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A Good Huswifes Handmaide, 1594

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16th Century Kitchen with Cook and Maid - Artist unknown

TITLE: A Good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin Containing Manie Principall Pointes of Cookerie, As well How to Dresse Meates, After Sundrie the Best Fashions Vsed in England and Other Countries
AUTHOR: Thomas Dawson?
PUBLISHER: Richard Jones, London
DATE: 1594
THIS VERSION: This transcript is based on the edition made available by the Justus Liebig University of Giessen, prepared by Sam Wallace. This Foods of England version has been partly edited, but still contains significant errors.


The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin.
London 1594


The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin.
Containing Manie principall pointes of Cookerie, as well how to dresse meates, after sundrie the best fashions vsed in England and other Countries, with their apt and proper sawces, both for flesh and fish, as also the orderly seruing of the same to the Table. Hereunto are annexed, sundrie necessarie Conceits for the preseruation of health. Uerie meete to be adioined to the good Huswifes Closet of prouision for her Houshold.
Imprinted at London by Richard Jones, 1594


To knowe the due seasons for the vse of al maner of meats throughout the yeare.
BRawn is best from holy Rood day til Lent, and at no other time commonlie vsed for seruice. Bacon, Beefe and Mutton, is good at all tymes, but the woorst tyme for Mutton is from Easter to Midsommer. A fatte yoong Pig is neuer out of season. A Goose is worst at Midsommer, & best in stubble tyme, but they be best of all when they be yoong green Geese. Veale is all tymes good, but best in Januarie and Februarie. Kidde and yoong Lambe is best between Christmasse & Lent, & good from Easter to Whitsontide, but Kid is euer good. Hennes be all times good, but best from Alhallowntyde to Lent. Fatte Capons be euer good. Peacocks bee euer in season, but when they be yoong and of a good stature, they be as good as Feasants, & so be yoong Grouces. Sinets be best betweene Alhallowen day and Lent. A Mallard is good after a frost, til Candlemas, so is a Teal and other wild foule that swimmeth. A Woodcocke is best from October to Lent, and so be all other birdes, as Ousels, Thrushes and Robins, and such other. Herons, Curlewes, Crane, Bittour, Bussard, be at all times good, but best in Winter. Feasant, Partridge and Raile, be euer good, but best when they bee taken with a Hawke, Quaile & Larks be euer good Connies be euer in season, but best from October to Lent A gelded Deare, whether he be fallow or red, is euer good. A Pollard is speciallie good in May, at Midsommer he is a Bucke, and verie good till Holy Rood day before Michaelmas, so like wise is a Stagge, but he is principal in Maie. A barren Doe is best in Winter. A Pricket and a Sorell syster is euer in season. Chickens bee euer good: and so be yoong Pigeons.    <"002">

The good huswiues Handmaid, for Cookerie in her Kitchin, in dressing all maner of meat, with other wholsom diet, for her and her Houshold, &c.
<"003">

To boyle Mutton with Mallowes or Turneps.
TAke a necke of Mutton, cut it in ribs, and put it in a pot, and a good quantity of beefe broth, and make it boyle: then take your Turneps or Mallowes, and cut them in peeces, of the bignes of your mutton, then put into your pot a little pepper, and so let them stew till they be verie tender, then take them of, and serue them vppon sops. <"004">

To boyle Mutton with Spinage.
TAke your necke of Mutton and cut it in peeces, and put it into a faire pot, and a good quantitie of Mutton broth, and make it boyle: then take sweete Bacon, and cut it of the bignes of your finger, and of the length, and put it in your pot, sixe or seuen peeces: then take three good handful of Spinnage, wash it verie cleane, and wring the water from it, and cut it small, and put it into the pot, and a litle pepper and salt, look that you haue no more broth then will couer your meat: so let it stewe verie softlie till it be tender, then serue it vpon sops. <"005">

To boyl mutton with Carrets.
TAke a breast or necke of Mutton, cut it of the bignes of your thombe, and put it into an earthen pot with faire water, and make it seeth: Then take Carret rootes, and scrape them cleane, and cut them of the bignesse of your Mutton, and let them seeth, then put in halfe a handfull of stripped Tyme, asmuch of Sauorie and Jsope, and a litle salte and Pepper: Let them seeth till your Mutton and roots be verie tender, then serue them vpon sops. <"006">

To boyle Mutton with Colworts.
<"007">TAke a necke of fat Mutton, and cut your ribbes, and broyle them vpon a girdyron till they be halfe ynough, then put them in a faire earthen pot, and a good quantitie of beefe broth, and make them boyle: Then take two handfull of Colewortes, and wash them cleane, and beate them in peeces, and put them to your Mutton, and a ladle full of the fatte of your beefe broth, and a litle Pepper and salte, and so let them stewe till they be verie tender, and put them vpon Soppes, put no salt in till the meate be readie to be taken up.   

To boyle a legge of Mutton with a pudding.
<"008">FJrst, with a knife raise the skin round about, til you come to the iointes, and when you haue perboyled the meate, shred it fine with suet or Marie, Parsley, Marioram, and Penieroyall: then season it with Pepper and salte, cloues, Mace, and Sinamon, and take the yolkes of nine or tenne egges, and mingle with your meat a good handfull of Corrans, and a few minced Dates, and put the meate into the skinne of the leg of Mutton, and close it with prickes, and so boyle it with the broth that you boyle a Capon, and let it seeth the space of two houres.   

To boyle a leg of Mutton with Lemmons.
<"009"> WHen your Mutton is halfe boyled, take it vp, cut it in small peeces: put it into a pipkin, and couer it close, and put thereto the best of the broth, as much as shall couer your Mutton, your Lemmons being sliced verie thin, and quartered, and Corrans, put in pepper grose beaten, and so let them boyle together, and when they be well boyled, season it with a litle Uergious, sugar, pepper grose beaten, and a little sanders, so lay it in fine dishes vpon sops. Jt will make three messe for the table.   

To boyle Mutton with Endiue, Borage, or Lettice, or any kinde of hearbes that may serue thereunto.
<"010">WHen your Mutton is well boyled, take the best of the broth, and put it in a pipkin: and put thereto an handfull of Endiue, borage, or what hearbs you list, and cast therto a few corrans, and let them boyle well, and put thereto a peece of vpper crust of white breade, season it with pepper grose beaten, and a little vergious, and a little Suger, and so powre it vppon your meat.   

To boyle Mutton for a sicke bodie.
<"011">PUt your Mutton into a pipkin, seeth it, and scum it cleane, and put thereto a crust of bread, Fennell roots, Parsly roots, corrans, great Raisons (the stones taken out) and hearbs, as the patient is. If they be cold, hot hearbs may be borne: if they be hot, cold hearbs be best, as Endiue, Sinamon, Uiolet leaues, and some Sorrell: let them boyle together. Then put in Prunes, and a verie litle salt. This is broth for a sicke bodie.   

To make balles of Mutton.
<"012">TAke your Mutton and mince it very fine with suet. Then season it with sugar Sinamon, Ginger, Cloues and Mace, Salt and raw egges, make it in round balles. Let your broth seeth ere you put them in. Make your broth with Corrance, Dates quartered, whole Mace and salt. Thicke it with yolkes of Egges, and Uergious, and serue it vppon soppes.   

To boyle a Capon with Oranges after Mistres Duffelds way.
TAke a Capon and boyle it with Ueale, or with a mary bone, or what your fancie is. Then take a good quantitie of that broth, and put it in an earthen pot by it selfe, and put thereto a good handfull of Corrans, and as manie Prunes, and a few whole Maces, and some Marie, and put to this broth a good quantitie of white wine or of Claret, and so let them seeth softly together: Then take your Orenges, and with a knife scrape of all the filthinesse of the outside of them. Then cut them in the middest, and wring out the ioyse of three or foure of them, put the ioyse into your broth with the rest of your stuffe, then slice your Orenges thinne, and haue vpon the fire readie a skellet of faire seething water, and put your sliced Orenges into the   <"013">water, & when that water is bitter, haue more readie, and so change them still as long as you can finde the great bitternesse in the water, which will be sixe or seven times, or more, if you find need: then take them from the water, and let that runne cleane from them: then put close Orenges into your potte with your broth, and so let them stew together till your Capon be readie. Then make your sops with this broth, and cast on a litle Sinamon, Ginger, and Sugar, and vpon this lay your Capon, and some of your Orenges vpon it, and some of your Marie, and towarde the end of the boyling of your broth, put in a little Uergious, if you think best.   

To boyle a Capon in white broth.
<"014">BOyle your Capon in faire liquor, and couer it to keep it white, but you must boyl no other meat with it, take the best of the broth, and as much vergious as of the broth, if your vergious be not too sowre, & put therto whole Mace, whole pepper and a good hand ful of Endiue, Letuce or Borage, whether of them ye wil, smal Raisons, Dates, Marow of marow bones, a litle sticke of Sinamon, the peele of an Orenge. Then put in a good peece of Sugar, and boyl them well together. Then take two or three yolkes of egges sodden, and strain them and thick it withal, and boyl your prunes by themselues, and lay vpon your Capon: powre your broth vpon your Capon.Thus may you boyle anie thing in white broth.   

Another way to boyle a Capon in white broth.
<"015">TAke Marow bones, breake them, and boylthem and take out the Marrowe. Then seeth your Capon in the same liquor. Then take the best of the liquor in a small potte to make your broth withall. Then take Corrans, Dates, and Prunes, and boyle them in a potte by themselues, till they bee plum, then take them vp, and put them into your broth, then put whole Mace to them, and a good quantitie of beaten Ginger, and some Salt. Then put the Marrowe that you did take from the bones, and straine the yolkes of Egs with Uinigre, and put them into your broth, with a good peece of Sugar, but after this it must not boyl. Then take bread, and cut therof thin sippets, and lay them in the bottome of a dish, then take sugar, and scrape it about the sides of the dish, and lay thereon your Capon, and the fruit vpon it, and so serue it in.   

To boyle a Capon in brewes.
<"016">YOu must boyle your Capon with fatte meat, then take the best of the broth, and put it in a pipkin, and put whole Mace to it, whole Pepper, some red Corrans, halfe as much white wine as you haue of brothe, good store of marrowe and Dates, and scum them cleane, and keep your liquor verie clear, and season it with vergious and Sugar, and then lay your Capon vpon browes finely cut, and so powre your broth vpon it.   

To boyle a Capon with Orenges or Lemmons.
<"017">TAke your Capon and boyle him tender, and take a litle of the broth when it is boiled, and put it into a pipkin, with Mace and Sugar a good deale, and pare three Orenges and pill them, and put them in your pipkin, and boyle them a litle among your broth, and thicken it with wine and yolks of Egges, and Sugar a good deale, and salt but a litle, and set your broth no more on the fyre, for quailing, and serue it in without sippets.   

To make Sops for a Capon.
TAke tostes of bread, Butter, Claret wine, and slices of Orenges, and lay them vpon the tostes, and Sinamon, Sugar, and Ginger.   <"018">

To make Sops for Chickens.
<"019">FJrst take Butter, and melt it vpon a chafingdish with coales, and lay in the dish thinne tostes of breade, and make Sorrell sauce with Uergious and Gooseberries, seeth them with a litle Uergious and lay them vppon.   

To boyle a Mallard with Cabage.
<"020">TAke the Cabage and pick them cleane, and wash them, and parboile them in faire water: then put them in a colender, and let the water runne from them, then put them in a faire pot, and as much beefe broth as will couer them, and the Marie of three Mary bones whole. Then take a Mallard, and with your knife giue him a launce along vppon each side of the breast. Then take him of, and put him into your Cabage, and his dripping with him, for he must be roasted halfe ynough, and his dripping saued, and so let them stew the space of one hower. Then put in some pepper and a litle salt, & serue in your Mallard vpon sops, and the Cabage about him, and of the vppermost of the broth.   

To boyle a Mallard with Onions.
<"021">TAke a Mallard, rost him halfe ynough, and saue the dripping, then put him into a faire pot, and his grauie with him, and put into his bellie sixe or seuen whole Onions, and a spoon full of whole pepper, and asmuch abroad in your pot, put to it as much Mutton broth or beefe broth as will couer the Mallarde, and halfe a dish of sweete butter, two spoonefuls of Uergious, and let them boyle the space of an houre. Then put in some salt, and take off the pot, and lay the Mallard vpon soppes, and the Onions about him, and powre the vppermost of the broth vpon them.   

To boyle a Ducke.
<"022">SEeth the Ducke with some good Marrow bones, or Mutton, and take the best of the broth, and put therein a fewe Cloues, a good manie sliced Onions, and let them boyle well together till the Onions bee tender, and then season your broth with Uergious and a litle bruised pepper: Take up your Ducke and lay it vpon sops, and giue it two slices vpon the breast, and sticke it full of Cloues, and powre the broth vpon it.   

To boyle Stockdoues.
<"023">SEeth them with Beef or Mutton. Take the best of the broth, and put in a pipkin, and put thereunto Onions finely minced and a few Corrans, and so boyle them til they be very tender, and season them, with vergious and a litle sweet butter, & powre them vpon your Stockdoues when they be laid vpon your sops.   

To boyle a Conie with a Pudding in his bellie.
<"024">TAke your Conie and flea him, and leaue on the eares, and wash it faire, and take grated bread, sweet suet minced fine, Corrans, and some fine hearbs, Peniroyall, winter Sauerie, Parslie, Spinnage or Beetes, sweete Marioram, and chop your hearbes fine, and season it with Cloues, Mace, and Sugar, and a litle Creame, and salt, and yolks of Egges, and Dates minced fine. Then mingle all your stuffe together, and put it into your rabbets bellie, and sowe it vp with a thred. For the broth, take Mutton broth, when it is boyled a litle, and put it in, then put in Gooseberries or els Grapes, Corrans, and sweete butter, Uergious, salte, grated breade, and sugar a litle, and when it is boyled, lay it in a dish with Sops, and so serue it in.   

To boyle Chickens or Capons.
<"025">FJrst boyle them in faire water till they be tender. Then take bread and steepe it in the broth of them, and with the yolkes of foure or fiue Egges, and Uergious or white Wine, straine it, and therewith season your broth and your Capon in it. Then take Butter, Parslie, and other small hearbs, and chop them into it. And so serue them foorth vppon soppes of bread.   

To boyle Chickens with a Cawdel.
<"026">TAke your chickens when they are fair scalded, and trussed and stuffed with Parslie in their bellies, and put them in a potte with faire water and a litle salte, and put to them twentie Prunes, halfe a handfull of corrans and Raisons, and let them boyle altogether till your chickens bee tender, then take sixe yolkes, and a pynte of Uinegar, and straine them together, and put thereto a quartern of Sugar, or as yee thinke meete, and so let it boyle, but ye must stirre it stil, els it wil curd: and when it boyleth, take it from the fire: then take your chickens, and put them in a colender, that the broth may goe cleane away, and so put your chickens and the fruite into the cawdell, and make soppes, and lay on your chickens and the fruite, and powre on the cawdell.   

To seeth Chickens in Lettice.
<"027">TAke a necke of Mutton with a Marrowe bone, and so let it seeth, and scumme it cleane, and let it boyle well together, and when it is enough, then take out some of it, and straine it, and put in your chickens: then take a good many Lettuce, and wash them cleane and put them in. Then take a litle white breade and straine it, and put it into the pot to thicke it withall. Then put a litle whole mace to season it, with Pepper and Uergious, and a litle Suger, and cut Sops, and lay them on, and put on the marrow and so serue them.   

