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Bacon

Meats

"England has no rival in the preparation of seasoned pork, and her famous bacon, the renown of which is enormous, constitutes one of the greatest discoveries in the science of gastronomy" -
Auguste Escoffier 'Le Guide Culinaire'


The back and sides of the pig, 'cured' by salting, drying or smoking. Usually thinly sliced and fried.


Bacon, from www.bostonsausage.co.uk


Auguste Escoffier, the cook of all cooks and 'Emperor of French Cuisine' says in the definitive and magnificent 'Le Guide Culinaire,' that "England has no rival in the preparation of seasoned pork, and her famous bacon, the renown of which is enormous, constitutes one of the greatest discoveries in the science of gastronomy".

England consumes some quarter-of-a-million tons of bacon each year, very roughly half a rasher per person, per day.


Original Receipt in 'A New System Of Domestic Cookery' by 'A Lady' (Mrs. Maria Eliza Ketelby Rundell) (Rundell 1807);

THE BLACK POOL RECEIPT FOR CURING BACON - EB
For a middling sized hog, take twelve pounds of the best common salt, and one pound of saltpetre pounded very finely, rub it in well and cover the meat about an inch thick, hams, chops and all placing it with the rind downwards. Let it remain for a week then take off the salt turn the whole with the rind upwards, then lay the salt on again for another week. Then remove the salt and turn it a second time lay on the salt and let it remain four days longer It will then be properly salted. Wipe it clean, rub it all over with dry salt, and hang it where it will have a little air of the fire until it is dry. Then sew it up in whity brown paper and hang it in a dry place where no heat can come to it, and if these precautions are taken it will not get rusty
Obs The meat must be salted on a board that is well perforated with holes to let the brine run from it, and it must be covered up closely with a coarse cloth to keep out the air and while salting, take care to lay the pieces as close as possible one upon the other.

TO CURE BACON FOR LARDING BRAISING &c. - ER
Take the fattest part of the pork and to every ten pounds employ a pound of pounded salt, rub it very well over put the pieces one upon another, upon boards and lay boards with a heavy weight upon the top, leave it in a dry cool place for about a month, then hang it up to dry without smoking. The hardest is the best for larding and bacon cured this way is preferable for culinary purposes since the saltpetre usually employed will turn veal or poultry red when braised with any portion of the lean.







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