Let it be scumd very cleane: then put in a Fagot of sweet Hearbes, and keepe it couered, for that will make it white: when it is almost boyled, throw in sliced Nutmeg, large Mace, a little Ginger, a Lemmon or two sliced.

To hash a shoulder of Mutton, or a Legge of Lambe.

TAke your meat off the Spit, and hash it into a Pewter Dish: put in some Rennish Wine, Razins of the Sunne, sliced Lemmon, raw Oysters: put them altogether into a Pipkin, and stirre them. Jf you want Oysters, and Razins, then take two Onyons whole, put them into the meat. Jf you want Wine, take strong broth, Uergis, and Sugar. Throw a few Barberryes into the Dish, and serue it on toasts or sippets.

A Legge of Lambe fearst with Hearbes.

SErue it as is before shewed, with sweet Hearbes, and grated Bread, Bisket-seedes, a few Coriander-seedes, Lemmon pils, minst fine, Nutmeg sliced, sliced Dates, a little grosse

Pepper, Capers washt cleane: put all together with sixe or seauen yolkes of new layd Egges, hard roasted, and whole, and put them into your stuffe, and worke them with Sugar, Rosewater, and Uergis, and the marrow of a bone or two, Salt, and Pepper, put all together into the skinne: Carrawayes, and Orrengado are fittest garnish for your Dish.

To smoore Calues feet.

BOyle and blaunch them, and lay them in fayre water and Salt, and when they are colde cut them in the middest, and take out the blackenesse, and put them in a Dish with sweet Butter.

Mince Parsley, Onyons, and tops of Time, Currins, large Mace, Pepper, with a little Wine-vinegar. Let all stue together vntill they be ready: put in a few Barberryes, chopt Parsley fine, two or three yolkes hard, and minst by themselues, Rosewater, and it with Parsley and hard Egges.

Another way.

BLaunch them as before, put them in a Dish with fayre water and Butter, chop Lettice, and Spinnage, with the backe of your Knife: and put them in a Dish: let them boyle with large Mace, sliced Lemmon, a few Grapes, or a stewed Cucumber sliced. Let all boyle well together with Pepper: straine into a Dish the yolkes of Egges, Uergis, and Sugar: straine them together when they goe to the Table. This boyling will serue for Neates feet, Sheepes Trotters, or Hogges feet: serue them hot at Supper.

To hash Neates-Tongues.

BOyle them, and blaunch them, and slice them in pieces, put them into a Pipkin with Razins of the Sunne, large Mace, Dates sliced, a fewe blauncht Almonds, and Claret Wine, boyle all together with halfe a pound of sweet Butter, Uergis, and Sugar. Straine a Ladle full of liquour, with the yolkes of about halfe a dozen Egges.

The same vvith Chestnuts.

SErue your Tongue, as before: put it in a Pipkin with blauncht Chestnuts, strong broth, a Fagot of Hearbes, large Mace, washt Endiffe, a little Pepper, a few Cloues, and whole Sinamon. Boyle all together with Butter, season them with Salt, onely garnish your Dish as you list.

FINIS







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