How to boile chickens with hearbs.
<"028">TAke your Chickens and scalde them, and trusse the wings on, and put their feete vnder the wings of your chickens, and set them on in a litle pot and scumme them faire, when they haue boiled, put in Spinnage or Lettuce a good deale, and Rosemary, sweete Butter, Uergious, salt, and a litle Suger, and strayned Bread with a litle wine, and cut sippets and serue it out. So may you boile mutton, or Pigions or Conie.   

How to seeth Hennes and Capons in Winter in white broth.
<"029"> TAke a necke of mutton and a marrowe bone, and let them boile with the Hens together, then take Carret rootes and put them into the potte, and then straine a litle bread to thicke the pot with all and not too thicke: season it with Pepper and Uergious, and then couer them close, and then let them boile together, then cut sops and put the broth and the marrow aboue, and so serue them.   

To boyle Calues feet or Lambs feet.
<"030">TAke your Calues feet after they be scalded, cut them in the middest, and put them into an earthen pot, & put to them mutton broth as much as wil couer them then take a litle Spinnage and Lettice, and a little stripped Time, and put it in your pot, and a dishe of sweet butter, and a litle salt, and let them boyle till they be verie tender: and when ye be readie to serue them foorth, take the yolkes of three Egges, and almost a pinte of Uergious, and stirre them well together, and take your pot from the fire seething, and put in your Uergious and egges, and stirre it well, and serue them in vpon sops.   

How to boile a tripe.
TAke a Tripe and cut it in peeces, of the breadth and length of your finger, and put them in an earthen pot, & put thereto as much Mutton broth as will couer them, a litle Lettice, Spinnage, a litle salt and Uergious, so when yee will serue them in, cast on a litle Pepper, and serue them on sops,   <"031">

To boyle tripes, pigs petietots or Neates feet.
<"032">TAke your Neats feete, tripes, or petitoes, and cut them in small peeces, and boile them with butter, Sinamon, Currans, and a litle vinigar, and serue them in vpon sops.   

How to boyle pigs petitoes another way.
<"033">BOyle them in a pint of Bastard, and put thereto four Dates minced, with a few Corrans and a litle Time, chop the time small, so let it boile, till it be wel: season your pot with Sinamon, Ginger, salt, and a litle Uergious.   

To boyle Chickens after the French fashion.
<"034">QUarter the Chickens in foure peeces: then take after the rate of a pinte of wine for two Chickens: then take time & parsly as small minced as ye can, and foure or fiue Dates, with the yolkes of foure hard Egges, and let this boile together, and when you will season your pot, put in salt, sinamon and Ginger, and serue it foorth.   

To boile tripes after the French fashion.
<"035">TAke a Tripe, and a fewe Onions, mince them small together, and boyle them together, and season your pot with a little Pepper, Uinigre and salt, and so serue them.   

How to make long worts.
<"036">TAke a good quantitie of Colewortes and seeth them in water whole a good while, then take the fattest of powdered beefe broth, and put to the woortes, and let them seeth a good while after: then put them in a platter and lay your poudred beefe vpon it.   

Triped mutton.
<"037">TAke a paunche of a Sheepe faire scowred, cast it in a pot of boyling water, and scum it cleane and take vp the fat. Then take it and cut it in small peeces of the breadth of twoo pence, and put it in a potte of stronge broth of Beefe or mutton, take Parslie blades minced and put to it, and let it seeth. Then put in powder of Ginger, a litle Uergious, Saffron and salt, and let them boile together till it bee enough, so serue it foorth.   

How to boyle a Lambs head and purtenance.
<"038">STrain your broth into a pipkin, and set it on the fire, and put in butter, and scum it as cleane as you can, and put in your meate, and put in Endiue, and cut it a litle and straine a litle yeast, and put into it, and Currans, and Prunes, and put in all manner of spices, and so serue it vpon sops.   

How to boile Quailes.
<"039">FJrst put them into a pot with sweete broth and set them on the fire: then take a Carret roote, and cut him in peeces, and put into the pot: then take parsely with sweet hearbs, and chop them a little, and put them into the pot: then take Sinamon, ginger, nutmegs and pepper, and put in a litle vergious, and so season it with salt, serue them vpon sops and garnish them with fruite.   

How to smere a Conie.
<"040">TAke the Liuers and boyle them, and chop it, and sweet hearbs, apples, and the yolkes of hard Egges, and chop them altogether, and Currans, Sugar, Sinamon, Ginger, and parsley, and fill the Conie ful hereof, then put her into the sweet broth, and put in sweet butter, then chop the yolkes of hard Egges, sinamon, Ginger, sugar, and cast it on the connie when you serue it vp, season it with salte, serue it on sops, and garnish it with fruit.   

How to make Hodgepot.
<"041">BOyle a necke of Mutton, or a fat rumpe of Beef, and when it is well boyled, take the best of the broth, and put it into a pipkin, and put a good many Onions to it, two handfull of Marigold flowers, and a handful of Parsley fine picked, and grosse shred, and not too small, and so boyle them in the broth, and thick it with strained bread, putting therin grosse beaten pepper, and a spooneful of Uinigar: and let it boyle somewhat thicke, and so lay it vpon your meat.   

How to a make Hodgepot in pots.
<"042">TAke a good peece of a leg of Mutton, pare away the skinne from the flesh verie small, and take halfe as much marrowe as you doe flesh, & then put them both into an earthen pot and put to it halfe a pint of beefe broth, or halfe a pint of Mutton broth that is not salt, and put thereto a Nutmeg beaten, and a litle pepper, two spoonefuls of currans, and twenty prunes and let them stewe softlie vpon a soft fire, and stirre it well together often, or els it will gather together in lumps: and when it hath stued an houre, put into it a spoonful of vergious and serue it vpon sops.   

The order to boyle a brawne.
<"043">TAke your Brawn, and when you haue cut him out, lay him in fayre water foure and twentie houres, and shift it foure or fiue tymes, and scrape and bind vp those that you shall thinke good with hempe, and binde one handfull of greene Willowes together, and lay them in the bottome of the pan, and then put in your Brawne and scum it verie cleane, and let it boyle but softly, and it must bee so tender that you may put a straw through it, and when it is boyled enough, let it stand and coule in the pan, and when you take it vp, let it lye in Trayes one houre or two, and then make sowsing drink with ale and water, and salt, and you must make it verie strong, and so let it lie a weeke before you spend it.   

How to make a good white broth.
<"044">TAke two marrow bones and a Cock, and boyle them together in faire water and white wine. Then take Parsley, Tyme, Spinnage & Lettice, and bind them in a bundell, and put it in the pot with the water and wine, the Cock & marrow bones. Then take Prunes and currans, & binde them in a cloth, and put them in the potte, and a quantitie of whole mace, and binde them in like manner by themselues, and put into the pot a peece of Butter, and a good quantitie of Sugar. When the Cocke and the mary bones be sodden and readie to be serued: Then take from them the broth, and straine it verie cleane, and put it into another pot. Then take the said mace, Prunes and currans foorth of the clothes & put them into the pot: then take three yolkes of Egs, and Rosewater, and put them into the broth, and boyle it a little while, fayre and softlie with a litle salt, and so serue it.   

How to make Farts of Portingale.
<"045">TAke a peece of a leg of Mutton, mince it smal and season it with cloues, Mace pepper and salt, and Dates minced with currans: then roll it into round rolles, and so into little balles, and so boyle them in a little beefe broth and so serue them foorth.   

How to make Fystes of Portingale.
<"046">TAke some sweet suet minced small, the yolks of two egs, with grated bread and currans: temper al these together with a litle saffron, sinamon, ginger, and a litle salt: then seeth them in a litle Bastard or sack a little while: and when they haue boiled a litle take it vp, and cast some sugar to it, & so make bals of it as big as tennis balles, & lay foure or fiue in a dish, and powre on some of the broth that they were sodden in, and so serue them.   

How to make a French pottage.
<"047"> TAke the ribs of Mutton, chop them small the bones and all, with the flesh in square peeces. Then take Carret roots, and for lack of them, Onions, or both together and if you will, or els hearbes, such as you like: seeth al these together, and when you will serue it iu, season your pot with a little Synamon, Pepper and salt, and so serue it foorth.   

How to make fine pappe.
<"048">TAke Milke and flower strain them, and set it over the fire till it boyle. Then take it off and let it coole, then take the yolkes of egs straine them and put it in the milk, and some salt, and set it in the fyre, and stir it till it bee thicke, and let it not boyle fullie. Then put it in a dish abroade, and serue it foorth for good pottage.   

A broth for a weake bodie.
<"049">TAke a legge of Ueale, and set it ouer the fyre in a gallon of water, and scum it clean and when you haue so doone, put in three quarters of a pounde of currans, halfe a pound of prunes & and a good handfull of Borage, as much Langdebeefe, as much of Mints, and as much of Harts tong, let all these seeth together till all the strength of the flesh be sodden out: then straine it as cleane as you can. And if ye think the patient be in any heat, put in Uiolet leaues, or Succorie, as ye do with other hearbs.   

A good way to powder or barréll beefe.
<"050"> TAke the beefe and lay it in mere sawce a day & a night. Then take out the beefe and lay it vpon a hirdle, and couer it close with a sheete, and let the hurdle be laid vpon a peuerell or couer to saue the mere sauce that commeth from it: then seeth the brine, and lay in your Beefe againe, see the brine be colde so let it lye two dayes and one night: then take it out, & lay it againe on a hurdel two or three dayes. Then wype it euerie peece with linnen cloth, dry them and couch it with salt, a laying of Beefe and another of salt: and ye must lay a stick crosse each way, so that the brine may run from the salt.   

How to keep Lard after my Lord Ferries way.
<"051">SCald your hogge, and even as you dresse your Bacon hogge, so dresse this: then lay it in salt, the space of three weekes or a moneth. Then take it vp, and let it hang ther as in maner is no smoke: but when ye thinke it wareth moyst, let it be hanged so lowe that the heate of the fire may come to it: or els put it in an Ouen when the breade is drawne out, and when ye thinke it be wel dried, take it out againe til it ware moyst again, and so ye shal keepe it wel enough three quarters of a yeare, and neuer take the leane from the fat but as ye occupie it.   

How to keepe larde after my Lady Westone Brownes way.
<"052">FLea the fat Lard from the flesh, and put in bay salt, ye must cast a good deale vppon it, and euen so salt it, and roule it together round, and so put it in a heap of salt, and when ye will occupie any of it, cut of it as yee need, and lay it in water, and so ye may keepe it as long as ye will.   

The keeping of Lard after my Lady Marquesse Dorsets way.
<"053">TAke a fat hog and salt him, and when he is through cold, quarter him, and take all the bones and flesh from the fat; and then take the fat of the said hog, and couch it in fayre dry white salt, and so keepe it two or three dayes: then change it again into faire drie white salt, euerie thirde or fourth day, and at the fourteen daies end, take faire cold water and white salt and make a verie strong brine, so that your brine be made so strong that it will beare an egge almost cleane aboue the brine, and put it in a faire close vessell: then take the said Lard and lay it in the said brine, so that the brine couer it ouer: so change it into new brine euerie fourteen daies, for the space of sixe weeks, and after that it needeth not be changed. But the brine may not be made of wel water.   

To make Blaminger.
<"054">TAke a Capon, boyle him in faire water verie tender, then take the brawne of him & chop it small, then take Almonds, and blanch them, and beat them small, and then put in your chopped capon and beate them together verie small: then a quart of Creame and the whites of ten Egs, & the crum of a fine Manchet, and your stuffe, and mingle them altogether, then strain them, and when it is strained put in a good quantitie of Sugar, and a litle salt. Then take a faire pot, and put your stuffe in it, and set it to the fire, stirre it, and boyle it as thicke as an Apple moise, when you haue boyled it, lay it in a faire platter til it be colde: then strain it againe with a litle Rosewater, and when you serue it in, cast sugar vpon it, & dish it in three partes.   

How to make Blaminger without Creame or Egs.
TAke a capon and almonds, and beat them as before is said: Then take faire hot water, and put into your capon and Almondes: then put the crumme of a Manchet in it, and let it stand and soke, then strain it, and when it is strayned put in your sugar, and boyle it of the thicknes of an apple moise: then let it cool and straine it againe with a little Rosewater and so serue it.   <"055">
Stewed meates.
To make stewed broth either for flesh or fish.
<"057">TAke halfe a handfull of Rosemarie, and as much of Time, and binde it on a bundle with threed after it is washt, and put it in the pot, after that the pot is cleane scummed, and let it boile a while, then cut sops of white bread, and put them in a greate charger, and put on the same scalding broth, & when it is soken enough, straine it through a strainer, with a quantitie of wine or good ale, so that it be not too tart, and when it is strained, poure it in a pot, and then put in your raisins and Prunes, and so let them boyle till the meate be enough. Jf the broth bee too sweete put in the more wine, or else a litle Uinegre.   

To make stewed steakes.
<"058">TAke the brest of Mutton, cutte it in peeces, wash it clean: then put it in a faire pot: and fill your pot with ale or halfe wine and halfe water, make it seeth and scum it cleane. Then put into your pot a fagot of Time and Rosemarie, and Parslie, and three or foure Onions cut rounde, take a litle Parsley picked very small, let them boyle altogether. Then take Prunes, smal Raisons, and great Dates, and let them boile altogether: then season your pot with these spices. Take Salt and a litle Saffron, Cloues and Mace, Sinamon, Ginger, & a litle Sugar: take a quantitie of these spices, and put them into your pot, & let them stew altogether, and when they be tender, put a litle Uergious to them, and let them stew againe, then lay soppes of a Manchet vnder them in a platter, at the first yee must put a good deale of marrow in it.   

To stew a capon in white broth.
<"059">TAke marrow bones with the capon, and seeth them in faire water, put to it a few maces, and three races of Ginger minced, and salt: and when the Capon is almost sodden, put in a good quantitie of Lettuce, and let them seeth a while. Then serue in the Capon vpon sops, and the hearbs vpon it.   

To stew a Capon in Lemmons.
<"060">TAke and slice your Lemmons, & put them in a platter, and put to them white wine, Rosewater, and Sugar, and so boyle them and sugar till they be tender. Then take the best of the broth wherein your Capon is boyled: and put thereto whole mace, whole Pepper, and red Corrans, Barberies, a litle Time and good store of Marrowe. Let them boyle well together, till the broth bee almost boyled away, that you haue no more than will wet your soppes. Then pour your Lemmons vpon your Capon, and season your broth with Uergious and Sugar, and put it also vpon your Capon.   

To stew Chickens.
<"061">TAke the best of your mutton broth, and put thereto a litle whole pepper, and a litle whole Mace, Parsley, and Time, and boyle them. Then put in halfe a dish of sweet butter. Uergious, and a peece of Sugar. Then take a good quantity of Gooseberies, and boil them, by themselves in a litle broth, and poure them vpon your Chickens: put into your broth a spoonfull of yest.   

To stew birdes.
<"062">TAke small birds faire picked, drawne, the legs cut off, frye them in butter or suet wel. Then lay them in a faire cloth and let the Butter soak all away: then take Onions minsed small, cast them in a pot, and take a portion of Sauell, & of wine, draw them through a strainer, and cast it into the pot, with the Onions and birds fryed, with Cloues, Mace, and a litle Pepper, let all these boyle together till it be enough, and put to it sugar, powder of Ginger, salt and Saffron, and so serue it foorth.   

To stew Larks or Sparrowes.
<"063">TAke of your mutton broth the best, and put it in a pipkin, and put to it a litle whole Mace, whole pepper, Claret wine, marigolde leaues, Barberies, Rosewater, vergious, sugar, and Marrow, or else sweet butter: perboil the Larkes before, and then boyle them in the same broth, and lay them vpon sops.   

An other way to stew Larkes.
<"064">YOu must take them & draw them clean and cut of their feet, & then take a good deal of wine in a platter, and take a good deale of marrow, and put it in the wine, and set them on a Chafingdish, and let them stew there a good while: then take a quantity of small Raisins and wash them cleane, and put them into the broth, and take a litle Suger and Synamon, and a few crums of Manchet bread and put them into the Larkes, and let them stew altogether. Then take and cut half a dozen tostes, and lay them in a platter, then put them into a dish with broth and serue them out.   

How to stew a mallard.
<"065">TAke your mallard and seeth him in fayre water with a good marrowe bone, and in Cabbage worth, or Cabbage Lettice, or both, and some parsnep roots, and Carret roots, and when all these bee well sodden, put in prunes, put in prunes enough, and three Dates, and season him with salt, cloues, and Mace, and a litle Sugar, and pepper, and then serue it out with sippets, and put the Marie vpon them, and the whole Mace lay on the sippets, and the Dates quartered, and the prunes, and the roots cut in round slices, and lay them vpon the sippets also, and the Cabbage leaues lay vpon the Mallard.   

To stue a Cocke
<"066">YOu must cut him in sixe peeces, and wash him cleane, and take prunes, Currans and Dates cut verie small, and Raisons of the Sun, and Sugar beaten verie smal, Sinamon Ginger, and Nutmegs lykewise beaten, and a little Maidens haire cut verie small, and you must put him in a pipkin, and put in almost a pint of Muskadell and then put your spice and Sugar vpon your Cocke, and put in your fruit between euery quarter, and a peece of golde between euerie peece of your Cock, then you must make a lid of wood fit for your Pipkin, and close it as close as you can with paste, that no ayre come out, nor water can come in, and then you must fil two brasse pots ful of water, and set on the fyre, and make fast the pipkin in one of the brasse pots, so that the pipkins feet touch not the brasse pots bottome, nor the pot sides, and so let them boyle foure and twentie houres, and fil vp the pot still as it boyles away, with the other pot that stands by, and when it is boyled, take out your gold and let him drink it fasting, and it shal help him: this is approoued.   

To stue a Neates foote
<"067">FJrst let your Neates foot bee scalded and made cleane. Then take Onions, slice them and boyle them well in faire water. Then take halfe water and halfe wine, so much as neede to serue for the boyling of the Neats foot (which wil be soone enough) and put it in a pipkin. Put therein some Cloues, and a litle whole pepper, and take the Onions out of the water they were sodden in, & put them into the same pipkin, & the Neats foot with them til it be almost enough. Then take a litle Uergious, half a dish of sweet Butter, and a litle Sugar, and let them boyle a litle together, & serue them in vpon Sops.   

To make stued pottage in Lent
<"068">TAke a faire pot, and fil it full of water, and take a saucer full of Oyle Oliue, and put it into the pot: then set your pot on the fire and let it boyle. Then take Parslie rootes, and Fennell roots, and scrape them cleane, then cut them of the bignesse of a Prune, and put them into the pot. Then take bread, and cut it in sops and cast it into a pot of wine: then straine it and put it in the pot. Then take Rosemarie, Time, and Parseley, and bind them together, and put them into the pot: then take Dates, Prunes, Corrans, and greate Raisons, and wash them cleane, and put them in the pot. Then season your pot with Salt, Cloues, Mace, and a litle Sugar. Jf it be not red ynough, take Saunders, and colour your pot therewith, looke that your broth be thicke enough.   

To stue Beefe
<"069">TAke Beefe and smyte it in peeces, and wash it in faire water, and straine that water and put it in the potte with the Beefe, and boyle them together. Then take Pepper, Cloues, Mace, Onions, Parsley and Sage, cast it thereto and let it boyle together: Then make licquor with bread and thicke it: and so let it seethe a good while after that the thicking is in. Then put in Saffron, Salt and vinegar, and so serue it forth.   

Another way to stue Beefe.
<"070">BOil your flank of beef very tender, till the broth bee almost consumed, then put the broth into a pipkin, & put to it Onions, carret roots shred smal, being tender sodden before and pepper groce beaten, Uergious, and halfe a dish of sweet butter, and so lay it vpon.   

To make brine to keepe Larde.
<"071">TAke faire Water and white Salte, and all to stirre them with a staffe a good pretie while: then lay the Lard in it one night and one day to soake out the bloud of the Lard. Then make new brine in lyke maner, and beate it, vntill the time that the salt is consumed, and then it will be cleare: that done, put the brine in a pretie tub that hath a couer wel fastened, then lay in your Lard, and keep it vnder brine with splints, then couer the tub close: and thus ye may keepe the Lard white and sweet two or three yeares, with change of Brine when need shall require.   

To make Maunger Blaunche
<"072">TAke half a pound of Rice verie cleane picked and washed, then beat it verie fine, and searse it through a fine searse, and put the finest of it in a quart of Mornings milk, & straine it through a strainer, and put it in a faire pot, and set it on the fyre, but it must be but a soft fyre, & still stir it with a broad stick. And when it is a litle thick take it from the fyre, and take the brawne of a verie tender Capon, and pull it in as small peeces as ye can, and the Capon must bee sodden in faire water, and the brawne of it must be pulled as small as a horse haire with your fingers, and put it into the milke which is but half thickened, and then put in as much sugar, as ye thinke will make it sweet, and put in a dozen spoonfuls of good Rosewater, and set it on the fyre again, and stir it well, and in the stirring, all to beate it with your sticke, from the one side of the pan to the other, and when it is as thicke a pap, take it from the fyre, and put it in a faire platter, and when it is cold, lay three slices in a dish, and cast a litle sugar on it, and so serue it in.   

To sowce a Pigge
<"073">YOu must take White wine, & a litle sweet broth, and half a score of Nutmegs cut in quarters: Then take sweete Margeram, Rosemary, Baies, and Time, and let them boil all together, scum them verie cleane: and when they be boyled, put them in an earthen pan, and the syrop also: and when ye serue them, a quarter in a dish, and the Baies and Nutmegs on the top.   

Of baked meates
<"074">

To make Paste, and to raise Coffins.
<"075">TAke fine flower, and lay it on a boord, and take a certaine of yolkes of Egges as your quantitie of flower is, then take a certaine of Butter and water, and boil them together, but ye must take heed ye put not too many yolks of Egges, for if you doe, it will make it drie and not pleasant in eating: and yee must take heed ye put not in too much Butter for if you doe, it will make it so fine and so short that you cannot raise. And this paste is good to raise all maner of Coffins: Likewise if ye bake Uenison, bake it in the paste above named.   

To make fine Paste a nother way.
<"076">TAke Butter and Ale, and seeth them together: Then take your flower, and put thereinto three Egs, Sugar, Saffron, and salt.   

To make short paste in Lent.
<"077">TAke thick Almond milke seething hot, and so wet your flower with it: and Sallet oyl fryed, and Saffron, and so mingle your past altogether, and that will make good paste.   

To bake Venison, or Mutton in stead of Venison.
<"078">TAke leane Uenison or Mutton, and take out all the sinewes, then chop your flesh verie small, and season it with a litle pepper and salt, and beaten Cloues, and a good handful of Fennel seeds, and mingle them all together. Then take your Larde, and cut it of the bignesse of a goose quill, and the length of your finger, and put it in a dish of Uinegar, & all to wash it therin. Then take meale as it doeth come from the mil, and make paste with colde water, and see that it be verie stiff: then take a sheet, and make a laying of the minsed flesh vpon the sheet, of the breadth that your Lard is of length, then make a laying of your Larde vpon your flesh, and let your Larde be one from another, the breadth of one of the peeces of the Larde, and so make foure layings of Lard, and three layings of flesh one vpon the another, so presse it downe with your hands as hard as you can for breaking the paste and cast in a handfull of Pepper and salt, & beaten Cloues, so close vp your paste, & let it bake two houres.   

To make sweete pies of Veale.
<"079">TAke Ueale and perboyle it verie tender, then chop it small, then take twise as much beefe suet, and chop it small, then minse both them together, then put Corrans and minced Dates to them, then season your flesh after this manner. Take Pepper, salt, and Saffron, Cloues, Mace, Synamon, Ginger, and Sugar, and season your flesh with each of these a quantitie, and mingle them altogether. This done take fine flower, Butter, Egs, and Saffron, & make your paste withall as fine as you can, and make your pie with it, and when it is made, fill it with your stuffes. Then put vpon your pie, Prunes, Corans, Dates, a litle Sugar, and yolkes of Egs hard. Then couer your pie and set it on a paper, and set it in the Ouen, and let it bake sokinglie, if it be scortcht aboue lay a paper double on it.   

To make Chewites of Veale.
<"080">Take a leg of Ueale and perboyle it, then minse it with beefe suet, take almost as much of your suet as of your Ueale, and take a good quantity of Ginger, & a litle Saffron to colour it Take halfe a goblet of white wine, and two or three good handfull of grapes, and put them all together with salt, and so put them in Coffins, and let them boyle a quarter of an houre.   

To make Chewets, another way.
<"081">TAke a litle Ueale and slice it, and perboile it then take it vp, and presse it in a fayre cloth, then mince it very fine, take Corance and dates and cut them very small, take some mary or suet, and the yolkes of three or foure Egges, and pepper, salt and Mace, fine beaten, and the crums of bread fine grated: then mingle al these together, and put in suet enough, and they will be good pies.   

To make Chewets in Lent
<"082">TAke a fresh Eele and flea it, and cut off the fish from the bone, mince it small, and pare two or three wardens, & mince them lykewise small, as much of them as of the Eele or Oysters, and temper them together, and season it with Ginger, Pepper, Cloues, Mace and salt, and a litle collour it with Saunders, and put Corrans and prunes, and minsed great raisons and Dates, as you doe to the other pies of flesh when it is halfe baked put them out, and put to it a litle vergious. And if your Gelly be not fat, put to it a litle Sallet Oyle fried with some sweet flowers or hearbes, if yee put a litle Rosewater and salt it is good, but if you haue any fat of fish it is better than Oyle.   

To make Oyster Chewets.
TAke a peck of Oisters, & wash them clean. Then shel them, and wash them in a Colender faire and clean, then seeth them in faire water a litle, and when they bee sodden, strain the water from them, and cut them smal as pie meat, season them with a little pepper, a peniworth of Cloues and Mace, a peniworth of Sinamon and Ginger, a peniworth of Sugar, a litle Saffron and salt: then take a handfull of Corrans, sixe Dates minced small, and mingle them altogether. Then make your paste with a quantitie of fine flower, ten yolkes of Egges, a quantitie of Butter, with a litle Saffron and boyled water, then raise vp your Chewets, and put in the bottom of your Chewets a litle Butter, and cast vpon them Prunes, Dates, and Corrans, so close them and bake them: let not your Ouen be too hot, for they would haue but litle baking. Then drawe them, and put in euerie of them two spoonfuls of Uergious and butter, and so serue them in, etc.   <"083">

To make special good pies ether of Mutton or Veale
<"084">LEt your meat bee perboyled, and mince it verie fine, and then your suet by it self: and after put to the meat, and mince them well together, then put thereto five or sixe yolkes of Egs, being hard sodden and minced, smal Corrans, Dates fine minced: season it with Synamon, Ginger, Cloues and Mace, a handfull of Carowayes, sugar and Uergious, and some salt and a litle Pepper, and so put it into your paste, whether they be Chewets or Trunk pies.   

To make paste, and to bake Chickens.
<"085">TAke water, and put in a good peece of butter, and let it seeth as hot as you can blow off your Butter into your flower, & break two yolkes of Egges, and one white, and put in a good peece of Sugar, and collour your paste with Saffron, then shall it be short. Then take your Chickens, and season them with Pepper, salt, Saffron, and great Raisons, Cloues, Mace Corrans, Prunes and Dates, then close them vp, and make a litle hole in the midst of the lid. Then set it in the Ouen, and to make syrrope for the same pie, take Malmsey, Creame, and two yolkes of Egges, and beat them together, and put in Synamon and Sugar, and when the Pie is almost baked, then put in the syrrop, and let them bake together.   

To bake Chickens in Summer.
<"086">CUt off their feete, trusse them in the Coffins. Then take for euerie Chicken a good handful of Gooseberies, and put into the pie with the Chickens. Then take a good quantitie of Butter, and put about euerie Chicken in the pie. Then take a good quantitie of Sinamon and Ginger, and put it in the pie with salt and let them bake an houre, when they bee baken, take for euerie pie a yolke of an Egge, and halfe a goblet ful of Uergious, and a good quantitie of sugar, and put them all together into the pie to the Chickens, and so serue them.   

To bake Chickens in Winter.
<"087">CUt off their feet, and trusse them, and put them in the pies, take to euerie pie a certain of Corrans or Prunes, & and put them in the pie with the Chickens. Then take a good quantitie of Butter to euery chicken, and put in the pie: then take a good quantitie of Ginger and salt, and season them together, & put them in the pie, let it bake the space of an houre and a halfe, when they be baken take sauce as is aforesaid, and so serue them in.   

To bake Chickens with Damsons.
<"088">TAke your Chickens, drawe them and wash them, then breake their bones, and lay them in a platter, then take foure handfuls of fine flower, and lay it on a faire boord, put thereto twelve yolks of Egs, a dish of butter, and a litle Saffron: mingle them altogether, & make your paste therewith. Then make sixe coffins, and put in euery coffin a lumpe of butter of the bignesse of a Walnut: then season your sixe coffins with one spoonful of Cloues and Mace, two spoonfuls of Synamon, and one of Sugar, and a spoonefull of Salt. Then put your Chickens into your pies: then take Damisons and pare away the outward peele of them, and put twentie in euery of your pies, round about your chicken, then put into euerie of your coffins, a hand full of Corrans. Then close them vp, and put them into the Ouen, then let them be there three quarters of an houre.   

To bake a Turkie.
<"089">TAke and cleaue your Turkie on the backe, and bruise all the bones: then season it with salt, and pepper grose beaten, and put into it good store of butter: hee must haue five houres baking.   

To bake a Fesant.
<"090">TRusse him like a hen, and perboyle him, then set him with cloues, then take a litle Uergious and saffron, and colour it with a feather, and take Salt, Mace, and Ginger to season it, and so put it in the paste, and bake it till it bee halfe enough. Then put in a litle Uergious and the yolk of an Egge beaten together: then bake it till it be ynough.   

To bake a Capon in steed of Feasant.
<"091">CUt off his legs and his wings, and after the maner of a feasant trusse him short, then perboyle him a litle, and Larde him with sweet Lard: so put him into the coffin, and take a litle pepper and salt and cast about him. And take a good halfe dish of butter and put into the coffin, so let him bake the space of foure houres and serue it forth cold in steed of Feasant. So lykewise bake a Feasant.   

To bake Red Deare.
<"092">YOu must take a handful of Fennell, a handfull of winter Sauorie, a handfull of Rosemarie, a handfull of Time, and a handfull of Baie leaues, and when your liquuor seethes that you perboyle your Uenison in, put in your hearbs also, and perboyle your Uenison till it be half ynough, then take it out, & lay it vpon a fair boord that the water may run from it, then take a knife and prick it ful of holes, and while it is warme, haue a faire traie with Uineger therein, and so put your Uenison therein from morning vntill night, and euer now and then turne it vpside downe, and then at night haue your coffin readie, and this done, season it with Synamon, Nutmegs and Ginger, Pepper and salt, and when you haue seasoned it, put it into your coffin, and put a good quantitie of sweet Butter into it, & then put it into the Ouen at night, when you goe to bed, and in the morning draw it foorth, and put in a sawcer ful of Uinegar into your pie at a hole aboue in the top of it, so that the Uinegar may run into euery place of it, and then stop the hole againe, and turne the bottome vpward, and so serue it in.   

To bake Venison.
<"093">PErboyle your Uenison, then season it with Pepper and salt, somewhat gross beaten, and a little Ginger, and good store of sweete Butter. Add when the Uenison is tender baked: put to it halfe a dozen spoonfuls of Claret wine, and shake it wel together.   

To bake a Crane or a Bustard.
<"094">PErboyle him a litle, then Larde him with sweet Lard, and put him in the coffin. Take Pepper and salt a good quantitie, and season them together, and cast vpon it. Then take Butter, and put in the coffin, let it bake three houres.   

To bake a Mallard.
<"095">FJrst trusse them, and perboyle them, and put them into the coffin: then season them with Pepper and salt, and four or fiue Onions peeled and sliced, and put them altogether, with a good peece of sweet Butter vnto the Mallard and so let them bake two houres, and when they be baked, put in halfe a goblet of Uergious for euery Mallard, and so serue them.   

To bake a wilde Boare.
<"096">TAke three parts of water, and the fourth part of white wine, and put therto salt, as much as shall season it, and let it boyle so til it be almost ynough: then take it out of the brothe, and let it lie till it be thorough cold: Then Larde it, an lay it in course paste, in pasties, and then season it with Pepper, salt, and Ginger, & put in twise so much Ginger as pepper. And when it is halfe baken, fill your pasties with white wine, and all to shake the Pastie, & so put it into the Ouen againe, til it be enough. Then let it stand five or sixe dayes, or euer that you eate of them, and that tyme it will be verie good meat.   

To bake wild Duckes.
DResse them fair, & perboyl them, then season them with pepper & salt, and a few whole cloues amongst them, and Onioss small minced, and sweet butter, Uergious, and a litle Sugar   <"097">

To bake Calues feet.
<"098">TAke Calues feet and seeth them tender, pull off the haire, then slit them, and make your paste fine, and when you haue made your coffin, before you put in your feet take great Raisons and mince them small, and plucke out the kernels, and strawe them in the bottome of your pie: then season your feete with Pepper, Salt, cloues and Mace, then lay in the feet, and straw Corrans on them, and Sugar, and a good peece of Butter in it, and close it vp, and make a litle hole in the lid, and when it is almost baked ynough, put in a messe of Uergious, and so serue them.   

To bake Calues feet after the French fashion.
<"099">TAke the feete, pull off the hair, and make them cleane, and boyle them a litle till they be somewhat tender, then make your paste, and season your Calues feet with pepper, Salt, and Synamon, and put them in your paste, with a quantitie of sweet Butter, Parsley and Onions among them, so close it vp, and set it into the Ouen til they be halfe baken. Then take them foorth, and open the crowne, and put in more butter & some Uinegar, so let them stand in the Ouen til they be thoroughlie baken.   

For to bake a Pigge.
<"100">FLea your Pigge, and take out all that is within his bellie cleane, and wash him well, and after perboyle him, then season it with Pepper, Salt, Nutmegs, Mace, and cloues, and so lay him with good store of Butter in the paste: Then set it in the Ouen till it be baked ynough.   

To bake a Pig like a Fawne.
<"101">TAke him when he is in the haire, and flea him, then season it with pepper & salt, cloues and Mace: then take Claret wine, Uergious, Rosewater, Sugar, Synamon, and ginger, and boyle them all together: then lay your Pigge flat like a Fawne or a Kid, and put your syrrop vnto it, with a litle sweet Butter, and so bake it leysurelie.   

To bake a Neats toong.
<"102">SEeth the toong halfe ynough, and blanch it, and cut it in two, then scortch it, and season it with pepper and salt, and put it in a coffin, and a good quantitie of marrow with it, and when it is almost baken, put in some red wine and Sugar.   

To bake an Hare.
<"103"> TAke your Hare and perboyle him, and mince him, and then beat him in a morter very fine liuer and all, if you will, and season it with all kind of Spices and salt, and doe him together with the yolkes of seuen or eight Egges, and when ye haue made him vp together, draw lard verie thicke through him, and mingle them all together, and put him in a pie, and put in butter before ye close him vp.   

For to bake a Gammon of Bacon.
<"104">BOyle your gammon of Bacon and stuffe it with Parsley and Sage, and yolks of hard Egs, and when it is boyled, stuffe it and let it boyle againe, season it with Pepper, Cloues, and Mace, sticke whole Cloues fast in it: Then lay it so in your paste with salte butter, and so bake it.   

To make a rare Conceit, with Veale baked.
<"105"> TAke Ueale and smite it in litle peeces, and seeth it in faire water, then take Parsley, Sage, Jsop and Savorie, and shred them small, and put them in the pot when it boyleth. Take powder of Pepper, Canel, Mace, saffron, and salt, and let all these boyle together till it be ynough. Then take vp the flesh from the broth, and let the broth coole, when it is colde, take the yolkes of Egges with the whites, and straine them, and put them into the broth, so manie till the broth be stiffe ynough, then make faire Coffins, and couch three peeces or foure in one coffin of the Ueale: and take Dates minsed and prunes, powder of pepper, Ginger and vergious, and put it to the broth. Then put the liquor in the coffins, like as ye do with a custard, and bake it till it be enough, and so serue it foorth.   

To make a florentine.
<"106">TAke Ueale, & some of the kidney of the loyne, or cold Ueale roasted, cold capon or feasant, which of them you will, and minse it verie smal, with sweet Suet, put vnto it two or three yolkes of Egges, being hard soode, Corans and Dates smal shred. Season it with a litle Sinamon and ginger, a very litle Cloues and Mace, with a litle salt and sugar, and a litle Time finely shred. Make your paste fine with butter and yolks of egs, and sugar, rolle it very thin, and so lay it in a platter with butter vnderneath, and so cut your couer and lay it vpon it.   

To make a pie to keep long.
<"107"> YOu must first perboile your flesh & presse it, & when it is pressed, season it with pepper and salt whilest it is hot, then lard it, make your paste of rie flower, it must be very thick, or else it wil not holde, when it is seasoned & larded, lay it in your pie, then cast on it before you close it, a good deale of cloues and Mace beaten small, and lay vpon that a good deale of Butter, and so close it vp: but you must leaue a hole in the top of the lid, & when it hath stood two houres in the Ouen, you must fill it as full of vinigar as you can, and then stop the hole as close as you can with paste, and then set it into the Ouen again: your Ouen must bee verie hot at the first, and then your pies will keep a great while: the longer you keepe them the better wil they be: and when ye haue taken them out of the ouen, and that they be almost cold, you must shake them betweene your hands, and set them with the bottom vpward, and when you set them into the Ouen, be well ware that one pie touch not another by more than ones hand bredth: Remember also to let them stand in the Ouen after the Uinigar be in, two houres and more.   

To bake small meats.
<"108">TAke Egges and seeth them hard, then take the yolkes out of them and braie them in a Morter, and temper them with Creame, and then strain them, & put to them pepper, saffron cloues, mace, smal raisons, almonds blanched & smal shred, & grated bread: take Peares also sodden in ale, & bray & strain them with the same liquor, and put therto bastard and honey, & put it in a pan and stirre it on the fire till it be well sodden. Then make litle coffins and set them in the Ouen vntil they bee hard, and then you must take them out again, and put the foresaid liquor into them, and so serue them foorth.   

How to make a pie in Lent.
<"109">TAke Eeles and flea them, and cut them from the bone, take Wardens and Figs, & mince them together, and put to them Cloues and mace, pepper, salt, and Saffron, and season al these together, and mingle it with great and small Raisons, Prunes and Dates, cut it in small peeces, and so put it into the coffin, and let bake halfe an houre.   

How to make a Custard in Lent.
<"110">TAke halfe a pound of almonds, blanch them and beate them in a morter. Then take a quart of fair water, warm it luke warme, and strayne your liquour with the almonds. Then take a peece of the spawn of a Pike, of a Carp or a Roch, and beat it in a morter, then straine it into your almonds: for lacke of spawne yee may take two spoonfuls of the flower of Rice, and put it into your almonds Then take Sugar, cloues, Maces, Saffron and salt, and season your liquor therwith, even as ye would season a custard of creame, then take three handful of fine flower, and almost a pint of fair water boyling hot, and a litle Saffron, and make your paste therwith. Then make your custard and when it is made, put small Raisons and Dates in the bottome of your Custarde, as you do vnto a custard of creame.

To bake Oysters shels and all.
<"111">TAke the best Oysters faire shaled, and the fairest & smoothest shels, wash a good manie, and to make them smooth, rub one shel against another, and when they are very clean make your pie: and then let your grauie run through a strayner of your Oysters and wash your oysters very clean, and season them with Pepper and salt. Then take out of the deepest shelles, and put into them three Oysters and three cloues, and a litle peece of butter, and lay a flat shell vpon that, and thus set your pie with the shels and the Oysters in them till they be full, and in voyde places put in a peece of Butter: then close your pie, and set it into the Ouen and when it hath stood there half an hour draw your pie, and then put in a sawcer full of your grauie. Then put the pie into the Ouen againe, and so let it stand one other halfe hower, and then serue it forth.   

To bake Peares, quinces, and wardens.
<"112"> YOu must take and pare them, and then coare them: then make your paste with faire water and Butter, and the yolke of an Egge, and sette your Orenges into the paste, and then bake it well: Then fill your paste almost ful with Sinamon, Ginger and Sugar: also apples must be taken after the same sort, sauing that whereas the core should be cut out they must be filled with butter euerie one: the hardest apples are best, and likewise are Peares and wardens, and none of them all but the Wardens may be perboiled, and the ouen must be of a temperate heat, two houres to stand is enough.   

To bake quince pies.
<"113">PAre them and take out all the Core: then perboyle them in water till they bee tender: Then take them foorth: and let the water runne from them till they be drie. Then put into euerie Quince, Sugar, sinamon and ginger, and fill euerie pie therewith, and then you may let them bake the space of an houre, and so serue them.   

To bake orenges.
<"114">FJrst take twelue Orenges, and pare away the yellow rinde of them, cut them in two peeces, and wring out the iuyce of them, then lay your pilles in faire water, and when it is boyling hot, put your Orenges therin, let them seeth therein vntill the water be bitter. Then haue another potte of water readie vppon the fyre, and when it dooth seethe, put your Orenge pils therein, and let them seeth again in the same water vntil they be very tender: then take your Orenges out of the pot, & put them in a bason of fayre cold water, and with your thombe take out the core of your Orenges and wash them cleane in the same water, and lay them in a faire platter, so that the water may run from them: then take a quart of Bastard, claret wine, or white wine, if you take a quart of Bastard, put thereto a quartern of sugar: if you take claret or white wine, ye must take to euerie pint a quarterne of Sugar, and set it to the fire in a faire pot: then put your Orenges therein, and seeth them till the liquor come to a Sirrop: when it is come to a sirrop, take a fair earthen pot, and put your Orenges and your sirrop altogether, so that your Orenges may be couered with your sirrop, if you lacke syrrop, you must take a pinte of Claret wine, and a quarterne of Sugar, and make thereof a sirrop, and put it into your Orenges, and stoppe your pot close, after this maner you may keep them two moneths, and when you will bake them, take an ounce of Synamon, and half an ounc of ginger, and beat them small, then take two pound of sugar, and beat it in like maner. Then put your sugar, Sinamon and Ginger in a faire platter, and mingle them together. Then take foure handful of fine flower, & lay it vpon a faire board, and make an hole in the midst of the flower with your hand: then take a pinte of fair water & eight spoonfuls of Oyl, and a little saffron and let them seeth altogether and when it seeths put it in the hole in the midst of the flower, and knead your paste ther with: then make little round coffins of the bignesse of an orenge, and when they be made, put a little sugar in the bottom of them: then take your Orenge pilles and fill them full of sugar and spices afore rehearsed, and put them into your coffins, and fill the coffins ful of the same sugar and spices: when the spices be in them, close them vp, and set them vpon papers, and bake them in an ouen or baking pan, but your Ouen may not be too hot if your coffins be dry after the baking, you may make a litle hole with the point of a knife vpon the couer of them and with a spoone put a little of the sirrop to them, at another season you must make your paste with foure handfuls of fine flower, and twelue yolks of egs, and a litle saffron, make your paste therewith.   

An other good way to bake Orenges.
PAre the vtter rinde as thin as you can: then take the Orenges, and cut out a litle hole in the top, & with a narrow pointed knife picke out as nigh as yee can al the pames: then seeth them in faire water boyling a soft pace: and when the water is bitter haue more water readye, and change the first water, and so let them seeth in the second water a good while softly boyling, let them not be very tender, for after that boyling ye must put them in an other liquor that must be water and hony very sweet sodden together & scummed: then put into that a good quantity of Saffron, and so put in your orenges, and let them seeth well in that water til they be verie tender, if yee will bake them, put Claret wine and sugar together, and let it boyle wel. Then fil your Orenges of drie Sugar and Ginger, and turne the whole of your Orenges vpward: then put the Claret wine in, till your coffin be almost full: and see that there be Sugar enough in the coffin and close it vp, and a litle before ye wil serue it in, put in more of the Claret wine and Sugar that was firste sodden, at the hole aboue in the coffin. Thus ye may keepe your Orenges in that same liquor that ye did seeth them in first, a moneth or more and if ye think that the liquor changeth: seeth it againe and it wil amend, and if you think that the Orenges doo not looke yellow enough, put Saffron in the liquor, and with a feather colour your Orenges.   <"115">

To bake Peaches.
<"116">TAke Peaches, pare them, and cut them in two peeces, & take out the stones as cleane as you can for breaching of the Peach: then make your pie three square to bake fowre in a pie, let your paste be verie fine, then make your dredge with fine Sugar, Synamon and Ginger: and first lay a little dredge in the bottome of your pies: Then put in Peaches, and fill vp your coffins with your Dredge, and put into euery coffin three spoonfuls of Rosewater. Let not your Ouen be too hot. &c.   

To bake pippins.
<"117">TAke your pippins and pare them, and make your coffin of fine paste, and cast a little sugar in the bottome of the pie. Then put in your Pippins, and set them as close as ye can: then take sugar, sinamon, and Ginger, and make them in a dredge, and fill the Pie therewith: so close it, and let it bake two houres but the Ouen must not be too hot.   

To make a good Castard.
<"118">TAke a platter full of Creame, if it bee a quart, then take sixe yolks of Egges, to a pint three Egges, and when you set your Creame, ouer the fire, cut your butter in smal peeces and but it into your creame, & it be litle more then the quantitie of a Walnut it is enough, and season it with salt, Sugar, cloues, mace, and saffron, and so couer it, and let it be set vpon a chafingdish or pot of seething water, and when it is well hardned, cast on it minced Dates and small Raisons, and so let it boyle till ye think it be wel hardned: and then serue them foorth. &c.   

How to make a Custard in Lent.
<"119">TAke the milt of any maner of fresh fish, and a little of the milt of a White Hering, and a quantitie of blanched almonds, and crums of bread, and mingle al these together: and a litle Water and Sugar, and a quantitie of Rosewater, and mingle that together: season it as ye would do another custard with al maner of spices. Then mingle therwith Raisons corrans, and Dates, cut in peeces, and so bake it in a platter or paste, whether ye will, the space of halfe an houre, and so serue it in.   

Another way to make a Custard in Lent.
<"120">TAke blanched almonds and bray them smal put crummes of white bread in the braying of the almonds. Then let a Pike be sodden, or fat Eels, that ye may haue the best of the broth and put that in the bottom of your platter, put in also minced dates and corrans. Then strain your almonds with the water sodden with sugar. Then season it with sugar, saffron, cloues and Mace: then put in all the stuffe in the platter, and so boyle it vppon a chafingdish a good while: see the platter be not couered, for if it be the Custard will neuer ware harde: when ye serue it forth, cast Sugar on it, & if your dates and corrans be sodden in the fish broth afore ye put them in the platter, they wil be the better, put to a litle salt in the making, &c.   

To make a tarte of apples and Orange pilles.
<"121">TAke your orenges, and lay them in water a day and a night, then seeth them in faire water and hony, and let them seeth till they be soft: then let them soak in the sirrop a day and a night: then take them forth and cut them small, and then make your tart and season your Apples with Sugar, Synamon and Ginger, and put in a peece of butter, and lay a course of Apples, and betweene the same course of apples, a course of Orenges, and so course by course, and season your Orenges as you seasoned your Apples, with somewhat more sugar, then lay on the lid and put it in the ouen, and when it is almost baked, take Rosewater and Sugar, and boyle them together till it be somwhat thick, then take out the Tart, and take a feather and spread the rosewater and Sugar on the lid, and set it into the Ouen againe, and let the sugar harden on the lid, and let it not burne.   

How to make a tart of Apples.
<"122">PAre your apples and cut away the core, & cut the remnant in smal peeces, & seeth it in rosewater or wine til they be faire, & ye must stirre it al the while it seeths, then draw it through a strainer, and season it with sugar sinamon & ginger, & spread it in your paste: & if you wil, ye may serue it in a dish without past & cut a date or two & lay it on, for a change yee may collour it with Saunders if you wil.   

To make a good tart of Cheries.
<"123">TAke your cheries and pick out the stones of them: then take raw yolks of egs, and put them into your cheries, then take sugar, Sinamon and Ginger, and Cloues, and put to your Cheries & make your Tart with all the Egges, your tart must be of an inche high, when it is made put in your cheries without any liquor, and cast Sugar, Sinamon, and ginger, vpon it, and close it vp, lay it on a paper, & put it in the Ouen, when it is half baken draw it out, and put the liquor that you let of your cheries into the Tart: then take molten butter, and with a feather anoint your lid therwith. Then take a fine beaten Sugar and cast vpon it: then put your Tarte into the Ouen again, and let it bake a good while, when it is baken drawe it foorth, & cast Sugar & Rosewater vpon it, and serue it in.   

To make a Tart of Cherries, when the stones be out, another waye.
<"124">SEeth them in White wine or in Claret, and drain them thick: when they be sodden: then take two yolks of Egges & thicken it withall: then season it with Synamon, Ginger, and Sugar, and bake it, and so serue it.   

To make a Tart of Damsons.
<"125">SEeth the Damsons in Wine, & straine them with a litle Creame: then boile your stuffe ouer the fier till it be thick, put there to Sugar, Synamon, and Ginger, so spred them on your paste, but set it not in the Ouen after, but let the paste be baken before.   

To make a Tart of Egges.
<"126">TAke twentie yolks of Egs, and half a pound of butter, and straine them al together into a plater: then put two good handfuls of Sugar in it, sixe spoonfuls of Rosewater, and stirre them altogether. Then make your paste with two handfuls of fine flower, and sixe yolkes of Egs, and a quarter of a dish of Butter: then make your Tart and put your stuffe therein, and lay your tart vpon a sheete of Paper, and so put it into the Ouen, and when that it is baked ynough, then drawe it out of the Ouen, and cast a litle sugar on it, and so serue it foorth.   

To make a good Tart of Creame.
<"127">TAke a quart of Creame, and put in twelue yolks of Egges, and a litle Saffron, strain them. Then put it in a pot and boyle it, but all the tyme it standeth on the fyre it must be stirred with a sticke for burning. Also ere ye boyle it, ye must put a good dish of Butter in it, when it is boyled, put in your Sugar, as much as wil make it sweet: then make your paste with Butter, Egges, Sugar, with a litle Saffron and fine flower, and make your Tart with it, and drie it in the Ouen, and when it is drie, put in a litle Rosewater and Butter, then fill your Tart with the stuffe, when it is strained, so bake it, and when it is baked, sprinkle a litle Rosewater and Sugar, and a litle Butter molten vpon it.   

To make a Tart of Prunes.
<"128">YOu must seethe the Prunes with Wine, then straine them, and season it with Sugar, so bake it with paste, and first prick it in the bottome: if that you will boyle your stuffe vpon a Chafingdish then the lesse baking afterwards wil serue it.   

To make a tart of Spinnage.
<"129">TAke some cast creame, and seeth some Spinnage in faire water till it be verie soft, then put it in a Collender, that the water may soake from it: then straine the Spinnage, and cast the creame together, let there be good plentie of Spinnage: set it vpon a chafingdish of coales, and put to it Sugar and some Butter, and let it boyle a while. Then put it in the paste, and bake it, and caste blanche powder on it, and so serue it in.   

To make a tarte of Veale
<"130">TAke two kidneys of Ueale and broyle them, then take off all the skin, and chop the fat verie small, and put two yolkes of Egs, a handfull of Corrans, sixe Dates cut small, two handfull of Sugar, a spoonfull of Salte, a spoonefull of Synamon, halfe a spoonfull of Ginger, foure spoonfuls of Rosewater, chop them altogether, then make your Tart of fine paste, and fill it with your stuffe: then close it with a couer, and strike vpon the lid of your Tart butter that is molten, and cast fine Sugar vpon it, as you do to a Marchpane, let not your Ouen be too hot, for it asketh but litle baking.   

To make a tarte of Cheese
<"131">MAke your tart, and then take Banberie Cheese, and pare away the outside of it, and cut the cleane cheese in small peeces and put them into the Tart, and when your Tart is full of Cheese: then put two handfuls of sugar into your Tart vpon your cheese, and cast in it fiue or sixe spoonfuls of Rosewater, and close it vp with a couer, and with a feather lay sweet molten Butter vpon it, and fine sugar, and bake it in a soft Ouen.   

To make a tarte of Almonds
<"132">BLanche Almonds and beat them, and straine them &c, with good thicke Creame, then put in Sugar and Rosewater, and boyle it thicke: then make your paste with Butter, fair water, and the yolks of two or three Egs, and as soone as you haue driven your paste, cast on a litle Sugar, and Rosewater, and harden your paste afore in the Ouen. Then take it out, and fill it, and set it in againe, and let it bake till it be well, and so serue it.   

To make a tarte of Medlers
<"133">TAke Medlers that be rotten, & straine them then set them on a chafingdish of coales, and beate it in two yolkes of Egges, and let it boil til it be somewhat thick: then season it with synamon, Ginger and Sugar, and lay it in paste.   

To make a tarte of Hippes
<"134">TAke Hippes, slit them, and pick out the kernels: then seeth them in white wine, or in faire water, when they bee soft sodden, straine them as thick as you can, and season them with Synamon, ginger & sugar, and lay it in paste.   

To make a Curde tarte.
<"135">TAke Creame, yolks of Egs, white bread, seeth them together, then put in a sawcer full of Rosewater or Malmesey, and turn it: and put it into a cloath, when all the whey is out, straine it, and put in Synamon, Ginger, salt, and Sugar, then lay it in paste.   

To make Lumbardy tartes.
<"136">TAke Beets, chop them small, and put to them grated bread and cheese, and mingle them wel in the chopping, take a few Corrans, and a dish of sweet Butter, & melt it then stir al these in the Butter, together with three yolks of Egs, Synamon, ginger, and sugar, and and make your Tart as large as you will, and fill it with the stuffe, bake it, and serue it in.   

To make a tarte of bread.
<"137">TAke grated bread, and put to it molten Butter, and a litle Rosewater and Sugar, and the yolkes of Egs, and put it into your paste, and bake, and when you serue it, cut it in foure quaters and cast sugar on it.   

A Tarte to prouoke courage either in man or Woman.
TAke a quart of good wine, and boyle therein two Burre rootes scraped cleane, two good Quinces, and a Potaton roote well pared   <"138">and an ounce of Dates, and when all these are boyled verie tender, let them be drawne throgh a strainer wine and al, and then put in the yolks of eight Egs, and the braines of three or foure cocke Sparrowes, and straine them into the other, and a litle Rosewater, and seeth them all with Sugar, Sinamon and Ginger, and cloues and Mace, and put in a litle sweet Butter, and set it vpon a chafingdish of coales betweene two platters, and so let it boyle till it be something big.   

To make a tart of Gooseberries
<"1390">TAke Goseberies, and perboyle them in white or Claret Wine, or strong Ale, and withall boyle a litle white bread: then take them vp, & draw them through a strainer as thicke as you can with the yolkes of sixe Egs, then season it vp with Sugar, and halfe a dish of Butter, and so bake it.   

Rosted Meates.
<"140">

To make Allowes of Mutton.
<"141">TAke faire Mutton, & cut it thin in flakes then take faire Parsley Onions, yolkes of Egs, sodden Egges, sodden Egges, marrow, or sweet suet, chop all these together, and so rolle it vp with the Mutton, and roste it,   

To roste a Gygot of Mutton.
<"142">CUt the flesh of a leg of Mutton, take out the bone, and take the flesh that you cut foorth, and chop it small, and put thereto yolkes of Egges, Cloues and Mace, Corrans, Rosemarie, Parsley. Time and some suet, and mingle them altogether, and put them into a bag and sowe it vp, and so toste it.   

To roste a Hare
<"143">FJrst wash it in faire water, then perboyle it and lay in cold water againe, then larde it, and roste it on a broch. Then to make sauce for it, take red Uinigar, Salt, Pepper, Ginger Cloues, Mace, and put them together. Then minse Apples, and Onions, and frie them in a pan: then put your sawce to them with a litle Sugar, and let them boyle wel together, then baste it vpon your Hare, and so serue it foorth,   

To roste a Calues head.
<"144">MAke a litle hole in the head, and pluck out all the braines, and lay the head to soake: then to make a pudding in it, take White bread, and lay it to soake in milke, and straine it thicke, then take foure yolkes of Egges, cloues, Mace, Pepper, Saffron, corrans, Dates, and a good quantitie of Butter, make a good Pudding, and fill the head full: then take the bone, and stop the hole, and when it is almost ynough, cast crummes of bread on it: then cleaue it, and make sawce to it with Synamon, Sugar, ginger, and Uinegar, and boyle them all together, and then you may serue it foorth.   

To roste a Capon, Phesant, or Partrige.
<"145">ROste a Capon with his head off, his wings and legges on whole: and your Phesant in like sort: but when you serue him in, sticke one of his feathers vpon his breast. And in lyke maner you must roste a Partridge, but stick vp no feather   

To roste Venison
<"146">LEt your Uenison be perboyled, then make it tender, and cast into it colde water, then Larde it, and roste it, and for sauce: take broth, Uinegar, Pepper, Cloues and Mace, with a litle salte, and boyle all these together, and so vpon your Uenison serue it.   

To roste a Quaile.
<"147">LEt his legs be broken, and knit one within another, and so roste him.   

To roste a Crane, Heron, Curlew, or Bitture.
ROste a Crane with his legs turned vp behind him, his wings cut off at the joynt next the bodie, and then wind the necke about the brech, and put the bill into his breast, the Heron Curlew, and Bitture after the same maner, but let the Bittures head be off.   <"148">

To roste a Plouer or a Snite.
<"149">TAke and roste a Plouer with his head off, and his legges turned vpward vpon his backe, but the Snite with his bill put into his breast, and his legges turned vpward vpon his breast.   

To roste woodcocks.
<"150">PLucke them, and then draw the guts out of them, but leaue the liuer still in them, then stuffe them with Larde chopped small, and Juniper berries, with his bill put into his breast and his feet as the Snite, and so roste him on a spit, & set vnder it a faire large pan, with white wine in it, and chopped Parsley, Uingar, salt, and ginger. Then make tostes of white bread, and toaste them vpon a Gridyron, so that they be not burnt: then put these tostes in a dish, and vpon them lay your woodcocks, and put your sawce being the same broth vpon them, and so serue them foorth.   

For Fishe.
<"151">

To make fine Rice pottage.
<"152">TAke halfe a pound of Jorden Almonds, and half a pound of Rice, and a gallon of running water, and a handful of Oke barke, and let the bark be boyled in the running water, and the Almonds beaten with the hulles and all on, and so strained to make the Rice pottage withal.   

To make a good Lenton pottage
<"153">TAke Eeles, and flea them, and cut them in Culpins, and caste them into a pot of faire water, and take Parsley and Onions, and shred them together not too small, & take cloues Mace, powder of Pepper, and Synamon, and cast it thereto, and let them boyle together a while: also take a good portion of Wine, & thick yest, and put it thereto, and set it boyle together a while. Then take Saffron, salt, and Uinegar, and cast it thereto, and serue it for good pottage.   

To seeth a Pike.
<"154">TAke white wine, faire water Uinegar, and a litle yest, or els a few gooseberries, boyl these together, and before ye seeth your Pike, lay it in Uinegar and salt, this is a good broth.   

To seeth a Carp.
<"155">YOu must take Red wine, and the bloud of the Carp, and a litle Uinigar and salt, and let it lie in this a while. Then seethe your Carpe in it, and put Pepper halfe broken in it, and a peece of sweet Butter, and make your soppes therewith and serue it in.   

To seeth a Gurnard.
<"156">YOu must open your Gurnard in the backe, and faire wash and seeth it in water and salt, with the fishie side vpward: and when it is sodden well, you may take some of the best of your broth if you will, or els a litle faire water, and put to it newe yest, a litle Uergious, Parslie, Rosemarie, a litle Time, whole Mace, and a peece of sweet Butter: and let it boyle in a pipkin by it selfe till it be well boyled, and then when you serue in your Gurnard, poure the same broth vpon it.   

To seeth fresh Salmon.
<"157">TAke a litle water, and as much Beere and Salt, and put thereto Parsley, Time, and Rosemarie, and let all these boyle together: Then put in your Salmon, and make your broth sharpe with some vinigar.   

To seeth a Breame.
<"158">PUt White Wine into a pot and let it seeth, then take and cut your Breame in the middest, and put him into the pot: then take an Onion and chop it small, then take Nutmegs beaten, Synamon and Ginger, whole Mace, & a pound of Butter, and let it boyle all together and so season it with salt, serue it vpon sops, and garnish it with fruit.   

To seeth Roches, Flounders, or Eeles.
MAke ye good broth with newe Yeast, put therein Uergious, Salt, Parsley, a litle Time, and not so much Rosemarie and pepper. So set it on the fyre and boyle it, & when it is wel boyled, put in Roches, Flounders, Eles, and a quantitie of sweet Butter.   <"159">

To seeth Stocke fish.
<"160">TAke Stockfish and water it well, and then put out all the baste from the fishe, then put it into a pipkin, and put in no more water then shall couer it, then set it on the fire, and as soone as it beginneth to boyle on the one side, then turne the other side to the fyre, and as soone as it beginneth to boyle on the other side, take it off and put it into a Colender, and let the water run out from it, but put in salte in the boyling of it, then take a litle faire water and sweete Butter, and let it boyle in a dish vntil it be something thicke, then poure it on the Stockfish, and so serue it in.   

To seeth a Dorye or a Mullet.
MAke your broth light with yest, somewhat savorie with salt, and put therein a litle Rosemarie, and when it seethes put in your fish, and let it seeth very softly. Take faire water and Uergious a like much, and put thereto a litle new Yest, Corrans, whole Pepper, and a litle Mace, and Dates shred verie small, and boyle them well together. And when they be well boyled, take the best of your broth that your fish is sodden in, and put to it straweberries, Gooseberries, or Barberries, sweete Butter, and some Sugar, and so season vp your broth and poure vpon your Dorie or Mullet.   <"161">

To stew Herringes.
<"162">TAke Ale, and put therin a few Onions small cut, & a spoonful of Mustard, great Raisons and saffron, & thick it with grated bread: if you wil haue puddings in them, take the soft rowes of the Herrings, & stamp them with a litle thick Almond milke, and put thereto some Dates or Figs minced, cloues, Mace, Sugar saffron, and salt, and some Corrans, and grated bread.   

To roste a peece of stockfish.
<"163">TAke a quarter of Stokfish, and a litle grated bread, and a litle Creame, & foure yolks of Egs, a few Dates minced, with Corrans, synamon, Ginger, and a little pepper, and so lay it to the fyre, & baste it well with Butter and Uinigar, & some Sinamon & Ginger in your butter, wherewith you baste it, and so serue it in.   

To bake Fish.
<"164">

To make Hering pies.
TAke Herringes and crush them in your handes, so shall ye loose the flesh from the skinne, saue the skinne as whole as yee can, and scrape off all the fish, that none may be left therupon. Then take a pound of almonds, or as manie as ye be disposed to make, blanch them, and stampe them, and in the stamping of them, put in one soft rowe, and one harde rowe, and fiue or sixe Dates, and a spoonfull or two of grated bread, and a pinte of Muscadell to grinde them withall, but yee may not grind them to fine, nor may not make them too moist with your muskadell, but somewhat stiffe, that you may fill the skinnes of your Herings, Then take Rosewater, and a litle Saffron, to co collour Almonds withall, when yee haue ground them. Then put in foure Dates, and cut them fine, and a handfull of Corrans, and a litle Sugar: then make fine paste, and rol it as thinne as you can, and strawe thereon a good deal of Sugar, then put your Herrings therin, and bake them.   

To bake a Carpe.
<"166">TAke off the scales, and take foorth the gall, and with Cloues, Mace, and salte, season it, and take Corrans and Prunes, and put about the Carp, and take Butter, and put it vpon him and let him bake two howres.   

To bake a ioll of fresh Salmon.
<"167">TAke Ginger and salt, and season it, and certaine Corrans, and cast them about and vnder it, and let the paste be fine, and take a litle Butter and lay about it in the paste, and set it in the Ouen two houres, and so serue it in.   

To bake a Breame.
SCale it, and take Cloues, Mace, and Salt, and put it in fine paste. Then take Corrans   <"168">and set about it, and a good quantitie of Butter, and put it into the bellie of the Bream, and about it, let it bake two howres.   

To bake a Gurnard with Eeles.
<"169">TAke certaine Eels and a Gurnard, and put them into your Coffin, & take cloues, Mace, and salt, and caste a litle into the bottome of your coffin. Then take the Eeles and lay them about the Gurnarde, and the residue of your spice cast about it, and take a quantitie of Corrans and Prunes: let it bake three houres.   

To bake a Trout
<"170">WAsh it a litle, and take two or three Eles, a few Cloues, Mace, ginger, and Salt, and season the Trowt and the Eele together, and put them in the coffin together, and a few Corrans about it, and a quantitie of Butter, and let them bake an houre and a halfe.   

To make a good Marchpane.
FJrst, take a pound of long smal Almonds, blanch them in colde water. Then take a cloth and drie them as dry as you can. Then stampe them small, and put no liquor to them but as you must needs to keepe them from oyling, and that litle that ye put to them must bee Rosewater, in lyke maner you shoulde but wet your Pestels end therein, for feare of putting too much liquor therein: and when you haue beaten them fine, take half a pound of Sugar or more, and see it be beaten smal to powder, but it must be fine Sugar, & then put it to your Almonds, and beate them altogether: when they be beaten, take your wafers and cut them compasse round of the bignesse that you will haue your Marchpane of. Then as soone as you can after the tempering of the stuffe, let it be put in paste of wafers and strike it abroad with a flat sticke of wood as euen as ye can, and pinch the verie stuffe as if it were an edge set on them, put a paper vnder it, & then set it vpon a faire bord, and lay a Lattine bason vppon it, the bottome vpward. Then lay burning coales vpon the bottome of your bason and euer anon lift vp your bason to see how it baketh: and if it happen to be browne, or to browne too fast in some places, fold paper as broad as that place is, and this well tended, ye shall bake one in litle more than three quarters of an houre: when it is baken, put on your gold and your biskets, and sticke in long Comfets, and then shall ye make a good Marchpane: But before that ye bake it, yee must cast on it fine Sugar and Rosewater, and that will make him to crispe like vnto yse, likewise you must haue a hoope for to make your Marchpane in.   <"171">

To make good Restons.
<"172">TAke a quart of fine flower, lay it on a faire boord, and make a hole in the middest of the flower with your hand, and put a sawcerfull of Ale Yest therein, and ten yolkes of Egges, and put therto two spoonefuls of Synamon, and one of Ginger, and a spoonfull of Cloues and Mace, and a quarterne of Sugar fine beaten, and a litle Safron, and halfe a spoonefull of Salt. Then take a dishfull of Butter, melt it and put into your flower, and therwithall make your paste as it were for Manchets, and mould it a good while and cut it in peeces the bignes of Ducks Egges, and so moulde euerye peece as a manchet, and make them after the fashion of an Ackorn broad aboue, and narrow beneath Then set them in an Ouen, and let them bake three quarters of an howre. Then take fiue dishes of Butter and claryfie it clean vpon a soft fire: then drawe foorth your Restons foorth of the Ouen, and scrape the bottoms of them faire and cut them overthwart in foure peeces, and put them in a faire charger, and put your clarified butter vpon them. Then haue powder of Synamon and Ginger readie by you, and Sugar verie fine. And mingle them altogether, and euer as you set your peeces thence, together cast some of your sugar, Synamon, & ginger vpon them, and when you haue set them all vp, lay them in a faire platter, and put a litle butter vpon them, and cast a litle sugar vpon them and so serue them in.   

To make a Vaunt
<"173">TAke marrow of Beefe, as much as you can hold in both your hands, cut it as big as great dice. Then take ten Dates, cut them as big as smal dice: then take thirtie Prunes and cut the fruite from the stones, then take halfe a handfull of Corrans, washe them and picke them, then put your marrow in a cleane platter, and your Dates, Prunes, and Corrans: then take ten yolks of Egs, and put into your stuffe afore rehearsed. Then take a quartern of Sugar, and more, and beat it smal and put to your marow. Then take two spoonfuls of Synamon, and a spoonful of Sugar, and put them to your stuffe, and mingle them all together, then take eight yolkes of Egs, and four spoonfuls of Rosewater, straine them, and put a litle Sugar to it. Then take a fair frying pan, and put a litle peece of butter in it, as much as a Walnut, and set it vpon a good fire, and when it looketh almost blacke, put it out of your pan, and as fast as you can, put halfe of the yolkes of Egs, into the midst of your pan, and let it run all the bredth of your pan, and frie it faire and yellow, and when it is fryed put it in a faire dish, and put your stuffe therein, and spread it al the bottome of the dish, and then make another vaunt euen as you made the other, and set it vpon a faire borde and cut it in faire slices, of the breadth of your litle finger, as long as your Uaunt is; then lay it vpon your stuffe after the fashion of a lattice window, and then cut off the ends of them, as much as lyeth without the inward compasse of the dish. Then set the dish within the Ouen or in a baking pan, and let it bake with leisure, and when it is baken ynough the marrow will come faire out of the vaunt, vnto the brim of the dish. Then draw it out, and cast theron a litle sugar, and so you may serue it in.   

To make Frians.
<"174">TAke three handfull of flower, seuen yolkes of Egges, and half a dish of Butter, make your paste therewith and make two Chewets therof, as you would make two Tarts, and when it is driuen verie fine with your rolling pin, then cut them in peeces of the bignesse of your hand. Then take a quartern of sugar, and one ounce and foure spoonfuls of Synamon, and halfe a spoonfull of Ginger, and mingle them altogether, then take lumps of marrow, of the quantitie of your finger, and put it on your peeces of paste afore rehearsed, and put vpon it two spoonfuls of your Sugar and spices: then take a litle water and wet your paste therewith: then make them euen as you would make a pastie of Uenison: then pricke them with a pin, and frie them as ye frie frittons, when they be fried, cast a litle sugar on them, and so serue them in.   

To make frians in Lent
<"175">TAke Ualsome Eeles and see they be fat, and cut the fish from the bone, and mince it smal, and a Warden or two with it. Then season it with Pepper, salt, Cloues, mace, and Saffron: then put to it Corrans, Dates and Prunes, smal minced, and when your fruit is altogether then poure on a litle Uergious and cut it in little peeces, and so bake it & put a peece of Butter in the midst of the peeces to make it moist, so close it, and bake it.   

To make Snowe
TAke a quart of thicke creame, and five or sixe whites of Egs, a sawcerfull of Sugar, and a sawcerfull of Rosewater, beate all together, and euer as it riseth take it out with a spoone: then take a loafe of bread, cut away the crust, and set it vpright in a platter. Then set a faire great Rosemarie bush in the middest of your bread: then lay your snow with a spoon vpon your Rosemary, & vpon your bread, & gilt it.   <"176">

To make a good Gellie.
<"177">FJrst, take foure Calues feet, and scald off the haire of them: then seeth them in faire water till they be tender. Then take out your feet, and let your broth stand till it be cold: then ye shall take of cleane the feet from it, and then put Claret wine and a litle Malmesey to it: if ye haue a pottle of Gellie water: then put to it a quart of wine, and a pint of Malmesey, then season it with salt, and put thereto one pound of Sugar, one ounce of Ginger, one ounce and a halfe of Sinamon, twelue Cloues, twelue pepper cornes, and a litle Saffron, so boyle all together: then take a good sawcerful of Uinegar, and lay your turnsall therein: and then put it to your Gellie, till it be somewhat keeled, then put in your whites of Egs, and let all these boil together. Then set all these by, and within a while let it run through your bag.   

To make Gellie both white and redde.
<"178">TAke foure Calues feete, scalde them verie cleane, and cut them in the middest, and as neere as ye can, take away all of the fat clean out of the ioints, and let the feete lie in faire water foure or fiue houres, & change the waters often. Then take a cleane pot and put your feete in it: and put to them three quarts of fair water, and scum it verie cleane, euer as anie fat doeth rise let it be taken away, and so let it seeth till the third part of your liquor be sodden away, and your feet very tender, then take it from the fire and let the liquor run through a strainer into a faire earthern pan, and set the pan in some colde place that it may be stiffe: and when it is stiffe, take a sharp knife and cut away the vppermost of the gellie as thin as you can then devide your gellie in the pan, and put it in two earthern pots: take three ounces of Synamon large, and wash it verie cleane: then break it of the bignesse of a penie. Take of case ginger almost an ounce and pare it cleane, then cut it as much as if you would eat it with figs: then take two Nutmegs and cut them in foure or fiue peeces: and put al this in one of your pots, and put thereto a pound of Sugar, as ye thinke good, and put thereto a sawcerfull of white Uinigar, and a litle faire white salt, faire picked, and verie clean: then set your pot in a soft fyre, and so let it stew, but not seeth, and let the pot be couered very close, when it hath stued a while, with a spoone assay it whether it be flashy in the mouth, if it be, put in a litle more Synamon, and if it be hot of the spice, put in a pint of white Wine, and let it stue a while. Then take the pot from the fyre, and let it stand till it be between hot and colde: then take the whites of ten Egs, and beat them well, and put them into the pot, but see that your liquor be not too hot, nor too cold, when you put them in. Then set your pot to the fyre againe, & when the Egs be hardened, with a spoone take them cleane off, and set the pot from the fyre, ere ye take off the whites. Then haue your gellie bag clean, and hang it in a faire place, and put in the bottome of your bag a litle Margeram, and so let it run through your bag three or four times or more, if neede require, but keepe alwayes a cleane cloth ouer the mouth of your bagge, then cast your dishes, when all is runne out, be well ware ye haue no duste when it runneth, or when ye shall cast it, and haue a litle fyre beside your bagge, when it is running, make your red gellie of your other pot, and season it as yee did the white gellie, and doo thereto in the putting in of the Egs as ye did before. But for the Nutmegs ye must take twentie cloues bruised, and beware ye make not too deep a collour of your Turnesall at the first, but take of it by litle and litle at once, and put in the bottome of your bag a litle Rosemary, & to vse it els in euery thing as ye vsed the white.   

To make Gellie with flesh.
<"179">TAke knuckles of Ueal, and cut the ioints all to peeces, and lay them in faire water the space of an houre, then wash them cleane, and lay them in faire water againe the space of halfe an houre. Then take a faire pot and put your flesh in it: then fill your pot with Claret wine and water, and set it to the fyre, and scum it as cleane as ye can: then let it boyle as softly as ye can, for the sooner it is boyled the longer it will be ere it come to a Gellie: therefore it muste boyle but softlie, when it is boyled, straine the liquor into a faire bolle, and when it is cold, take off the grease that lyeth vpon it: then take of the clearest of the stuffe, and put it in a faire pot and seeth it, and then put in your Sugar: then take Synamon, graines, Cloues, long Pepper, Nutmegs, and Ginger, of each of these a quantitie, then bruise them, and searce out the small spices, and put the greatest into your pot, when it boyleth, put in whites of Egs beaten: Then take a scummer and scum them as they rise, and drie your Turnesall by the fyre, and rub it cleane, and collour your Gellie therewith, then take your bag, and put Rosemarie in the bottome of it, and hang it by the fyre side, and let your gellie runne two times through your bag into a faire vessell.   

To make Gellie with Fish.
<"180">TAke Tenches and scalde them, and drawe them and wash them cleane: then put your Tenches into a faire pot: then take white wine or Claret, and fill your pot therewith: then take Jsenbras as much as ye think best. Then take your pot and set it on the fire, and let in boyl the space of an hower and a halfe: then take it from the fire, and let your liquor run through a strainer, then let your liquor stande till it be cold. Then order it in euerie point as yee did the other before, that is made with flesh.   

All necessaries appertaining to a Banquet.
<"181">SYnamon, Sugar, Nutmegs, Pepper, Saffron, Saunders, Coleander, Anniseeds, Licoras, all kind of Comfets, Orenges, Pomegranate, Tornsall, Lemmans, Prunes, Corrans, Barberries conserued, Paper white and browne: seeds, Rosewater, Raisons, Rie flower, Ginger, Cloues and mace, Damaske water, Dates, Cherries conserued, sweet Orenges, Wafers for your Marchpanes, seasoned and vnseasoned, Spinnedges.   

To make a Tyssan.
<"182">TAke a pint of Barley beeing picked, sprinkled with faire water, so put it in a faire stone morter, and with your pestell rub the barley, and that will make it tuske, then picke out the barley from the huskes, and set your barley on the fyre in a gallon of faire water, so let it seeth til it come to a pottle. Then put into your water, Succory, Endiue, Cinkefoyle, Uiolet leaues, of each one handfull, one ounce of Anniseed, one ounce of Liquoris bruised, and thirtie great raisons, so let all this geare seeth till it come to a quart: then take it off, let it stand and settle, and so take of the clearest of it, and let it be strained, and when you haue strained the clearest of it, then let it stand a good pretie while. Then put in foure whites of Egs al to beaten, shels and all, then stir it well together, so set it on the fyre againe, let it seeth, and euer as the scum doth rise take it off, and so let it seeth a while: then let it run through a strainer or an Jpocras bagge, and drinke of it in the morning warme.   

To clarifie Whey.
<"183">TAke the ioyse of Fumetorie, halfe a pinte of the ioyse of Borage, of Endiue, of the tendring of hoppes, of each of them a quarter of a pinte, then put al these ioyses to a pottle of whey, with three whites of Egges beaten, and with Sugar sufficient: then boyle them on an easie fire, take away the scum as it riseth, and when it is cold let it run through a faire strayner: take thereof euery morning halfe a pinte, and before supper as much. This wil pure your bloud, and will continue good foure dayes.   

To make fillets Gallentine
<"184">TAke faire Pork, and take off the skin and roste it half ynough, then take it off the spit, and smite it in faire peeces, and caste it in a faire pot: then cut Onions, but not too small, and frie them in faire suet, put them into the Porke, then take the broth of Beefe or Mutton, and put thereto, and set them on the fyre, and put thereto powder of Pepper, Saffron, Cloues and Mace, and let them boyle wel together. Then take faire bread and Uinigar, & steep the bread with some of the same broth, straine it, and some bloud withall, or els Saunders, and collour it with that, and let all boyle together, then cast in a litle Saffron and salte, and then you may serue it in.   

To make Gallentine.
<"185">TAke tostes of white bread, boyle them on a chafingdish of coales, with vinigar, when it hath soaked afore in the vinegar, and in the boyling put in a brance of Rosemary, Sugar, Synamon and Ginger, straine it and serue it.   

To make tostes of Veale.
TAke the kidneyes, choppe them verie small, then put to it foure or fiue yolkes of Egges,   <"186">three spoonfuls of Sugar, a litle synamon and Ginger, a spoonefull of Corrans cleane washed and picked, choppe them alltogether, then make sops of stale white breade, and lay your stuffe vpon them, and take a frying pan and a dish of sweet Butter in it, and melt it: then put in your tosts and fry them vpon a soft fyre: then lay them in a dish, and cast sugar on them, your fyre must be verie soft, or els they will burne.   

To make an Apple Moye.
<"187">TAke Apples, and cut them in two or foure peeces, boyle them till they be soft, and bruise them in a morter, and put thereto the yolkes of two Egs, and a little sweet butter, set them on a chafingdish of coales, and boyle them a litle, and put thereto a litle Sugar, synamon and Ginger, and so serue them in.   

To make Pescods.
<"188">MAke your past with fine flower, and yolks of Egs, make it short and drive it thinne. Then take Dates, Corrans & marrowe, and cut them lyke Dice, and season them with salt because of the marrow a litle: then put in Synamon, Sugar and Ginger, make your past as you doe for the Frians in Butter or suet, & serue them in.   

To make Pescods another.
<"189">TAke Apples, and mince them small, take Figs, Dates, Corrans, great Raisons, Sinamon, Ginger, and Sugar, mince them, and put them all together, and make them in litle flat peeces, and frie them in Butter and Oyle.   

Pettie seruices.
<"190">TAke faire flower, Saffron, & Sugar, make thereof paste, and make thereof coffins, and take the yolkes of Egs tried from the whites, and see the yolks be all whole. Then lay three or foure Egs in the coffin, and two or three peeces of marrow: then take powder of Ginger, Sugar, and Corrans, and roll the marrowe in it, and put all in the pie, and couer it, or bake it in a pan.   

To make Spanish balles.
<"191">TAke a peece of a leg of Mutton, and pare away the skin from the flesh, chop the flesh verie small: then take marrow of beefe, and cut it as big as a hazell nut, & take as much of marrow in quantity as ye haue of flesh, and put both in a faire platter, and some salt, and eight yolks of Egs, and stirre them wel together: then take a litle earthern pot, and put in it a pint, and a halfe of beefe broth that is not salt, or els Mutton broth and make it seeth: then make balles of your stuffe, and put them in boyling broth one after another, and let them stew softly the space of two houres. Then lay them on sops three or foure in a dish, and of the vppermost of the broth vpon the sops, and make your balles as big as tennis balles.   

To make balles of Italie.
<"192">TAke a peece of a legge of Ueale, parboyle it, then pare away all the skin and sinews and chop the Ueale verie small, a litle salt and pepper, two yolks of Egges hard rosted, and seuen yolkes rawe, temper all these with your Ueale, then make balles thereof as big as walnuts, and boyle them in beefe broth, or mutton broth, as ye did the other before rehearsed, and put into your broth ten beaten cloues, a race of Ginger, a litle Uergious, foure or fiue lumpes of marrowe whole, let them stew the space of an howre. Then serue them vpon sops, eight or nine in a dish, and betwixt the balles you must lay the lumps of marrow.   

To make Almond butter after the best and newest manner.
<"193">TAke a pound of Almonds or more, as ye wil, blanch them in cold water, or in warme, as ye may haue leysure: after the blanching, let them lie an howre in colde water: then stampe them in fair cold water as fine as ye can: then put your Almondes in a cloth, and gather your cloth round vp in your hands, and presse out the milke as much as you can, if ye thinke they bee not small ynough, beat them againe, and so get out milke as long as you can. Then set it on the fyre, and when it is ready to seeth, put in a good quantitie of salt, and Rosewater, that will turne it, and after it is in, let it haue one boyling, and then take it from the fyre, and caste it abroade vpon a linnen cloth, and vnderneath the cloth, scrape off the whey as long as it will runne. Then scrape together the butter into the midst of your cloath, and binde the cloth together, and let it hang as long as it will drop. Then take peeces of Sugar, as much as yee think wil make it sweet, and put thereto Rosewater a litle, as much as wil melt the Sugar, and fine powder of Saffron, as ye think wil collour it, and let both your Sugar and Saffron steepe together in that litle quantitie of Rosewater, & with that season vp your butter when you will make it.   

To make Ipocras.
<"194">TAke of chosen Sinamon two ounces, of fine Ginger one ounce, of Graines halfe an ounce of Nutmegs halfe an ounce, bruise them al, and stampe them in three or foure pintes of good odifferous wine, with a pound of Sugar, by the space of four and twentie houres: then put them into an Jpocras bag of woolen, and so recieve the liquor. The readiest and best way is to put the spices with the pound of Sugar, & the wine into a bottell, or a stone pot stopped close, and after xxiiii houres it wil be ready, then cast a thin linnen cloth, and letting so much run through as ye will occupie at once, and keep the vessell close, for it will so well keep both the spirite, odour, and vertue of the wine and also spices.   

To make Ipocras another way.
<"195">TAke a gallon of wine, an ounce of Synamon two ounces of Ginger, one pound of Sugar, twentie Cloues bruised, and twentie cornes of pepper big beaten, let all these soake together one night, and then let it run through a bag, and it will be good Jpocras.   

To make Egs vpon Sops.
<"196">TAke Egs and potche them as soft as ye can, then take a fine manchet, and make soppes thereof, and put your sops in a dish, and put vergious thereto and Sugar and a litle Butter: then set it to the fire, and let in boyl: then take your egs and lay them vpon your sops, and cast a litle chopt Parslie vppon them, and so serue them in.   

To make Egges in Lent.
TAke Hennes Egges, and put out cleane the white and the yolk. Then wash your shell   <"197">clean, and take Almond milk, and seeth it with Jsonglas, or of the broth of a Pike or a Tench, and when it is sodden, take it off, but before yee take it from the fyre, ye must season it with sugar and salt, and fill your Egge shels before the milke be colde. Then make a hole in the Egge aboue, and cut out so much of the white as yee will make your yolks, then collour your milke that ye left afore with Saffron, like the yolk of an Egge, and fill vp the hole againe therewith, and let it stand till it be occupied.   

To make caste Creame.
<"198">TAke milke as it commeth from the Cow, a quart or lesse, and put thereto rawe yolks of Egges, temper the milke and the Egges together. Then set them so tempered vpon a chafingdish of coales, and stirre it stil, and put Sugar to it, and see it curd not, and it will be lyke Creame of Almonds: when it is boyled thicke ynough, then caste a litle sugar on it, and sprinkle Rosewater vpon it, and so serue it in.   

To make cast Creame another way.
<"199">TAke the milk that is milked ouer night, and scum off the Cream: then take the milk and sixe whites of Egs, straine them together, and two yolks of Egs mingled together, and boyle them altogether vntill they turne to a Curde, then put thereto a quantitie of Uergious and then it wil turne: then take the same, and put it in a linnen cloth, and hang it vpon a pin a litle while, and let the whey run from it. Then take it downe and straine it into a platter, and season it with a litle Rosewater and Sugar, and so serue it.   

To make clowted Cream after Mistres Horsmans way.
<"200">WHen you haue taken the milke from the Kine, straight set it on the fire, but see that your fyre be without smoake, and soft fire, and so keepe it on from morning till it be night, or nigh thereabout, and ye muste be sure that it doeth not seeth all that while, and ye muste let your milke be set on the fyre, in as broad a vessell as you can. Then take it from the fire, and set it vpon a board, and let it stande al night: then in the morning take off the cream, and put it in a dish or where ye wil.   

To make Creame of Almonds.
<"201">TAke thicke Almond milke, and seeth it a litle, then take it from the fyre, and corne it with salt and Uinigre. Then caste it in a cloth, and with a litle knife scrape in vnder the cloth, and there will come out whey. Then put the Creame together in the midst of the cloth, and hang it on a pin, and let more whey drop out, till ye thinke it be well. Then put it in a vessell, and put to it sugar plentie, if it hang too long that it be too drie: then temper it with sweete wine, and dresse it if you will with small raisons and lay it like morterels, or els put it abroad, and lay Borage leaues vpon it, or els red comfets, and so serue it in.   

To make a good posset curde.
<"202">TAke your milke and set it on the fyre, and let it seeth, put in your yolks of Egs according to the quantitie of your milk. But see that your Egs be tempered with some of the milke ere ye put them to the milke that is on the fire, or els it will fall together and mar all, and yee must stirr it still til it seeth and begin to ryse. Then take it off the fyre, but before yee take it off, haue your drinke readie in a fair bason, on a chafingdish of coales, and powre the milke into the bason as it standeth ouer the chafish with fyre, so couer it, and let it stand a while Then take it vp and cast on Synamon and sugar, and so serue it in.   

Mistresse Drakes way to make soft Cheese all the yeare through, that it shall be lyke rowen Cheese.
TAke your milke as it commeth from the Cow, and put it in a vessell til it be cold, then take as much faire water, and set it on the fire, when your water is warm, put so much of your   <"203">water is warme, put so much of your water in that milke as wil warme the milk. Then take a spoonefull of runnet and more, and put into your milke and make your Cheese, and put it into a faire cloth, and so put it into the presse, & turne it in the presse often, and wype it with faire clothes as often as ye turne it.   

To make Fritters.
<"204">TAke a pinte of Ale, and foure yoalkes of Egges, and a faire litle Saffron, a spoonfull of Cloues and Mace, and a litle salte, and a halfe a handfull of Sugar, put all this in a faire platter, and stirre them all together with a spoone, and make your batter thereof. Then take ten Apples, pare and cut them as big as a groate, put them in your batter: then take your suet & set it on the fyre, & when it is hot, put your batter & your Apples to your suet with your hand one by one, and when they be faire and yellow, take them out, and lay them in a faire platter, and let them stand a little while by the fyre side Then take a faire platter, and lay your fritters therein, and caste a litle Sugar on them, and so serue them in.   

To make Curde Frittors.
<"205">TAke the yolks of ten Egs, and breake them in a pan, & put to them one handful of Curds, and one handful of fine flower, and straine them all together, and make a batter, and if it be not thicke ynough put more Curdes in it, and salt to it. Then set it on the fyre in a frying pan, with such stuffe as ye will frie them with, and when it is hot, with a ladle take parte of your batter, and put of it into the panne, and let it run as smal as you can, & stir them with a stick, and turne them with a scummer, & when they be fair and yellow fryed, take them out, and cast Sugar vpon them, and serue them foorth.   

To make Fritters with marrow.
TAke three handfuls of fine flower and more, and lay it in a faire platter, and put thereto sixe yolkes of Egs, and almost a pint of Ale, and a good handfull of Sugar, and two spoonfull of Synamon, and a spoonfull of Ginger, and halfe a spoonefull of Cloues and Mace, a litle salt, and a litle Saffron to collour it withall. Then take a spoone, and stirre all these foresaid things together, and make your Batter therewith: then take your marrowe, and cut it of the bignesse of a groat: then haue a frying pan readie with sweet suet therin, and set it to the fyre, and when it is hot, dip your marrow in the butter, and put it into the pan peece by peece, and euer be stiring them with a stick, and when they be fryed, take them out of your pan with a scummer, and lay them in a fayre platter, and take   <"206">Sugar, Synamon and Ginger, and cast vpon them, and so serue them in.   

To make stocke Frittors.
<"207">TAke an handfull of marrow, or the kidneyes of a Calfe, chop them small. Then take ten yolks of Egs, and put them to your marrow or kidneyes. Then take a handfull of Corrans, and wash them cleane, put them to your stuffe, and take ten Dates and cut them smal, and put them to your stuffe, and take two handfull of grated bread, two spoonful of Ginger, and one spoonfull of Synamon, and a spoonfull of cloues and Mace a quarter of Sugar and a litle Saffron, and mingle your spices and stuffe together in a faire platter: then take two handfull of fine flower, and sixe yolks of Egges, and make your batter therewith with Ale and Saffron. Then make of your stuffe afore rehearsed litle pilles as bigge as a walnut. Then haue a frying pan readie with faire suet therein vpon the fyre, and when it is hot, dip your pilles into your batter, and put them into your frying pan, & fry them as ye would frie frittors, and that done, put them in a platter, and cast a litle Synamon, Sugar, and Ginger on them, and so serue them in.   

To make Frittors with Apples.
<"208">TAke fine flower, and temper it with Butter and a litle salt, and make a Batter, and take a very litle saffron to collour your batter withall, and when your batter is made, straine it through a strainer, then cut your apples of the bignesse of a grote, and put them to your batter then put your suet to the fyre, and when it is hot, put a peece of your Apples to your suet, and if it ryse quicklie, then your stuffe is well seasoned, if it abide in the bottome, then it is not halfe ynough: therefore when it riseth from the bottome, fill your pan one after another as fast as ye can, and when they are faire colloured, tak them out with a scummer, and put them in a platter, and alwayes whiles they are in the pan stirre them with a sticke, and looke that yee haue liquor ynough. Then take your frittors, and put them in a faire platter, and then scrape Sugar ynough vpon them.   

To make Frittors of Spinage.
<"209">TAke a good deale of Spinnage, and wash it cleane, and boyle it in faire water, and when it is boyled, put it in a Collender, and let it coole. Then wring all the water out of it as neere as ye can, lay it vpon a board, and chop it with the back of a chopping knife verie smal, and put it in a platter, and put to it four whites of Egs, and two yolks, and the crums of halfe a manchet grated, and a litle Synamon & Ginger, and styrre them well together with a spoon and take a frying pan and a dish of sweete Butter in it, when it is molten put handsomly in your pan halfe a spoonefull of your stuffe, and so bestowe the rest after, fry them on a soft fyre, and turn them when time is, lay them in a platter and cast sugar on them.   

To make Pancakes.
<"210">TAke new thicke Creame a pinte, foure or fiue yolks of Egs, a good handfull of flower, and two or three spoonfuls of ale, strain them altogether into a faire platter, and season it with a good handfull of Sugar, a spooneful of Synamon, and a litle Ginger: then take a frying pan, and put in a litle peece of Butter, as big as your thombe, and when it is molten browne, cast it out of your pan, and with a ladle put to the further side of your pan some of your stuffe, and hold your pan aslope, so that your stuffe may run abroad ouer all the pan, as thin as may be: then set it to the fyre, and let the fyre be verie soft, and when the one side is baked, then turne the other, and bake them as dry as ye can without burning.   

To make good white puddings.
<"211">SEe that your liuers bee not too much parboyled. Then take of the liuers and lights, and let them bee picked and chopped with knives, then stamp them in a morter, & straine them through a Collendor, and put some milke to it, to help to get it through, then put foure or fiue Egs and but fiue whites, and put in crums of bread, Cloues, Mace, Saffron, Salt, and some Pepper, and sweet suet small minced, and let there be ynough of it, and so still fill them vp, and to black puddings, Otemeale, milk & salt.   

To make Puddings,
<"212">TAke grated bread, the yolks of sixe Egs, a litle Synamon and Salt, Corrans, one minced Date, and the suet of Mutton minced smal, knead all these together, and make them vp in litle balles, boyle them on a chafingdish with a litle Butter and Uinigar, cast Synamon and Sugar thereon, and so serue them in.   

To make Ising puddings.
<"213">TAke a platter full of Otemeale grotes clean picked, and put thereto of the best Creame sodden that ye can get, blood warme, as much as shall couer the grotes, and so let them lie and soake three houres, or somewhat more, till they haue drunke vp the Cream, and the grotes swollen and soft withall. Then take sixe Egges whites and yolkes, and straine them faire into your grotes: then take one platterfull and a half of beefe suet, the skin cleane pulled from it, and as small minced as is possible. So that when ye haue minced it, you must largelie haue one platterfull and a halfe, & rather more than lesse: then mingle these wel among your grotes then season them with some salt and some Saffron: & if ye will put in Cloues and Mace: then fill your Puddings, but not too ful, and see they be faire washed and sweet, and beware that ye pull not away too much of the fat within, for the fatter they be within, the better it is for the Puddings: also if ye finde too much Creame left among the grotes, after they haue lyne foure houres: then put out part of it, and so seeth vp your puddings.   

To make a Tansey.
<"214">TAke a litle Tansey, Fetherfew, Parsley, and Uiolets, and stampe them all together, and straine them with the yolkes of eight or tenne Egges, and three or foure whites, & some Uergious, and put thereto Sugar and salt, and frie it.   

To make a Tansey another way.
<"215">TAke halfe a handfull of Tansey, of the yoongest ye can get, and a handfull of yong Borage, Strawberry leaues, Lettice, and Uiolet leaues, and wash them cleane, and beate them very small in a morter: then put to them eight Egges whites and all, and sixe yolkes besides, and straine them all together through a strainer: then season it with a good handfull of Sugar, and a Nutmeg beaten small. Then take a frying pan, and halfe a dish of sweete Butter, and melt it: then put your Egs to it, set it on the fyre, and with a sawcer, or with a ladle, stir them til they be halfe baken: then put them into a platter, and all to beate them still till they be very small: then take your frying pan made cleane, and put a dish of sweet Butter in it, and melt it: then put your stuffe into your pan by a spoonfull at once, and when the one side is fryed, turne them and frie them together: then take them out, lay them in a platter, and scrape Sugar on them.   

To make a Tansey in Lent.
<"216">TAke all maner of hearbs, and the spawn of a Pike, or of anie other fish, and blanched Almonds, and a few crums of bread and a litle faire water, and a pinte of Rosewater, and mingle altogether, and make it not too thin, and frie it in Oyle, and so serue it in.   

The making of fine Manchet.
<"217">TAke halfe a bushell of fine flower twise boulted, and a gallon of faire luke warm water, almost a handful of white salt, and almost a pinte of yest, then temper all these together, without any more liquor, as hard as ye can handle it: then let it lie halfe an hower, then take it vp, and make your Manchetts, and let them stande almost an hower in the ouen. Memorandum, that of euery bushell of meale may be made fiue and twentie caste of bread, and euerie loafe to way a pounde beyside the chesill,   

The making of manchets after my Ladie Graies vse.
<"218">TAke two peckes of fine flower, which must be twice boulted, if you will haue your manchet verie faire: Then lay it in a place where ye doe vse to lay your dowe for your bread, and make a litle hole in it, and put in that water as much leauen as a crab, or a pretie big apple, and as much white salt as will into an Egshell, and all to breake your leuen in the water, and put into your flower halfe a pinte of good Ale yest, and so stir this liquor among a litle of your flower, so that ye must make it but thin at the first meeting, and then couer it with flower, and if it be in the winter, ye must keepe it verie warm, and in summer it shall not need so much heate, for in the Winter it will not rise without warmeth. Thus let it lie two howers and a halfe: then at the second opening take more liquor as ye thinke will serue to wet al the flower. Then put in a pinte and a halfe of good yest, and so all to breake it in short peeces, after yee haue well laboured it, and wrought it fiue or sixe tymes, so that yee bee sure it is throughlie mingled together, so continue labouring it, till it come to a smoothe paste, and be well ware at the second opening that yee put not in too much liquor sodenlie, for then it wil run, and if ye take a litle it will be stiffe, and after the second working it must lie a good quarter of an hower, and keep it warme: then take it vp to the moulding board, and with as much speede as is possible to be made, mould it vp, and set it into the Ouen, of one pecke of flower ye may make ten caste of Manchets faire and good.   

To make short Cakes.
<"219">TAke wheate flower, of the fayrest ye can get, and put it in an earthern pot, and stop it close, and set it in an Ouen and bake it, and when it is baken, it will be full of clods, and therefore ye must searse it through a search: the flower will haue as long baking as a pastie of Uenison. When you haue done this, take clowted Creame, or els sweet Butter, but Creame is better, then take Sugar, Cloues, Mace, and Saffron, and the yolke of an Egge for one doozen of Cakes one yolke is ynough: then put all these foresaid things together into the cream, & temper them al together, then put them to your flower and so make your Cakes, your paste wil be very short, therefore yee must make your Cakes very litle: when yee bake your cakes, yee must bake them vpon papers, after the drawing of a batch of bread.   

To make leauened bread.
TAke sixe yolkes of Egs, and a litle peece of Butter as big as a Walnut, one handfull of verie fine flower, and make al these in paste, and all to beat it with a rolling pin, till it be as thin as a paper leafe, then take sweet Butter and melt it, and rub ouer all your paste therewith, with a feather: then roll vp your paste softly as ye would roll vp a scroll of paper, then cut them in peeces of three inches long, and make them flat with your hands and lay them vpon a sheet of cleane paper, and bake them in an Ouen or panne, but the Ouen may not be too hot, and they

must
bake halfe an howre, then take some sweete butter and melt it, and put that into your paste when it commeth out of the Ouen, and when they are verie wet, so that they be not drie, take them out of your butter, and lay them in a faire dish, and cast vpon them a litle Sugar, and if you please, Synamon and Ginger, and serue them foorth.   <"220">

To make Buttered Beere.
<"221">TAke three pintes of Beere, put fiue yolkes of Egges to it, straine them together, and set it in a pewter pot to the fyre, and put to it halfe a pound of Sugar, one penniworth of Nutmegs beaten, one penniworth of Cloues beaten, and a halfepenniworth of Ginger beaten, and when it is all in, take another pewter pot and brewe them together, and set it to the fire againe, and when it is readie to boyle, take it from the fire, and put a dish of sweet butter into it, and brewe them together out of one pot into an other.   

A Purgation.
TAke an Ounce of Seene, and as much of Polipody, bruise them, and lay them in steep with a litle Anniseed, and a litle Ginger bruised in three partes of a pinte of white wine, so let it lie all day or a night: then seeth it to a quarter of a pinte, and in the morning drinke it earlie. Cancer, Scorpio, and Pisces: these three be the best signes to take purgations in.   <"222">

The order hovve all maner of meates should be serued to the Table, with their proper sawces both for flesh and fish.For flesh dayes at dinner:

The first course.
<"224">POttage or stewed broth. Boyled meat or stewed meat. Chickens and Bacon. Powdered Beefe. Pies, Goose, Pigge, Rosted Beefe, Rolled Ueale, Custard.   

The second course.
<"225">Roasted Lambe, roasted Capons, Rosted Conies, Chickens, Pehennes, Baked Uenison, Tart.   

The first course at Supper.
<"226">A Sallet, a Pigs Petitoe, powdered beefe sliced, a shoulder of Mutton or a breast, Ueale, Lambe, Custard.   

The second course.
<"227">Capons roasted, Connies roasted, Chickens roasted, Pigions roasted, Larkes roasted, a Pie of Pigions or Chickens, baked Uenison, Tart.   

The Seruice at Dinner.
<"228">Brawne and Mustard. Capons stewed in white broth: a pestle of Uenison vpon brewes: A chine of Beefe, and a breast of Mutton boyled: Chewets or Pies of fine Mutton: three greene Geese in a dish, Sorrell sauce. For a stubble Goose, mustard and Uinigar: after Alhallowen day a Swanne, sauce Chaudron: A Pigge: A double ribbe of Beefe roasted. Sauce Pepper and Uinigar. A loyne of Ueale or breast, sauce Orenges: Halfe a Lambe or a Kid: Two Capons roasted, Sauce Wine and salt, Ale and salt, except it be vpon sops: Two pasties of fallow Deere in a dish: a Custard: A dish of Leash.   

The second course.
Jellie, Peacockes, sauce Wine and Salte: Two Connies, or halfe a dozen Rabbets, sauce Mustard and Sugar: halfe a dozen of Pigions, Mallard, Toyle, sauce Mustard and Uergious: Gulles, Storke, Heronshew, Crab, sauce Galantine: Curlew, Bitture, Bustard, Feasant, sauce Water and Salt, with Onions sliced: Halfe a dozen Woodcockes, sauce Mustarde and Sugar: Halfe a dozen Teales, sauced as the Feasants: A dozen of Quailes: a dish of Larkes: Two Pasties of red Deare in a dish: Tarte, Ginger bread, Fritters,   <"229">

Seruice for fish dayes.
<"230">Butter, a Sallet with hard Egs: pottage of sand Eles and Lampernes, red Herring, greene broyled and strewed vpon. White Herring, Ling Haburdine, sauce Mustard, salt Salmon minced, sauce Mustard and vergious, and a litle Sugar, powdered Conger, Shad, Mackerell, sauce Uinigar: Whiting, sauce, with the liuer and Mustard or vergious. Thornback sauce, liuer, and mustard, Pepper and salt strowed vpon, after that it is bruised: Fresh Codde, sauce Greene sauce, Dace, Mullet, Eeles vpon sops, Roche vpon sops: Perch: Pike in Pike sauce, Trout vpon sops, Tench in Gellie or Gresyll, Custard.   

The second course.
<"231">Flounders or Floukes, Pike sauce: Fresh Salmond, Fresh Conger, Bret, Turbut, Halibut sawce Uinegar, Breame vpon sops, Carpe vpon sops, Soles, or any other fishes fryed, Roated Eele, Sauce the drypping, Rosted Lampernes, rosted Porpos, fresh Sturgion, sauce Galentine. Creuis, Crab, Shrimps, sauce Uinegar: Baked Lampray, Tart, Figs, Apples, Almonds blanched, Cheese, Raisins, and Peares.   

Fine Sauce for a roasted Rabbet: vsed to king Henrie the eight.
<"232">TAke a handfull of washed Parcelie, minced small, boil it with butter and vergious vpon a chafingdish, season it with Sugar, and a litle pepper grose beaten: when it is readie, put in a few crums of white bread amongst the others let it boile againe til it be thick: then lay it in a platter, like the bredth of three fingers, lay of each side one rosted Cony or more; so serue them

To make sauce for a Capon with Orenges.
<"233">TAke red wine, Synamon, Sugar, Ginger, the grauie of the Capon, or a little sweet butter: slice an Orenge thin, boyle it in the stuffe, when your Orenges be tender, lay them vpon your sops, mince some of the rynde and caste on the sops, and so serue them.   

To make sauce for Capon another way.
<"234">TAke Claret wine, Rosewater, sliced Orenges, Sinamon and Ginger, and lay it vpon sops, and lay your Capon vpon it.   

To make sauce for Capons or Turkie Foules.
<"235">TAke Onions, slice them thin, boile them in faire water til they be boyled drie, put some of the grauy vnto them, & pepper grose beaten.   

Sauce for Capons, Feasants, Partridges, or Woodcockes.
<"236">Onions sliced verie thinne, faire water and Pepper grose beaten.   

Sauce for a rosted Stockdoue.
<"237">TAke Onions, mince them not too small, boyle them in a litle Claret wine, when they be boyled almost drie, put thereto vinigar, Sugar, Pepper, and some of the grauie of the Stockdoue.   

Sauce for a shoulder of Venison.
<"238">TAke Uinigar crums of white bread, and the grauie of the Uenison, or some sweete butter and Sugar, Synamon, Ginger, and Pepper, boyle them together on a chafingdish of coales, and so serue them foorth.   

To make sauce for Mutton.
<"239">TAke Onions, slice them, boyle them in Uergious, cut a peece of lean Mutton that is almost rosted, mince it very small, put it to your sauce, let it boile altogether a good while, when you serue your mutton in, poure that vpon it.   

A Chaldron for a Swan.
TAke red wine, tostes of white bread, straine them, put in Uinigar, boyle it on a chafingdish: put in a fewe Saunders, a litle Sugar, Synamon, Ginger, and Pepper, and so serue it in FINIS,   <"240">

The table of all the principall matters contained in this Booke.
<"241">

FINIS.




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